Sherman County eNews #152

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1

Bridges

Oregon has a rich history with covered bridges. In their heyday in the early 1900’s there were an estimated 600 of them. But due to newer roads, better bridges, negligence and decay there only remain about 50. In 2006 one such bridge came crashing down in Wimer, Oregon. The people were in shock at the loss of their historic treasure, and the headlines of the local paper simply read, “It’s Gone.”

So often when we cross ways with people or even churches we speak of “burning a bridge” or “not going there again,” and it is not until someone dies or something tragic happens until we rethink our actions or role. It is then that we think about what we should-of or could-have done to draw closer, to resolve that long-standing issue or even rebuild the bridge.

The people of Wimer, Oregon, were so moved by their loss that they committed huge blocks of time and resources to rebuilding the bridge. It wasn’t easy, and it didn’t happen overnight, but they made the commitment, pooled their resources, and they got to work.

“Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you.” (Ephesians 4:31–32)

Is there a broken bridge in your life that needs some attention? Maybe from your perspective the bridge might even be gone, and maybe you don’t even know how to take the first step. Start with your heart. Rejoice even in the fact that you recognize the need. Then ask God for an opportunity, and as the first plank is laid take the first step realizing that you may not get very far on your first attempt.

Joe Burgess
Pastor
Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

THE TIMES-JOURNAL has a new e-mail address: timesjournal1886@gmail.com. Please begin using this new e-mail with all e-correspondence with the newspaper. Thank you. ~The Editor

SPIRITUAL MATTERS for Sherman County Churches and Faith Groups. A Friday column, Spiritual Matters is intended to welcome, inform and inspire. 

First: Recognized/organized churches and faith groups in Sherman County are invited to participate. 

Second: The Current Rotation

1st Friday: Wasco Church of Christ, Christian & Moro Community Presbyterian

2nd Friday: Grass Valley Baptist & Wasco Catholic

3rd Friday: Baha’i  & Kent Baptist

4th Friday: Wasco United Methodist, Rufus Baptist & Grass Valley Catholic

5th Friday [to be determined by the Editor or proposed by a participant] 

Third: Articles must be submitted by 5 p.m. Wednesday for Friday publication. Please limit messages to 300 words or less.

Fourth: Attacks on another faith, a previous Spiritual Matters article or author will not be published. 

Fifth:   The subject matter should be spiritual and inspirational, calling people to faith, and may include doctrinal understandings. 

Sixth:   The editor reserves the right to decline to publish articles.

Seventh: Please let us know if your group wishes to participate in this rotation.

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

EMPLOYMENT:

COACHING POSITIONS for Sherman County School Fall, Winter & Spring. In order to better align Sherman County School’s Athletic Program from Grades 5-12 there are openings for the following Coaching positions:

Fall

5th-8th Volleyball (2 positions)

5th-8th Football (2 position)

Winter

5th-8th Boys Basketball (2 positions)

5th-8th Girls Basketball (1 position)

Spring

5th -8th Boys and Girls Track (2 positions)

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing will be required for all positions. For further information and application materials please email Gary Lewis at glewis@sherman.k12.or.us or Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

OFFICE DEPUTY, ASSESSOR’s OFFICE. Position Type: Full Time; Starting Salary: $42,624. Open Until Filled. General Statement of Responsibilities: Provide administrative support to the Assessor’s office through conducting and organizing administrative duties and activities including receiving and handling information. Assist in the daily activities of the Assessor’s office related to the assessment and tax roll, processes deed and map changes, and provides front counter assistance to the public. Obtain an application and full job description from the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us or from the Sherman County Assessor’s office. Must return completed application to the Sherman Assessor’s Office PO Box 283, Moro, Oregon 97039. Sherman County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

RETAIL | HUMAN RESOURCES |RECEPTIONIST | LABORER | DRIVER. Mid Columbia Producers is now hiring for multiple positions.

  • Full Time Retail Associate– Wasco, Oregon (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Part Time Retail Associate– Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Retail Associate – Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Petroleum Delivery Driver– Moro, Oregon
  • Full Time Grain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations
  • Part TimeGrain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations

For complete job descriptions please visit www.mcpcoop.com. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: HR, PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039 Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  HR@mcpcoop.com

FOR SALE:

 MORO LOTS. Two, One acre lots for sale in an area with new homes on large parcels.  Has city water and power at the road on edge of lot. Gravel road access only a couple hundred yards off pavement. Great view of town, the fairgrounds, Lots of fields, see the top of Mount Hood and Mount Adams on clear days.  The Washington side of the gorge, 20 miles away! Has never had a house on it and was a wheat field until a few years ago. Rectangle in shape, 273.53 x 159.26. Horses, livestock, etc. All Ok in city limits. (No pigs unless 4-H). Zoned agriculture and buildable for one house per acre.  Located just on the outskirts of the city of Moro. To view the property travel out first street in Moro and take a right on Pinkerton (across from the extension office). The lots will be located on the right side of the road. Two acres available for $60,000. For pictures visit: https://portland.craigslist.org/grg/reo/6611735601.html   For more information, contact Brittany at 541-413-1616.  7/13

UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED OUTDOOR FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS AND FURNITURE REHABILITATION: Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 6/15

 FOR RENT OR LEASE:

 FREE:

 SERVICES:

 THE LEAN-TO CAFÉ & GOOSE PIT SALOON.  Daily Specials: Tuesday Hamburgers, Wednesday Soft Tacos, Thursday Chicken Fried Steak, Friday Fresh Clam Chowder and Saturday Night Prime Rib. 541-442-5709 in Historic Downtown Wasco. 6/22

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/15

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:

HOUSE. Looking to rent or buy. Our small family of myself my husband and our two beautiful boys are wanting to move to Moro OR. We live in Newport but have family that live there. Open to ideas. For rent we are looking for a 2-3 bed. And to buy we would like an owner carry 3-4 bed. You can email or call/text. Lexxieadams@gmail.com.

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION, and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

cowboyyeehawJUNE

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman Co. Historical Museum Artist Series: Sherman County Photography Club

15 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 1- Burnet Building, Moro

15 The June Bugs Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

16-17 A-Town Throwdown: Kite, SUP & Windsurf Competition, Arlington

17 Father’s Day

17 Father’s Day Free Admission at Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5

18 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 7 Public/School Library

18 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Union County

19 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Hood River Country Club

19 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

20 Sherman County Court 9

20 Sherman County Court Biggs Service District Hearings 9 & 10 a.m.

20-22 Sherman County 4-H Camp

22 Columbia Gorge Bi-State Renewable Energy Zone Meeting 12:30 Casa el Mirador

22 Family Bingo Night 6-8 Grass Valley Pavilion

23 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Start Your Miniature Rock Garden

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Annual Meeting 11-1

25 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Moro

25 Korean War Began 1950

26 Sherman County Public/School Library 10 S.T.E.A.M. ages 6-12

26 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

26 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

27 City Broadband Meeting 7 Wasco

27 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

27-30 4-H Summer Conference, OSU Campus, Corvallis

28 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Footloose

29 Frontier TeleNet Budget Hearing 9 & Board Meeting 10

29 Home Run Derby, Condon

30-July 1 Harvester’s Classic Coed Soft Ball Tournament, Condon

Wheat4JULY

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Linda Krasfic’s Baby Quilts

3 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

3 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Independence Day

4 HYATUS Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Grass Valley Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

5 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

6 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

7 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Art Walk in Moro

7 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

7 Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

7 14th Annual Fossil Cruz-in 9-4 Fossil

7-15 Moro’s 2nd Annual Quilt and Fiber Event 10-4

8-11 Portland Horseless Carriage Club Tour: Journey Through Time Scenic Byway, John Day

8-12 Sherman County Historical Museum Quilt Display

9-12 Sherman County 4-H Food Preservation Day Camp, Extension Office

9-15 Summer Fishtrap Gathering (Writers in the American West) Wallowa Lake

10 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Sherman County Public/School Library 6 Hogwarts Mystery Night

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

10 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Meeting 12:30

12 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Coco

12-15 National Association of Counties Conference, Nashville, Tennessee

13 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

14 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Rock Necklaces ages up to 4

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Traffic Jam Show

14 TriCounty Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

14 Starry Night Camp-out at Maryhill Museum of Art

16-19 Sherman County 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Day Camp, Extension Office

17 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

17 Sherman County Public/School Library 11 Oregon Rocks! K-6

17 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

18 Sherman County Court 9

18 Kids Pioneer Day at Sherman County Historical Museum

19 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

21 Sherman County Public/School Library 1 Adam Miller, Old Songs for Young Folks

21 Summer Reading Program End of Summer Party 3

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

23 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 3

24 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

24 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

25 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County

25-28 Jefferson County Fair, Madras

26 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Love, Simon

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

28 WWI Began 1914

31 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31-Aug. 4 Malheur County Fair, Ontario


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #156

CONTENTS

  1. Notice: Sherman County School District Board Meeting, June 18

  2. Maryhill Museum of Art – Free County Weekend, June 16-17

  3. North Central ESD Board Meeting Minutes, June 7

  4. More Than Just the Numbers

  5. Nation’s Largest Not-for-Profit Air Ambulance Service Life Flight Network Celebrates 40 Years of Service; Offers $40 New Memberships Through Labor Day

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Notice: Sherman County School District Board Meeting, June 18

Public Meeting Announcement

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, June 18, 2018.  This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library. 

 SchoolBd1.6.2018

Schoolbd2.6.2018


2. Maryhill Museum of Art – Free County Weekend, June 16-17

Coming UP–Saturday, June 16 & Sunday, June 17 | All Day 
FREE COUNTY WEEKEND! A tradition for over 2 decades!

Our neighbors living in the following counties are granted free admission upon presentation of an I.D. with address:

Oregon: Baker, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Harney, Jackson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Malheur, Umatilla, Union, and Wallowa Counties

Washington: Adams, Asotin, Chelan, Garfield, Douglas, Ferry, Grant, Kittitas, Mason, Lincoln, Pierce, Pend Oreille, Okanogan, Spokane, Stevens, Thurston, Whitman, and Yakima

For additional Free County Days this year check it out here: http://www.maryhillmuseum.org/…/…/special-admission-programs


3. North Central ESD Board Meeting Minutes, June 7

NORTH CENTRAL ESD REGULAR BOARD MEETING June 7, 2018

The North Central ESD Board of Directors met in regular session in the NCESD Conference Room,Thursday, June 7, 2018.

Attending                    

P—Sarah Rucker, Chair-June 2021

P—Jim Doherty-June 2021

A—Kristen Neuberger-June 2019

A—Amy Derby -June 2019

P—Jeff Schott -June 2021

P—Greg Greenwood -June 2019           

P—Penny Grotting, Superintendent

P—Kim Domenighini, Bus. Mgr.

Visitors:

Stacy Shown

Rinda Montgomery

Ron Carroll 

Budget Hearing:

Budget Open: 6:06 pm

No discussion regarding the budget.

Budget Closed: 6:06

CALL TO ORDER

Sarah opened the Board Meeting at 6:06 p.m.

Public Input: None

CONSENT AGENDA

MINUTES & FISCAL RECEIPTS

The minutes & fiscal receipts from the May 3, 2018 regular board meeting were distributed for review via email May 8, 2018.

Motion—Jim, seconded Greg, to approve the minutes and fiscal receipts. Kim will print a detail financial report of July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018 for the next board meeting.

VOTING—Unanimously approved.

Superintendent Report

  • Most of the schools are finished for the 2017-18 year.
  • Penny had a meeting with Speech/Language staff for next year. Colby Garth will be on maternity leave starting in September and there needs to be coverage for Mitchell, Spray and Arlington. Penny is working on possible solutions, Kalie Rolfe and Ashley Northam will help with coverage, could be virtual correspondence to help with the distance.
  • Natalie Iryzk’s last day was June 7, 2018. There is an ad in the paper for a SLPA position. At this point there has been no interest.
  • Stacy Shown has decided to be the Special Education Teacher in Sherman Co. School District. There is an ad for a SPED Teacher for the Wheeler Co. Schools and one in Sherman Co. Schools.
  • At the superintendent meeting, it was discussed to develop a Regional Program for high needs students for our district. The cost to send students to The Dalles is very expensive.
  • Mitchell School District is in the final stages with their superintendent search, they currently have interviewed three candidates and will decide on June 15, 2018.
  • North Central ESD has an open Accounts Payable Position. We have received two applications but will repost in paper to get more applicants.
  • Penny passed out an article from Small School Association regarding the Dorm School Legislation. The legislation has extended the sunset for another two years for the five school districts that could be affected.

 

NEW BUSINESS:

Adopting Budget Resolution 1718-02-03-04

Motion—Jim, seconded Greg, to accept 1718-02 Resolution in Adopting the Budget.

VOTING—Unanimously approved

Motion—Jim, seconded Greg, to accept 1718-03 Resolution Making the Appropriations.

VOTING—Unanimously approved

Motion—Jim, seconded Greg, to accept 1718-04 Resolution Imposing and Categorizing Taxes.

VOTING—Unanimously approved

Sidewalks

  • Jeff Schott put together a RFP for our sidewalks. It was sent out to four companies and received one bid back, which was $26,000. At this time, the board feels that we need to wait until later in the summer or next spring to post the RFP.

Columbia Gorge ESD

Motion—Jeff, seconded Jim, to accept the Columbia Gorge ESD 2018-19 Superintendent Contract.

VOTING—Unanimously approved

Wheeler Tech Contract

  • Penny let the board know that Wheeler County Courthouse has cancelled their tech contract with North Central ESD as of February 28, 2018. They have decided to go with another provider.

Zone 4 Board Position Available

  • The Zone 4 board position is still available. The area is Moro, Kent and Grass Valley.

Penny had a meeting with union members Stacy Shown and Colby Garth. North Central ESD will give a cost of living increase of .5% and insurance cap will stay the same at $1400.00.

Next meeting: July 5, 2018 6:00pm

ADJOURNMENT
With no further business, the meeting was adjourned at 6:43 p.m.

                                                                                                           

SARAH RUCKER, CHAIR                                KIM DOMENGIHINI, BUS. MGR.


4. More Than Just the Numbers

How much do you think the average businessperson needs to know about psychology? The answer might surprise you.

Some American businesspeople have an interesting, albeit limiting, idea about psychology. They think they can forget it and run their business by numbers alone. They believe that if they have a good enough understanding of things like profit and loss, cash flow, economic forecasts, and credit sources, then they know all they need to know.

In many instances, their managers have come up through the ranks after coming out of business school, and the psychology of human behavior has just never seemed important enough for their time and attention. It may have been a class they had to take, to get their degree, and nothing more.

However, if the average businessperson doesn’t think psychology is important, the highly successful ones know better. Malcolm Forbes once said, “There are those of us who think that the psychology of man, each and together, has more impact on markets, business, services, construction, and the entire fabric of an economy than all the more measurable statistical indices.” In other words, numbers don’t drive success – people do.

So, if you are serious about succeeding in business, or in any endeavor where the end-result depends on people, you would do well to find out what is happening in the worlds of cognitive, organizational and social psychology. The best evidence is telling us that quality, productivity, and customer service are the results of beliefs, attitudes and expectations as much as, or more than, good skills, processes and systems. And today’s ever-expanding world of neuroscience seems to be confirming this evidence.

Understanding the people drivers in your organization, especially if you are in a leadership position, is more important today than ever before. Leadership defines the culture in an organization and it is your people who express that culture in everything they do, say, and how they work with each other. And at the very foundation of your people lies the psychology you need to understand if your organization is to succeed. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Nation’s Largest Not-for-Profit Air Ambulance Service Life Flight Network Celebrates 40 Years of Service; Offers $40 New Memberships Through Labor Day

Aurora, Ore., June 13, 2018—Life Flight Network, the largest not-for-profit air medical transport service in the United States, is celebrating its 40th anniversary and offering $40 new memberships in honor of its 40 years of service to communities across Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana.  

“Since 1978, Life Flight Network has provided air medical transport service to people in the Pacific Northwest, saving lives and saving valuable time when every second counts,” said Life Flight Network CEO Michael Griffiths. “It is our privilege to continue to serve the region alongside hospitals and the emergency response community.”

To celebrate its 40 years of service, Life Flight Network will offer $40 annual memberships—for new members only—for a limited time from June 13 through Labor Day, 2018. Memberships are not available in Montana due to state regulations.  Members incur no out-of-pocket expense if flown for medically necessary emergent conditions by Life Flight Network or one of their reciprocal partners. Membership covers the primary membership holder, their spouse or domestic partner, and dependents claimed on their income tax return. Elderly and disabled family members living in the same household can also be covered. Memberships are normally $65. To enroll, visit www.lifeflight.org/membership or call the Life Flight Network membership office at 800-982-9299.

Started in 1978 as Emanuel Life Flight, the program was owned and operated by Emanuel Hospital (now Legacy Emanuel Medical Center). Emanuel Life Flight was one of the first hospital-based air ambulances on the West Coast and only the fourth in the nation. Transporting 121 patients in its first year, a French-made Allouette-3 helicopter was the program’s inaugural aircraft.

Yachats Fire Chief Frankie Petrick activated the first Emanuel Life Flight transport. “In more than 40 years with the Yachats Fire Department, I’ve worked closely with Life Flight Network in situations where having access to air ambulance transport meant the difference between life and death,” said Petrick. “Life Flight Network has served our region well and since my first call to Emanuel Life Flight in 1978, they’ve always been there when we needed them.”

Today, Life Flight Network is a nationally recognized air medical transport service with more than 550 employees and 25 bases covering a large part of Oregon, Idaho, Washington, and Montana. Life Flight Network is still committed to its core mission – to serve the community by providing ICU-level critical care transportation to ill or injured patients in a safe, compassionate, efficient, and expeditious manner.

Life Flight Network recently released a new app called LFN Respond that allows hospitals and first responders to call for a life-saving air ambulance transport with the touch of a button. Using the app, hospital and emergency responders can instantly request a Life Flight Network aircraft by tapping the flight call button in the app, sending vital information and GPS location directly to dispatch personnel at Life Flight Network’s Communications Center

The consortium of Oregon Health & Science University, Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center, and Providence Health & Services own Life Flight Network. The combined strength of these world-class health institutions ensures the quality of the program remains as safe and strong today as when it started in 1978.

ABOUT LIFE FLIGHT NETWORK

Life Flight Network, a not-for-profit air medical service, is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Medical Transport Systems (CAMTS) and the National Accreditation Alliance of Medical Transport Applications (NAAMTA). Life Flight Network has administrative offices in Aurora, Oregon.  Aviation services provided by: Life Flight Network and Jackson Jet Center, Inc. For more information about Life Flight Network or to become a member, visit www.lifeflight.org.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbNational Geographic: The Story of Earth

Colorful, not blue, language

 

Remember when the massive California wildfires of 2017 were blamed on global warming? Never mind.

 

SARAH HUCKABEE SANDERS THANKED DENNIS RODMAN ON BEHALF OF TRUMP FOR BEING ‘HELPFUL’ WITH NORTH KOREA


 

Sherman County eNews #155

CONTENTS

  1. The Importance of Forgiveness

  2. Sherman High School May 29, 2018, Academic & Athletic Awards

  3. Sherman County School 2018 Senior Scholarships

  4. Notice. Correction: Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, June 14

  5. Presentation about the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building in The Dalles, June 30

  6. 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 4

  7. CGCC Learning Communities help students succeed

  8. Final Defendant Sentenced for Armed Takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge


1. The Importance of Forgiveness

Many people throughout the ages have spoken of the virtues of forgiveness. Today, let’s look at this most personal, yet universal, of subjects and perhaps add a special twist.

Against whom are you carrying a grudge? Is there someone who has done you a wrong, in some way, and who you just can’t forgive? Have you, yourself, done things that you can’t forgive? When we cannot forgive, we have the tremendous potential of doing incredible damage to our selves, if we don’t let go of these hurts. In order to be fully human, we must learn to forgive and forget.

Confucius said that, “To be wronged is nothing unless you remember it.” He was absolutely right, and here’s why. Every time you remember something bad that happens to you, some wrong that was done to you, you feel those bad feelings all over again. You record the event in the neuron structure of your brain, and it plants itself in your subconscious. You reinforce the neural pathways, keeping that hurt within easy access.

Now the subconscious doesn’t know the difference between a vividly imagined or remembered event and the real thing. It is all “real” to the subconscious. When we subject ourselves, over and over again, to painful, angry memories, eventually our inner system begins to break down. The poison of the not forgiven hurt and anger attacks from the inside and then makes its way out.

12-step programs often emphasize the importance of forgiveness, because they recognize that forgiveness is the key to action and freedom. Jesus forgave those who crucified him while he was still on the cross. When apartheid ended, South Africa went through a sometimes wrenching forgiveness and reconciliation process, because they knew they could not have a successful future if they were still trapped in the past. Examples of acts of forgiveness are everywhere; we just need to look for them.

When we forgive, we let go of past hurts and open up to wonderful new possibilities. What wonderful possibility awaits you? What do you need to let go of, in order to meet that possibility? ~The Pacific Institute


2. Sherman High School May 29, 2018, Academic & Athletic Awards

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSherman High School academic and athletic awards were presented on May 29th  at the Sherman County School.

Mr. Jared Collins presented agriculture and shop awards to Outstanding Ag Student Emma Witherspoon, Outstanding Shop Student Loren Henderson, Outstanding Vet Science Student Savannah Moe, Outstanding Careers Student Bradley Moe, and Outstanding Personal Finance Student Brianna McKinney.

Mr. Jarek Bartels recognized Best Overall Band Student Mana Chamoto, Best Brass Player Kay Cyrus, Best Attitude Valeria Ambriz, Most Valuable Player Will James, Musicianship Darian Davis, Most Improved Christian Derting, Leadership Student Morgan Lesh, Student of High Achievement Catherine Rhodes, Heart of a Teacher Student Emma Witherspoon and Best Woodwind Player Izabella Montesanti.

Mr. Tim Zacharias presented the Exceptional 9th Grade English Award to Jed Harrison and Lindsey Jones; Exceptional 10th Grade English to Mana Chamoto, Alyssa Hill and Darian Davis; Exceptional 11th Grade English to CJ Johnson and Luke Martin; Exceptional 12th Grade English to Rebecca Earl and Treve Martin; and Most Improved English Award to Christian Derting and Angel Olea.

Math awards, presented by teacher Gerald Casper, went to Outstanding Math Student Luke Martin; 4-Year Advanced Math Students Kiersten Casper, Rebecca Earl, Alexis Grenvik, Brianna McKinney and Makoa Whitaker. Luke Martin was recognized for Calculus, Kiersten Casper for Pre-Calculus, Desiree Winslow for Algebra II, Mana Chamoto for Geometry and Emma Witherspoon for Algebra I.  Lindsey Jones was recognized for Leadership and Gavenn Lohrey and Isaak McLemore for Personal Finance. 

Mr. Kevin Stuart credited Social Studies achievement with the Margo Lee Shetterly Award to Jordan Barrett, Stephen Ambrose Award to Gavenn Lohrey, Barbara Tuchman Award to Emma Witherspoon, Shelby Foote Award to Zachery Fluhr, Ellen J. Langer Award to CJ Johnson, David McCullough Award to Luke Martin, Dorris Kearns Goodwin Award to Alyssa Hill and George Washington Award to Bradley Moe. 

Biology awards were presented by Mr. Tyler Dearborn to Jordan Barrett, Christian Derting, Alyssa Hill, Jaelyn Justesen and Emma Witherspoon. Chemistry awards went to Madison Brokaw, Michaela Lloyd, Luke Martin and Makoa Whitaker. Nate Ruise received the STEAM Award.

Mr. Gary Lewis recognized Physical Education students Rebecca Earl, Treve Martin and Bradley Moe with an Outstanding Weights Award.

Principal Mike Somnis recognized the 2017 Outdoor School Counselor Morgan Lesh.

The 2017-18 Student Council was recognized by Ms. Angie Totaro: President Savannah Moe, Vice President Luke Martin, Secretary CJ Johnson, Treasurer Brianna McKinney, Ad Manager Morgan Lesh, Senior Class President Rebecca Earl, Junior Class President Desiree Winslow, Sophomore Class President Loren Henderson, Freshman Class President Lindsey Jones, FFA Representative Bradley Moe, National Honor Society Representative Alexis Grenvik and Pep Band Representative Izabella Montesanti. 

Principal Mike Somnis presented Husky Scholar Athlete Awards to CJ Johnson, Samantha Lepinski, Luke Martin, Treve Martin, Savannah Moe, Emma Stutzman and Desiree Winslow, an award given only once to any junior or senior who achieved a 3.50 CUM GPA or above and lettered in a sport.

Mr. Lewis presented 4-Year, 3-Sport awards to Jacob Justesen and Treve Martin. Family members presented the Susie, Don & Ron Thompson Memorial Scholarship Award to Kiersten Casper. The Jerry DuBois Memorial Scholarship Award went to Bradley Moe.

Baseball coach Justesen presented state baseball participants, Wade Fields, Will James, Jacob Justesen, Treve Martin, Bradley Moe, Patrick Remos and Jack Woolworth. Wade Fields was named Most Improved and Jacob Justesen Most Inspirational, and the Hustle Award went to Treve Martin and Bradley Moe. Athletic letters went to 1st year Wade Fields, Will James, Patrick Ramos and Jack Woolworth, and 4th year to Jacob Justesen, Treve Martin and Bradley Moe.

Tennis coach von Borstel presented tennis participants Valeria Ambriz, Jordan Barrett, Caleb Fritts, Alyssa Hill, Michaela Lloyd and Trenton Mason and regional participants CJ Johnson, Savannah Moe and Gaby Rubio. Alyssa Hill was named Most Improved and CJ Johnson Most Inspirational. Caleb Fritts received the Hustle Award. Tennis letters went to 1st year Alyssa Hill; 2nd year Valeria Ambriz, Jordan Barrett and Trenton Mason; and 3rd year to CJ Johnson, Savannah Moe and Gaby Rubio.

Track coach Somnis recognized participant, Nancy Ambriz, and state track participants Jeremy Ballesteros, Tyler Bledsoe, Mercedez Cardona, Mana Chamoto, Owen Christiansen, Keenan Coles, Alexis Grenvik, Jed Harrison, Loren Henderson, Tyler Jones, Jaelyn Justesen, Savanna Orendorff, Nick Riggs, Makoa Whitaker and Desiree Winslow. Jed Harrison was named Most Improved for track and Desiree Winslow Most Improved for field events. Makoa Whitaker was named Most Inspirational. Letters for track went to 1st year Jeremy Ballesteros, Tyler Bledsoe, Mercedez Cardona, Mana Chamoto, Jed Harrison, Loren Henderson, Tyler Jones, Savannah Orendorff and Nick Riggs; 2nd year to Owen Christiansen, Alexis Grenvik, Jaelyn Justesen and Makoa Whitaker; and 3rd year to Keenan Coles and Desiree Winslow.


3. Sherman County School 2018 Senior Scholarships

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSherman County School District and Scholarship Association awarded scholarships to seniors in May, 2018. 

Reese Blake

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Dave Miller Memorial Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

Randy Rood Memorial Scholarship

Kiersten Casper

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

CGCC Foundation Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

Susie, Don, & Ron Thompson Memorial

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Wasco Lodge Masonic Scholarship

Rebecca Earl

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Sierra Fellner

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Jared Fritts

John Deere “Access Your Future” Internship and Training Program

Alexis Grenvik

Mid-Columbia Bus Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Jacob Justesen

Sherman County Scholarship/Sherman County Court       

Mid-Columbia Bus Scholarship

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Nicolas Lesh

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Treve Martin

Bank of Eastern Oregon Scholarship

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Oregon Wheat Foundation & Sherman Wheat Growers

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust 

Brianna McKinney

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Michael Simantel Citizenship Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Raleigh T. Curtis Memorial Scholarship

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Bradley Moe

Bank of Eastern Oregon Scholarship

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Jerry DuBois Memorial Scholarship

May Barnum & Dorotha Moore Leadership Scholarship   

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust.


4. Notice. Correction: Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, June 14

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on June 14th,
2018- 6 p.m. at the WSEC (903 Barnett St.). The public is welcome to attend!


 5. Presentation about the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building in The Dalles, June 30

Wasco County Historical Society invites the public to attend local archaeologist Eric Gleason’s presentation on the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building with its long history and possible future.  The free presentation will take place at 11 a.m. on June 30 at 210 E. 1st St., just east of the Baldwin Saloon, in the Wing Hong Hai Building.


6. 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 4

golf1The 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, presented by Columbia State Bank and Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation, will be held at Indian Creek Golf Course in Hood River on Saturday, Aug. 4. The annual event promises a fun-filled day that brings together golf, friends, food, and raffle prizes. This year, the tournament will benefit student scholarships.

Sponsorship opportunities and four-person team entries are available. To sponsor the tournament, or to register a team at either the gold ($600) or silver ($500) team level, please contact Stephanie Hoppe, shoppe@cgcc.edu or call (541) 506-6113. Only 28 teams may enter the tournament so please contact the foundation to register a team at your earliest convenience. For more information, visit cgccfoundation.org.


7. CGCC Learning Communities help students succeed

By Rose Kelly

Attending college can be a challenge. Personal finance, time management, language barriers and life’s everyday stresses sometimes lead students to drop classes or quit college entirely.

That’s where Learning Communities help make a crucial difference, as students discover they don’t have to face these challenges alone.

In 2012 instructor Tim Schell and Julie Belmore started CGCC’s first learning community, comprised of Reading 90, Writing 90, Career Guidance 101 and ALC 51, a three-hour per week lab where students work with their reading and writing instructors.

Learning Communities help break down traditional barriers between subject content, encouraging students to apply math skills, for instance, in everyday communication and, conversely, how reading and writing skills often apply to math problems. But most importantly, Learning Communities bring students and teachers together as a team, overcoming the sense of isolation many students feel with unfamiliar academic topics.

These days, Tim teaches Writing 90 and a Learning Community lab he shares with Reading 90 instructor Jenn Kamrar. Each instructor works with a group of students for 40 minutes, and then they switch groups.

“When it comes to teaching, we also cross pollinate our curriculum,” Jenn explains. “While we may be focused on writing personal narratives in the writing course, we’ll read and analyze personal essays in the reading course. Each class then reinforces and deepens the learning that happens in the other.”

Learning Communities’ effect on students is profound, as attested by two students who recently described their experiences to CGCC’s board of directors.

Cindy Vandeventer is an expansive, outgoing woman who came to CGCC from Mercy House, a faith-based, clean and sober treatment center she joined following prison. Mercy House encouraged her to go back to school, so she checked out The Dalles campus of CGCC; she was so impressed she signed up that day. Yet she found the first day of class intimidating.

“I felt like a fish out of water,” Cindy recalls. “I was the oldest person in the class, and I was nervous about coming back. I was considering dropping and taking all online classes where I wouldn’t have to be around other students.” But that changed when she met Jenn at the Learning Community. Jenn offered one-on-one help, giving Cindy the skills and confidence to succeed.

Brenda Perez is composed and self-possessed, but she had similar feelings about attending school. “I was super-nervous, and worried that I didn’t blend in,” Brenda explained.

She was pleasantly surprised by the Learning Communities and impressed by the support she discovered there. Brenda not only benefitted through her studies, but wanted to become even more involved by encouraging and helping other students in the class, calling upon her bi-lingual skills to explain content to her classmates, even translating when necessary. Getting to know everyone in the Learning Community made her want to stay in school and pushed her to do her best. When she started at CGCC Brenda intended to proceed quickly, obtain her certificate after a year and move on. But the encouragement she received from Tim and Jenn convinced her this should only be the beginning.

“Jenn makes me want more out of life,” Brenda said.

Life can be rough. After a close relative passed away, Cindy was overwhelmed by grief, falling into depression. She was ready to quit school, but Jenn gave her the encouragement to continue. “Jenn not only was helpful with my education, but I learned so much about myself, my inner self,” she recalls.

When students enroll in a Learning Community they join a cohort and stay together for three consecutive classes of reading and writing, spending the year together. “We really get to know each student and what they’re individually going through,” Jenn explains. “We also have the opportunity to offer them support in ways that other, more traditionally scheduled college courses might not.” Indeed, Tim and Jenn have each taken students to counselors, referring suicidal students to the Center for Living, a professional counseling service.

Personal tragedy sometimes also brings creative ways of coping.

“We had one student whose apartment burned down, causing her, her husband and three small children to flee in the middle of the night,” Tim said. “The student did a research paper about PTSD in children. She also said to us: ‘You really care about us.’”

The skills Cindy learned in class helped her heal. One of her assignments was a personal essay; she wrote an honest, brutal paper describing some of the challenges of abuse, domestic violence and addiction she has faced. As students read their essays aloud, hers resonated with others who had faced some of the same issues in their lives.

“I was so impressed by the young people in my class,” Cindy said. “They are breaking away from some of the same hardships I have faced and starting a journey toward a different life.”  Cindy is growing and changing also, now spending her spare time attending church, AA, and visiting her kids and grandchildren. She wants to be a counselor, specializing in drug and alcohol or sexual abuse. 

Brenda works with children while continuing her education. She is a hard worker who likes getting things done. Her diligence is paying off, as she completes her two-year associate degree in Science and Early Childhood Education. Next, Brenda plans to attend Portland State University. Her goal is to own and operate a preschool. (When time allows, she enjoys the beautiful outdoors, too.)

For instructors Jenn Kamrar and Tim Schell, Learning Communities are intense but rewarding. “My students are beyond inspiring,” says Jenn. “I’m humbled by their power, and I couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments.”

“Teaching in these Learning Communities has been very rewarding because I can see the difference in these students’ lives,” Tim added. “Sometimes the biggest challenge is keeping a student in school, and when these students get to know each other — as they always do — they push each other to stay and work, and not give up. Another reward is we get to see students help each other in the lab. It sounds simple, but it is truly beautiful to behold.”


8. Final Defendant Sentenced for Armed Takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Oregon.Flat.polePORTLAND, Ore. – Blaine Cooper aka Stanley Blaine Hicks, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona, was sentenced today to time served in prison for his role in the 41-day armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge beginning in January 2016.

Cooper is the eighteenth and final defendant sentenced for crimes associated with the occupation. Eleven defendants pleaded guilty to felony conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. Four other defendants were convicted of felonies by a federal jury in a trial ending in March 2017. Three additional defendants pleaded guilty to misdemeanor trespassing. Seven defendants, including occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy, were acquitted of all charges in a trial ending in November 2016.

“I firmly believe that our communities and state are stronger because of our shared experience responding to and litigating the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I want to sincerely thank the countless federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officials that played a role in bringing these eighteen defendants to justice. Our message is clear,” continued Williams, “taking up arms because you don’t like how things are done will never be accepted as a lawful way to protest here in Oregon or elsewhere.”

“The U.S. Constitution granted Americans both rights and responsibilities. With state, local and tribal partners, the FBI responded to this armed takeover by defending the rule of law and protecting the people of Harney County. We stand with Oregonians committed to finding peaceful solutions and will always work to protect our communities from violent conflict,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

Beginning on January 2, 2016, Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, and several dozen followers, seized the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon in Harney County. For forty-one days, the armed occupiers prevented federal officials from performing their official duties at the refuge by force, threats, and intimidation. The Bundys and several other occupiers, were arrested on January 26, 2016 on U.S. Highway 395 near Burns en route to a community meeting in John Day, Oregon. The occupation officially ended on February 11, 2016 when the last four occupiers turned themselves in to federal authorities.          

Summary of sentences imposed:

–Dylan Anderson, 37, of Provo, Utah, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Sandra Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Sean Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Jason Blomgren, 44, of North Carolina, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Brian Cavalier, 47, of Bunkerville, Nevada, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Blaine Cooper, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona was sentenced to time served in prison and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Travis Cox, 23, of Bend, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Duane Ehmer, 47, of Irrigon, Oregon, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

–Eric Flores, 24, of Tulalip, Washington, was sentenced to two years’ probation with home detention after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Wesley Kjar, 34, of Manti, Utah, was sentenced to 250 hours of community service, two years’ probation, and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Corey Lequieu, 47, of Fallon, Utah, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and three years’ supervised release after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Joseph O’Shaughnessy, 46, of Cottonwood, Arizona, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Jason Patrick, 46, of Bonaire, Georgia, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

–Ryan Payne, 34, of Anaconda, Montana, was sentenced to 37 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–John Ritzheimer, 34, of Peoria, Arizona, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, one year in a residential reentry center, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Jake Ryan, 29, of Plains, Montana, was sentenced to 12 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

–Geoffrey Stanek, 28, of Lafayette, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Darryl Thorn, 33, of Monument, Oregon, was sentenced to 18 months in prison and $5,000 restitution after being found guilty of one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

The case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Geoffrey Barrow, Ethan Knight, and Craig Gabriel, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.


 

Sherman County eNews #154

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H Camp Needs a Cook – Next Week!

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court, Biggs Service District Hearings, June 20

  3. Sherman County School Fall, Winter & Spring Coaching Openings

  4. Attention and Recognition

  5. Ceremony for Disposal of Unserviceable Flags, June 14

  6. Caregivers’ Free Training: Safe Medication Use in Older Adults

  7. Automation Is Now, Apple Labeling Machine, June 27

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 Caution!

We asked for rain and it rained!

The wheat grew and so did the roadside vegetation!

Please do not park or drive your vehicle in dry grass!

Safety First! Prevent wildfires!


1. Sherman County 4-H Camp Needs a Cook – Next Week!

4-H clover1Love to cook, love being by a lake and love being around kids? Sherman County 4-H Camp just found out WE NEED A COOK for camp next week! Camp is 9am Wednesday, June 20 through 1pm Friday, June 22. Campers stay 3 days and 2 nights. You’ll be paid $250 and have the undying appreciation of all the campers and staff! Camp Morrow has a great commercial kitchen, and you’ll be cooking for about 50 people each day. Interested?? We need you! Contact Sherman County Extension 541-565-3230, email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu, or stop by the office.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court, Biggs Service District Hearings, June 20

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session on Wednesday, June 20, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Hearings Room at the Sherman County Courthouse Addition, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda includes a Biggs Service District – USDA Biggs Water System public hearing at 9 and Biggs Service District Budget Hearing at 10. Updates will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Sherman County School Fall, Winter & Spring Coaching Openings

clock.stopwatch.In order to better align Sherman County School’s Athletic Program from Grades 5-12 there are openings for the following Coaching positions:

Fall

5th-8th Volleyball (2 positions)

5th-8th Football (2 position)

Winter

5th-8th Boys Basketball (2 positions)

5th-8th Girls Basketball (1 position)

Spring

5th -8th Boys and Girls Track (2 positions)

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing will be required for all positions. For further information and application materials please email Gary Lewis at glewis@sherman.k12.or.us or Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


 4. Attention and Recognition

When your children want attention, what do they do? Throw a tantrum? Misbehave? Act inappropriately? Perhaps you can show them a better way.

There are many things children want, things they won’t usually ask for directly. In that way, they are no different from adults. There are two things in particular that all of us seem to need – recognition and attention; or, if you will, appreciation and a little tender loving care (TLC).

Kids who get plenty of each from the start are usually happy, well-adjusted, confident, and behave themselves appropriately. Kids who don’t get much of either will get very creative. They may try throwing tantrums. If the tantrums get them attention, they may grow up believing that when you don’t get what you want, get angry, because it works. It becomes an ever-escalating spiral, affecting anyone within earshot.

Some children misbehave to get attention, because even negative attention is better than nothing at all. If neither tantrums nor acting up get them the attention they need, they may eventually quit trying at all. They will become withdrawn and apathetic. Their world turns in on itself.

The thing to do then, if you want to deal successfully with these problems, or avoid them in the first place, is to give your kids plenty of attention and affection when they are behaving well. Let them know that it is okay to ask for what they want, or to say, “Mom and Dad, would you please pay attention to me for a few minutes?” When they do ask, make the time to give them the attention they need – for them and for you. A little TLC sown now will reap tremendous benefits in everyone’s future.

And by the way, leaders, this same “attention and engagement” model works with those you lead. Engaging with the workforce, asking the right questions, and listening purposefully to the responses provides recognition to the solutions that are waiting to be presented to you. Reflective of a growth mindset your part, it’s a triple win for you and the organization. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Ceremony for Disposal of Unserviceable Flags, June 14

Goldendale American Legion

Louis Leidl Post 116

The Ceremony for Disposal of Unserviceable Flags

Thursday June 14, 2018

5:30 PM

Klickitat County Courthouse

American flag1The Ceremony for Disposal of Unserviceable Flags is outlined in Resolution No. 440, passed by the 19th National Convention of The American Legion in New York, Sept. 20-23, 1937. The ceremony has been an integral part of American Legion ritual since that date. More than two centuries ago, on June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress formally adopted the Stars and Stripes as the official flag of our new Republic. Through the many triumphs and trials of our Nation, our flag has reflected our heritage of liberty and embodied the American virtues of bravery, justice, and loyalty. Each year, we celebrate Flag Day and National Flag Week to honor our timeless national emblem.   https://www.legion.org/flag/ceremony


6. Caregivers’ Free Training: Safe Medication Use in Older Adults

Medication safety starts with you. Medication management can be complex but is an important part of providing the best possible care for older adults. Our expert instructors will teach you how medicines work in older adults, the benefit of regular medication reviews and non-medication alternatives for individuals living with dementia. 

FREE TRAINING IN THE DALLES

Tuesday, June19th, 2018

8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Check-in starts at 8:00 a.m.

CEUs: 3.75

Fairfield Inn & Suites by Marriott
2014 West 7th Street
The Dalles, OR 97058

Click to Register for Class

https://oregoncarepartners.com/classes/in-person/safe-medication-use-in-older-adults-9/

Take a moment to register today! Oregon Care Partners helps caregivers improve the lives and care for aging Oregonians by providing access to no-cost, high quality trainings in all corners of the state. Professional and family caregivers, administrators, and members of the public are encouraged to sign up for free classes and learn more awww.OregonCarePartners.com.


7. Automation Is Now, Apple Labeling Machine, June 27

Automation, technology that performs or processes a procedure without human assistance, is present now and will continue to grow in our businesses. While many fear automation will do away with jobs, it can also free up time for employees to focus on areas where humans excel, such as creativity, relationships, inventiveness and problem-solving.

Join the Gorge Tech Alliance on June 27, 6pm at Wildwood Events (13 Railroad Ave., Hood River) to learn what to consider before deciding to automate a business, or parts of a business. See a working model of an apple labeling system, an example of new automation equipment, designed and built by SIGMADESIGN. Our presenter will be Bill Huseby, President and CEO of SIGMADESIGN, a product development and engineering firm based in Camas, WA. Entry is $10 for those who are not members of the Gorge Tech Alliance, and includes appetizers, one drink and door prizes.

The GTA is the regional tech industry association that supports, connects and develops the technology community of the Columbia River Gorge with networking and educational events, business support and promotion, workforce development and STEM education. Contact Jessica Metta, Executive Director, at 541-296-2266, jessica@crgta.org or learn more at crgta.org.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3 Sherman County Government https://www.co.sherman.or.us/

 Sherman County Historical Museum https://www.shermanmuseum.org/

 Sherman County, Oregon History Collection http://shermancountyoregon.com/

 TEDEd: Depression https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=drv3BP0Fdi8

Illegal Immigration Is a Major Crime Problem https://patriotpost.us/articles/56447-illegal-immigration-is-a-major-crime-problem?utm_medium=email&utm_source=pp.email.3534&utm_campaign=digest&utm_content=body

Opinion: Bad News at the Border https://patriotpost.us/opinion/56435-bad-news-at-the-border

History Shows Amnesty Doesn’t Work https://www.heritage.org/immigration/commentary/history-shows-amnesty-doesnt-work?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=thf-fb

USDA Economic Research Service: Amber Waves   https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/  


 

Sherman County eNews #153

CONTENTS

  1. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators’ Meeting, June 19

  2. Oregon State University: 150 Years at Oregon’s Land Grant Institution, June 11

  3. Online Lyrasis Training for Digital Preservation

  4. Lessons to be Learned

  5. Summer Book Sale in Goldendale, July 7 & 8

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


50 things that really matter ~ wisdom ~ warm spring days ~ memories ~ honest work ~ faith ~ bubble baths ~ passion ~ puppies ~ the sounds of music ~ seashells ~ candlelight ~ saying I Love You ~ flowers ~ parenthood ~ a good book ~ kindness ~ afternoon naps ~ thunderstorms ~ friends ~ sad movies ~ family ~ gratitude ~ quiet time ~ independence ~ imagination ~ contentment ~ milestones ~ hugs ~ a child’s art ~ the smell of a new baby ~ romance ~ holidays ~ trust ~ sympathy ~ holding hands ~ charity ~ summer nights ~ a good cup of coffee ~ curiosity ~ a sense of wonder ~ hope ~ companionship ~ home ~ butterflies ~ courage ~ you. ~Rodale Books.


1. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators’ Meeting, June 19

Unit 20, OREA, will meet noon Tuesday, the 19th, at the Hood River Country Club for both golf and lunch.  Please contact Roy Nellermoe at 541-354-1007 for reservations.  Guests are welcome.


2. Oregon State University: 150 Years at Oregon’s Land Grant Institution, June 11

Mark your schedule to watch or record: “Oregon State University: 150 Years at Oregon’s Land Grant Institution.”  This 50-minute program will be aired on OPB on June 11 at 8:00pm and again at 9:00pm.

Here is the trailer:

https://www.opb.org/television/programs/oregonexperience/segment/oregon-state-university-history-land-grant-lincoln/

This overview of OSU features Extension and 4-H and its place in history at this land grant university. 

~Cindy Brown, Educator

Oregon State University, OSU Extension Service – Sherman County

College of Public Health & Human Sciences, 4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed

66365 Lonerock Rd, Moro, Oregon 97039

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291 extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


3. Online Lyrasis Training for Digital Preservation

Crowdsourcing for Digital Collections http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=ujrjlc6ab.0.0.64z577bab.0&id=preview&r=3&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lyrasis.org%2FContent%2FPages%2FEvent-Details.aspx%3FEid%3DADC3A6D4-C732-E811-80E8-00155D73CF16  – 6/13

Oral Histories: Care and Preservation from the Start http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=ujrjlc6ab.0.0.64z577bab.0&id=preview&r=3&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lyrasis.org%2FContent%2FPages%2FEvent-Details.aspx%3FEid%3DB029B1F9-C732-E811-80E8-00155D73CF16  – 6/20

Preservation of Photographic Materials (Multi-Session Event) http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=ujrjlc6ab.0.0.64z577bab.0&id=preview&r=3&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lyrasis.org%2FContent%2FPages%2FEvent-Details.aspx%3FEid%3D120FE156-5933-E811-80E8-00155D73CF16  – 6/26 and 6/27

Introduction to Copyright for Digitization < http://r20.rs6.net/tn.jsp?t=ujrjlc6ab.0.0.64z577bab.0&id=preview&r=3&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lyrasis.org%2FContent%2FPages%2FEvent-Details.aspx%3FEid%3D224BE1D3-D143-E811-80E8-00155D73CF16 > – 6/27

Visit https://www.lyrasis.org/services/Pages/Classes.aspx for more information


4. Lessons to be Learned

The best teachers learn from their students. The wisest parents teach and learn from their kids. Today let’s talk about what we can learn from our children.

There is a great deal we can learn from our children, if we approach them with open hearts and a receptive spirit. In some ways, kids are the greatest teachers, because they teach by simply being who they are. And who are they?

Well, when children are young, they are completely trusting. It is only when they have had their trust betrayed many times that they learn to doubt and fear. Young children love justice and scrupulously respect the rules. They are also fearless. As far as anyone can tell, we come into the world with a startle reflex when we hear a loud noise. All the other fears are learned.

This is something that has been known, sometimes intuitively, and more recently with research proof. Our beliefs, habits and attitudes have all been learned. We weren’t born with them. With a nod to Oscar Hammerstein’s lyrics for “You’ve Got to be Carefully Taught” from 1949’s “South Pacific” –

                                    “You’ve got to be taught to hate and fear,

                                    You’ve got to be taught from year to year,

                                    It’s got to be drummed in your dear little ear,

                                    You’ve got to be carefully taught.”

Young children are naturally joyful and full of life. Everything is new and inviting to explore. They seem to have a natural inclination toward love but need to be taught to hate or feel contempt. They are color-blind, and play happily together regardless of race, religion, sex, or ethnic background. They are honest and confident, secure, and venturesome.

When we realize that all of us started out that open and generous of spirit, we also realize that if we will only let our children teach us to remember our essential nature, there is great reason to hope for a world that celebrates diversity, equality and inclusion. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Summer Book Sale in Goldendale, July 7 & 8

bookStackFriends of the Goldendale Library

Location: Goldendale Senior Center on Main Street

Member Pre-Sale

Friday, July 6

5:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Community Sale

Saturday, July 7

9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Buck-a-Bag Sale

Sunday, July 8

1:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Join the Friends for their big summer book sale during Goldendale Community Days over the 4th of July weekend. The sale will be held inside the Goldendale Senior Center at 115 E. Main Street. Great selection of books, movies, audiobooks, and more. The Friends are accepting book donations at the General Store on Main Street during the library’s remodel project.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbWil Wheaton: I live with chronic depression and I am not ashamed

 

Pew Research Center: State of the News Media

 

Public Broadcasting Fact Sheet

 

 

Charles Krauthammer: Readers, you gave consequence to my life’s work

Don’t Undermine America’s Charitable, Volunteer Ethic  

TEDEd: What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people? 

Mike Kerrigan: I thought I had enough friends then a stranger did this on my flight home

 

Congress Can Save Billions

A raw, unfiltered look at the [Opioid] ‘Crisis Next Door’


 

Sherman County eNews #152

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS 

church.family1“How are you doing?” This a common but potentially awkward question. Much of the time we expect a casual non-committal response such as “good,” or “Okay” which we acknowledge in some equally casual way and move on. Even when someone throws this process for a loop and responds negatively we have our favorite responses such as “hang in there,” “I hope it gets better” or even, “I’ll pray for you.”

But it doesn’t take much to break this cycle and open the door to richer and more meaningful interactions. Following their response with a simple “Oh” provides an invitation for the other person to go deeper and share more. Saying “Oh” communicates that I’ve got a few minutes to hear and to care and not rush on down the road. Rather than fearing the “Oh no, what have I done now,” “oh” said at the right time can in a non-threatening way prove a huge blessing as you take advantage of an opportunity to enter into the life of someone else, to encourage, possibly help and even bring them in prayer before God who knows them far more than we could ever imagine (Psalm 139). “Oh” is an opportunity to extend the compassion to others that God has shown to us.

“Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies and God of all comfort, who comforts us in all our affliction, so that we may be able to comfort those who are in any affliction, with the comfort with which we ourselves are comforted by God.” (2 Corinthians 1:3–4, ESV)

Try allowing some extra time for an “Oh” encounter and listen with an open heart for where it might go.

Joe Burgess
Pastor
First Baptist Church Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS: 

sherrycaricatureCLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU!! The Board of Directors and staff members of ABC Huskies Child Care would like to express sincere gratitude to the many volunteers who contributed to the success of the 2018 Wasco Memorial Weekend Country Breakfast. Special recognition goes to North Sherman Rural Fire Protection District for use of their facility, Morrow County Grain Growers for securing and transporting the grills, Wasco Market for their generous donation of ham, Sherman County for tables and chairs, volunteers who helped move and set them up, staff and board members whose teamwork kept everything running smoothly and most importantly to our volunteer cooks who prepared a fantastic meal: Norman Fridley, Kent Thomas, Commissioner Tom McCoy and Mike Smith. We are very grateful for the amazing support demonstrated by the Sherman County community. Thank you!!  ~ Carrie Kaseberg, Gail Macnab & Melva Thomas – Board of Directors

 THANK YOU to everyone who came to Wasco’s Memorial Day celebration and helped celebrate our veterans! Thank you to all the volunteers who help make this a successful celebration.  Special thanks to special guests Jane and Jerry Kirkpatrick, music by Wasco resident Tyson Huckins, Rod McGuire and Paradise Rose BBQ staff, Pastor Bob Reasoner for another wonderful tribute to the veterans, and the adults and young adults who pitched in and helped with many jobs that needed to be done. Parade announcer Joe Dabulskis and their family flag that led the parade, fun family nite, ABC Husky’s pancake breakfast and the new special activity coordinated by the Catholic Church, a fund raiser for the county food bank— bingo and ice cream sundaes. Of course, to special engineer Tom Lepinski for driving the children’s train, and wonderful car show entrants. Hope everyone had a chance to see the new Wasco city brochure designed by Jessica Wheeler and funded by a grant from the Sherman County Cultural Coalition, and several vendors. Hope to see you next year!! ~Carol MacKenzie, Mayor, City of Wasco, Oregon

 THANK YOU! The Catholic Community of Sherman County thanks everyone who joined us on Memorial Day for bingo and ice cream sundaes. With your help, we raised over $300 for the Sherman County Food Bank! See you next year! Thank you.

 THANK YOU! Received my beautiful Sherman County, Oregon coffee table book.  Wow, Beautiful!!!  Thanks to everyone involved in its production – you did a great job!!!! ~Carol MacKenzie.

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life.

Your willingness to put it into words

is all that is necessary.

~ Margaret Cousins

 JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

EMPLOYMENT:

RETAIL | HUMAN RESOURCES |RECEPTIONIST | LABORER | DRIVER.  Mid Columbia Producers is now hiring for multiple positions.

  • Full Time Retail Associate– Wasco, Oregon (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Part Time Retail Associate– Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Retail Associate – Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Human Resources Director– Moro, Oregon (Closes 6/9/2018)
  • Full TimeReceptionist – Bend, Oregon (Closes 6/9/2018)
  • Full Time Grain Operations Laborer – Sherman/Gilliam County (Closes 6/9/2018) 
  • Full Time Petroleum Delivery Driver– Moro, Oregon 
  • Full Time Grain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations
  • Part TimeGrain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations 

For complete job descriptions please visit www.mcpcoop.com. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: HR, PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039 Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  HR@mcpcoop.com

PUBLIC WORKS OPERATOR ASSISTANT.  The City of Rufus is seeking an assistant to the Public Works Operator. Seasonal – Temporary – Part Time Position – flexible hours at $12.00/hr. (no benefits). Job Description: Includes but not limited to performing a variety of tasks involved in the Public Works Department: Such as servicing water meters, water and sewer lines, streets, equipment operations and maintenance, and intermittent operation of the water and sewer treatment facilities.  Landscaping including mowing, weeding, trimming, and irrigation.  Being able to perform other related work as required for the City’s day to day operations. Desired Applicant: Must be 18 years of age and possess a valid Oregon driver’s license.  Must have a high school diploma or GED equivalent.  Must possess the ability to accurately record and maintain records; ability to establish and maintain effective working relationship with employees, supervisors, other departments, officials and the public; ability to communicate effectively verbally and in writing.  Mechanical aptitude is a plus. Physical Demands: The applicant must have the ability to lift 50 lbs, and work in extreme weather conditions. The City would be willing to train the right applicant with fewer qualifications for this position. To apply: Contact Rufus City Hall at 541-739-2321 for an application. The City of Rufus is an equal opportunity provider and employer and a drug free workplace.

FOR SALE:

OPEN HOUSE, SATURDAY JUNE 9TH – 1-3 PM 608 MCCOY, MORO, OR. Come on over to see this beautiful Victorian Farmhouse that was restored in 2002. Generously sized living room boasts tall ceilings and windows. Large eat-in kitchen has been fully updated with solid maple floors and cabinets, granite counters, SS appliances, island. Staged with contemporary furnishings. Refreshments & Door Prizes! 2 large bedrooms 1.5 baths. Requesting $157,500. WINDERMERE COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE. 541-386-3444.

UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED OUTDOOR FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS AND FURNITURE REHABILITATION: Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 6/15

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

HOUSE. Looking to rent or buy. Our small family of myself my husband and our two beautiful boys are wanting to move to Moro OR. We live in Newport but have family that live there. Open to ideas. For rent we are looking for a 2-3 bed. And to buy we would like an owner carry 3-4 bed. You can email or call/text. Lexxieadams@gmail.com 541.351.5294   6/8

FREE:

SERVICES:

THE LEAN-TO CAFÉ & GOOSE PIT SALOON.  Daily Specials: Tuesday Hamburgers, Wednesday Soft Tacos, Thursday Chicken Fried Steak, Friday Fresh Clam Chowder and Saturday Night Prime Rib. 541-442-5709 in Historic Downtown Wasco. 6/22

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/15

GHOST TOWN SAFARI PHOTO WORKSHOPS. (1) Venice Italy – 20 September through 2 October, 2018. $2,350.00 each plus transportation, food, lodging, etc. Come on this fabulous workshop where we explore the back streets of Venice, the Lagoon, Verona, and much more. (2) Macro/Micro workshop – 23 June, 2018. 9 AM to 4 PM, subjects will be provided. $40.00 per person. Itinerary will be sent with enrollment. Information and questions, email Bob Davis at ghosttownsafari@charter.net or call 541 296 2553. 6/8

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED: 

HOUSE. Looking to rent or buy. Our small family of myself my husband and our two beautiful boys are wanting to move to Moro OR. We live in Newport but have family that live there. Open to ideas. For rent we are looking for a 2-3 bed. And to buy we would like an owner carry 3-4 bed. You can email or call/text. Lexxieadams@gmail.com.

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION, and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected

starCircleJUNE

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman Co. Historical Museum Artist Series: Sherman County Photography Club

8 Sherman County School Students Go on Summer Vacation

8 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

9 World Wide Knit in Public Day at Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro, Oregon

9 Moro’s Annual Clean-up Day 8-4

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogists: Tips from Rootstech 10:30 Discovery Center

9 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Steam Cars, Hit & Miss Engines

9 Rose Festival Parade, Portland

9 Kids Free Fishing Day at Spearfish Park 9-12 http://www.nwp.usace.army.mil/news/article/Article/1532665/kids-fishing-day-at-spearfish-park-june-9/

10 Sherman County 4-H Market Animal Weigh-in

11 City of Grass Valley Conditional Use Hearing 7 Grass Valley Pavilion

12 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

12 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

12 Tri-County Mental Health / Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

12 Experiment Station Field Day, Pendleton

12 Sherman County Ambulance Board Meeting 1800

13 Sherman County Historical Society Annual Meeting 5 Senior Center, Moro

13 Columbia Basin Ag Research Center Field Day, Moro

13 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee Meeting 12:30

13 Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting 6

14 Flag Day

14 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 White Salmon

14 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 The SAndlot

15 The June Bugs Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

16-17 A-Town Throwdown: Kite, SUP & Windsurf Competition, Arlington

17 Father’s Day

17 Father’s Day Free Admission at Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5

18 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Union County

19 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

20 Sherman County Court 9

20-22 Sherman County 4-H Camp

22 Columbia Gorge Bi-State Renewable Energy Zone Meeting 12:30 Casa el Mirador

22 Family Bingo Night 6-8 Grass Valley Pavilion

23 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Start Your Miniature Rock Garden

25 Korean War Began 1950

26 Sherman County Public/School Library 10 S.T.E.A.M. ages 6-12

26 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

26 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

27 City Broadband Meeting 7 Wasco

27 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

27-30 4-H Summer Conference, OSU Campus, Corvallis

28 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Footloose

29 Frontier TeleNet Budget Hearing 9 & Board Meeting 10

29 Home Run Derby, Condon

30-July 1 Harvester’s Classic Coed Soft Ball Tournament, Condon

Flags StarsJULY

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Linda Krasfic’s Baby Quilts

3 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

3 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Independence Day

4 HYATUS Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Grass Valley Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

5 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

6 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

7 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Art Walk in Moro

7 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

7 Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

7 14th Annual Fossil Cruz-in 9-4 Fossil

7-15 Moro’s 2nd Annual Quilt and Fiber Event 10-4

8-11 Portland Horseless Carriage Club Tour: Journey Through Time Scenic Byway, John Day

8-12 Sherman County Historical Museum Quilt Display

9-12 Sherman County 4-H Food Preservation Day Camp, Extension Office

 

9-15 Summer Fishtrap Gathering (Writers in the American West) Wallowa Lake

10 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Sherman County Public/School Library 6 Hogwarts Mystery Night

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

10 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Meeting 12:30

12 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Coco

12-15 National Association of Counties Conference, Nashville, Tennessee

13 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

14 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Rock Necklaces ages up to 4

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Traffic Jam Show

14 Starry Night Camp-out at Maryhill Museum of Art

16-19 Sherman County 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Day Camp, Extension Office

17 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

17 Sherman County Public/School Library 11 Oregon Rocks! K-6

17 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

18 Sherman County Court 9

18 Kids Pioneer Day at Sherman County Historical Museum

19 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

21 Sherman County Public/School Library 1 Adam Miller, Old Songs for Young Folks

21 Summer Reading Program End of Summer Party 3

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

23 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 3

24 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

24 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

25 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County

25-28 Jefferson County Fair, Madras

26 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Love, Simon

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

28 WWI Began 1914

31 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31-Aug. 4 Malheur County Fair, Ontario

compass4AUGUST

1 All County Prayer Meeting, Rufus Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

2 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

1-4 Union County Fair, LaGrande

1-5 Deschutes County Fair, Redmond

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Abbey Phelps, Knitting & Fiber Arts

3 Jawbone Flats Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

3 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

3 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

4 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

4 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

4 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

4 Art Walk in Moro: Wool Spinners & Quilts

4-11 Wallowa County Fair, Enterprise

6-10 Sherman County Summer Drama Day Camp

7 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Vietnam War Began 1964

7-10 Baker County Fair, Baker City

7-11 Umatilla County Fair, Hermiston

8 Sherman County Community & Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

8-11 Crook County Fair, Prineville

8-11 Yakima Valley Fair & Rodeo, Grandview

9 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 My Little Pony

10 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

11 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

11 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Helicopters

14 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

14 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

16 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

17-18 Sherman Class of ’68 Reunion

20 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Silvies Valley Ranch

20-26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Activities Every Day

21 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

21-26 Sherman County Fair & Rodeo, Moro

23 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Pacific Rim Uprising

23-26 Wasco County Fair, Tygh Valley

28 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

28 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

clock.793SEPTEMBER

1 Art Walk in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

 


 

Sherman County eNews #151

CONTENTS

  1. Family Bingo Night at the Grass Valley Pavilion, June 22

  2. Crop Talks + Farm Tours, 4th Tuesdays, June 24

  3. Sherman County Citizen-Reporter June Edition Online

  4. Sherman County Court Meeting Minutes Online, April 19, May 16

  5. Caution: Beware of Hopelessness

  6. Secretary of State Dennis Richardson: What Shall We Give In Return For Receiving So Much?

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Accept and own your struggle. Embrace change and lean into the love of others around you. Your best life is born out of intense struggle and taking action to implement daily, sustainable change.” ~Will Malicote


1. Family Bingo Night at the Grass Valley Pavilion, June 22 

FAMILY Bingo Night
Friday evening, June 22 ~ 6-8 (might run late)
Grass Valley Pavilion
free popcorn, lemonade and coffee
selling candy and pizza-by-the-slice
We encourage the whole family to join us for a fun evening!


2. Crop Talks + Farm Tours, 4th Tuesdays, June 24

4th Tuesday of each month, 6pm – 8pm

Join OSU Extension, local farmers and interested community members for a monthly crop talk and farm tour of local farms to learn new tips, techniques and trades. Check out OSU Extension Small Farms for more information. This month, on June 24th, visit Treebird Organics in Trout Lake!


3. Sherman County Citizen-Reporter June Edition Online

The June edition of the Citizen Reporter is currently published online and can be found at https://www.co.sherman.or.us/the-citizen-reporter/


4. Sherman County Court Meeting Minutes Online, April 19, May 16

ShermanCoLogoApproved minutes for the April 19, 2018 Work Session, and May 16, 2018 regular session, are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/


5. Caution: Beware of Hopelessness

One piece of advice that bears repeating is this: “Be careful who you listen to.” This is an important caution, because we can let others determine what we believe, if we give sanction to, or accept without question, what they say.

A case in point: There are doom-and-gloom folks out there, who, for their own reasons, would rob the rest of us of hope. It has been proven that a hopeless attitude is just as dangerous as anything we could do to, say, pollute the environment. Hopelessness is like a nerve gas – it paralyzes us and prevents us from seeing the kind of world we want for our children and grandchildren, and then doing what we need to do to create it.

Yes, there are planet-wide challenges to our air and water, the land and the creatures that live in and on all three – including humans. However, if we give up, we don’t engage the creativity and problem-solving abilities that are inherently human. Hopelessness will kill the dream of a healthy planet quicker than all the holes in the ozone layer and all the chemicals released into the atmosphere put together. To hope is not foolish. If you look for reasons to despair, you easily will find them. However, if you choose, instead, to look for reasons to hope, you easily will find them as well.

Why not collect hopeful signs, like some folks collect stamps, coins or baseball cards? Then, when you hear people saying that it doesn’t matter what we do, because it is too late to save the environment, tell them they are wrong. Prove it with examples from your own collection. If you don’t have a collection yet, social media is alive with examples – again, just be careful what you listen to. Do your own research to ensure that your collection will stand the scrutiny.

Yes, there is work to be done and we will find the tools to use. Committed people are finding new methods to clean up past mistakes every day. The hopeful news is that each of us can make a difference – you can make a difference! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Secretary of State Dennis Richardson: What Shall We Give In Return For Receiving So Much?

Oregon.Flat.poleThe motto for my administration is taken from the Latin phrase Pro Tanto Quid Retribuamus, which translated means: “What shall we give in return for receiving so much?”

From day one, my leadership team and I were developing plans and strategies to bring Oregon to a place where accountability, transparency, and integrity are the norm, not the exception. While there will always be bumps in the road, our goal to create a world class Secretary of State’s office that leads by example has not wavered. We also adopted the theme from our nation’s Pledge of Allegiance to promote “liberty and justice for all” Oregonians. As my administration approaches the year and a half point in our tenure, I want to share with you our successes and some of the challenges we face. I consider us all one Oregon family and feel a deep responsibility to keep you informed.

Therefore, please read this entire newsletter, as I have some personal news to share with you as well.

Here’s what we have accomplished during the past year and a half—beginning with key audits we have conducted.

As Oregon’s Secretary of State and as a former foster parent, it hurts my heart to see the deplorable conditions revealed in our recent audit report on Oregon’s child welfare system. These are the most vulnerable children.

I take seriously the responsibility to ensure Oregon’s aging and disabled populations receive proper care. These are our brothers, sisters, parents and grandparents.

I am angered at the crushing failure of many Oregon public schools to do their jobs and prepare our students for life. They are the future.

In addition to the above audits, I have attached a list of the many accomplishments this office has achieved.

This work is an example of what good government looks like and what can be done when politicians hold their constituents’ futures as their guiding force instead of their own. I hope this information also reinforces the faith and trust you placed in me to keep my promises and always do the right thing for Oregon.

You, the people of Oregon, are the centerpiece of our mission, vision, and values and are the reason for everything we do. In the past year and a half, we have conducted 50 audits of state agencies. Some confirmed the great work being done, while others uncovered extremely disturbing failures. Three of the most egregious findings were:

  • The Oregon Health Authority Automated Medicaid eligibility audit found that thousands who were ineligible to receiving benefits had not been removed from the system, costing tens of millions of dollars. In addition to the audit, the Audits Division produces a first of its kind “Auditor Alert” that won an Excellence in Accountability Award from the National State Auditors Association. The audit and the Auditor Alert pressed OHA to complete eligibility reexaminations and remove the thousands of ineligible recipients from the system. The agency also promised to make other changes recommended in the audit.
  • The Department of Human Services audit on Oregon’s aging and disabled population found that this extremely vulnerable population was not receiving adequate in-home care. This audit helped to motivate the creation of legislationto strengthen training and standards for home care workers.
  • The Department of Human Services Child Welfare System audit uncovered that chronic management failures and high caseloads were jeopardizing the safety of many of the state’s most vulnerable children. The impact of this audit was so significant, Governor Kate Brown requested $14.5 million to hire nearly 200 new caseworkers.

Please check out our complete list of audit reports < https://sos.oregon.gov/audits/Documents/audits-accomplishments-2017.pdf >.

We can never foresee all the twists and turns in the road we will travel whether in public service, in business, or in life. However, we here at the Secretary of State’s office can be certain that in the coming years we will not shrink from our duties: we will have spirited debates with the legislature over budget matters; we will take on more tough audits that uncover problems, make recommendations on “best practices,” and encourage our state agencies to do better; and we will continue to promote integrity in our elections keeping Oregon as a national leader in elections cybersecurity. In short, we continue to implement Oregon government with a commitment to accountability, transparency, and integrity, all the while seeking the very best results for each of you.

On a more personal note, there is another challenge to be faced that was not expected. This challenge will be my responsibility, however, I will lean on my team and my family.

In May, I was diagnosed and began treatment for a small, cancerous brain tumor. While this was a difficult diagnosis to hear, I’m blessed and optimistic. We caught it early. I have a treatment plan in place, and I have an exceptional support system here at work and at home. I am taking on this challenge the same way I’ve taken on every challenge since my days flying “Night Hawk” as a combat helicopter pilot—I’ve considered my options, set my goal, developed my plan, and failure is not an option.

I am excited to continue serving along with my incredible team of 219 professionals. You have elected me as your Secretary of State, and you can count on me and my Administrative team, Audits Division, Corporations Division, Elections Division, and the State Archives to always provide the same outstanding service.

In addition to serving Oregon, it is wonderful to be able to serve in another positive and meaningful way. This is an opportunity to advocate for all who are living with and fighting cancer along with their loved ones. 

No one is promised tomorrow, so please use my situation as a reminder to be kinder, more patient, and more loving to each other. And, if by God’s grace we all live long, thriving lives, let’s live them with purpose. That’s my plan. I’ll keep you posted.

Dennis Richardson


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Mid-Columbia Center for Living Services

Drug Rehab

Rose Fest fleet steams into Portland for tours, festivities

Obama’s Iran Lie Was Even Bigger