Sherman County eNews #12

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Notice of Vacancy in Sherman County Commissioner Position

  3. Where will you be ten years from now if you keep on going the way you are going?

  4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  5. Gorge Tech Alliance Event Will Highlight Local Innovators, Jan. 22

  6. Agriculture Scholarship Opportunity for Local High School Senior

  7. Reclaiming Control



1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open SCHOOL Hours

8am-4pm Monday, Wednesday and Friday

8am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday

10am-4pm Saturday.

REMINDER: if Sherman County School choses to delay or close due to inclement weather the Library will follow suit.

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am

Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

YA Art Club – IS MOVING

WEDNESDAY after school in the library.

Grades 6-12.

When it’s over, catch the 5:00 activity bus

January’s Book Club– Thursday, January 24th, at 6:00pm.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman.



2. Notice of Vacancy in Sherman County Commissioner Position

A meeting facilitated by Sherman County Republican Chair Chris Moore will be held on January 21, 2019 at the Steve Burnet Extension building at 6 p.m.

All applicants for the position must be a registered Republican for 180 days prior to January 6, 2019 and a resident of the county for the period of one year prior to the date of the appointment.

Pursuant to ORS 236.217 the Sherman County Republican Central Committee will nominate no fewer than three nor more than five qualified persons to fill the vacancy.  The nominating convention shall be conducted according to party rules.

Those interested in running for this position should contact Sherman County Republican Chair Chris Moore. 541-565-3516 or chrismoore@gorge.net.



3. Where will you be ten years from now if you keep on going the way you are going?

Many people fail to realize that big success is the result of little successes achieved, often over a very long period of time. Truly successful people are long-term thinkers. They know that they must build upon each achievement and constantly learn new and better ways of doing things. A regular review of your progress is an essential part of goal-setting. A goal is little more than a wish unless it has a timetable for completion. Make sure your plan for your life includes short-, medium-, and long-term goals. Revise your goals as circumstances dictate, check them off when they are completed, and set new and bigger goals for yourself as you grow. And take time to reflect often to make sure you are on the right course — for you. ~Napoleon Hill Foundation



 4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbSherman County Stories by Sherman County People: For The Record

Nuclear 101 For the New Congress

Merriam-Webster: Jerry-built vs. Jury-rigged vs. Jerry-rigged

Liar, Liar Quiz

Wheat Foods Council & Newsletter

Where are you, Martin Luther King?

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE! Two-faced Roman god opens the doors, and the year



5. Gorge Tech Alliance Event Will Highlight Local Innovators, Jan. 22

The Gorge is home to a large and often-unknown group of innovators changing the world. The Gorge Tech Alliance invites the community to celebrate Gorge innovators past, present and future at its event on January 22 to hear their stories and be inspired. Learn about the initial inspirations, the bumpy roads to success and the future from the presenters, including:

  • Seth Tibbots of Turtle Island Foods sharing the founding story behind the Tofurkey line of products;
  • Les Perkins of Farmers Irrigation District with their fish screen and small-scale hydro innovations;
  • Nate DeVol with initial concepts to take the Farmers Irrigation innovations to the main-stem of the Columbia River; and
  • Jack Perrin with the Gorge Makerspace Project Invent team sharing their work developing a joystick that would allow people with cerebral palsy, a spastic paralysis due to brain damage, to play online games.

“Minds all over the Gorge have created and are creating solutions and products that are changing the world,” says GTA Executive Director Jessica Metta. “While the GTA often shares the innovations from our tech industry, we were excited for this event to share the broader story of innovation happening in the Gorge.”  The event is Tuesday, January 22, 2019 at Columbia Center for the Arts, 215 Cascade Ave., Hood River.  Doors open at 6:30 p.m. for appetizers and networking, with the presentations starting around 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 cash/check at the door or can be bought in advance online. Students and educators are free but encouraged to RSVP. Details are found at crgta.org/get-involved/events.

The Gorge Tech Alliance (GTA) is the regional tech industry association that supports, connects and develops the technology community of the Columbia River Gorge with networking and educational events, business support and promotion, workforce development and STEM education. Contact Jessica Metta, Executive Director, at 541-296-2266, jessica@crgta.org or learn more at crgta.org.



6. Agriculture Scholarship Opportunity for Local High School Senior

High school seniors, consider applying for a $500 scholarship offered by the Columbia Gorge Chapter of Oregon Women for Agriculture.  Students must be/have been a resident of Hood River, Wasco, Sherman or Gilliam County a minimum of two years during their high school education.  Preference goes to a student (1) pursuing a major in agricultural studies (2) with a 3.0 GPA or higher (3) female.  Money is expected to be used for tuition and/or books.  Applications have been sent to area high schools, and are due to the local chapter no later than May 1, 2019.  For more information or a scholarship application, contact chapter President Cindy Brown at 541-565-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu



7. Reclaiming Control

With national and international news being so much easier to access, we have all become aware that the last few years have been challenging for a lot of people around the world. Let’s spend some time talking about these challenges and what we can do, as individuals and communities.

One of the traps we, as human beings, can get caught in is looking at our social, economic and financial situations as happening “to” us. We see things from an external perspective, and believe we are powerless to do anything. If you can visualize a leaf traveling at the mercy of the wind, you get a pretty good picture of someone who sees life happening “to” them. This is an external “locus of control” and puts us in the mindset of a victim.

Now, what would happen if we changed our perspective to one of an internal locus of control? What if we asked ourselves the question, “What can I do ‘for’ me?” How does that change the way we look at ourselves and our abilities?

Well, for one thing, we take back control of our lives and our decisions. It’s like adding a rudder and a motor to that leaf blowing in the wind, as we plot our own course through the breeze. We give ourselves the power to determine the direction in which we travel through challenges. We are only victims if we allow ourselves to be victims.

There is a tendency, these days, to think of ourselves as victims. But keep in mind that economic, social and political headlines are meant to sell papers and magazines to keep advertising dollars. Televised media is not just reporting the news, but sometimes making the news in order to get ratings and advertising dollars. By looking a little deeper and listening a little closer, this becomes evident.

In these times, it is easy to fall prey to the “bad news” constantly being reported in the media. If we are wise, and we all have access to untapped wisdom stored in our minds, we will become skeptical listeners and readers, and take charge of our own decisions about our futures. ~The Pacific Institute


 

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Sherman County eNews #11

CONTENTS

  1. Public Notice. City of Moro Councilor Vacancy

  2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 14

  3. Sherman County School District Public Participation in Board Meetings Policy

  4. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Jan. 16

  5. Notice. Lower John Day Working Group Meeting #23, Jan. 29

  6. Foundation of Intimacy

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 

“It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives.” —John Adams (1756)

1. Public Notice. City of Moro Councilor Vacancy

*IMMEDIATE OPENING*

The City of Moro announces a vacancy in the City Council created by the election of Councilor Perry Thurston (Position 4) to Mayor, effective January 01, 2019. Pursuant to the City of Moro Charter, Chapter VII, Section 33, hereby gives notice that the Moro City Council will fill said vacancy at the City Council meeting to be held on the following date:

Tuesday, February 05, 2019 at 7 P.M.

at the Moro City Hall

104 Main Street, Moro, Oregon

This term would run from appointment date, until January 1, 2021.

Persons serving on the City Council must have been a resident of Moro for the last 12 months. Persons serving on the City Council must be able to attend all council meetings (First Tuesday of each month, at 07:00 pm at City Hall, unless excused) and yearly budget meetings.  Anyone interested in the above position should send a letter of interest to:

City of Moro PO Box 231, Moro, OR 97039

By: Monday January 28, 2019.

This is an appointed position by the City Council. Letters of Interest will be accepted until January 28, 2019 at 02:00 p.m.


 

2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting Agenda, Jan. 14

Logo.Sherman High SchoolPublic Meeting Announcement

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, January 14, 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County Public/School Library.

Here is the link to the agenda.

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/uploads/1/3/8/9/13895640/2019-01-14_school_board_meeting_agenda.pdf


 

3. Sherman County School District Public Participation in Board Meetings Policy

newsletter2Public Participation in Board Meetings

All Board meetings, with the exception of executive sessions, will be open to the public. The Board invites district community members to attend Board meetings to become acquainted with the program and operation of the schools. Members of the public also are encouraged to share their ideas and opinions with the Board when appropriate.

It is the intent of the Board to ensure communications with individuals with disabilities are as effective as communications with others. Individuals with hearing, vision or speech impairments will be given an equal opportunity to participate in Board meetings. Primary consideration will be given to requests of qualified individuals with disabilities in selecting appropriate auxiliary aids and services.

Auxiliary aids and services for persons with disabilities will be available at no charge to the individual. All auxiliary aids and/or service requests must be made with appropriate advance notice. Should the Board demonstrate such requests would result in a fundamental alteration in the service, program or activity or in undue financial and administrative burdens, alternative, equally effective means of communication will be used.

Audience

During an open session of a Board meeting, members of the public are specifically invited to present concerns during the designated portion of the agenda. At the discretion of the Board chair, further public participation may be allowed.

Request for an Item on the Agenda

A member of the public may request the superintendent place an item of concern on the agenda of a regular Board meeting. This request should be made in writing and presented to the superintendent for consideration at least five working days prior to the scheduled meeting.

Procedures for Public Participation in Meetings

The Board will establish procedures for public participation in open meetings. The purpose of these procedures will be to inform the public how to effectively participate in Board meetings for the best interests of the individual, the district and the patrons. The information will be easily accessible and available to all patrons attending a public Board meeting.

  1. Discussion or presentation concerning a published agenda item is limited to its designated place on the agenda, unless otherwise authorized by the Board chair.
  2. A visitor speaking during the meeting may introduce a topic not on the published agenda. The Board, at its discretion, may require that a proposal, inquiry or request be submitted in writing, and reserves the right to refer the matter to the administration for action or study.
  3. Any person who is invited by the Board chair to speak to the Board during a meeting should state his/her name and address and, if speaking for an organization, the name and identity of the organization. A spokesperson should be designated to represent a group with a common purpose.
  4. Statements by members of the public should be brief and concise. The Board chair may use discretion to establish a time limit on discussion or oral presentation by visitors.
  5. Questions asked by the public, when possible, will be answered immediately by the Board chair or referred to staff members for reply. Questions requiring investigation may, at the discretion of the Board chair, be referred to the superintendent for response at a later time.
  6. At the discretion of the Board chair, anyone wishing to speak before the Board, either as an individual or as a member of a group, on any agenda item or other topic, may do so by providing the Board secretary with a completed registration card prior to the Board meeting in order to allow the Board chair to provide adequate time for each agenda item. The Board chair should be alert to see that all visitors have been acknowledged and thanked for their presence and especially for any contributed comments on agenda issues. Similar courtesy should be extended to members of staff who have been in attendance. Their return for future meetings should be welcomed.

Petitions

Petitions may be accepted at any Board meeting. No action will be taken in response to a petition before the next regular meeting. Petitions will be referred to the superintendent for consideration and recommendation.

Comments Regarding Staff Members

Speakers may offer objective criticism of school operations and programs. The Board will not hear comments regarding any individual district staff member. The Board chair will direct the visitor to the procedures in Board policy KL – Public Complaints for Board consideration of legitimate complaints involving a staff member. The association contract governing the employee’s rights will be followed. A commendation involving a staff member should be sent to the superintendent, who will forward it to the employee, his/her supervisor (if applicable) and the Board.

END OF POLICY

Legal Reference(s):

ORS 165.535 ORS 165.540 ORS 192.610 to -192.690 ORS 332.057


4. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Jan. 16

ShermanCoLogoSherman County Court will hold a regularly scheduled meeting on January 16th at 9:00am in the Commissioners Meeting Room at Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street in Moro Oregon 97039.

Agenda topics include Quarterly Reports by County Clerk Jenine McDermid, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District representative, Sherman County School Superintendent Wes Owens and Bob Thomas of Wildlife Services; Supplemental Budget Hearing at 10; written Senior Center, Veterans’ Officer, Prevention and Emergency Services Quarterly Reports; Action topics: Mid-Columbia Housing Authority, North Central Public Health District Medical Examiner Services Agreement and Sherman County Scholarship for Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation; Commissioner McCoy and Judge Dabulskis’ reports; and the consent agenda: Minutes of November 7, 2018, Revenue/Expenditure Summary-December 2018, and Treasurer’s Report, November 2018. The agenda and updates are posted online.

~Kayla von Borstel

Sherman County Court Administrative Assistant

(541)-565-3416

Hours: M-TH 8am-430pm


5. Lower John Day Working Group Meeting #23, Jan. 29

Lower John Day Working Group Meeting scheduled for Tuesday, January 29th from 10:00am to 2:00pm.
We will be meeting in the South Gilliam Emergency Services Building, 220 N. Main St. Condon, OR 97823
Lunch will be provided. Call in details are listed below.

We will be discussing the Step 3 budget, landowner and city government outreach, Step 2 report edits and adopting the final draft of the report, as well as planning the February meeting with a special focus on the Step 3 subcommittees. We will also be hearing from Chris Fitzsimmons (Gilliam) and Shawn Payne (Sherman) on their counties’ Natural Hazard Mitigation Plans.

Your participation is important and greatly appreciated! Don’t hesitate to give me a shout with any questions.

Call-In Info:
Please join my meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone:
https://www.gotomeet.me/Gilliam_County_SWCD
You can also dial in using your phone:
United States: +1 (872) 240-3212
Access Code: 385-955-045
First GoToMeeting? Let’s do a quick system check: https://link.gotomeeting.com/system-check

~Hannah Fatland
Watershed Coordinator
Gilliam-East John Day Watershed Council
234 S. Main St
P.O. Box 106
Condon, OR 97823
Office: (541) 384-2672 ext. 111


 

6. Foundation of Intimacy

Are you in an intimate relationship? Would you like to be? If so, how do you define intimacy? In many cultures, the true meaning of intimacy has been distorted, equating it with sex. However, sex is not necessarily an essential component of intimacy. There is something else that is more vital, more foundational, and necessary.

One of the best definitions of intimacy is listening to another person’s disclosures and caring about their meaning to the other person’s growth. Intimacy is also caring enough to disclose yourself to others – making the effort and taking the risk involved in opening yourself up to another human being. A fundamental component of this is, of course, trust.

It is this mutual disclosure that enables us to share emotional closeness, and it is this mutual caring that provides a receptive climate for helping each other to make self-discoveries and to express our feelings and experiences in words.

If we help each other to understand our individual meanings and feelings in this way, we are helping each other to grow and to find new ways of action and interaction that will lead to even greater growth.

There is also an intimacy that does not require words. In this kind of intimacy, we do not pretend to know the contents of the other’s thoughts, yet we share compassion and affirmation through silence, companionship, and gentle, respectful touch.

Considering intimacy in this manner, let’s ask the questions again: Are you in an intimate relationship? Would you like to be? ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3January, February & March at OMSI

Nuclear 101: An Introduction to Nuclear Energy for the New Congress

NPR: Where Does Illegal Immigration Mostly Occur? Here’s What The Data Tell Us

Representative Walden’s Work to Improve Oregon Forest Management

The $22 Billion Question: Understanding PERS

New Facilities at Cottonwood Canyon State Park Open to Rent

Oregon Family Farmer Magazine

What Ever Happened To Pendleton Grain Growers?

Baby Born to Orca Pod That Hunts Around the Mouth of Columbia River


 

Sherman County eNews #10

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR



1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1Truth in a Treacherous World

Driving back to Sherman County yesterday I saw a sign warning of “possible” black ice conditions. When it comes to the weather, hiking a perilous mountain, or swimming in a swelling river we commonly refer to the conditions as treacherous. This means that they are dangerous, unsafe, precarious, and laden with hidden or deceptive risk. It also means that because of their dangerous nature they are unreliable and frequently unstable.

But treacherous also is used to refer to people. The Bible speaks frequently of the dangers of hanging out with treacherous people who act treacherously. In this sense the word is used to describe betrayal or deception because the person is unfaithful, deceitful, false, double-crossing, two-faced, untrustworthy, unreliable, and undependable.

After two chapters in the Bible of “good” and “very good” (Genesis 1-2) we read in the first verse of chapter 3, Satan (or the serpent) is described as “more crafty than any beast…” The serpent then proceeded to tempt Eve to eat what God had forbidden, which she and Adam did do. In Genesis 3:13 God asked her, “What is this you have done?” Eve’s response was “The serpent deceived me, and I ate.”

From this point on the story of God in the Bible includes His unveiling to us His plan to bring us back from the hands of that deceiver through His Son who is described as the Way, the Truth and the Life (John 14:6). This story unfolds until the point that we are brought to the cross on which Jesus is crucified where He declares “It is finished” (John 19:30). Sin and death had been defeated and in the last verses of the third to last chapter of the Bible we see it all wrapped up, leaving us once again with two chapters of God’s eternal very good for all who believed in His Son (Revelation 21-22).

Joe Burgess
Pastor, First Baptist Church Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU to all who have allowed me to participate in their physical therapy needs over the past 20 years. I made a recent change in employment and look forward to continuing to assist you in your recovery towards optimum health at my new location. I am working at the KVH Wellness Center in Goldendale, WA. For those of you who are familiar with my former co-worker Jason Sallee, DPT, he has made the move to the Wellness Center as well. This clinic was expanded and remodeled within the past year. We have a team of 4 great therapists in the outpatient clinic. The clinic is open for appointments from 7:30am-5:00pm Mon-Fri. Contact is (509) 773-1025. Live well! ~Amanda Payne, PTA

JOYFUL NEWS:

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

SUPPORT BRENNAH MILLER.  Brennah Miller is a young wife and mother, an electrician and a cancer patient. |  Opportunities to support the Miller Family are located at local businesses in Grass Valley, Moro, Wasco and Rufus. |  Brennah Miller Account, Bank of Eastern Oregon, P.O. Box 444, Moro, Oregon 97039.

EMPLOYMENT:

SEASONAL HABITAT RESTORATION TECHNICIAN. Lower Deschutes Cooperative Weed Management Area/Sherman County Weed District is currently seeking job applicants for full time employment as a seasonal habitat restoration technician. Technicians will be hired to work approximately 35 weeks beginning March 2019 through October 2019. Please contact Dan Son at dson@shermancounty.net for more information.  Thank You.  3/1

BUS DRIVERS. Help Mid-Columbia Bus Co. drive Condon and Sherman County students to success! | $13.30 an hour | 401 K | No CDL required to apply | Sign on bonus up to $350 | Flexible Schedule | Dental | Vision | Accident/Critical Care Insurance | Paid Training. Schedule your interview today and start making a difference tomorrow!!!  ~Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter | Office: 541-567-0551 | Cell: 541-303-5093 | amberlena@midcobus.com 2/22 

FUEL DELIVERY DRIVER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Petroleum Delivery Driver. This FT position is based in Moro. The role of the Delivery Drivers is to safely transport petroleum products and render outstanding customer service to our patrons. The deliveries will range from commercial/industrial accounts and home heating oil to bulk and packaged lubricants. Product knowledge is a plus. On Site training will be provided. Please contact Human Resources at 541-565-3737 for questions. 1/25

SERVICES: 

LOCAL HANDYMAN’S SERVICES. Handyman, General Contractor & Equipment Operator. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 3/15

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

THE TIMES-JOURNAL! The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com  $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond the region. 1/25

FOR SALE:

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & GIFTS. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 3/15

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

LOST OR FOUND:

FREE:

WANTED: 

FUEL DELIVERY DRIVER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Petroleum Delivery Driver. This FT position is based in Moro. The role of the Delivery Drivers is to safely transport petroleum products and render outstanding customer service to our patrons. The deliveries will range from commercial/industrial accounts and home heating oil to bulk and packaged lubricants. Product knowledge is a plus. On Site training will be provided. Please contact Human Resources at 541-565-3737 for questions. 1/25



 3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

Sherman County School District Calendar

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

JANUARY

11 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 10 Condon Fire Hall

12 19th Annual Eagle Watch at The Dalles Dam Visitor Center 9-3

12 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Program 10:30 Discovery Center

15 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 11 NORCOR The Dalles

15 Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Board Meeting 1 Condon

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

16-18 Northwest Agricultural Show, Oregon State Fairgrounds

19 19th Annual Eagle Watch 9-3 The Dalles Dam Visitor Center

19 Sherman Athletic Foundation Crab & Oyster Feed 3-8 Wasco

19 North Central Livestock Assoc. Annual Meeting 5 Jefferson County Fairgrounds

21 MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY

23 Tri-County Courts 10 Fossil

26 19th Annual Eagle Watch at The Dalles Dam Visitor Center 9-3

26 22nd Annual Robert Burns Supper 2 Condon

31 Farm to School Regional Gathering (Gorge Grown Food Network) 4-6 Mosier Community School

FEBRUARY

2 NW Nonprofit Leaders Annual Conference, Corvallis https://www.nonprofitsteward.org/conference/

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 Moro City Council 7

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 All County Prayer Meeting Rufus Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12 LINCOLN’S BIRTHDAY

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

13 Rufus City Council 7

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

15 Frontier TeleNet TBA

15 North Central Livestock Association 6:30 The Riverside, Maupin

18 PRESIDENTS’ DAY

19 Wasco City Council 7

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals 9

22 WASHINGTON’S BIRTHDAY

23 OSU Small Farms Conference

25 SHERMAN COUNTY’S BIRTHDAY 1889-2019



 

Sherman County eNews #9

CONTENTS

  1. Notice of Vacancy in Sherman County Commissioner Position

  2. Notice. Sherman County School District Calendar Update, Jan. 11

  3. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 14

  4. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 15

  5. Notice. Sherman County Ambulance ASA Plan Advisory Committee Agenda, Jan. 17

  6. So, What’s Next?

  7. Greg Walden announces 16 town halls across Oregon’s Second District in January

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


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1. Notice of Vacancy in Sherman County Commissioner Position

A meeting facilitated by Sherman County Republican Chair Chris Moore will be held on January 21, 2019 at the Steve Burnet Extension building at 6 p.m.

All applicants for the position must be a registered Republican for 180 days prior to January 6, 2019 and a resident of the county for the period of one year prior to the date of the appointment.

Pursuant to ORS 236.217 the Sherman County Republican Central Committee will nominate no fewer than three nor more than five qualified persons to fill the vacancy.  The nominating convention shall be conducted according to party rules. Those interested in running for this position should contact Sherman County Republican Chair Chris Moore. 541-565-3516 or chrismoore@gorge.net.


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 2. Notice. Sherman County School District Calendar Update, Jan. 11

Sherman County School Calendar Update

January 11th, 2019 is now a Full Day Friday

Dear Sherman County School District Students, Parents, Guardians, Families and Staff,

Due to the school closure on January 8th, 2019, the originally scheduled ½ day Friday on January 11th will now be a full day Friday.  As a reminder, Board Policy (EBCD – Emergency School Closures) determines this schedule change.  The wording states, “If, during a half day Friday week, there is an emergency school closure on any full day, the half day Friday will be changed to a full day that particular week.”

Please give me a call at Sherman County School at 541-565-3500 or send me an email at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us if you have any questions.

Sincerely,

Wes Owens

Superintendent

Sherman County School District

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3. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 14

Public Meeting Announcement 

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, January 14, 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County Public/School Library. 

agenda1.schooldist.jan.2019

agenda2.schooldist.jan2019

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4. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 15

FRONTIER REGIONAL 911 DISPATCH BOARD MEETING

         January 15, 2019 at  1:00 p.m.

         ESD Conference Room – 135 S. Main, Condon

1 –     Approve October 16, 2018 Minutes

2 –     Election of Officers

3 –     Frontier TeleNet Update

4 –     Manager’s Report:  Phone Update, Burns Paiute Bill – Renee Heidy

  • If necessary, Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660 (1)

                                             (e) Property

                                             (h) Legal Rights

                                             (i) Personnel

  • As this is a regular meeting of the Frontier Regional 911 Board, other matters may be addressed as deemed appropriate by the Board.

Agenda Distributed January 8, 2019:

Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Members:

Sheriff Gary Bettencourt – sheriff@co.gilliam.or.us

Judge Elizabeth Farrar – elizabeth.farrar@co.gilliam.or.us

Sheriff Jim Adkins – jim.adkins@co.jefferson.or.us

Commissioner Mae Huston – mae.huston@co.jefferson.or.us

Sheriff Brad Lohrey – bradlohrey@yahoo.com

Judge Joe Dabulskis – jdabulskis@co.sherman.or.us

Sheriff Mike Smith – mike.smith@co.wheeler.or.us

Judge Lynn Morley – lmorley@co.wheeler.or.us


decor45. Notice. Sherman County Ambulance ASA Plan Advisory Committee Agenda, Jan. 17

Sherman County Ambulance

ASA Plan Advisory Committee Meeting Agenda

Burnet Extension Building

January 17, 2019   6:00 PM

1.0     Open Meeting

2.0     Review/Approve September 5, 2018 minutes

3.0     Review 2018 (January – December) Response Statistics

         3.1  Dispatch

         3.2  Ambulance

4.0     Issues / Concerns

5.0     Next Meeting July 18, 2019 @ 6:00PM

6.0     Adjourn

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6. So, What’s Next?

Have you ever noticed that there seems to be a lull, a drop in energy, after the holidays? Yes, it may be due to insufficient sleep, but more than likely, it’s because a goal has been achieved.

When we set a goal, our minds are dealing with the gap between the way things are now (current reality) and the way we want things to be (the goal). This is also known as Cognitive Dissonance – cognitive, meaning of the mind, and dissonance meaning things just don’t match. In music, it’s two notes, usually very close together, that causes our ears to beg for resolution – one way or the other.

Because we are picture-oriented as human beings, our minds want the pictures we hold to match. And because we cannot hold two opposing pictures at the same time, we naturally move to the strongest picture – either way, because our minds don’t care. It is only the strength of our goals that cause our minds to “care” so much about which picture we move toward. As we move, we get energy and ideas to reach the goal. The closer we get to goal achievement, the less energy and ideas we need, which leads to the lull. For the holidays, we goal-set to decorate, get gifts purchased, make it through dinners and brunches and parties.

Now, the parties are over. Gifts are exchanged and opened, and the refrigerator may still have leftovers. It’s “lull time.” Now, lulls in the action are fine, as long as they are intentional and not a mistake. They are also a great time for a little introspection and for planning that next round of goal-setting. What do you want next? Where do you want to go? What is going to be your hallmark for this new year?

The possibilities are as great as your imagination. ~The Pacific Institute

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7. Greg Walden announces 16 town halls across Oregon’s Second District in January

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) today announced he will hold 16 town halls in January, with meetings in Josephine, Jackson, Klamath, Deschutes, Jefferson, Crook, Harney, Malheur, Baker, Wallowa, Union, Umatilla, Morrow, Gilliam, Hood River, and Wasco counties. Full details on the town hall meetings are included below.

“I’m pleased to announce that I’ll be holding 16 town halls across Oregon’s vast Second District,” said Walden. “I look forward to getting together with people on the ground and hearing your concerns and ideas and suggestions about this new session of Congress, and giving you an update on the things we’ve accomplished and what we want to work on going forward.”

Walden has held 148 town hall meetings since 2012, and responded to more than 168,000 letters, emails, and phone calls in the last two years. Walden recently released the top legislative accomplishments for Oregon in the 115th Congress, including work to combat the opioid crisis, improve forest management, and give Oregon veterans access to better care at the VA.

Oregonians who cannot attend Walden’s town hall meetings but would still like to ask questions or provide input are encouraged to visit his website at www.walden.house.gov. There, Oregonians can find Walden’s views on local and regional issues, send him an email to provide input, and sign up for his free, regular newsletter. 

Second District residents can also sign up for telephone town hall meetings through Walden’s website. “I receive very positive feedback from people in our district about telephone town halls, which reach thousands of people in the comfort of their own homes. These are especially important for those who have difficulty with transportation. Telephone town halls give people whose voice might not otherwise be heard a chance to give their input on the issues they care about,” Walden said.

Constituents can also follow Walden on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to learn more about his work around Oregon’s Second District

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8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Women now hold most top Oregon political jobs

Central American Countries Are Helping Middle Easterners Illegally Enter The United States

Final crewman from Operation Magic Carpet recounts heroic life-saving mission

Imprimis: Should we regulate big tech?


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Sherman County eNews #8

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Closed, Tuesday, Jan. 8

  2. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, Jan. 11

  3. Margaret M. Smith 1920-2018

  4. Greg Walden nominates ten Oregon students for acceptance to U.S. service academies


1. Sherman County School Closed, Tuesday, Jan. 8

Sherman County School superintendent Wes Owens issued notice of school closure today based on road and weather conditions.


2. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting, Jan 11

Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting

Friday, January 11 at 10 a.m.


3. Margaret M. Smith 1920-2018

flower.rose.starJune 18, 1920 — December 27, 2018
Margaret Florence (Merchant) Smith, 98, longtime resident of Wasco, Sherman County, passed away peacefully the evening of December 27, 2018 at Samaritan Pacific Hospital in Newport following a brief illness, with both of her children at her bedside.

Margaret was born June 18, 1920 on Juniper Butte, near Terrebonne, Oregon to William Vern and Anna Lee (Martin) Merchant in her midwife Grandmother Josaphene (& Isaac) Martin’s home. She grew up in Culver, Oregon, where her parents operated a grocery and general merchandise store, after moving to town from his nearby Peck family homestead shortly after she was born.

After graduating from Culver High School in 1938, she attended Behnke-Walker Business College in Portland. She returned home in April 1939 to help at the wedding of an older schoolmate, who was marrying her principal for the first three years of high school. She met the Best Man, Delmer Smith, first cousin to the groom, who offered her a ride back to Portland where he was working for Otis Elevator. She apparently decided he was the “best man” as they were married the next year on June 23, 1940 in her parent’s new home in Redmond, Oregon, and enjoyed the next 68 years together, rarely parted.

Following a “gone fishing” honeymoon, they settled in Wasco and Delmer began harvest with his father and brother Leon on the family homestead farm East of Wasco their Medler grandparents had established in 1898. Come December Otis needed him temporarily in Spokane and ten years later they were still there. Two children followed, Marilyn in 1941 and William in 1945.

When his brother Leon died suddenly in 1950, Delmer & Margaret moved back to Wasco to farm. They moved into the homestead East of Wasco where Delmer had been born, and then to their new home they built in 1951, a mile “down the creek” off Scott Canyon Road with the view of her mountains that Margaret had requested. Great nephew Nathan & Samantha Smith are now raising their family to appreciate Margaret’s view as well as being the fifth and possibly sixth generations to operate the Smith Farm lands.

She learned knitting, crocheting, sewing and quilting from her Mother and enjoyed them her entire life. She participated in the The Dalles Hospital Auxiliary Volunteer Services for at least 25 years with a sewing circle of local friends and neighbors, making hand puppets for the hospital.

Margaret advanced through an amazing progression of handwork hobbies which she used for “road work” while traveling, beginning in the early ‘60s with hand embroidery under Margilee Kaseberg’s tutelage, some bead-crafting, pine needle basketry, and counted cross stitch. She gifted family and friends with beautiful baskets and cross stitch items. In 2001, Marilyn helped her buy her first embroidery machine, and it immediately became a passionate daily activity she enjoyed the rest of her life, decorating clothes, shopping bags and squares for blocks in bed and crib quilts for family and hospitals. With the advent of grandchildren in the ‘60s Margaret had begun making Christmas ornaments each year, utilizing each of these handcrafts, and continued the tradition through 2017 to an ever increasing list of grand- and great- grandchildren, nieces, nephews and friends.

Delmer & Margaret enjoyed trips to Montana to visit their daughter & family, and South to Death Valley and Arizona. When William moved to Texas, they immediately became “snowbirders” travelling different routes to Texas and staying for longer periods of time each winter before returning to Wasco and Montana in the summers. In 2001 they downsized, moving from the ranch into William’s duplex in Richland Hills, Texas, and continued an annual summer trek, joined by William, to Montana, Sherman County, down the Oregon Coast and returning to Texas with Marilyn on board as well most years. Following Delmer’s death in 2008, Margaret and William decided to move back to Oregon, and in 2009 found a home in Seal Rock where they could watch the ocean waves, and enjoyed visits from family and friends.

Margaret was preceded in death by her parents, husband, sister Geraldine Bertsch, and grandson Paul Barnett. She is survived by her daughter Marilyn & Keith Barnett, son William Smith, grandson Lee Barnett & Laurie Booth, great-grandchildren Brandan & Abigayle Barnett and Morgan Barnett, two great-great-grandchildren Addyson Mae and Wyatt Benjamin, and many nieces, nephews and their families.

At her request, no services will be held, with a graveside gathering at a later date when she joins Delmer in a family plot in Sunrise Cemetery, Wasco, Oregon. Arrangements were made with Bateman Funeral Homes with a guestbook on their website (https://www.batemanpacificview.com). Memorials may be made to the Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, Oregon 97039, or the charity of your choice.


4. Greg Walden nominates ten Oregon students for acceptance to U.S. service academies

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) today announced that he has nominated ten Oregon students for acceptance to the prestigious United States service academies. Walden’s Service Academy Nomination Board — retired and active-duty military officers who interview potential candidates for the service academies — recommended each student based on their academic performance, extracurricular involvement, and character.

“I am honored to nominate these outstanding young Oregonians to America’s service academies,” Walden said. “Years of hard work, dedication, and commitment to character have earned these future leaders these much-deserved nominations. By pursuing a higher education at one of our country’s select service academies, these students have shown a desire to lead by example, grow intellectually, and serve the United States in uniform. I am confident that each nominee will have tremendous success in this admirable endeavor and that their futures will be bright.

“I also thank my Service Academy Nomination Board for recommending these young leaders. Their experience serving our country in uniform is invaluable to the nomination process, and speaks to the caliber of the students they interviewed and recommended for nominations this year. Without their guidance and understanding of what it takes to succeed at the U.S. service academies, these nominations would not be possible,” said Walden. Serving on Walden’s Service Academy Nomination Board are: Retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Paula Brown; Col. Smith, Jeff, Oregon Air National Guard; Lt. Col. Lee, Travis, Oregon Army National Guard; Retired U.S. Navy Commander John Howard; Retired U.S. Army Lt. Col Kirk Mickelsen.

The service academies include the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado; the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York; the United States Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland; and the United States Merchant Marine Academy at Kings Point, New York. Final selection for admission to the service academies will be determined by officials at each respective academy this spring.

Students who are interested in learning more about service academy nominations can visit Walden’s website at https://walden.house.gov/academynominations.

The nominees from Oregon are as follows:

Baker County

  • Clay Keller, son of Douglas and Theresa Keller of Baker City, attended Baker High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy.

Deschutes County

  • Jackson Clough, son of James and Jill Clough of Bend, attending Summit High School — nominated to the Unites States Air Force Academy.
  • Benjamin Roberts, son of Andrew and Kimberly Roberts of Bend, attending Bend Senior High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy.
  • Levi Schwarz, son of Janet and Douglas Schwarz of Bend, attended Bend Senior High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy.

Jackson County

  • Dana Jung, daughter of Dr. Tae Kyung Jung and Mikyoung Yang of Medford, attending North Medford High School — nominated to the United States Military Academy (West Point), and United States Air Force Academy.

Klamath County

  • Brandon VanMeter, son of Stephen and Amy Johnson of Klamath Falls, attending Klamath Union High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy, United States Air Force Academy, and United States Military Academy (West Point).
  • Nolan Britton, son of Robert and Bobbie Sue Britton of Klamath Falls, attending Lost River High School — nominated to the United States Air Force Academy.
  • Jacob Healy, son of Mike and Julie Healy of Klamath Falls, attending Mazama High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy.
  • Maximillian Balakas, son of Martin Balakas and Kathleen Todd of Klamath Falls, attending Mazama High School — nominated to United States Military Academy (West Point).

Umatilla County

  • Kirk Liscom, son of Matthew and Shelley Liscom of Pendleton, attending Pendleton High School — nominated to the United States Naval Academy.

Sherman County eNews #7

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update, Jan. 8

  2. Statewide Comprehensive Recreation Plan Draft Online for Public Review

  3. Frontier TeleNet Approved Meeting Minutes Online, Nov. 28, 2018

  4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  5. Hansell introduces wildfire legislation package

  6. Delving Into the Words We Use

  7. Cascade Singers Community Choir Welcomes New Members

  8. Sherman County Emergency Services November/December Activity Report


1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update, Jan. 8

sports-basket2ballOn Tuesday, January 8 the girls basketball game at Hood River has been moved  to 5:00 pm.

Also on Tuesday, January 8, our boys JV basketball team will be playing Horizon Christian at 5:00 pm with the varsity game following at 6:30 pm.

Jeanie Pehlke

Confidential Secretary
Sherman County School District
541.565.3500  |  541.565.3319 (Fax)


2. Statewide Comprehensive Recreation Plan Draft Online for Public Review

pen.markerThe public is invited to comment on the state’s plan for outdoor recreation drafted by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). Outdoor Recreation in Oregon: Responding to Demographical and Societal Change is posted for public review and comment at  https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/PLANS/Pages/201923SCORP.aspx. Comments will be accepted through Feb. 7, 2019.

The plan closely examines the effects of important demographic and societal changes facing outdoor recreation providers in the state, including:

  • An aging population
  • An increasingly diverse population
  • Lack of youth engagement in outdoor recreation
  • An underserved low-income population
  • Increasing levels of physical inactivity within the population.

OPRD planners developed the report using a series of carefully designed statewide research studies including a statistically reliable survey of Oregon residents. Staff gathered feedback from 3,550 randomly selected residents.

States are required to develop a Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan to be eligible to receive matching grants from the federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) grant program. The five-year plan guides the use of those funds and other OPRD-administered grant programs including the Local Government Grant Program.  It also provides recommendations to all levels of recreation providers on how they can better serve Oregonians.

OPRD will accept comments through Feb. 7, 2019. Responses can be made via:

The recreation plan is also available in a CD format by contacting Terry Bergerson at 503-986-0747 or terry.bergerson@oregon.gov.


3. Frontier TeleNet Approved Meeting Minutes Online, Nov. 28, 2018

Frontier TeleNet approved meeting minutes for November 28, 2018 are posted online:  https://frontiertelenet.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/2018-11-28_FTN-Bd-Mtg-Minutes-APPROVED-fn-sec.pdf 


4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbSalvage roadkilled deer and elk with free online permit beginning Jan. 1, 2019

Where to Discover Native Cultures in the Puget Sound Area

Sherman County, Oregon History Collection

Oregon Encyclopedia: Sherman County Courthouse

Oregon Encyclopedia: Sherman Big Bluegrass

Oregon Encyclopedia: DeMoss Springs Park

Oregon Encyclopedia: John & Helen Moore House


5. Hansell introduces wildfire legislation package

ORStateFlagSALEM, Ore.—In the aftermath of devastating wildfires throughout Oregon last year, State Sen. Bill Hansell, R-Athena, is introducing a package of bills that he hopes will become law. The bills allow greater flexibility in freeing up resources to fight fires and moves areas that are currently unprotected under the jurisdiction of the state Fire Marshall.

“This legislation is a major step forward in protecting both public and private property and ensuring the safety of Oregonians. Senate District 29, the district I represent, has seen severe wildfires in recent years and this legislation will help provide the clarity and resources that are needed in fighting these fires,” Hansell said.

Hansell crafted these bills after he sponsored a town hall meeting in Sherman County following the Substation Fire.  This wildfire, which was the largest in the United States at the time it was burning, consumed 80,000 acres of range and cropland, in Sherman and Wasco Counties.  Several state legislators were in attendance, and heard testimony at the town hall meeting, from farmers, first responders and fire officials.  These bills are a result of the testimony given at the meeting.

One of the bills, Senate Bill 311, would add 400,000 acres of currently unprotected land to the State Fire Marshall’s jurisdiction. In addition, Senate Bill 290 would grant civil immunity to a person who voluntarily fights a wildfire in good faith.

Senate Bills 291 and 292 would allocate more resources for air support and allow the Governor and the State Fire Marshall more flexibility in allocating statewide resources to fight wildfires.

The 2019 Legislative Session is scheduled to begin in Salem on January 22nd.


6. Delving Into the Words We Use

“We move toward, and become like, what we think about. Our present thoughts determine our future.” More wise words, this time from Lou Tice. Our thoughts form the foundation of our beliefs, and these beliefs are played out every day in the words we use, and in the behaviors we show to the world. These beliefs and behaviors are also reflected in our attitudes.

Now, an attitude is simply the way we lean. We either lean toward something (a positive attitude) or we lean away from something (a negative attitude). It’s something we want, or something we don’t want. The words we use to describe either of these situations reinforce our attitudes and by extension, our beliefs and our habits.

We also do and say a lot of things by habit, because habits make our lives easier. We don’t have to think about everything we do, every time we do it. Saves time, right? Saves energy, too. We don’t need to devote much brainpower to our habits and the brain loves that. The challenge comes when we don’t stop to really consider the effects our habitual words have on our attitudes.

Unfortunately, we don’t stop to think when we use “always” or “never” – situations that rarely exist, in reality. But our brains know what they mean, and we act accordingly. “Always” and “never” are exclusionary and are designed to divide and separate, even in mathematics. When they are used in society, one group inevitably suffers from the separation.

Over the next few weeks, let’s do a little research. As you are reading or watching the news, be aware of the use of “Always” and “Never.” As you listen to the speech-makers, whether in politics or elsewhere, listen carefully for the words being used. Ask yourself, “Is what I am hearing really the truth?” Becoming a skeptical listener leaves each of us stronger, smarter and wiser. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Cascade Singers Community Choir Welcomes New Members

Cascade Singers community choir welcomes new members for its spring season.  Work has begun for a choir festival in February and the annual St. Patrick’s Day concert.  A late spring concert will feature women composers.  The Singers meet under the direction of Miles Thoming-Gale Sundays from 7 to 9 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church, 10th and Union Streets, in The Dalles.  One-hour work sessions also happen Thursdays at 7 p.m. at First United Methodist Church.  Rehearsals are open to all interested singers.  For further information, contact the director at milesmansfield93@gmail.com.


8. Sherman County Emergency Services November/December Activity Report

emergencydial911red~Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

 

Sherman County Ambulance

December 2018 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
12-01 8:16 PM Breathing Problem Wasco
12-02 3:16 PM Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Grass Valley
12-02 6:21 PM Possible Stroke Moro
12-03 2:23 PM Chest Pain Linda’s Parking Lot in Biggs
12-03 2:55 PM Chest Pain Moro Fire Station
12-04 1:19 PM Overdose Moro
12-08 11:34 AM Lower Back Pain Rufus
12-08 5:51 PM Chest Pain Moro Fire Station
12-10 8:16 PM Difficulty Breathing Wasco
12-14 10:20 AM Medical Alert Activation Rufus
12-15 2:09 PM Sick Person Moro
12-15 2:59 PM Overdose Rufus
12-17 6:36 AM Unconscious Person Moro
12-17 8:16 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 112
12-18 6:48 AM Dizziness & Chest Pain Rufus
12-18 3:25 PM Chest Pain Sherman County Medical Clinic
12-19 12:01 AM Structure Fire Standby Biggs
12-22 6:54 AM Chest Pain Grass Valley
12-25 2:00 AM Stomach Pain Moro
12-26 8:55 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 30
12-26 9:18 AM Foot Pain Grass Valley
12-26 11:16 AM Woman with Anxiety Pilot Station in Biggs
12-26 7:18 PM Possible Fractured Leg Wasco
12-27 11:15 AM Fall Injury Rufus
12-28 11:45 AM Difficulty Breathing Rufus
12-31 6:22 PM Seizure Linda’s Truck Stop in Biggs
12-31 7:28 PM Possible Fractured Hip Wasco

 

Moro Fire Department

December 2018 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
12-18 12:07 AM Sign on fire Subway Restaurant in Biggs

 

North Sherman County RFPD

November 2018 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
11-09 4:05 AM Vehicle Fire US 97  MP# 12
11-16 6:47 PM Search Hwy 206  MP# 3
11-24 1:24 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 37
11-30 11:11 AM Medical Assist Rufus
11-30 10:38 PM Medical Assist Rufus

 North Sherman County RFPD

December 2018 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
12-10 8:24 PM Medical Assist Wasco
12-17 8:16 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 110
12-18 11:53 PM Sign on Fire Subway at Biggs
12-26 7:18 PM Medical Assist Wasco
12-28 1:54 PM Lift Assist Rufus RV Park
12-31 6:20 PM Medical Assist Linda’s at Biggs
12-31 7:22 PM Medical Assist Wasco

 

 

 

Sherman County eNews #6

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  3. Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 36, Number 1, 2018

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Events

  5. If You Can’t Say Something Nice…


 1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open SCHOOL Hours
8am-4pm Monday, Wednesday and Friday
8am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday
10am-4pm Saturday.

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

Movie Night at the Library – The Meg – Tuesday, January 8 at 6:00pm
After escaping an attack by what he claims was a 70-foot shark, Jonas Taylor must confront his fears to save those trapped in a sunken submersible.
Rated: PG-13
Run Time: 1hr 53min

YA Art Club
THURSDAY after school in the library.
Grades 6-12.
When it’s over, catch the 5:00 activity bus

January’s Book Club– Thursday, January 24th, at 6:00pm.
Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman.


2. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbBefore you go… Oregon TripCheck

Rural museums keep history alive

Oregon Encyclopedia: Camp Rufus

Umatilla’s Owl Man Is Bringing Burrowing Owls Back From The Brink

Opinion: ‘Fixing PERS is Job. 1 — and it’s doable’ 

Sen. Ron Wyden and Rep. Earl Blumenauer Introduce Nationwide Vote-by-Mail Bill

Book. The Bonanza King by Gregory Crouch

Book. Amelia Earhart: The Mystery Solved by Elgen Long (a grandson of Sherman County’s Starvation Point settlers)

How The American Republic Was Based On The Ancient Hebrew Republic


3. Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 36, Number 1, 2018

Volume 36 of Sherman County: For The Record landed in members’ mailboxes in December. It’s a Sherman County Historical Society publication dedicated to preserving local history in stories, records and photographs. Imagine… 36 years!

This volume features the John Day Dam and Sherman County on the 60th anniversary of the start of construction, relocation of highways, towns and railroads and the creation of Lake Umatilla.

Gladys Wesley, editor, compiled excerpts from the Sherman County Journal during the John Day Dam construction, 1958-1968, that are illustrated with 30 photographs contributed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and others.

Peggy Bird Allen, Cindy Kaseberg Brown, Linda Macnab Krafsic, Shirley Watkins Blaylock and Nancy Grogan Bailey answered the call for stories about families and change during that period. George Fox, Sr.’s story about the inundation by the John Day Dam pool of the hamlet of Early on the John Day River is reprinted from the February 13, 1968, Sherman County Journal. Jennifer Macnab contributed “City Mouse, Country Mouse.” These are illustrated by photographs contributed by the authors or from the Sherman County Historical Museum collection.

The traditional list of donors of memorial gifts and honorariums is published, as well, gifts received from November 1, 2017 through October 31, 2018, that demonstrate significant support of Society and Museum operations and programs. When the Society or Museum is suggested as a charitable organization in an obituary, a plaque with the name of the deceased is placed on the IN MEMORY OF wall in the Museum. Memorial gifts may be sent to the Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, Oregon 97039 with the names and addresses to which acknowledgement is to be sent.

A call for stories is included in the Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society news below.


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Events

Just a reminder of the January meeting and program on Saturday, January 12. Carolyn Purcell will be giving a lecture on preserving photos and documents. This free lecture will cover subjects of identifying different types of photo processes used throughout history and best practices for handling and storing them, as well as historical documents. The lecture begins at 10:30 in the downstairs classroom at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center.

Please email Georga Foster <georga.foster@gmail.com> if you plan to attend this lecture as space is limited and Carolyn would like to know how many are attending.

*********

newspaper-arrowThe Sherman County Historical Society is looking for historical stories to publish in their “For The Record” series. They have asked anyone that has family or historical event stories to please pass them on to them.  Please mail your stories to SCHS, P.O. Box 173, Moro, Oregon 97039 or contact Gladys Wesley, editor, at 541-565-3232.

**********

Don’t forget the beginners class for Genealogy February 9, 2019. The class will cover subjects as organization, family interview tips, forms to help you get started and other informative information. Class will begin at 10:30 in the downstairs classroom at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center.


5. If You Can’t Say Something Nice…

Disney’s animated features have long been known to teach important life lessons to children, from the consequences of jealousy and hatred by the Evil Queen in “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs,” to learning the value of humility over arrogance like Lightning McQueen did in “Cars,” and the true value of friendship as shown in the “Toy Story” series. And like all good children’s tales, most adults would benefit from revisiting these life lessons, from time to time.

One lesson in particular has never lost its timeliness, and perhaps applies more today than when it was first uttered on-screen in 1942. After being reprimanded by his mother, for laughing at the ungainly newborn Bambi, an embarrassed Thumper repeats what he had heard from his father just that morning: “If you can’t say somethin’ nice, don’t say nothin’ at all.”

Wise words used to teach our children how to play nicely in the sandbox with each other, with widespread application to the entire world today. Keep in mind that we humans are picture-oriented, and with newspapers and online sites publishing negative headlines in the largest font they can find, abusive “trolls” on social media sites, not to mention “false news” sites, it is no wonder that our minds see only the negative pictures. It is also no wonder that depression has been steadily on the rise, nearly everywhere.

Perhaps it is time to stop and choose our words more carefully. Perhaps it is time to hit our mental “Pause” button, before sending that negative email, text or post. Maybe, we need to give ourselves time to let the emotion of the moment subside, put the negative texts in our mental Draft Box and come back to them at a later time, when we have analyzed why we felt the need to write them.

And maybe, just maybe, we need to rinse our comments through “Thumper’s Law” (see above). Are our words helping or hurting? Are they constructive or destructive? Do they support a positive change or get fractured in the heat of the moment? Only you can answer these questions. ~The Pacific Institute