Sherman County eNews #229

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins 

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM, SEPT. 14. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the dinner/auction event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner and an amazing silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets (dinner/auction) $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th! 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

Thread-and-needleVOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065. 9/13

Participate in the process of your community and country.

One person can make a difference.

Take a stand.

Do something about it.

Look hard at your larger community

–it may need your specific participation.

–Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey 

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com.  If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13 

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

sign.forsale

FOR SALE:

LAWN MOWER. Husqvarna 23hp riding lawn mower with 48″ mower deck, only 47 hours and new battery. $1,000 or OBO. Contact: (541) 980-3406. 9/27 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/ 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information. 

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

sewing.machine.womanVOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

pencil.sharpYOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

arrow-rightSHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

THE TIMES-JOURNAL, September 5th, 2019: Athletic Schedules for regional schools, page 5. 

books.loveSEPTEMBER

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10 Sherman County Booster Club Annual Meeting 5:30 OSU Extension Office

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 4 The Dalles

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

24 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council Meeting 5:30 The Dalles

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

27 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 2

sports-volley-ballOCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center Benefit

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

31 HALLOWEEN


 

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Sherman County eNews #228

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services August Activity Report

  2. If you Feel Different, You Drive Different impaired driving campaign

  3. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Sept. 9

  4. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, Sept. 11

  5. Cascade Singers Begin Fall Season Rehearsals, Open to Interested Singers

  6. Walk on the Riverfront Trail under the Harvest Moon, Sept. 13

  7. Geology Trip to Central Oregon’s High Lava Plains, Sept. 14

  8. Shifting Your Perspective

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Emergency Services August Activity Report

~Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

Sherman County Ambulance

August 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
8-01 7:44 AM Unknown Illness Moro
8-01 4:38 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 114
8-02 12:56 AM Fall Wasco
8-04 5:01 PM Well person check Moro
8-06 9:46 AM Possible Stroke Wasco
8-06 11:04 AM Chest Pain Moro
8-11 9:32 PM Abdominal Pain Grass Valley
8-12 3:13 PM Motorcycle Crash US 97  MP#19
8-12 6:33 PM Fever Wasco
8-13 1:12 AM Possible Stroke Giles French Park
8-14 5:11 PM Welfare Check Wasco
8-15 11:37 AM Unconscious Patient Wasco
8-16 6:53 PM Welfare Check on Bicyclist US 97  MP# 43
8-17 12:46 AM Leg Pain Sinclair Station in Biggs
8-18 7:29 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I 84  MP# 108
8-18 8:35 PM Leg Laceration Rufus
8-20 9:44 AM Headache Rufus
8-20 12:05 PM Abdominal Pain Wasco
8-20 2:11 PM Fall Injury Pilot Station
8-20 6:45 PM Fever Wasco
8-21 1:45 PM Motor Cycle Crash US 97  MP#42
8-23 11:22 AM Breathing Problem Rufus
8-23 6:56 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 108
8-23 7:15 PM Bull Riding Standby Sherman County Fairgrounds
8-24 7:15 PM Demo Derby Standby Sherman County Fairgrounds
8-28 12:42 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Rufus
8-28 1:09 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover US 97  MP#32
8-28 4:00 PM Abdominal Pain Biggs
8-30 11:17 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 100
8-31 7:00 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 26

North Sherman County RFPD

August 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
8-01 4:38 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 114
8-06 4:41 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 103
8-12 6:33 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
8-18 7:28 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover I-84  MP# 108
8-18 8:37 PM Leg Laceration Rufus
8-20 12:13 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
8-20 2:14 PM Ambulance Assist Pilot in Biggs
8-20 6:53 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
8-23 3:12 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 100
8-23 6:56 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 110
8-28 4:13 PM Ambulance Assist Biggs
8-30 3:03 PM Grass Fire Rufus Landing Access Road

Moro Fire Department

August 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
8/06 4:39 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 103
8/12 3:19 PM Motor Cycle Crash US 97  MP#19  (Moro)
8/21 1:45 PM Motor Cycle Crash US 97  MP#42 (Kent)
8/30 3:08 PM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 109

2. If you Feel Different, You Drive Different impaired driving campaign

Hopefully you have noticed the signs around the county and were aware of the DUI Prevention Walk on Aug. 24th.  ODOT, Sherman County Prevention and Sherman County Sherriff’s Office have joined together to promote the reduction and elimination of alcohol and drug impaired driving in Sherman County.  The “If you Feel Different, You Drive Different” is a national campaign through the U.S. Department of Transportation.

There are 91 yard signs in support of the campaign displayed around the county.  There are still 9 yard signs available at the Prevention Office at the Court House if you would like to put one up.  The campaign will be in effect until September 16 when signs will be picked up by Amy Asher.  If you need or want to drop your sign off at the Prevention Office before that, please feel free.


3. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Sept. 9

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, September, 9 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library. See the agenda here: https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/meeting-agendas.html.


4. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, Sept. 11

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on September 11th, 2019 at 6pm. The public is welcome to attend! (903 Barnett St.).


5. Cascade Singers Begin Fall Season Rehearsals, Open to Interested Singers

Cascade Singers community choir is beginning its fall season.  The Singers meet under the direction of Miles Thoming-Gale Sundays from 7 to 8:45 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church, 10th and Union Streets, in The Dalles.  One-hour work sessions also happen Thursdays at 7 p.m. at First United Methodist Church.  The fall project is preparation for a holiday concert in December.  Rehearsals are open to all interested singers.  The choir often appears at community events, with formal concerts at Christmas, St. Patrick’s Day, and late spring.  For further information, contact the director at milesmansfield93@gmail.com.


6. Walk on the Riverfront Trail under the Harvest Moon, Sept. 13

Take a walk under the Harvest Moon on the Riverfront Trail on September 13, 2019. Meet at 6:45 p.m. for a one hour guided interpretive nature walk at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum in The Dalles. This is a free event. For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201 or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


7. Geology Trip to Central Oregon’s High Lava Plains, Sept. 14

Explore Central Oregon’s active High Lava Plains on a full-day geology field trip Saturday, September 14, 2019. Led by geology professor Steve Carlson, participants will learn the story of the area’s geological past. The $50 fee per person includes a boxed lunch and water. For tickets or information, phone (541) 296-8600 x 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


8. Shifting Your Perspective

Do you ever wish you could predict your future? Now, we are not talking about using tea leaves or cards, or calling a toll-free number and talking to someone claiming to be a psychic. What we are talking about is much more accurate and reliable.

If you want to know what your future is going to be like, do not waste your time looking into a crystal ball. Instead, take a look at your present thoughts. You see, your present thoughts determine your future. What you are thinking about today is going to show up in a future tomorrow.

And, if you want to see your belief system, which is just a collection of thoughts you accept as true, take a look at your life. Your life is your beliefs, made into reality.

For instance, if you believe there is never enough, that life is a struggle, that you have to fight for what you get, then you will never have enough. You will struggle and fight your way through life. You wind up exhausted at the end of every day.

If you believe there is no limit to what you can do, and adversity just makes you stronger, then your life will be one of achievement and resiliency. Understand that what you see in life depends mainly on what you look for. This means that everything you see, everything you do, everything you hear and think and wonder about is filtered through your belief system.

So, if you want to shape your future into a happy, productive, fulfilling time, eliminate negative thoughts about what you don’t want, in favor of positive ones about what you do want. It’s all about shifting your perspective – that single most important variable in any task, mission, or philosophy – and watching the effect ripple out into everything you do. ~The Pacific Institute


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

birdHappyOwlLike Humans and Apes, Ravens Have the Foresight to Save Up for the Future

New exhibit at zoo highlights Mid-Columbia lamprey recovery efforts

Chart Showing How The UK Generates & Uses Electricity In 2019

Representative Greg Walden, 2nd District of Oregon

Oregon Heritage


 

Sherman County eNews #227

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Parent Teacher Organization Meeting, Sept. 12

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

  3. Weather: September outlook and the August Monthly Climate Summary

  4. Sherman County: For The Record, 37 Years

  5. Home Inventory Week: Tasks to Save Time, Money & Stress After Disaster

  6. Goals and Passions

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Aristotle: “Courage is the first of human qualities because it is the quality which guarantees the others.”


1. Sherman Parent Teacher Organization Meeting, Sept. 12

Sherman PTO Planning Meeting will be Thursday, September 12 at 6pm in the Sherman County Library Program Room. A copy of the agenda can be found on the Sherman School District’s webpage https://sjshs.weebly.com/pto.html.


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday September 3 @ the Moro Presbyterian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


3. Weather: September outlook and the August Monthly Climate Summary

sun.circleYou can find the September outlook and the August monthly climate summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

~Marilyn Lohmann, National Weather Service Pendleton  541-276-7832


4. Sherman County: For The Record, 37 Years

pen.markerVolume 37, Number 1, 2019, begins the 37th year of twice-yearly publication of this historical anthology by the Sherman County Historical Society. It’s a remarkable achievement made possible by volunteers… the editors, proofreaders and authors! The current editorial team, Gladys Wesley, Lowell Smith, Sheri Carlson and Janet Pinkerton, call for your stories, photographs and records for the next issues.

The Society’s mission is to gather, preserve, research, interpret, exhibit and publish materials related to the history of Sherman County. Your story and photographs contribute to the mission! It’s about us, all of us, in this place.

This issue comprises a variety of topics generously illustrated with photographs: Fire Destroys Elevator: Farmers Elevator Company Has Large Fire Loss at Moro, Sherman County Observer 1927; Kaseberg Cousins: The Journey from Germany to Oregon, An Oregon Trail Story by Augusta Kaseberg Copeland, with Alice Kaseberg and Sherry Woods Kaseberg; Township and Range System; The Morse Family: Mt. Hood Climb, the Columbia Southern Railroad Survey and a Photograph by Alice Kaseberg; Helen White Bruckert by Sherry Kaseberg; Grass Valley High School Class of 1942 Update by Grace M. Zevely Busse; Early Days Recalled by Former County Resident by W.E. Parry, Sherman County Journal 1965; James O. Elrod and Lawrence K. Moore by Gladys Wesley; A Crop Year’s Cycle Described by Sherman County Poet Farmer, H.B. Belshee, Sherman County Observer, 1925; and Memorial Gifts and Honorariums.

More information will be found here https://www.shermanmuseum.org/publications-for-the-record and here http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/.


5. Home Inventory Week: Tasks to Save Time, Money & Stress After Disaster

~Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services
(Salem) – Lightning storms lit up the night skies sparking new wildfires, and a 6.3 magnitude earthquake shook the ground in Oregon right before National Disaster Preparedness Month. These stern warnings make it critical for Oregonians to get prepared for both natural and human-caused disasters.

September is National Preparedness Month, and it is kicked-off by Home Inventory Week. To recognize this often overlooked part of disaster preparation, the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation encourages all Oregonians to do two simple tasks that will save time, money, and stress when disaster strikes:

  1. Build a home inventory – Take video or photos of each room in your home, paying close attention to walls, drawers, closets, and storage areas. Recalling your personal property is a daunting task following a disaster. A home inventory eases the post-disaster stress, and enables your insurance company to move forward with processing your claim.
  2. Review your insurance coverage – Take time to discuss your policies with your insurance company or agent. Make sure you have the right coverage and know what to expect when you file a claim for disasters such as fire, earthquake, flood, tornado, theft, and ice storms.

“Recent wildfires and earthquakes reminds us how important it is for every Oregonians to build a home inventory and make sure they have the right insurance coverage to protect their families,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “These projects are easy to do and now is the time to add these money-saving, stress-reducing tasks to your to-do list.”

Oregonians are encouraged to visit dfr.oregon.gov/preparenow for videos, apps, and resources to help complete these simple tasks. The site also provides social media tools to help residents share their experience and encourage their families, friends, and neighbors to get prepared as well.

The division has joined several state and county agencies in a month long effort to help Oregonians get prepared for both natural and human-caused disaster. Follow the conversation on social media using these hashtags: #2WeeksReady, #NatlPrep. #PrepareNow.


6. Goals and Passions

Today let’s talk about the best advice you will ever get on how to become financially, as well as mentally, wealthy. It is a true story that should interest you if you would like to earn a lot of money or even if you just want to enjoy lots of success.

Some time ago, a random sample of 1500 graduating college seniors were surveyed to find out what they would base their career choice on. 83 percent said that financial gain was the first thing they would base their career choice on and following their dream, or their passion, would come second. Seven percent said that following their dream would be first and financial gain second.

In a follow-up study on actual net worth 20 years later, what do you think they found? Well, 101 of the 1,500 had become millionaires. But only one of those millionaires had come from the group that put financial gain first, while one hundred of them came from the group that followed their dreams.

Of course, this study doesn’t “prove” anything. Its objective was simply to give us information about ourselves. The point is that a path with heart, and a goal with passion driving it, is incredibly powerful. People who do great things have, above everything else, a purpose that stirs their soul, that gives life meaning. How does that saying go? “Do what you love and you will never work a day in your life.” If it’s something you love, it’s not work. It is a life-fulfilling joy!

So, follow your dream. Do what you love and what gives you joy, and do it with your whole heart. And if what you love and dream is also a contribution to the betterment of the world around you, so much the better!

If this survey is any indication, this might be the way to become a millionaire, if that is what we truly want. But more so, it is also the way to become mentally wealthy, because following our passions will make us happy, the very essence of our personal well-being.

So, how will you mix your goals and your passions? ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbKayak at One of Oregon’s Most Remote State Parks

New plan targets salmon-eating sea lions in Columbia River

BPA Balancing Authority Load and Total Wind, Hydro, Fossil/Biomass, and Nuclear Generation, Near-Real-Time

East Oregonian

Merriam-Webster Definition of woke   chiefly US slang  aware of and actively attentive to important facts and issues (especially issues of racial and social justice)

Oregon Travel Impacts Statewide Estimates 1992 – 2018 Sherman Co. p.169

WWII’s start marked in Poland with German remorse, warning

Global Warming Natural Cycle

Pew Research Center Polling Methods


 

Sherman County eNews #226

CONTENTS

  1. Today is Labor Day

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

  3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

  4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  5. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

  6. There always remains an opportunity to make a new start.


1. Today is Labor Day

Today is Labor Day, and that means the unofficial end of summer on a day of celebration of the American worker. The holiday originated in the late 19th century and was born of the labor movement, though many Americans, led by President Grover Cleveland, pushed for and secured a September date to distinguish it from the socialist/communist “International Workers Day,” or “May Day,” on May 1. Labor Day was made an official federal holiday in 1894. ~The Patriot Post


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday September 3 @ the Moro Presbyterian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

dollars.coinsSherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms will be available September 3, 2019, for projects and/or programs in Sherman County. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

  • A brief description of your project.
    • State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
    • Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

dollars.coinsThe 2019 Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 3, 2019. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


5. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

m_returnThe Sherman County Historical Society invites you to the first annual Night at the Museum benefit dinner and auction. On September 14th, the Society will showcase local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the dinner event. VIP tickets are $50.

Dinner and auction tickets are $35, and may be purchased at the museum or from event committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. All ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and improvements.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors.

If you wish to contribute to the auction, we will be over-the-top grateful! Please call 541-565-3232, or deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th~Sherman County Historical Society Trustees and Event Committee

Prohibition History Tidbit: 100 years ago, in 1919, the United States of America was going through an identity crisis. The 18th Amendment, which forbade the making, selling or transportation of “intoxicating liquors,” was ratified on Jan. 16, 1919, and took effect a year later. Politicians voted to enact Prohibition as a “noble experiment” to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve Americans’ health, according to an analysis by the Cato Institute, which characterized the effort as a “miserable failure on all counts.” The amendment was championed by the temperance movement, which mainly was supported by women who saw alcohol as a destroyer of families. They carried signs saying, “Lips that touch liquor shall not touch ours,” according to the National Archives.


6. There always remains an opportunity to make a new start.

Though it may not seem so when you first encounter a serious blow, you can never lose two of the most important assets you have. These are the power of your mind and your freedom to use it. Once you have turned them to understanding what laid you low, you can begin forming new plans. You may not have the money you once had; you may lack the allies you had cultivated. But you still have the benefit of a universe that eventually rewards honest effort, as well as gaining the experience of mistakes you will never make again. Remember, no matter where you are now, whatever you can conceive and believe, you can achieve. ~Napoleon Hill Foundation


 

Sherman County eNews #225

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion, Sept. 21

  2. Oregon Arts Watch: Maryhill’s Exquisite Gorge Woodcut Print

  3. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

  4. OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Schools in 1919

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


1. Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion, Sept. 21

Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion

at CASA EL MIRADOR, 1424 W 2nd Street, The Dalles, Oregon

September 21, 2019

No Host Cocktails 5:30 pm

Dinner to Follow

$36.00 per person

Please remit by September 1, 2019

Payable to:

Sharon Spencer

66902 Hwy 97

Moro, OR 97039.

Questions:

Alison Yamauchi 501-258-7299

Rooms Available at:

The Dalles Inn 541-206-9107

Cousins 541-298-5161

Fairfield Inn & Suites 855-297-1429

Various Senior, AARP or AAA discounts are available on above properties.

Other hotels may be searched via Google.


2. Oregon Arts Watch: Maryhill’s Exquisite Gorge Woodcut Print 

On a bright & shining Saturday, it all came together: Maryhill Museum’s audacious, 66-foot long print project went to press via steam roller.

AUGUST 28, 2019 // ARTSWATCH FOCUSCULTUREFEATUREDVISUAL ART // FRIDERIKE HEUER

THE EXQUISITE GORGE PROJECT

“…a collaborative printmaking project featuring 11 artists working with communities along a 220-mile stretch of the Columbia River from the Willamette River confluence to the Snake River confluence to create a massive 66-foot steamrolled print. The unique project takes inspiration from the Surrealist art practice known as exquisite corpse. In the most well-known exquisite corpse drawing game, participants took turns creating sections of a body on a piece of paper folded to hide each successive contribution. When unfolded, the whole body is revealed. In the case of The Exquisite Gorge Project, the Columbia River will become the ‘body’ that unifies the collaboration between artists and communities, revealing a flowing 66-foot work that tells 10 conceptual stories of the Columbia River and its people.”  – Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at Maryhill Museum

See story and pictures at https://www.orartswatch.org/exquisite-gorge-11-its-a-print/?fbclid=IwAR00jEm6wWJXr6McpNbL5hJYmtHrw4pq51fmeKsxNZuI7R9i4A3kRSn0SQI


3. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday September 3 @ the Moro Presbyterian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


4. OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts

Oregon.Flat.pole(1)Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, when met with an actual or potential conflict of interest, a public official shall:

(a)If the public official is a member of the Legislative Assembly, announce publicly, pursuant to rules of the house of which the public official is a member, the nature of the conflict before taking any action thereon in the capacity of a public official.

(b)If the public official is a judge, remove the judge from the case giving rise to the conflict or advise the parties of the nature of the conflict.

(c)If the public official is any other appointed official subject to this chapter, notify in writing the person who appointed the public official to office of the nature of the conflict, and request that the appointing authority dispose of the matter giving rise to the conflict. Upon receipt of the request, the appointing authority shall designate within a reasonable time an alternate to dispose of the matter, or shall direct the official to dispose of the matter in a manner specified by the appointing authority.

(2)An elected public official, other than a member of the Legislative Assembly, or an appointed public official serving on a board or commission, shall:

(a)When met with a potential conflict of interest, announce publicly the nature of the potential conflict prior to taking any action thereon in the capacity of a public official; or

(b)When met with an actual conflict of interest, announce publicly the nature of the actual conflict and:

(A)Except as provided in subparagraph (B) of this paragraph, refrain from participating as a public official in any discussion or debate on the issue out of which the actual conflict arises or from voting on the issue.

(B)If any public official’s vote is necessary to meet a requirement of a minimum number of votes to take official action, be eligible to vote, but not to participate as a public official in any discussion or debate on the issue out of which the actual conflict arises.

(3)Nothing in subsection (1) or (2) of this section requires any public official to announce a conflict of interest more than once on the occasion which the matter out of which the conflict arises is discussed or debated.

(4)Nothing in this section authorizes a public official to vote if the official is otherwise prohibited from doing so. [1974 c.72 §10; 1975 c.543 §7; 1987 c.566 §15; 1993 c.743 §15]


5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Schools in 1919

books4Some 1919 School Statistics of Sherman County

    54 teachers employed in county

    27 teachers in rural schools

    27 teachers in town schools

    10 teachers in Wasco

    9 teachers in Moro

    8 teachers in Grass Valley

    4 teachers in Kent

    30 school districts in county

    26 rural districts

    4 high school districts

    1 school pays $65 for teacher

    8 schools pay $75

    5 schools pay $80

    7 rural schools pay $90

    5 teachers in town schools get $85

    3 teachers in town schools get $90

    4 teachers in town schools get $95

    7 teachers in town schools get $100

    $81.96 average monthly wage for rural teachers

    $93.75 average monthly wage for town grade teachers

    $100 lowest wage paid for high school teachers in county

    1118 boys and girls in county between ages of 4 and 20

    535 pupils enrolled in town schools

    384 pupils enrolled in rural schools

    919 total enrollment in county for 1918-1919

    192 pupils enrolled in Wasco

    139 pupils enrolled in Moro

    114 pupils enrolled in Grass Valley

    90 pupils enrolled in Kent

    54 high school pupils in Wasco

    49 high school pupils in Moro

    23 high school pupils in Grass Valley

    13 high school pupils in Kent

    140 high school pupils in county

    33 in 8th grade rural schools

    60 in 8th grade town schools

    93 total enrollment in 8th grade.

Source: Grass Valley Journal, February 28, 1919


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Free New Oregon State Map

Oregon has more than a dozen license plates

OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts


 

Sherman County eNews #224

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Booster Club Annual Meeting, Sept. 10

  2. Sherman County Court Session, September 4

  3. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee Meeting, Sept. 10

  4. It’s all about the Numbers: BLM Releases Annual Almanac

  5. Sherman County History Tidbit: The Teacher in an E. Oregon Rural District

  6. Self-Worth and Behavior

  7. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


We should be unfaithful to ourselves if we should ever lose sight of the danger to our liberties if anything partial or extraneous should infect the purity of our free, fair, virtuous, and independent elections. —John Adams (1797)


1. Sherman County School Booster Club Annual Meeting, Sept. 10

The Sherman County School Booster Club annual meeting will take place on September 10 at 5:30 p.m. at OSU Ext office, Burnet Building in Moro.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, September 4

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 4th, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Cindy Brown, OSU Extension vehicle; Debbie Hayden, Finance Director, PERS; Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents; Sherman County Public/School Library window replacement; Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facilities Inspection; Biggs Motel Property; Gorge Networks IGA; Consent Agenda; and Commissioners’ Reports.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Notice. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee Meeting, Sept. 10

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be holding a meeting on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 3:00PM. Meeting will be held at North Central Public Health District located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


4. It’s all about the Numbers: BLM Releases Annual Almanac

compass3Portland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon and Washington is proud to announce the release of the latest BLM Facts, our annual illustrated almanac answering the diverse and detailed questions one may have about public lands in the Pacific Northwest.

BLM Facts has lots of numbers, and those figures do tell a story. In most cases, your public lands are located within an hour’s drive from where you live or work. You can find an amazing array of resources and opportunities at almost any site you visit.

This 2018 report has the latest BLM news and updates – from wild and scenic rivers and exciting recreation sites to wildlife, cultural, and archaeological programs. BLM Facts also shares information about management plans for minerals and energy, forestry, mining, wild horses, and much more.

In addition to maintaining our commitment to delivering an updated volume every year, we continue to make improvements such as full-color maps, photos, and a plethora of timely, user-friendly data. You can read it online at:

www.blm.gov/sites/blm.gov/files/documents/files/orwa-blmfacts-2018.pdf

You can also swing on by your local BLM Office to pick up your copy of BLM Facts: www.blm.gov/contact/oregon-washington

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


5. Sherman County History Tidbit: The Teacher in an E. Oregon Rural District

arrow-rightThe Teacher in an Eastern Oregon Rural District

By Miss Grace L. May  [later Mrs. Zevely]

Read at Class State Normal, Monmouth.

Source: Sherman County Observer, September 1, 1916

The rural school problem is becoming greater every year. Since it is one of the many problems that must be faced we should begin to consider the responsibility at once.

The main feature in an eastern Oregon rural community is the loneliness and the lack of co-operation and enjoyment of neighborhood life. The farm homes are usually from two to five miles apart. Almost their only connection is the country telephone, which is, indeed, a godsend when not over used.

I think the farmers themselves have the better time of it, for the discussions of crops and current events at the post office are often of more value than might be imagined. Since it is much more difficult for the farmer’s wife to leave her duties, she quite often leads a life of drudgery and loneliness. Then, too, there is so much to be done that she seldom has time for good reading if she happens to be lucky enough to have good books or magazines in her home.

Many families become so accustomed to the lack of ready money and the habit of eternally saving that they seldom venture from home for so much as a short vacation trip. The owning of automobiles is fast lessening many such difficulties but there are many families for whom a car is only a dream. Even so, automobiles are not necessity and people can be interested in their homes and in their community without automobiles.

The grave need of better trained persevering teachers is evident, but the average trained teacher dislikes to take a rural school for even one year. This is by no means a wonder for all know that a country school is generally a hard proposition and very often an extremely lonely one.

At this point comes the need for change and improvement. We sometimes wonder how one teacher can manage eight grades, be a social leader and exert some of the other influences that a rural teacher is supposed to have. Here is where some of the funds that the country district must have could be used to advantage.

We hear much about the farmer being the mainstay in the nation and we are coming to realize that this is true. Rural credit systems and improved farming methods are doing much to make the farmer more independent, but the farmer would be greatly helped if more attention were given the schools. True, many wonderful changes have been brought about in the last ten years, but year before last the rural school enrolled over half of all the pupils in the United States and sixty per cent of these were in one room buildings. The startling fact is, that at the same time the nation was spending three times as much to educate the city boy as the country boy.

Of course this isn’t fair to the country child, nor is it fair to the country teacher. The need for trained teachers would be more easily met if consolidation and more co-operative work were made possible. I know of a community in eastern Oregon where there is a good two-room school building next the railroad. This school has a large enrollment and often more grades than one teacher can well handle. Four miles on each side there are small one-room buildings, poorly built and equipped and poorly attended. Co-operation of the three districts has been suggested but as yet no action has been taken. Three $60 salaries are now being paid to untrained teachers, where the same money would hire two competent teachers who could give more by their combined efforts than the three. Consolidation is not practical in some country districts, but in others it is and one of the responsibilities of the present teachers is to encourage the idea.

As it is, the trained teacher who goes to the rural districts should have many ideals for her school. Only of late have we heard anything of the advantages for work offered in the country districts. Of course work is plentiful in the city and work is what we want, but what about the enjoyment of the reward offered: “Teaching demands that you shall give — give yourself — and he who gives most receives most.” Because of the many channels for a teacher’s effort I believe the country is the best place to see comparatively quick results.

The work of the rural teacher is indeed varied but in a broad sense of the term it may all be classed as social work. Her leadership, her educational work and all the influences she has on a community affect its social system in some way.

Great, indeed, must be the reward of a teacher when he knows that even one person has been strongly influenced for good through his efforts. What a God-given work is that of the rural teacher! In her hands, I believe, as much as in any other lies the welfare of the nation.


6. Self-Worth and Behavior

Whether you are raising kids or trying to improve your own self-esteem, the relationship between who you are and what you do is important. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, or simply trying to build your own self-esteem, it is important to realize that we need to separate our sense of self-worth from our behavior.

Imagine this scene: A three-year-old asks repeatedly, “Mama, do you love me?” Each time, Mom answers, “Of course I do.” Then the child takes her hand and leads her to a broken vase or shattered toy and looks at Mother questioningly.

Here is a little child, on this earth only three short years, already asking one of the most profound psychological questions any of us can ask: “Is my ability to be loved tied to what I do? Am I the same as my behavior?” The answer for most of us, no matter how old we are, should be the same, “No, indeed!”

The importance of this point cannot be overemphasized. To increase self-worth, it is vital that we respond to behavior while remaining friendly and respectful toward the person. This means that when a child misbehaves, we should not call him a “bad boy.” And when a child does what we want her to, we should not say, “What a good girl!” In either instance, we want to comment on the behavior – with celebration of something done well, or a clear “next time” picture to change the negative behavior – and hug the child.

Psychologists, psychiatrists, therapists are likely to disagree with at least part of this premise, when it comes to those with out of control mental illnesses – those classified as clinical sociopaths and psychopaths, and those with other mental disorders. And they are correct to disagree. But for the majority of people, we want to make sure that the self-worth is in line with positive, contributive behaviors, and not vice versa.

One other caveat for adults: While we are not simply what we do, our actions are a reflection of what we think. So, if the actions you see yourself taking do not line up with the person you think you are, then perhaps it’s time for some much-needed self-reflection. Step outside yourself and look at what you do and how you act. If it is not what you’d like to see, you do have the power to change. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.pole~Created: 29 August 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

6,607: People whose personal information was exposed in a phishing attack at the Oregon Judicial Department last month, the judicial department said this week.

6.3: Magnitude earthquake that struck off the southwest Oregon coast, according to CNN.

3.4: Miles deep the earthquake occurred.

$1.6 billion: “Kicker” tax rebate that Oregonians will receive next year, according to The Oregonian.

$1.4 billion: Amount state economists predicted the size of next year’s rebate would be several months ago.

39: Age of Jessi Combs, who died Tuesday, Aug. 27 in Southeast Oregon’s Alvord Desert trying to break a land speed record in a “supersonic vehicle made from the fuselage of a jet plane,” according to NBC News.

546: Height, in feet, of the Wells Fargo building in Portland. The tallest skyscraper in the state, it was closed Thursday due to flooding.

14: Oregon counties that have not recovered the jobs lost during the Great Recession, according to Willamette Week, citing Oregon Center for Public Policy data. They are Baker, Crook, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Klamath, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Umatilla and Union counties.

1894: Year the heat record for Astoria, Oregon on Tuesday, Aug. 27 was set, at 88 degrees Fahrenheit.

91: Tuesday’s high temperature in Astoria, breaking the 125-year-old record, according to The Oregonian.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbInteresting Map Showing The Importance of Canada-USA Trade By State/Province

Which Country Would You Like To Live In (Besides Your Own)?

Judicial Watch: Majority of Federal Arrestees are Foreigners, Thousands of “Unknown Citizenship”

Rediscovering the Wisdom in American History

Video. A Day Without Oil

Video. Life Without Oil

Public Can Comment On Killing Sea Lions In The Columbia River

Urban/rural divide puts lawmakers at loggerheads

After Washington State Ban, Oregon Becomes the Last West Coast State Where Consumers Can Buy CBD-Infused Food and Beverages

JustSecurity: Expert Summaries of Mueller Report: A Collection

Everything You Know About the Civil War is Wrong


 

Sherman County eNews #223

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES: 

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

ThankYou1

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! Bryan, Forest, Scott and Kari Peters would like to thank all who helped with wheat harvest this year while Bryan was recovering.  We hope we didn’t forget anyone, if so, we apologize.  Thank you very much to:  Rick Jauken, Taner Elliot, Garrett Peters, Justin Miller, Nate Smith, Charlie Miller, Ryder Smith, Colton Shull, Ryan Thompson, LP McClennan, Max McClennan, Colton Kock, Cody Jauken, Sarah Bibby, Jeff Kaser, Amy Mcnamee, Gary Shull, Dee Richelderfer, Don Hilderbrand, Josh Hilderbrand, Rory Wilson, Travis and Michelle Lawrence.  It was amazing to have so many people come to help and offer to help. We really appreciate all the support from this awesome community! 

THANK YOU, CATHY BROWN & JAMIE WILSON!  The Sherman County Senior & Community Center extends a special thank you to Cathy Brown and Jamie Wilson of WB Ranch for their generous donation of beef. We received 380 pounds of local beef, and only had to pay the cut, wrap and kill fee, which allows us to serve good quality local beef to our seniors over the next year. Thank you so much for your generosity and your donation to the community!  ~Kari Pinkerton Silcox, Sherman County Senior Center, PO Box 352, Moro, OR 97039 | 541-565-3191 | kari@shermancounty.net

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th! 

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

VOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com.  If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13 

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE: 

LAWN MOWER. Husqvarna 23hp riding lawn mower with 48″ mower deck, only 47 hours and new battery. $1,000 or OBO. Contact: (541) 980-3406. 9/27 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE: 

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

WHEELCHAIR. I would like to borrow a wheelchair with leg rests that can be elevated. That way I could take mom out for some fresh air. She has to keep her right leg straight not bent so it needs to support it. 541-325-2993. Thanks. Leta Ann Reckmann. 9/27

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

LogoShermanCoSchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

AUGUST

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Deadline Sherman County Resident Incentive Application

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon

food.sack1SEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

2 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

3 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

24 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council Meeting 5:30 The Dalles

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

27 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 2 

sport-football-whistleOCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

31 HALLOWEEN