Sherman County eNews #276

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Indescribably Describable

church.family1Last month I spent three days with a number of pastors at a prayer summit. The theme for our prayer this year was the attributes of our indescribable God. These two terms “attribute” and “indescribable” don’t seem like they belong together, but in them being knit together we find incredible hope. An attribute is a quality or characteristic of someone that is integral to who that person is. In that sense, it is an “about them” that we can use words to describe one to another. But when we think of God and Him being indescribable or inexpressible, we think of Him being infinite in every way and fully beyond description.

The absolutely amazing thing about God is that while being infinitely beyond all that we can describe or imagine He also has revealed Himself or made Himself known and knowable to us. While there are things about Him that we do not share such as His eternality which describes Him as existing outside of time and the creator of even time itself, there are other things qualities of Him that He has allowed us to enter into. Our God who describes Himself as the “I Am” or the eternal one created us into time and He knows absolutely every aspect of everything that has, is and will happen in our time. There is nothing about us that is not known to Him and over which He is not in control. He knows the depths of our sin and is perfectly just. But we also know at the same time that He is good, just, gracious and merciful, and He has allowed man to experience on our human scale these things so that we might also appreciate even more those things about Him and worship Him in response.

“But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Romans 5:8)

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Grass Valley Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

pencil.spiraleNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. No posters or flyers.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.  We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM. Christmas shopping at The Museum Store and Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day displays December 7 10-3. No admission fee. Brand new items just for the Christmas Sale plus all your year-round favorites. 10% Discount for Sherman County Historical Society members. Got a history buff on your list? MUSEUM MEMBERSHIPS MAKE GREAT GIFTS!

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 on December 7th at the Grass Valley Pavilion. 

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

sign.helpwanted

EMPLOYMENT:

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039. Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year. Posting. Sherman County School is seeking a Temporary .94 FTE highly qualified Instructional Assistant candidate with preferred previous experience working in an educational setting. The successful candidate will work under the direct supervision of the school administration to support activities as assigned.  This position will start on or close to November 12.  This is a temporary position for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500. Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district), resume, and letters of recommendation if you are interested in the position to: Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039, (541) 565-3500 wowens@sherman.k12.or.us  This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $21-$28/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us under “Jobs/contracts”. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, 500 Court Street, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 no later than Tuesday, November 12, 2019 by 5:00 pm. Interviews will be held Friday, November 15, 2019. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 11/8

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid-Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter. OFFICE: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

KITCHEN AID MIXER. Kitchen Aid Professional Mixer KP2671X  6 Qt 525 watt. includes Burnished Flat Beater, Burnished Dough Hook and Professional Wire Whip. Used 4X asking $200 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27

DEHYDRATOR, JERKY MAKER. New still in the box never opened, Nesco Dehydrator & Jerky Maker FD-60 with 4 trays. asking $45 / best bid. Call 541-442-8572 Nancy 12/27

POSTERS. SHERMAN COUNTY EDUCATION TIMELINE. The 150 years of Sherman County Education; One-Room Schools to One Campus Timeline was dedicated on 10/19/19. The timeline will hang permanently in the school outside the cafeteria. Posters of this timeline are available for purchase. The posters are 16 x 36 and are $30/poster.  There are only seven left.  You may purchase them by calling the Sherman School 541-565-3500 and asking for Kim McKinney. 11/8

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND: 

FOUND:

WIG. Halloween wig. Location found- Grass Valley. Call or Text Jeanne at 541-714-5740 to identify and claim.

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

LogoShermanCoSchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

NOVEMBER

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

9 Military Displays Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, Hood River

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

11 VETERANS’ DAY

11 Veterans Day Chimes 11 Maryhill Museum

11 Veterans Appreciation Dinner, Turkey Bingo 5 Wasco School Event Center

11 Veterans Day Open Mic Town Hall 6-8 Sherman Public/School Library

11 Veterans Day Dinner Free for Veterans – Goldendale American Legion

12 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 6 Public/School Library

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting 6

13-16 Tri-State Grain Convention, Spokane

15-17 Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Portland

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

17 Antelope Community Harvest Dinner 2-4 Antelope Community Center

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

21-23 Oregon Cattleman’s Association Convention, Bend

23 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Thanksgiving Dinner 5

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

snowflakeDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

7 Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store 10-3 Moro

7-8 Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas”

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council Board Meeting 8

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10-12 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention, Gleneden Beach

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

snowflake4JANUARY

2 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

7 Moro City Council 7

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman Senior Center Advisory 12:30

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

11-13 Columbia River Circuit Rodeo Finals, Yakima, Washington


 

Sherman County eNews #276

CONTENTS

  1. Veterans Day Dinner Free to all Veterans and Spouses, Nov. 11

  2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Nov. 20 Session Canceled

  3. Public Notice. Approved Minutes of Sherman County Court Oct. 16 Session Online

  4. PGE Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Earns Workplace Safety Recognition

  5. Defining Your Values

  6. Farmers encouraged to “Keep the Stubble” during No-Till November

  7. Sherman County Ambulance October Activity Report Corrected


There are those whose lives affect all others around them, quietly touching one heart, who in turn, touches another, reaching out to ends further than they would ever know. ~William Bradfield


1. Veterans Day Dinner Free to all Veterans and Spouses, Nov. 11

Monday, November 11th

Prime Rib Dinner

FREE to All Veterans and Spouses

American flag1

Brought to you by Goldendale American Legion

Louis Leidl Post 116

** FIRST DINNER served 4:00 to 5:15 PM

Advanced Tickets Required

Tickets are available at the Legion – must have current

membership card or DD214 to pick up a ticket in advance.

Tickets available November 1st.

Limit of 100 tickets ~ first come first served.

** SECOND DINNER served 6:00 to 7:30 PM

Let’s support the Goldendale Food Bank.

Thanksgiving and Christmas are just around the corner.

Please bring a can of food.

Thank you!

P.S. Sherman County Veterans and Spouses are welcome!


2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Nov. 20 Session Canceled

Due to scheduling conflicts, the November 20, 2019, Sherman County Court Regular Session has been canceled. The next regularly scheduled session will be held, December 4, 2019.


3. Public Notice. Approved Minutes of Sherman County Court Oct. 16 Session Online

Approved minutes of the October 16, 2019 Regular Session, are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/

~Kristi Brown

Sherman County Court

Deputy Clerk/Temporary Administrative Assistant

500 Court Street

PO Box 365

Moro, OR 97039


4. PGE Biglow Canyon Wind Farm Earns Workplace Safety Recognition

(Salem) – Portland General Electric Co.’s Biglow Canyon wind farm has graduated from Oregon OSHA’s Safety and Health Achievement Recognition Program (SHARP), a significant milestone in growth and commitment to worker safety.

SHARP coaches companies on how to effectively manage workplace safety and health. It empowers employers to continuously improve. In turn, companies are recognized for their success in reaching specific benchmarks. An employer becomes a graduate when it completes five years of SHARP.

During its SHARP journey, Biglow Canyon – which encompasses 217 wind turbines covering 25,000 acres outside of Wasco – tackled a variety of safety improvements. Those included installing deflector plates to protect workers from permanent obstructions or clearance issues as they move up and down ladders inside wind towers; standardizing safety and health procedures across facilities; and setting up TV monitors to display safety trending reports.

In assessing Biglow Canyon’s safety culture, Oregon OSHA consultants noted that personnel at the site do not hesitate “to ensure the task at hand is being performed in the safest manner possible.”

“Biglow’s graduation from SHARP is a great example of what an employee-driven safety culture can achieve,” said Elizabeth Kokos, PGE senior wind technician. “Employees are more willing to be active contributors in a company’s safety programs when they own them. Biglow’s ability to attain SHARP graduate status is a prime example of what can be achieved when everyone pulls together for safety.”

SHARP encourages Oregon employers to work with their employees to identify and correct hazards, and develop and implement effective safety and health programs. The benefits of the program, which is part of Oregon OSHA’s consultation services, include lower injury and illness rates, decreased workers’ compensation costs, increased employee morale, and lower product losses.

Oregon employers that have been in business for more than one year are eligible to apply for SHARP. For information about the program, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/sharp-vpp/Pages/SHARP.aspx.

For information about Oregon OSHA’s no-cost consultation services, visit https://osha.oregon.gov/consult/Pages/index.aspx.


5. Defining Your Values

What does getting what you want in life have to do with values? There is a connection. Let’s take a look at it today.

You can’t get what you want in life until you know what it is you want. And, you’ll have a hard time knowing what you want, if you are not clear about what your values are. You see, when someone asks you what you really want, what they are really asking is, “What do you value?”

Values are guides for daily living that influence your thoughts, feelings, words and deeds. Values form the foundation of the decisions you make. They shape your personality and give direction to what would otherwise be an aimless, purposeless life. Your values are reflected in your goals, hopes, dreams, attitudes, interests, opinions, convictions, and behavior as well as in your problems and worries.

Values are choices you make from the available alternatives. Therefore, well-chosen values require an open mind, because you can’t choose freely if you don’t know what your options, and their consequences, are. Values are cherished and we fight to keep them because they mean so much to us.

Finally, to be truly significant, values must move from fantasy into reality and be acted upon. They cause us to do something, so that we can get and keep what we prize so highly. And while the cynics among us may dismiss them, it is why successful and significant organizations define their values, and place them front and center, for all to see.

What do you value in life? Have you spent much time thinking about it? If not, you might want to take time to do so. Start today. Sit down and make a list of all your values. Then make a list of all your life goals. Do they coincide? If not, maybe you should re-define your goals to match your values, because it is more likely that you will get what you want in life if you do. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Farmers encouraged to “Keep the Stubble” during No-Till November

Put away the plow to minimize disturbance and maximize healthy soil

PORTLAND, Ore., Nov. 5, 2019 — This month the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) is encouraging farmers to “keep the stubble” on their harvested crop fields and improve soil health during No-Till November.

First launched in 2017 by NRCS Iowa, the No-Till November campaign is mirrored after the national cancer awareness No Shave November movement that encourages people not to shave during the entire month. The NRCS campaign encourages farmers to keep tillage equipment in their machine sheds this fall and keep the crop stubble on their fields. In the past two years, the campaign has reached more than 1 million people.

“No-till farming is a cornerstone soil health conservation practice, which also promotes water quality while saving farmers time and money,” said Cory Owens, state soil scientist for NRCS Oregon. “One of the first soil health principles is ‘do not disturb’. This campaign is a fun way to remind farmers about the important relationship between tillage and soil health.”

Improving soil health increases soil biological activity, which provides erosion control, nutrient benefits, and can simulate tillage.

For more information about soil health in Oregon, including success stories from Oregon farmers who are keeping the stubble, visit the NRCS Oregon Soil Health webpage.


7. Notice. Sherman County Ambulance October Activity Report Corrected

ShermanCountyEmergencyAmbulanceReport.Oct2019

 

Sherman County eNews #275

CONTENTS

  1. Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, Military Vehicles, Nov. 9

  2. Veterans Day Chimes at Maryhill, November 11 | 11:11 a.m.

  3. Final Days! Ladies and Gentlemen… The Beatles! Exhibit Closes Nov. 12

  4. Sherman County Emergency Services October Activity Report

  5. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board Meeting, Nov. 12

  6. Public Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, Nov. 13

  7. Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store in Moro, Dec. 7

  8. Sherman County History Tidbits: A Bridge: Collaboration and Connection, 1993

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The work of your heart, the work of taking time to listen, to help, is also your gift to the whole of the world. ~Jack Northfield.


1. Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum, Military Vehicles, Nov. 9

American-Flag-StarOn the 2nd Saturday, November 9th, the museum will be featuring the military vehicle collection. Hop a ride in a World War II Scout Car! Check out a World War I Army Ambulance! Learn the difference between a WWII Jeep and a Korean War Jeep! See WAAAM’s World War II airplanes operate up close. All past and present military service members are encouraged to come in uniform. Aircraft, automobiles, motorcycles, tractors, military jeeps and engines all get their day in the sun again at WAAAM.

See http://www.waaamuseum.org/.


2. Veterans Day Chimes at Maryhill, November 11 | 11:11 a.m.

flag.verticalMaryAnn Parrott and the Hood River Valley Church “Chime Choir” will mark Veterans Day at Maryhill with chimes and a moment of silence at 11:11 a.m. All veterans and active military are admitted free to the museum on Veterans Day.

 


3. Final Days! Ladies and Gentlemen… The Beatles! Exhibit Closes November 12

After filling thousands of Beatles fans with nostalgia for the Fab Four, the popular traveling exhibit Ladies and Gentlemen… The Beatles! will end its run at the Oregon Historical Society on November 12. Curated by the GRAMMY Museum and Fab Four Exhibits LLC, Beatles fans have flocked to OHS to see original handwritten set lists penned by John and clothing worn by Paul, and to play the drums with Ringo in this interactive exhibition covering the years Beatlemania ran rampant in America.


4. Sherman County Emergency Services Activity Report

~Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

emergencydial911red

Sherman County Ambulance

November 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
11-04 5:58 PM Cardiac Arrest Rufus
       

 Moro Fire Department

October 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
10-13 5:43 PM Mutual Aid Fire Gilliam County

 North Sherman County RFPD

October 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
10-02 8:37 PM Ambulance Assist Giles French Park
10-10 10:35 PM Ambulance Assist Wasco
10-13 5:03 PM Mutual Aid for Fire Arlington
10-16 9:17 PM 3 Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 12
10-20 8:50 AM Medical Assist Wasco
10-27 4:05 PM Controlled Fire Hwy 206
10-31 11:37 PM Medical Assist Pilot in Biggs

5. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Nov. 12

LogoShermanCoSchoolPublic Meeting Announcement: The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 6:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 12, 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County Public/School Library.  Agenda topics include Recognition of Students, Staff, and Community Members, Students of the First Quarter, Student Body Report, Consent Agenda, Approve hire of Steve Bird, Head High School Girls Basketball, Approve hire of Gary Lewis, Head High School Boys Basketball, Approve hire of Samantha Roberts-Smith, A Girls Basketball, Approve hire of Kari Peters, B Girls Basketball, Approve hire of Rick Whitaker, A Boys Basketball, Approve hire of Amber Riley, Temporary Title 1 Teacher, Superintendent Report – Wes Owens, Sherman County School K-12 Administrator Report – Mike Somnis, Athletic Director Report – Mike Somnis, Preschool Rent Reduction and Presentation, Update from OSBA Fall Regional Meeting, Student Success Act School Community Engagement Survey, Continuous Improvement Process Update, Transportation Co-op Update, Policy Update – GBEBA, GBNA, GBNA-AR, JECB, JECB-AR(1), IGBBC, IGBBC-AR, KL, KL-AR(1), IKF, ECACB, GCDA/GDDA, GCDA/GDDA-AR, IICC, District Tractor Purchasing Process, Statements, Values and Priorities 2019-20 through Strategic Plan Process.

~Sherman County School
541.565.3500  (Phone) ~  541.565.3319 (Fax)

www.sjshs.weebly.com

Working Together To Put Student Success First!


6. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting, Nov. 13

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on November 13th, 2019. The public is welcome to attend! 6 p.m at the WSEC, 903 Barnett Street.


7. Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store in Moro, Dec. 7

Christmas Shopping

at

The Museum Store

Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro

 Saturday, December 7 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Light refreshments.

No admission fee.

Brand new items just for the Christmas Sale

plus all your year-round favorites

10% Discount for Sherman County Historical Society members

Got a history buff on your list?

MUSEUM MEMBERSHIPS MAKE GREAT GIFTS

American flag1

Dec. 7th is Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day and the museum will have special displays.

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM | 200 DEWEY STREET, MORO, OR

541.565.3232 | WWW.SHERMANMUSEUM.ORG


8. Sherman County History Tidbits: A Bridge: Collaboration and Connection, 1993

Bridging Barnum Creek in Moro City Park is the Sherman County Historical Society’s Regional Strategies-funded covered footbridge. This sturdy, handsome structure connects visitors in the park and on Highway 97 to the Museum and the adjacent playground. Carpenter Russell Hiatt of Cove and Ed Jones of Moro were on hand to erect the bridge. Local historical society volunteers Don Coats, Pat Macnab, Joe Weber, Barbara Cantrall, Carolyn DeMoss, Leroy Sherman, and Glenn Virtue assisted, led by Jerry Kirkpatrick. Mid Columbia Producers and Sherman County Road Department collaborated with heavy equipment and muscle as the steel I-beam donated by MCP was lifted into place in 1993. The wood structure, built on the steel, rests on concrete footings. ~Sherman County Historical Society newsletter, The Plow, 1993.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

bird.owl.limbWATCH YOUR LANGUAGE! Unanswered emails unanswered no more

Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum

Agritourism Allows Farms To Diversify and Has Potential Benefits for Rural Communities

Oregon minors use pot at second-highest rate in United States, study find

OSU hires new wheat extension agent for Wasco, Sherman counties


 

Sherman County eNews #274

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

  2. Oregon Unclaimed Property Program

  3. Making the Best of Bad Times

  4. New Oregon Rest Area Facilities Open on I-5

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits from The Observer: 1919


Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. ~Leo Buscaglia


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday November 6 @ the Kent Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.

Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


2. Oregon Unclaimed Property Program

dollarbillOregon is holding millions of dollars in unclaimed assets – like uncashed checks, forgotten bank accounts, security deposits, tax refunds, credit balances, investment accounts and other funds. The Unclaimed Property Program keeps those funds safe for their rightful owners to claim. Search to see if the state is holding money that belongs to you! Go to https://oregon.findyourunclaimedproperty.com/.


3. Making the Best of Bad Times

It is a great gift to be able to find the good in bad situations, and it is a gift you can give yourself, if you choose to.

Many people, when they come upon a stumbling block or an obstacle in their path, become discouraged and quit. But highly successful people know how to turn stumbling blocks into stepping stones, keeping them moving toward what they want to achieve.

In December 1914, Thomas Edison’s laboratories in West Orange, New Jersey were almost entirely destroyed by fire. In one night, Edison lost two million dollars’ worth of equipment and the records of most of his life’s work. The next morning, as he walked around the charred embers of so many of his hopes and dreams, the sixty-seven year old Edison said, “There is great value in disaster. All our mistakes are burned up. Thank God, we can start anew.”

The ability to see the benefits in bad situations will stand you in good stead in every type of endeavor, whether it is sales or manufacturing, art or aerospace, your personal or professional life. Sometimes, this is a difficult thing to do. And sometimes, it can take quite a while to manage – but it is manageable. And think of the possibilities! We get to start again, with a clean slate, or whiteboard, or piece of paper – however you want to think about it.

Now this does not mean you should pretend things are wonderful when, in fact, they are bad. But, if you can accept pain and disappointment as a part of life, if you can see it for what it is and then move past it, if you can look disaster in the face and call it what it is – and then find a blessing in it – you will be making the best of bad times. ~The Pacific Institute


4.New Oregon Rest Area Facilities Open on I-5

Oregon.Flat.poleEugene- The Travel Information Council (TIC) is excited to announce the Oak Grove Safety Rest Area, on I-5 north of Eugene, has reopened to visitors with a brand-new restroom facilities. The new construction, on both the north and southbound sides of the rest area triple the capacity of the buildings they replaced. Daphnee Legarza, Rest Area Program Administrator for TIC explained, “The original restroom facilities at Oak Grove were inadequate for the amount of traffic the rest area receives.  During peak summer travel, as well as during college football season, long lines of travelers waiting to use the restrooms were common.” In 2018, over half-a-million people used the restrooms on each side of the Oak Grove Safety Rest Area. “We are focusing on making strategic improvements to our rest area facilities that will better meet the needs of Oregon’s motorists and visitors to our state well into the future,” says TIC Executive Director, Jim Denno.

Funding for this building project was approved by the Oregon Legislature in 2017 as part of statewide transportation system upgrades included in ”Keep Oregon Moving” HB 2017. Oregon Legislators set aside funding for rest area improvement with the goal of improving and repairing inadequate infrastructure. Safety rest areas are a vital component to improving driver safety and reducing accidents by giving drivers a convenient place to stop, rest and refresh.

The Travel Information Council is a semi-independent state agency located in Salem. TIC manages most of the highway rest areas in Oregon. TIC also helps motorists find essential services through blue highway logo signs and administers two state heritage programs: Oregon Historical Markers and Oregon Heritage Trees.


5. Sherman County History Tidbits from The Observer: 1919

February 7, 1919

_. H. Elliott, when in town Tuesday, informed us that he had received word from his son, Milo Elliott, saying that by the time word reached here he would be on the ocean bound for Fort Vancouver, B. C., for discharge from the Canadian army.  Milo enlisted early in the Canadian army and has seen considerable service in France.

February 14, 1919

The city authorities have had a retaining wall built in the waterway back of the Moro Hotel and Maxwell properties to better take care of the flood waters going into the concrete sewer built last year under the Karlan property and across First street.

March 7, 1919

   Ellsworth Woods and wife were visitors during the week at the home of his parents in Moro.

March 7, 1919

The concrete foundation under the east end of the bridge over Grass Valley canyon at Nish is not safe.  Flood waters have washed and undermined the pier until any car hitting the structure at more than 20 miles an hour will probably push it into the creek.

March 14, 1919

State Highway Engineers Nunn, Bennett and Newell were in the county Wednesday to inspect the route of the Columbia river to the south line of Sherman county.  The engineers are understood to have expressed the unofficial opinion that the estimate of Road Master Wall is well within the possible coast of construction of the road, based on an 18-foot roadway with eight inches of gravel, well packed.

March 28, 1919

Saturday afternoon fire destroyed the smoke house and blacksmith shop on the Wright place east of Monkland, farmed by Roy Kessinger.  In addition to the buildings Mrs. Kessinger lost a buggy, hack, blacksmith tools and two hogs that were being cured in the smoke house.

March 28, 1919

The good roads in the Fairview district, east of Monkland, are mainly due to the efforts of P. J. Dillinger, and his neighbors are not at all backward about saying so.  When asked about it Mr. Dillinger said that his residence in Iowa demonstrated the need of good roads and when he returned to Sherman county he began immediately to have as good as any in his neighborhood at least.  Each year Dr. Dillinger has been doing donation work on the roads in that section, both with drags and a road grader until now it is a pleasure to drive over the roads in the Fairview section.

April 4, 1919

_. E. Hulery drove up the Columbia river highway from Portland last Sunday.  He reports the entire stretch of road as being in good condition, the worst piece being between The Dalles and Hood River.  Coming across the Sandy river at Troutdale the party stopped for several hours to watch the crowd fish for smelt.  Tom says he never saw fish landed that way before, the fishermen using boxes, barrels and bird cages nailed to long poles and dipping the fish out of the water as fast as they could be lifted.  Smelt are now running in the Sandy and look to be a thick mass of fish about two feet under the surface and as thick as flies around a syrup can in the summer time.

April 4, 1919

Friends will be sorry to learn that Lloyd Smith, farming near Kingsley, lost his farm residence and its contents about two weeks ago by fire.  We did not learn the cause of the fire.

April 18, 1919

Editor C. L. Ireland, in his 6-cylinder roadster, accompanied by State Representative A. M. Wright, last Monday drove the 125 miles to Portland in 5 1/2 hours road time, not counting stops made at The Dalles, Hood River, Mosier and points on the highway.  Some of the distance was made about 25 miles an hour, but the larger part was within speed limit.  The trip back was not so speedy because rain was with us all the distance from Portland to Sherman county.

May 9, 1919

_.H. Elliott and wife returned Wednesday from a two weeks’ visit with their younger son, Milo, at Vancouver, B.C.   It will be remembered that Milo, early in the war, volunteered in the Canadian army and has now just been discharged from service.

May 23, 1919

Miss Faith Ginn is visiting at Lexington, having accompanied John McMillen and family upon their return last week.

June 13, 1919

New North Bank Highway Open.  The North Bank highway, from Vancouver to White Salmon and the east, was thrown open to travel June 7 by the engineers in charge.  Between Cooks and Collins several stretches are not yet graveled.  It these are negotiated slowly but little tire trouble should be experienced.

A car from White Salmon was the first over the new route and marked the highway into Vancouver, a distance of 94.5 miles between this section and Portland, crossing the Columbia at Lyle, Hood River or Cascade Locks.

June 20, 1919

Elevator Company Improvements.  Manager J. C. McKean is making a number of improvements to the Farmer’s Elevator & Supply Co. property in this city.  A new flour and feed warehouse 76×50 feet is being built on the north side of the building, part of which will be used as an office, 16×30 feet.  A new building 30×60 feet will be built on the south side of the building to house an up-to-date roller feed mill, power being supplied from the main engine used in running the elevator machinery.  The operating machinery has just about been placed in position by D. H. Wright and, best news of all, the pit is now entirely free of water.

June 27, 1919

Paving Begun on Highway.  Crews have begun the work of paving the Columbia highway between Hood River and Cascades, a task that will cost approximately $500,000.  Two plants have been established, one each at Cascades and Wyeth.  A retaining wall is also being built between the highway and railroad at Shell mountain and at this place some changes in grades will be made.  As soon as work on a concrete bridge between Hood River and Ruthton hill is finished, this stretch of road will be brought to standard grade.

June 27, 1919

Thursday afternoon, June 19th, fire set by a passing train destroyed about half of the town of Columbus, across the Columbia from Biggs.

June 27, 1919

The rock crusher crew expect to finish the Fulton canyon road work within the next two weeks.  The long haul from the crusher both ways is not finished and the crew is working toward the center quite rapidly.  If men and teams can be secured a top dressing will follow all the work as soon as finished.

July 4, 1919

The contractors will finish paving between The Dalles and Senfert about July 10.  Work will then begin on the three-mile stretch from The Dalles city limits to Chenowith creek.

——

The grading and graveling of 11 miles of the Columbia highway from Seufert to the Deschutes river will be contracted for soon and it is believed the work may be completed this year.

—–

An improvement which will be of great benefit to both Sherman and Wasco counties is the construction of the DesChutes bridge.  Material is now being unloaded at the site and work of actual construction will be under full swing in a short time.

July 4, 1919

If you have trouble on the Columbia highway, camp with your car until you move it.  An owner of an Oakland car broke a wheel Monday and upon his return with assistance, found all four wheels gone as well as some accessories.  This happened west of Hood River.

July 11, 1919

Hotel Moro Lost by Fire.

On the afternoon of Friday, July 4th, the Hotel Moro was completely destroyed by fire that started in the ceiling of the kitchen over the range shortly after 2 o’clock, while the Chinese cook was away visiting a countryman in a building close by.

The fire had gained considerable headway before its discovery, but if water could have been had when the first fire-fighters arrived the building most likely could have been saved along with its contents.  As it was very little of the furnishings on the upper floor were saved because the fire burning through the stairway partition wall.  Nearly all the furnishings on the lower floor, except the kitchen were saved by efforts of men and women who quickly fell in line to move everything possible from the building.

This fire was one of the most fortunate affairs of the kind that ever visited Moro.  At the beginning the wind was only a gentle persistent breeze from the west and the blaze was forced to work against it.  Later when the Maxwell building was burning on the side nearest the hotel and had its roof ablaze in many places the breeze stiffened to a strong wind and held the heat away until the fire fighters secured and held the upper hand.

Numerous cinders fell in the Belshee barn corral and probably a dozen small fires were burning there at one time, but volunteers kept them from spreading or doing any damage.  Cinders also set fire to the dry grass surrounding the Experiment Station and the barn yard, but these were kept under control by Superintendent Stephens.

Loss was confined to the Hotel Moro valued at $7500, with insurance of $3500; the Maxwell building, part of one side and the roof burned, insurance $1000; the Webb brick, the upstairs used as an annex to the hotel and the ground floor containing the Farmers’ State Bank and the private office of W. H. Ragsdale.  The brick was entirely destroyed, but the bank was able to save all its papers and furniture, as well as the furniture in Ragsdale’s office.  The contents of the upper story was a total loss, with one or two exceptions.

Volunteer firemen found the usual conditions when they attempted to fight the fire.  Both fire hydrants on the hotel street intersection were buried by a street fill made several years ago.  It was all of 30 minutes before any water could be had from any hydrant and one hydrant valve, buried four feet deep, was not opened until three days after the fire.

July 11, 1919

The contract for the new two story 80×80 school building at Grass Valley has been awarded to Hedges & Huls, who will start work immediately in an effort to complete the building in time for school next fall.  When completed the building will have a modern gymnasium, be heated by a low pressure steam heating plant and by using accordion doors between class rooms have an auditorium 41×81.

July 18, 1919

Proposed New Hotel.  Two conference meetings of the member of the Moro Chamber of Commerce have been held this week to decide on a line of action regarding the building of a hotel in Moro to replace the old Hotel Moro, burned July 4th.

At this time the only proposition being considered is a combination building where the old Blue Barn formerly stood.  This location is now owned by several people identified with the Farmers State Bank and as that bank lost it business home in the fire, anything to be done with a new building at this location must necessarily also consider the bank.

The plans of the building under consideration call for a garage in the back lower portion facing First street; on the front facing Main street the bank will occupy the corner; next to the bank will come the office of the hotel, with the dining room and kitchen in the rear of the office and bank; next to the hotel office will be a store 50×100 feet, and upstairs will be the hotel rooms, 26 in all, with possibly 30 as the maximum.

After taking out the rooms necessary for those operating and managing the hotel, providing rooms for the average number of regular boarders, there will in all probability be very few rooms for transient travel and such an hotel would always be patronized to capacity, but so far as a real utility for transients it would fall far short of what is needed now, without discounting the future.  Another story would probably make the difference between profit and loss in the operation of the hotel part of the building.

A committee was appointed by the Chamber to consult with the Webb estate and with W. C Rutledge for the purpose of buying that property and building a hotel on the old location, but Mr. Ruthledge did not want to sell now.  The owner of the Maxwell property is willing to sell 15 feet of his property if a hotel is built on the old location.  The three pieces of property would make a holding 65×100 feet, nearly as large as the location where the Farmers State Bank will build, and would be an all hotel building.

July 25, 1919

Mrs. C. H. Ellsworth has bought the Martin building on south Main street and is having it remodeled for a rooming house to be used in connection with the Ellsworth Hotel.  When finished the building will contain 16 rooms and a suite of housekeeping rooms on the lower floor, the latter to be occupied by Ralph Brisbine and family, who will have charge of the building.

July 25, 1919

Columbia Highway in Sherman County.  Every section of highway between The Dalles and Pendleton will be under contract next month.  At the August meeting of the state highway commission proposals will be received for grading the stretch between Seufert and Blalock.  This stretch of improvement has been held back by negotiations for right of way with the O. W. R. & N. Co. and the United States government.

A settlement has been reached with the railroad company regarding encroachments on its right of way in Sherman county and negotiations with the federal authorities for right of way in the vicinity of Celilo are practically finished.  Two overhead crossings are to be put in in Sherman county, one at Biggs and one at Sherman.  At Celilo a portion of the old portage road will be used.

With this work under contract the entire road from Astoria to Pendleton will be under contract, construction or completed except the section between Mosier and Chenowith creek, a few miles west of The Dalles.  The location survey of this section is now being made and bids for consideration will soon be asked for.

July 25, 1919

The new highway grade between Hood River and Mosier has but a mile now to go before the west and east crews meet.  The shorter of the twin tunnels, two miles east of Hood river, is finished and the workmen are well started on the longer, which will be 240 feet long and have two rock windows.  The short tunnel is 65 feet long and only 60 feet west of the longest.

August 1, 1919

Probably within the next week the Columbia highway between Hood River and Cascade Locks will be closed for paving.  Parties may then miss all the hill roads between The Dalles and the Cascades by crossing the river at Rowena and back to the Oregon side at Stevenson.  The road on the Washington side is good, but don’t drive fast because of the many sharp turns.

August 1, 1919

Purely as a matter of civic pride the trees on first and Main streets destroyed by the fire that burned the Hotel Moro should be replaced as soon as possible.  During their life they were a comfort to hundreds of people, residents as well as transients, and a barrier to the sweep of the fire king, worth all they cost in attention and care.  The trees in front of the Webb building were planted by Postmaster J. M. Parry in 1901 when he was in charge of the post office then located in that building.

August 8, 1919

Moro’s Hotel Problem.  At a meeting of members of Moro Chamber of Commerce Tuesday evening a committee of six — J. C. Freeman, W. F. Jackson, Roy Powell, T. C. Lee, A. M. Wright, T. W. Alley — appointed by R. J. Ginn, president of the chamber, to interview property holders and secure options, if possible, on different locations suitable for a hotel, have a sketch made and take other preliminary steps that they may consider necessary to get the project under way.

_. C. Rutledge was present and stated that at the present time he had no plans as to disposal of the corner where the Hotel Moro formerly was located.  He also said that any hotel building that may now be built in Moro should contain not less than 45 rooms; that the old building had contained 25 rooms, five of these having two double beds in each.

A second meeting was held on Wednesday evening at which time the committee reported that a price had been given on four locations for the proposed building; the Ramsey and Foss properties, each 100×100 feet, the Rutledge corner and the property opposite the Rutledge property.

It was decided that the property first talked of be used and that the architect be requested to meet with the members of the Chamber Thursday evening.  Tentative plans at the present time are for a three story building facing Main street.  The ground floor to contain a storeroom 45×100 feet, an office for the Farmers’ State bank, 25×50 feet, and a hotel lobby 30×30 feet.  The hotel kitchen and dining room will be back of the lobby and bank office, while the two upper floors will contain 45 rooms to be used by the hotel.  The basement, after taking space for store and bank uses, will be used by an ice manufacturing plant, a steam laundry and a barber shop.

August 8, 1919

Materials are now being assembled by Hedges & Huls for work on the Grass Valley school addition, estimated cost of which is $16,000.  Actual construction work will begin this week.  H. J. Huls, recently returned from army service overseas and formerly associated with the firm for some years will be in charge of the work.

August 22, 1919

Saturday afternoon fire destroyed one of the residence buildings on the Archie Russell place two miles north of Grass Valley, along with a chicken house, fencing and wood.  The building was occupied by Mr. Russell’s brother, the fire starting in a wood shed located between the two buildings.  Although close to the fire the building occupied aby Mr. Russell escaped the flames.

August 22, 1919

About twenty acres of stubble and pasture land on the James Taylor place was burned last week for a fire set, presumably, by a passing train.

August 22, 1919

    Mrs. Elmo S. White and son “Little Bob” White, and Miss Genevieve Potter, sister and cousin to Mrs. T. S. Reese, who have been visiting at the Reese home east of Moro, returned Tuesday to their home at Salem.

August 29, 1919

But for the timely discovery of a small blaze in a pile of rubbish between the city’s distillate tank and several hundred cords of firewood yesterday by J. C. McKean, what might have developed into a costly conflagration was averted by some quick hard work of a few persons, without loss.  The origin of the fire is unknown, but the smallest spark is liable to start a large fire during the present dry season.

September 5, 1919

An unusual electric rain storm broke the drouth in Sherman county last Saturday that has revailed since April 5th except for a few local showers that did not lay the dust. Near Kent a son of Mike O’Sullivan was killed by lightning as he sat in the open door of a building watching the storm. Telephone wires and poles were down in all directions from Kent, and one report said that the straw carrier of a threshing rig was blown at right angles to its correct position. Along with the report of rain and storm came word that the center of the storm left a streak about three miles south of Kent where very little rain fell on the dry soil.

September 12, 1919

  Leslie Webb was in Moro this week looking over the fire ruins of the Webb property on First street.  Report has it that the property will be made into a one story business building and rented to the Farmers State Bank until the new hotel is ready for use.

September 19, 1919

Near Fatal Accident. Miss Cecil Wright, 18-year-old daughter of D. H. Wright, had a near escape from burning to death about 5 p.m. Saturday when a gasoline iron she was using came in too close contact with the fumes of gasoline contained in an open pitcher near where she was working, causing the liquid to explode and shower flames over her and her work in the kitchen of the family home north of Hay Canyon.

On the back porch at the time of the accident was a galvanized tub holding about two inches of water and screwed to the tub was a clothes wringer. Miss Wright ran from the room, seized the tub and upended it over her head and back, extinguishing the flames but not before practically all her clothing had been burned off her.

At the time Mrs. Wright was at the barn and saw her daughter run from the house with the burning pitcher of gasoline and herself apparently a ball of fire, saw her turn the water over her and quench the flames, all in less than a half minute. Undoubtedly the tub of water saved her life, otherwise she would have gone to the creek for water and probably would never reached it.

The victim was burned from above the waist line to her heels, on the front of her right arm and slightly on the neck and face. Most of the burns are third degree or muscle burns, very little being less than second degree burns. Dr. Poley is treating the patient in an unique manner, but with every expectation of success, it having been used successfully in similar occasions, although the need is rare. A heavy canvas covered with a draw sheet lined with oil silk is suspended in a large bath tub, the patient seated on the oil silk and the tub filled with a salt solution heated to body temperature. Over the tub is heavy blankets to hold the heat. The patient eats and sleeps in the tub, being removed once a day for changing the water. Reports are that she suffers very little except when out of the bath tub, and that the wounds are beginning to heal nicely.

September 26, 1919

Accident Terminates Fatally. Miss Cecil Wright, who was burned by the explosion of gasoline at the family home in Hay Canyon the morning of the 13th, died early Sunday morning during a fainting spells and the accident tended to make them more severe.

Miss Wright was the eldest daughter of Mr, and Mrs. D.H. Wright and at the time of her death was 19 years, 8 months and 25 days. She was a student of the Wasco high school, this term would of been her senior year. She leaves a father, mother, three brothers and one sister to mourn her departure and a large circle of friends among the young people of Moro and Wasco who sympathize with the family in their misfortune.

Funeral services were conducted from Moro Presbyterian church Monday afternoon by Rev. E.E. McVicker, interment being Moro cemetery.

September 26, 1919

Mr. and Mrs. Dan McLachlan returned to Portland the first of the week to get ready for a trip overseas to their old home in New Zealand, expecting to sail from San Francisco October 31st.

October 24, 1919

    Mr. and Mrs. Dan McLachlan have been visiting in the county while waiting for the British government to put its O.K. on their passports and let them continue their journey to their old home in New Zealand.  They were intending to leave San Francisco a month ago, but now they will leave on the first steamer after they get their passports.

October 31, 1919

Pavement Sherman County to Astoria

Before next summer every foot of the highway between Astoria and Hood River will be hard surface.  This winter the contractors will lay about half of the distance between Cascade Locks and Hood River and finish that stretch of road early in the spring.

Beyond Hood River the highway is under contract as far as The Dalles, and it will be graded and rocked next year.  The concrete bridge across the Deschutes river and the section of the highway between the bridge and The Dalles will be finished next year.

There are a few miles east of the bridge and this side of Blalock which have not been located and that stretch is the only part needed to open the road from the Pacific Ocean to beyond Pendleton.

October 31, 1919

Figures showing a total of 1745 aliens chiefly Scandinavians, who withdrew their declarations of intention to become citizens in order to avoid the draft, have been furnished the officials and these men, under a bill now pending in congress will soon be deported to their homes.

November 21, 1919

Last Wednesday, the 12th, the Roy Barnett farm home near Kent burned.  A small part of the furniture was saved, but the house was a complete loss.

November 21, 1919

Captain and Mrs. G. H. Bates were weekend visitors in Moro from Portland, where Captain Bates is now stationed on detail duty connected with the Oregon National Guard.  Mrs. Bates is a daughter of R. J. Ginn.

November 28, 1919

C.L. Montgomery started a coal oil stove Wednesday night, in his room, to warm the place and then went down town to wait until the heat conquered the cold.  When he returned in about an hour he found the room full of flames and the stove ready to fall to pieces from the heat, with two large pools of melted solder on the floor.  He caught up the stove in this gloved hands and soon had it outside and the fire out.  Mrs. James Stewart and family were asleep on the lower floor and had no knowledge how near they were compelled to make a hasty exit into the cold cold night.

December 19, 1919

Unusual Weather Conditions. Sherman county last week passed through an unusual experience with winter weather, something entirely new to a large majority of its residents and which brought to mind of one time eastern folks stories of extreme cold in eastern states.  Grass Valley and Wasco were both lower in the degree of cold than Moro, Wasco going to 28 degrees below and Grass Valley to 30 below while the coldest at Moro was the nights of December 12th and 13th when the government thermometer at the Experiment Farm registered 20 degrees below zero.  Since then its has been warming up until this week 38 degrees above has been registered with an average of above freezing for every day.  Thursday night a slight rain fell in the early evening, bordering upon a silver thaw, but not enough to start the snow to melting although probably the snow now is packed to half its former depth with a good crust that will prevent drifting and help materially in thawing the frost in the ground.

December 19, 1919

Highway construction camps are now located at different place in Sherman county, along the route of the Columbia highway, from opposite Maryhill to the John Day river.  The storm has temporarily stopped work, but the steam shovel will soon be in operation on the hill above Rufus and when it ___will make up for the lost time.

December 19, 1919

The Columbia river at Rufus was frozen over last week and people were using the ice bridge in place of the usual ferry.  The weather man portioned out a sample of winter that reached 22 degrees below for that section of the county last week.

December 19, 1919

The storm caused stoppage of work on the John Day river bridge east of Rufus.  With a little more than a month of good weather this feature of the Columbia highway will be finished.

December 26, 1919

Columbia Highway in Miniature.  Mrs. L. Grimes says that she now knows what a real house flood means and the joke of it is that it was the fault of the city being out of water and a sink pipe being frozen up.  December 11th Mrs. Grimes had stepped to a neighbors, leaving the faucet open, and Mr. Grimes and son Lloyd coming in about an hour later, found the house flooded, there being six inches of good city water on the living room floor and some extra supply pouring through into the basement in an open stream.  Mrs. Grimes says that the stairway resembled Horse Tail fall on the Columbia highway, but is thankful it was a flood instead of a fire.


 

Sherman County eNews #273

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

  2. Letter to the Editor: Hall of Honor Induction

  3. Senator Bill Hansell Will Seek Re-Election to Oregon Senate District 29

  4. The Compulsive Drive to Do – Part 2

  5. History Tidbits: Sherman County Centennial Cake Contest, 1989


Nothing is more beautiful or powerful than an individual acting out of his or her conscience, thus helping to bring the collective conscience to life. ~Norman Cousins


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday November 6 @ the Kent Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.  ~Red Gibbs


2. Letter to the Editor: Hall of Honor Induction

pencil.sharpI, along with many others, attended the Hall of Honor induction ceremony at the Sherman school recently.

Thank you to all who made this evening possible. Thank you to those that educated and enriched our knowledge of 150 years of Sherman County Schools.

I could not be more proud of the young men and women who were serving and helping at dinner and throughout the program. Happy, selfless, professional, and extremely helpful come to mind when describing these students. A heart felt thank you to all of you and to your parents. This experience was yet another reminder of why Sherman County is such a special place.

With gratitude,

Sol Jacobsen

Rufus


3. Senator Bill Hansell Will Seek Re-Election to Oregon Senate District 29

Oregon.GrapeATHENA, ORE.- Oregon State Senator Bill Hansell announced today that he will seek re-election to the Oregon Senate for another 4-year term. Hansell has built strong relationships and has a unique ability to work across the aisle to deliver for District 29.

Hansell (R-Athena) released the following statement:

“Greg Walden has been a tireless advocate for Eastern Oregon and our natural resource-based economy. He has represented the 2nd Congressional District very well and I wish Greg the best as he embarks on his next chapter. Greg leaves big shoes to fill and I am confident that the voters of the 2nd District will elect a representative who will continue where Greg has left off.

“After talking with family and friends, I have decided not to seek the Republican nomination as the next Congressional Representative for our area. It is humbling to have received calls and e-mails from people encouraging me to run. Together, we have accomplished much at the state level. Over the last seven years, we have secured funding for vital irrigation projects in the Umatilla Basin, funded two health centers in Elgin and Enterprise, helped secure funding to restore the Wallowa Lake Dam, secured funding for the FARM II Project at Blue Mountain Community College and to build a mental health crisis wing to the Umatilla County Jail that will serve all of northeastern Oregon.

“The 2019 Session had tense moments. Despite that, we were able to pass legislation to give farmers and ranchers civil immunity when fighting wildfires, we passed legislation to give cancer patients insurance coverage for less invasive proton beam therapy and we passed a bill to give Oregon Native American high school graduates in-state tuition at our public universities. All of these bills passed unanimously.

“There is still work that needs to be done and I am ready to return to Salem to continue where we’ve left off. Representing Senate District 29 in the Oregon Senate has been an honor and I am ready to serve for another term.”

Hermiston area rancher Bryan Wolfe said that “Senator Hansell has been a strong advocate for Oregon’s agricultural community in the Legislature. His leadership in Salem has been outstanding and I am pleased he is running for another term.”

Prior to being elected to the Oregon Senate, Hansell served for 30 years as a Umatilla County Commissioner. His family has farmed and ranched in Oregon for over 100 years. Hansell and his wife Margaret reside in Athena and are the proud parents of six grown children and 11 grandchildren.


4. The Compulsive Drive to Do – Part 2

Yesterday, we looked at some problems associated with the compulsion to do too much. Today, let’s look at some solutions.

Feeling driven to achieve can lead us to become high performance people. But when that drive is taken to extremes, it can result in compulsive behavior that can have disastrous effects on our families, stress levels and health.

If you sometimes feel that you are a candidate for the “Most Overworked Person Award,” what can you do about it?

Psychologist Christian Komer, of Grand Rapids, suggested that you try doing nothing for short periods every day. Designate a time to simply sit, without talking, reading or even watching the television. It can help short-circuit compulsive behavior and provide time for reflection that could reveal the feelings behind the behavior.

Try to just wander around for a while, too. Follow your impulses, something compulsive people rarely do but which can get you back in touch with your own life. Instead of trying to fit more into your day, try doing less, but concentrate on doing it better. And avoid trying to do two things at once. [Recent research indicates that conscious “multitasking” is a fallacy, and that our conscious minds can only focus on one thing at a time, even if the attention given is extremely short. Our Subconscious is already doing plenty of multitasking, as it handles habits, attitudes, heartbeat, breathing – anything automatic.]

Pace yourself as well. Take some time in the morning to relax and set the tone for the day instead of racing around trying to get a head start on your list of things to do. Create an affirmation such as, “I calmly and easily accomplish what I need to do and take time to enjoy the process as well.” Then, say it often every day, while you visualize yourself doing just that. Absorb how good it feels to be in control of your life and your time. ~The Pacific Institute


5. History Tidbits: Sherman County Centennial Cake Contest, 1989

birthdaycake.candlesAs reported by Elroy King in The Dalles Chronicle, February 26, 1989, the Sherman County Centennial Cake Contest was held in several categories. “Pat Jacobsen of Wasco was the overall winner in the cake baking contest and also was first in the best decorated competition. She also took runner-up honors in the latter category.”

King continued, “Jacque von Borstel, Grass Valley, was second over-all and first in the angel food cake contest. Other cake winners were: Mix – 1st Gena Hilderbrand, Wasco; Spice – Jennie McDermid (sic), Wasco, second, Catherine Thomas, Wasco; Chocolate – first Sandy Macnab, Moro, second Lori McGuire, Grass Valley. All of the prize winning cake bakers won dinners at area restaurants.” These cakes, along with the official centennial birthday cake, were served to the crowd. The official birthday cake was cut by the county’s only 100-year-old plus resident, Ethel Van Gilder.


 

Sherman County eNews #272

CONTENTS

  1. Weather: November Outlook & October Monthly Climate Summary

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

  3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

  4. The Compulsive Drive to Do – Part I

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“In all very numerous assemblies, of whatever character composed, passion never fails to wrest the sceptre from reason.” —James Madison, Federalist 55


1. Weather: November Outlook & October Monthly Climate Summary

sun.circleYou can find the November outlook and the October monthly climate summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

 

~Marilyn Lohmann, National Weather Service Pendleton, 541-276-7832


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Nov. 6

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday November 6 @ the Kent Baptist Church.  Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleCreated: 31 October 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 1998: Year Oregon Republican Greg Walden was first elected to the Oregon House of Representatives, according to OPB. Walden announced Monday he would not run again for the seat in 2020.
  • 69,000: Approximate land area, in square miles, of the second Congressional district, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
  • 189,893: Registered Republicans in the district.
  • 143,353: Registered Democrats in the district.
  • 197,584: Non-affiliated voters in the district.
  • 22: Wildfires that started in Northern Oregon this week due to “high winds and dry conditions,” according to the Statesman Journal.
  • $319 million: Amount Portland vacation-rental company Vacasa raised in funding, the company announced this week, according to The Oregonian.
  • 5,000: Employees of the company, which The Oregonian reports is poised to become the largest new Oregon company in a generation.
  • $22.3 billion: Size of Oregon’s global export market, according to the governor’s office.
  • 38: People Gov. Kate Brown is taking to South Korea and Japan as part of a trade delegation there Nov. 5-16.

4. The Compulsive Drive to Do – Part I

What is the difference between a pleasantly active life and one that is compulsively busy? Sometimes, it is a heart attack.

There is no doubt about it – we are a “can do” society. Sometimes though, “can do” becomes “must do,” and “must do” can have some unpleasant consequences. For one thing, people who “must do” things, as opposed to “wanting” to do them, often find ways to subconsciously sabotage themselves, just to take the pressure off. For another, they short-change their families and themselves.

When you are compulsive about how much you have to accomplish every day, you sacrifice spontaneity, creativity and the joy of everyday living. Your children grow up largely without you, and you can’t kid yourself into thinking that a few minutes of so-called quality time can make up for generally not being there at all. (Well, you “can” kid yourself, but you won’t be truly happy with the results.)

Compulsive doers also run the risk of actually reducing their productivity. Psychologists who specialize in stress management report compulsive doers make more mistakes and are more prone to physical illness. They are called “Type A” people, and we know that they make more mistakes and are more prone to heart attacks than the rest of us. We also know that stress-related accidents in the workplace are increasing at a dramatic rate. So, how do you break out of the programming that drives people to force themselves do too much?

Give this some thought this evening, and we will look at some solutions to this all-too-common problem. In the meantime, for your heart and mind, enjoy the day! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3This Man Took Over 1,000 Children Of Fallen Soldiers To Disneyland Free Of Charge

Opinion. Why Kids Are Socialists and How to Start Fixing It

Opinion. The Miseducation of America’s Youth

Opinion. Exposing the Fraud of Socialism

Editorial: Don’t hide financials of Oregon sports betting


 

Sherman County eNews #271

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Too often we underestimate the power of a touch, a smile, a kind word, a listening ear, an honest compliment, or the smallest act of caring, all of which have the potential to turn a life around. ~Leo Buscaglia


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)  

eNEWS POLICIES:

classifieds.boyCLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR.  We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES: 

THANK YOU! Janet Pinkerton and I would like to thank everyone for their kind remarks and interest in our 150 year history of Sherman County education timeline.  Granted, it was time consuming but proved fascinating to learn about the journey of education in this county.  We had heard bits and pieces from our fathers but it was interesting to put the whole story together.  Words cannot express our gratitude for the hard work and dedication of the entire community to realize the school system we have today. We want to recognize Julie Triebelhorn Fong, Lloyd Henrichs’ granddaughter, for donating her creative genius. She took an idea drawn on a napkin and created this eye-popping timeline. Clearly, this presentation would not have happened without Julie’s skill and ingenuity.  She told us that she gives her clients two opportunities to review and alter before she starts charging.   Janet and I lost count of the number of changes but at least 25, all without a charge or a hint of frustration. ~Nancy Henrichs Simpson and Janet Pinkerton.

THANK YOU from Wasco School Events Center! Due to the generosity of so many talented Sherman County people, Wasco School Events Center hosted another very successful fund raiser. This past Sunday, “An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent” saw more than a dozen artists showing and selling their creations in our auditorium, and over 50 items were donated to our silent auction — everything from paintings, jewelry, photos on canvas, metal work, quilts and wall hangings, vinyl signs, solvent transfer prints, cross stitch, wood carving, cut & polished rocks . . . the list goes on. There are too many participants and donors to name personally here, but know that the Board of Directors greatly appreciates all of you who participated and donated so that we may continue to make improvements to our building. Sherman County people are the best!

THANK YOU! The Sherman County Senior Center would like to extend a very special thank you to Chris & Carrie Kaseberg of Wheatacres Ranch in Wasco, for their incredibly generous donation of 160 pounds of ground beef. Donations like this allow us to serve good quality meals to seniors, using local beef, which is very helpful with our monthly food budget. We cannot thank Wheatacres Ranch enough for this donation! Thank you so very much for your generosity!! 

CONGRATULATIONS, CINDY! 1st Place Western Region Winner for a Communications Written Press Release at the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences conference in Hershey PA.  The award was accepted on her behalf by OSU Extension attendees. Her article titled “Picky Eaters? Eat Your Peas, Louise” ran in The Dalles Chronicle’s Extension Cord column April 2018.  Brown is a 4-H Youth Development & Healthy Living Educator serving Sherman County. ~Larry & Sherry

Kind words are jewels that live in the heart and soul, and remain as blessed memories years after they have been spoken. ~Marvea Johnson.

THANK YOU to the local history and art enthusiasts who photographed public art in Sherman County for my photo essay series for Sherman County: For The Record. The project expanded to Public Art categories – Itinerant Sign Painters and Artists; Local Government; Businesses and Organizations; Murals, Mosaics and Mascots; Heritage and Monuments. Two more Public Art categories have been suggested: Stained Glass and Farm & Ranch Signs… good ideas for another volunteer! ~Sherry Kaseberg

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen! 

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Being a trustholder of the community means serving as would a good steward. The good steward views the community as a gift from previous generations, but a gift with strings attached. One is obligated to pass the gift to future generations in a better state than that in which it was received…. The community is both our inheritance and our legacy.” ~National Association of Community Leadership, Taking Leadership to Heart (1996)

EMPLOYMENT:

INSTRUCTIONAL ASSISTANT Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039. Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year | Posting: Sherman County School is seeking a Temporary .94 FTE highly qualified Instructional Assistant candidate with preferred previous experience working in an educational setting. The successful candidate will work under the direct supervision of the school administration to support activities as assigned.  This position will start on or close to November 12.  This is a temporary position for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500. | Application Method/Materials Required Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district), resume, and letters of recommendation if you are interested in the position to:   Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039 | (541) 565-3500  wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $21-$28/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us under “Jobs/contracts”. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, 500 Court Street, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 no later than Tuesday, November 12, 2019 by 5:00 pm. Interviews will be held Friday, November 15, 2019. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 11/8

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter OFFICE: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE: 

POSTERS. SHERMAN COUNTY EDUCATION TIMELINE. The 150 years of Sherman County Education; One-Room Schools to One Campus Timeline was dedicated on 10/19/19. The timeline will hang permanently in the school outside the cafeteria. Posters of this timeline are available for purchase. The posters are 16 x 36 and are $30/poster.  There are only seven left.  You may purchase them by calling the Sherman School 541-565-3500 and asking for Kim McKinney. 11/8

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/ 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED:


THE TIMES JOURNAL! Have you submitted your public meeting notices, special events and services offered to The Times-Journal? Press deadline is 5pm Mondays. Call 541-384-2421 or send an email to timesjournal1886@gmail.com.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

Thanksgiving.CornucopiaNOVEMBER

1 Tri-County Hazardous Waste Collection Event 10-2 Wasco School Events Center

3 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

3 Sherman Historical Society Volunteer Lunch & Program 1 Grass Valley

3 Dewey Thomas’ 105th Birthday 2-4 The Springs at Mill Creek, The Dalles

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 Moro City Council 7

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 Gilliam County Court 10

6 Wheeler County Court 10

6 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6-10 American Agri-Women Convention in Tigard

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7-10 American Agri-Women Convention, Portland

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

11 VETERANS’ DAY

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Rufus City Council

13-16 Tri-State Grain Convention, Spokane

15-17 Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Portland

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

17 Antelope Community Harvest Dinner 2-4 Antelope Community Center

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

21-23 Oregon Cattleman’s Association Convention, Bend

23 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Thanksgiving Dinner 5

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

mittens1DECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

7-8 Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas”

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council Board Meeting 8

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10-12 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention, Gleneden Beach

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

snowman-sunJANUARY

2 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

11-13 Columbia River Circuit Rodeo Finals, Yakima, Washington