Sherman County eNews #261

CONTENTS

  1. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting & Hearing, Oct. 23

  2. Network and Learn at Gorge Tech Company Showcase, Nov. 5

  3. Sherman 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night, Nov. 13

  4. Antelope Community Harvest Dinner, Nov. 17

  5. 3rd Annual Columbia River Indian Autumn, Sat. Nov. 2

  6. Oregon Capital Insider: This week, by the numbers

  7. History Tidbits: Wasco Main Street c. 1895-1915


1. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting & Hearing, Oct. 23

Public Notice of Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting and

Public Hearing on Proposed FY 2019-2020 Supplemental Budget

Meeting Date/Time: Wednesday, October 23, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Meeting Location: Jeanne E. Burch Building, 401 Fourth Street, Fossil, OR

Teleconference Dial-in: 669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 431-875-341

PUBLIC HEARING

1:30pm Public Hearing Regarding FY 2019-2020 Supplemental Budget

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

1.0 Call to Order; Establish Quorum; Introductions; Additions/Revisions to Agenda

2.0 Public Comment

3.0 Financial Matters

3.1 Review and Consider Monthly Financial Summaries for July-September 2019

3.2 Discuss Resolution of Past Due Balances

4.0 Old Business

4.1 AOC Report Checklist Next Steps: Update on Independent Systems Audit

4.2 AOC Report Checklist Next Steps: Discuss Request for Proposals for Management Services

4.3 Update on Cottonwood Tower Site

4.4 Consider Approval of Proposal for Roosevelt Site Repairs & Generator

4.5 Consider Approval of Bakeoven Tower Site Lease Agreement with Day Wireless

4.6 Discuss USAC E-rate Program Status and Final Steps to End Participation

5.0 New Business

5.1 Consider Adoption of FY 2019-2020 Supplemental Budget

5.2 Discuss Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting Minutes

5.3 Consider Approval of the Eakin Elevator Lease Agreement

5.4 Consider Approval of the Fields Ranch Lease Agreement

5.5 Discuss Frontier Regional 911 User Fees

5.6 Discuss the North Central ESD Tower

5.7 Regulatory Compliance: Status Report and Discussion of Management Plan Going Forward

5.8 Regulatory Compliance: Records Retention Requirements Report and Discussion

6.0 Day Wireless Update

7.0 Public Comment

8.0 Adjournment

Additional Announcements:

  • With the exception of public hearings, the Frontier TeleNet Board, in its sole discretion, may make changes to this agenda and/or address other matters it deems appropriate. In addition, the Frontier TeleNet Board may at any time and without prior notice enter into an executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660(2).
  • The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made not less than 48 hours prior to the date/time the meeting is set to begin by contacting Judge N. Lynn Morley at 541-763-3460 or via email to info@frontier-telenet.org.

2. Network and Learn at Gorge Tech Company Showcase, Nov. 5

The third-annual Gorge Tech Showcase returns on Tuesday, November 5, 2019 to highlight some of the exciting, world-changing tech companies in the region. Tech enthusiasts and job seekers are invited to attend to learn about the amazing work of Applied Navigation, Insitu, Power4Flight, Prigel Machine and Fabrication, Seeq, Skookum Resource Management, Trillium Engineering and Zepher. The event at the Columbia Gorge Hotel, 4000 Westcliff Dr., Hood River includes brief presentations, networking and appetizers. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. with presentations starting around 7:00 p.m. Tickets are $15 at the door or in advance through Eventbrite.

The Gorge Tech Showcase is hosted by the Gorge Tech Alliance (GTA), the regional tech industry association that supports, connects and develops the technology community of the Columbia River Gorge with networking and educational events, business support and promotion, workforce development and STEM education. Contact Jessica Metta, Executive Director, at 541-296-2266, jessica@crgta.org or learn more at crgta.org.


3. Sherman 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night, Nov. 13

4-H clover1Families, mark your calendar for Wednesday, November 13 6pm for a 4-H Open House & Enrollment Night at the Sherman Fairgrounds. A light dinner will be served, as kids and families can meet 4-H club leaders and get their enrollment forms done and pay the $30 fee. Clubs include beef, sheep, swine, goat, poultry, horse, small animals, cooking, outdoor cooking/food preservation, photography, sewing, theatre arts, hiking/biking, shooting sports, and leadership/camp counseling. Get started with forms here, scroll down the page for Youth Enrollment Packet, fill out and return to Sherman Extension office: https://extension.oregonstate.edu/4h/sherman/get-involved


4. Antelope Community Harvest Dinner, Nov. 17

Harvest Dinner

wheat.four

Sunday, November 17th from 2 until 4

Antelope Community Center (school)

Sponsored by Antelope Home Extension

Admission by donation

Proceeds to benefit community activities, 4-H and fair.

Questions? Call Missy McNamee. 541-489-3363.


 5. 3rd Annual Columbia River Indian Autumn, Sat. Nov. 2

fish.salmon1THE DALLES — Don’t miss Columbia River Indian Autumn, Saturday, November 2, 2019 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles. Admission is free, and features artisans, musicians, dancers and vendors from our regional Native American community in addition to the museum’s exhibits and collections.

The day’s activities will include dance groups, traditional Indian games and drumming with Jefferson Greene, flint knapping instruction with Clayton Carter, plus a variety of local craft vendors.

Feast on a locally-caught traditional Native Salmon bake for $15 at 12 noon. The salmon will be prepared and presented by Warm Springs’ members Brigette and Sean McConville. Tickets for the lunch are available for pre purchase at http://www.gorgediscovery.org. Lunch will be available until supplies last. In addition, Indian Fry Bread will be available for purchase.

Games for kids will be available, including drum and song games, Hoop Toss, Hoop & Arrow, Kick Bags, Rock in Fist, Ring the Stick, Kickball racing and dice games. Jefferson Greene from Warm Springs will be on hand to lead the games for children throughout the day.

Several Native vendors will be on hand with exquisite art, beadwork, jewelry, and hand-made crafts. Get a jump on the holidays and find some gifts for loved ones that reflect the authentic and unique Native art from the Columbia River region.

“This is a day to celebrate our beautiful home and share with all of our neighbors the inspiration and bounty of the Columbia River” said Executive Director Carolyn Purcell.  Sponsorship provided by Weston Kia in Gresham, Columbia Gorge Real Estate in The Dalles and Indian Head Casino in Warm Springs, Oregon.

For more information, call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit http://www.gorgediscovery.org

Nch’i-Wána is the Indigenous name for the Columbia River.


6. Oregon Capital Insider: This week, by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleCreated: 18 October 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • $279,937: Amount the Oregon Education Association donated to candidates for the state legislature in the 2017-18 election cycle, according to the National Institute on Money in Politics. The union said it wouldn’t give money to primary candidates who voted for reforms to the state’s public pension system.
  • $1.4 million: Amount Oregonians have given to candidates for president in 2020, according to the Portland Business Journal.
  • $862,862: Amount Oregonians have given to Democratic candidates for president.
  • $535,937: To President Donald Trump.
  • 3: Democrats vying for the nomination for Oregon Secretary of State next year.
  • 11,000,000: Unwanted robocalls from U.S. Air Ducts, a Vancouver, Wash., company, to Oregon phone numbers. Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum announced she was suing the company Wednesday for violating the state’s Unlawful Trade Practices Act through robocalls and print advertisements using “deceptive marketing practices.”
  • 5: Percent of Oregon kids living in poverty, according to Children First For Oregon.
  • 9: Of Oregon kids who are food insecure.
  • 2: Of Oregon kids eligible for free and reduced lunch at school.
  • 10,634: Oregon kids who spent at least one day in foster care in 2018.

7. History Tidbits: Wasco Main Street c. 1895-1915

wheel.wagon1

As remembered in a sketch by Gladys (Morrow) Laidlaw (1901-2000)

 

 

West side of Main Street starting on the north

Christian Church

3rd Street

Mr. Bowman’s lot, flower nursery

Walter May residence

Mrs. Williams’ residence

Other residences

Garage

2nd Street

Western Hotel – Van Landinghams

Marsh Drug Store (burned)

Dr. Beers, then Dr. Morse

Crosfield Store

1st Street

IOOF building w/meeting room upstairs; Yancey’s confectionery, Guy Pound’s Jewelry and barbershop downstairs

Clodfelter’s confectionery with rooms to rent upstairs

Early Ellis furniture store

McClelland’s butcher shop

Yancey confectionery

Fulton Street

Railway station & tracks

O’Meara’s 1st implement company

Davis Street

McCoy-Atwood store

Vacant lots, later Sherman Hotel

Ellis Street

Mrs. Amos’ boarding house

Residences from there half-way up the hill

East side of Main Street starting on the north

Open field across the street from the Christian Church

3rd Street

Open Space

Hicks the plumber’s residence

Residence: Charlie Everett, Dell Hull, John Fields

Open lots

Mrs. Amos’ residence later

2nd Street

Open lots

Barnett’s Brick Bank

1st Street

Ellsworth Hotel, 2 stories

Old cleaning establishment

Ellis’ new furniture store

Post Office

Fulton Street

Vacant space until Medler built store c.1913, later burned

Reinhardt Saloon

Davis Street

Brick Bank

Ellis Street

Dentist’s office – Gormley, then Butler, then Matthews, then Morgan

Hailey Saloon – Legion Hall

Morrow Blacksmith Shop.


 

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Sherman County eNews #260

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1“Give it to the Relationship”

One of the hardest things we can do sometimes is to go to someone we care about and talk to them about something that they have done or said is troubling to us. I say hardest, in the sense that we aren’t firing off a retaliatory shot in response, but in lovingly and thoughtfully approaching them with the view in mind of being reconciled in your relationship without sweeping something that you might consider unsweepable under the rug.

Ed Welch of the Christian Counseling and Education Foundation wrote a brief article in 2015 titled “Three Relationship Rules.” The first of those rules had to do with this issue of working it out together rather than attacking or retreating. He wrote:

“If something bothers you, give it to the relationship. If either my wife or myself have any struggle in our own hearts that lasts longer than thirty seconds, and the other person is involved in any way, we give it to the relationship. That is, we talk about it. The person who is struggling might have a problem, or it might belong to the other person (who is blissfully ignorant of that struggle) or the blame might be laid on neither.

““I am struggling with something and I think it would be best for us if we tried to talk about it.” With that entrance into the discussion, it rarely turns sour. The struggler wants to talk together and not simply make pronouncements. The outcome might be that someone asks forgiveness, or it simply be that we have a more accurate understanding of each other.”

The apostle Paul wrote in Colossians 4:6, “Let your speech always be with grace, as though seasoned with salt, so that you will know how you should respond to each person.”

Relationships are too important to let hurts linger.

Joe Burgess

Pastor, Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers. 

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU, RDO JOHN DEERE! When we shop for our 4-H raffle basket at RDO we greatly appreciate Steven Fritts’ amazing customer service! ~Larry and Sherry Kaseberg

EDITOR’S NOTE. A THANK YOU NOTE that came our way from Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at Maryhill Museum of Art must be shared! … “I just wanted to thank Sherman County for bringing students to Maryhill Museum yesterday. They were so wonderful and we enjoyed having them. Other visitors remarked repeatedly at the well behaved students… yours!! Thank you!” 

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS:

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

Logo.Hall of Honor.ShermanCo.SchoolBOOSTER CLUB. The Booster Club will be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. at the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor reception. Designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. Everyone is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. Please join us for the $12.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased in advance by calling 541-565-3500 or at the door. 

children.silhPEARS & APPLES. Little Wheats Daycare is excited to offer a fundraiser of Kiyokawa Orchards fresh picked local pears and apples- orders due THIS Friday, TODAY… October 18th! Several varieties: Gala, Fuji, Red Bartlett, Anjou, and many more- perfect for fall baking, snacking or even to donate to your child’s class. Please contact Tabetha at 541-993-9618, or any Little Wheats family, to get your order in. Fruit will be available October 26th.

pen.markerAN AFTERNOON OF SHERMAN COUNTY TALENT: “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent” on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. Questions? Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778). 

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Being a trustholder of the community means serving as would a good steward. The good steward views the community as a gift from previous generations, but a gift with strings attached. One is obligated to pass the gift to future generations in a better state than that in which it was received…. The community is both our inheritance and our legacy.” ~National Association of Community Leadership, Taking Leadership to Heart (1996)

Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society  

EMPLOYMENT:

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer:$13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more.Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today:

Amberlena ShafferRecruiter OFFICE: (541) 303-5093

Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses

FOR RENT OR LEASE: 

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29 

FREE:

Freestanding basketball goal (it could use a new net but has one and works just fine). It’s heavy as the bottom is weighted, of course.  Free – You haul and it’s yours.  Call Jeanne at 541-714-5740. 

Antique Sewing Machine in original wood cabinet – unusual Craftsman style cabibet- great shape I believe it is from the early 1900’s, original book and accessory box included. It’s heavy – you arrange to pick it up and it’s yours- originally from a local Sherman county resident.  Call Jeanne 541-714-5740.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED: 

PHOTOGRAPH. Copy of pre-1950 photo of the east side of the Barnett-Crosfield brick general merchandise store in Wasco for a photo essay on itinerant sign painters and artists. ~Sherry Kaseberg sherryk@gorge.net.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

Halloween.pumpkin2OCTOBER

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration 5:30

19 Octoberfest for The Woolery Project, Arlington

19-20 SHS Class of 1969 Reunion Shilo Inn 11-3, Rural Moro 10

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

22 Sherman County Public/School Library Soup Night 6

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

25 Trunk or Treat 6-7 Senior Center Parking Lot, Moro

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

31 HALLOWEEN 

flag.verticalNOVEMBER

3 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

3 Sherman Historical Society Volunteer Lunch & Program 1

3 Dewey Thomas’ 105th Birthday 2-4 The Springs at Mill Creek, The Dalles

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 ELECTION DAY

5 Moro City Council 7

6 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6-10 American Agri-Women Convention in Tigard

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

11 VETERANS’ DAY

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Rufus City Council

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

thermometer.degreesDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

snowflake4JANUARY

11-13 Columbia River Circuit Rodeo Finals, Yakima, Washington

 

 


 

 

Sherman County eNews #259

CONTENTS

  1. Order Fresh Pears & Apples to Benefit Little Wheats Daycare

  2. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle

  3. Plans and Planning

  4. Medicare Annual Enrollment, Oct. 15-Dec. 7

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Here comes the orator! With his flood of words, and his drop of reason.” ~Benjamin Franklin (1735)


1. Order Fresh Pears & Apples to Benefit Little Wheats Daycare

food.pearfood.applesLittle Wheats Daycare is excited to offer a fundraiser of Kiyokawa Orchards fresh picked local pears and apples- orders due THIS Friday, October 18th! Several varieties: Gala, Fuji,  Red Bartlett, Anjou, and many more- perfect for fall baking, snacking or even to donate to your child’s class. Please contact Tabetha at 541-993-9618, or any Little Wheats family, to get your order in. Fruit will be available October 26th.


2. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle

Check-markGreen
Applications are available for 2019 Sherman Development League (SDL) grants. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020. To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


3. Plans and Planning

Do you have plans for what you want from life? Do you have a plan for what you want to accomplish in your work? Today, let’s talk about why plans rarely seem to work as we think they will – and why we need them anyway.

Perhaps you have noticed, in the past, that making plans very seldom works. Well, at least not in the exact manner we expect when we write them. We have a goal. We break it down into action steps, and estimate how long each step will take.

But when we achieve the goal, we look back and see that very little actually went exactly as we had planned. Some things took longer, some things took less time; some things were skipped altogether, while other things we never expected required last-minute attention and quick decision-making.

However, without that “faulty” plan, we might never have achieved our goal at all. So even though a lot of plans may not work out the way we expect them to, without them we would wind up stuck in the mud of our own procrastination and lack of direction. Without a plan, it can be very difficult to see if we have made any progress.

When an airplane takes off, the pilot has a detailed plan to govern the trip, and it has been filed with air traffic control. Do you have a plan for getting what you want in life? Do you plan your time day by day, maybe hour by hour, to ensure that you are moving forward toward your goals? Do you put your plans in writing, and adjust them as you go? Do others close to you have an idea where you are going, so that they can be supportive?

If so, good for you! You are more likely to get to where you want to go than those who just fly through life by the seat of their pants, hoping they will make it. But then, you already know that, don’t you? That is why you make plans in the first place! ~The Pacific Institute


4. Medicare Annual Enrollment, Oct. 15-Dec. 7

(Salem) – The annual open enrollment for Medicare starts today and the Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) Program in the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is ready to help. Medicare annual enrollment is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7.

Medicare is health insurance for people 65 years or older or younger than 65 with Social Security Disability Income. People living in Oregon who are 65 years or older may be eligible to sign up and find health insurance that best meets their needs. Medicare covers many medical costs, including visits to the doctor, prescription medications, and preventive care such as mammograms, colonoscopies, diabetes treatment, and blood pressure screenings.

Medicare annual enrollment for 2020 benefits runs through Dec. 7, 2019. Enroll in a Medicare Advantage (MA) or prescription drug plan (Part D) for the first time or make changes between these dates so coverage begins without interruption on Jan. 1, 2020. There is also an extended MA open enrollment period from Jan. 1, 2020, to March 31, 2020. You must be enrolled in an MA plan to use this extended open enrollment period to make any changes.

“Medicare Advantage and Part D plans are sold by private insurance companies that contract with Medicare,” said Lisa Emerson, Medicare (SHIBA) program analyst. “They can change their cost and coverage each year, so it’s important to do annual check-ups to make sure you have the coverage you need in 2020.”

There is a new Medicare plan finder tool this year, the first upgrade in a decade. The new plan finder is at https://www.medicare.gov/plan-compare/#/.

The finder allows users to shop and compare Medicare Advantage and Part D plans. The updated finder also provides people with Medicare coverage and their caregivers with a personalized experience through a mobile friendly and easy-to-read design that will help them learn about different options and select coverage that best meets their health needs.

SHIBA provides free health insurance counseling to explain how the Medicare program works, more insurance options that work with Medicare, and help with reducing out-of-pocket costs. SHIBA staff members, along with more than 200 certified counselors, serve many of Oregon’s more than 860,000 Medicare beneficiaries to help them understand their Medicare benefits and enrollment options. Free information and help is available by calling 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting shiba.oregon.gov.

SHIBA also publishes an annual Medicare guide, which is available online and will be available in print in mid-November.

SHIBA is also advising people to protect their identity by guarding their Medicare card like they would their credit card or Social Security number. Identity theft from stolen Medicare numbers is becoming more common. To protect against identity theft, don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone or email, or approaches you in person, unless you have given that person permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you (unless you ask them to) for your Medicare number or other personal information. Also, don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number.

More information

SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit https://healthcare.oregon.gov/shiba to find local help in your county, obtain a copy of the 2018 Oregon Guide to Medicare Health plans, and find Medicare education and enrollment events in your area.

Follow SHIBA on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/OregonSHIBA.

SHIBA is part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on topics such as insurance, mortgages, investments, and workplace safety.


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limb50 ways to be ridiculously generous — and feel ridiculously good.

http://www.alexandrafranzen.com/2013/09/05/50-ways-to-be-ridiculously-generous/

Northwest Tribes Call For Removal Of Lower Columbia River Dams

Energy Skeptic: How much oil is left in America? Not much.

Senator Wyden announces statewide effort for wild, scenic rivers

Oregon students’ mastery of Common Core math ranks next-to-last among 10 states that use same measuring stick

Energy Skeptic: The carbon trap by Paul Chefurka

EPA accepting comments on herbicide paraquat

Archaeologists Have Unearthed A 9,000-Year-Old City In Israel That Rewrites Human History

Fact: Trump TV Ad Misleads on Biden and Ukraine

Hemp Harvest Underway

 


 

Sherman County eNews #258

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Education Foundation Meeting, Oct. 16

  2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor & Special Presentation, Oct. 19

  3. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent, Oct. 20

  4. Presentation: “Recognizing the Diversity Among Us,” Oct. 24

  5. An Invitation! Dewey’s Birthday Celebration, Nov. 3

  6. Diamonds in Your Pockets

  7. Shared State and County Services Serve the Same Oregonians!


1. Sherman County Education Foundation Meeting, Oct. 16

Sherman County Education Foundation Meeting Wednesday, October 16th at 6pm in the Library Program Room.


2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor & Special Presentation, Oct. 19

Sherman County School District

Hall of Honor

and

a special presentation:

From One-Room Schools to One Campus

Logo.Hall of Honor.ShermanCo.School

The Sherman County School District will be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one team into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Event Center that will begin at 5:30 p.m. on October 19, 2019. There will also be a special presentation and celebration of 151 years of education in Sherman County (From One-Room Schools to One Campus).

The Booster Club will be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m.

Please join us for the $12.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased in advance by calling 541-565-3500 or at the door.

The 2019 inductees include United States Military Academy Graduate and Captain Deron R. Kaseberg, former State FFA President and OSU College of Agricultural Sciences Hall of Fame Member Michael S. Macnab, Teacher and State Champion Coach Ron Townsend, the first female Sherman County Superintendent Grace Zevely (Posthumously), and the 1989 1A State Champion Football Team.

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District.

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.


3. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent, Oct. 20

Wasco School Events Center

Presents

An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent

Sunday, October 20

2-5 o’clock

Visit with local artists as you enjoy their work, and enjoy a silent art auction and appetizers with beer/wine.

Mark your calendar! You won’t want to miss this benefit event! Some amazing items have been donated for the silent auction, and over a dozen artists will have some of their work on display and for sale! Tickets are $10 at WSEC, Wasco City Hall or at the door at the Wasco School Events Center, Sunday, October 20 from 2 to 5 pm. Sponsors are Wheatacres Ranch, 4M Farm, WK Ranch and the Macnab Sisters.


4. Presentation: “Recognizing the Diversity Among Us,” Oct. 24

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center presents “Recognizing the Diversity Among Us” with Miguel Angel Herrada, Thursday, October 24, 2019. The program will be offered in Spanish at 5:00 p.m., an optional $15 pork taco dinner begins at 6:00 p.m. and the program in English starts at 7:00 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in The Dalles. This Oregon Humanities Conversation Project event is open to everyone. Admission to this program is free, but a $5 donation per person is appreciated. For more information, call (541) 296-8600 x 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


5. An Invitation! Dewey’s Birthday Celebration, Nov. 3

birthdaycake.candles

Join us for a Birthday Celebration as Dewey Thomas is turning 105!!

Sunday, November 3, 2019

2:00 – 4:00 Open House

The Springs at Mill Creek, The Dalles, Oregon

The Springs Room

Light refreshments – No gifts please.


6. Diamonds in Your Pockets

Abraham Lincoln once said that if you “look for what is wrong, you will surely find it.” How true this is. The imperfections in ourselves mean we can always find deficits if we try. For a lot of us, it is much easier to find the cracks and faults.

If your focus is on what is wrong, if you are busy looking for the flaws and weaknesses in your character, you are weighing yourself down just as surely as if you were going through life carrying a big backpack full of rocks – and every day the backpack just gets heavier. It is no wonder that your mental and emotional “back” is bent under the strain.

Of course, if you are a world-class negative thinker, then the weight of your burden becomes just one more thing with which to find fault. On the other hand, if you spend most of your time looking for and appreciating all that is right or delightful about yourself and the world around you – and make no mistake, there are thousands of delights in this world once you start looking for them – it is as if you had diamonds in your pockets.

To get a quick read on where your focus is, list all your shortcomings and all your strengths on a piece of paper. Take your time and make sure you cover as much as possible. Once you have finished both lists, look to see if you used a double standard. Did you list as weaknesses those things that are occasionally true about you or always true? On the other hand, did you list strengths that are almost always true or just occasionally true? Depending upon what you find, you may be stacking the cards against yourself.

If you get rid of your old programming that says it is better to haul rocks than diamonds, and start affirming your strengths instead, your life will be so much richer! Think of what it will do to your emotional well-being, and your physical well-being, too. And you couldn’t find a better day to start than today. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Shared State and County Services Serve the Same Oregonians!

The State:

—general administrator

—state property manager

—state courts, patrol, prison

—child protection

—mental health hospital

—housing

—highways

—state parks.

Services Shared by County and State:

—administration

—assessment and taxation

—PERS

—elections

—county jails

—community corrections

—court security

—district attorney

—9-1-1

—juvenile services

—aging services

—alcohol/drug programs

—children and families

—developmental disabilities

—mental health services

—veterans’ services

—public health

—environmental health

—planning

—economic/community development

—engineering

—roads

—housing

—Oregon Plan

—public forests

—federal land policy

—telecommunications

—county fair

—water-master.

Counties:

—administration

—property management

—records

—county law library

—sheriff patrol

—medical examiner

—animal control

—solid waste

—surveying

—capital projects

—county forests, parks

—libraries.

~Association of Oregon Counties

Sherman County eNews #257

CONTENTS

  1. An Enormous, Bright Orange Full Hunter’s Moon Will Light Up The Night Sky, Oct. 13

  2. Interest on Potential

  3. Letter to the Editor: Concerned Citizen

  4. Conducting Meetings

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Notes from The Plow 1983

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Our ancestors were builders and pioneers and mostly fearless. We are regulators, auditors, bureaucrats, adjudicators, censors, critics, plaintiffs, defendants, social media junkies and thin-skinned scolds. A distant generation created; we mostly delay, idle and gripe.” ~Victor Davis Hanson


1. An Enormous, Bright Orange Full Hunter’s Moon Will Light Up The Night Sky, Oct. 13

If you notice the moon to be larger and unusually orange in color on October 13, don’t be alarmed as this is a natural phenomenon called the ‘Hunter’s moon.’

According to NASA, it will reach its peak at 5.08 pm EDT on Sunday afternoon, October 13, 2019. The upcoming full moon will appear to be in a larger shape and perfect circle for roughly three days as opposed to one. Beginning from Saturday morning, Hunter’s moon will be visible until Tuesday morning.

Now, the ‘normal’ full moon usually occurs once a month when the Earth is positioned directly between the sun and the moon and during this, the earth completely blocks away direct sunlight from reaching the surface of the moon.

The only source of light the moon receives is reflected from its surface and refracted by our planet, thus appearing reddish in color. Be sure to take a peek at the sky during this time will appear gorgeously lit from dusk till dawn.

Speaking to Country Living, an astronomer at the Royal Observatory Greenwich, Tania de Sales Marques said, “The October full moon will happen on the 13th and is known as the Hunter’s Moon. The Moon will rise just after sunset, at 18:35 and will be highest in the sky around midnight, so if you go for a walk after dinner and the skies are clear, face south and you should be able to spot a beautiful full moon.”

According to Farmer’s Atlantic, the term ‘Hunter’s Moon’ is directly related to the Harvest Moon that helps with hunting. It’s believed that hunters could easily spot fattened deers and other creatures who usually came out to glean at the recently reaped fields by harvesters under the Harvest Moon, hence the name. ~McGill Media


2. Interest on Potential

Have you ever looked back on something that you achieved and wondered why you were so successful? When you look back at your successes and the things you’ve achieved in your life and you look for the reasons why you succeeded, you’ll find that most often it wasn’t just luck. Some, if not all, of the following were involved:

Knowledge, Skill, Commitment, Motivation, Energy, Confidence, Resilience, and a Belief in yourself and what you were doing

It’s not hard to see why we succeed. What is hard is explaining why we don’t succeed all the time. Quite often people will say, “Oh, that would be too hard for me,” or “That would take too much effort.” But would it really? Because the truth is that each one of us has a wealth of abilities, energy and skills, but most of the time we only use a fraction of this wealth.

This incredible wealth of untapped resources is called “Human Potential.” How much we use of it depends, more than anything else, on our belief system. You see, we have far more potential than we use on any given day.

If we believe there is no way around a problem, we close our minds to possible solutions. Our brains literally shut down, because we’ve closed off the path to creative solutions. But if we believe we will find a way, then it doesn’t matter what obstacles we run into. We get very creative. We see things we wouldn’t ordinarily see, and we hang in there and get others to help us until we do find a way. This is your human potential, paying interest.

So, pop the cork on your beliefs. Remove the restraints. The most powerful thing you can do to change your life is to change your beliefs about who you are, about your life, your abilities and the idea of possibilities. Then, begin to act accordingly. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Letter to the Editor: Concerned Citizen

I have read recent letters to the Editor with much distress lately. It seems that there are rules in place to keep such letters positive and informational to the community. Of late, they have been increasingly personal in nature with a heavy bend towards singling out and attacking certain members of our community. I have personally seen at least 3 letters to this effect, and the letter to the Editor dated Sep. 20th certainly had this tone. I also noticed that it violated 4 of the 7 guidelines listed for a letter to be accepted, which makes me wonder if there is a severe bias and agenda as to who gets their letters published in the Sherman County eNews.

Case in point, the rules regarding letters to the Editor are clearly posted on the eNews site. However, the letter from Meinrad Kuettel dated 9/22/19 violated the first guideline by coming in at 362 words. Secondly, the second guideline was violated by posting an attachment., Thirdly, the forth guideline was violated as it was one of the most libelous things I have read in quite a while since it launched a direct attack at 2 specific members of our community by attempted character assassination. Fourthly, it was most certainly a personal matter that should have been kept between the family members named, not aired for the public. Good taste, quality reporting, diplomacy and the interest of the community on the part of all parties involved in publishing that letter should have known better.

The continued publishing of such articles that violate the standards laid out make me question if this is really a news site for the community to be informed or just an electronic tabloid for people to publicly air their feelings instead of dealing with the individual (s) themselves like adults should. I, for one, would appreciate a simple news outlet for our community without the drama. Would that be possible with this publication?

Alex McNabb

Wasco


4. Conducting Meetings

Following is a much-abridged version of Robert’s Rules as they might be adapted for nonprofit meetings. The goal is to promote a balance of fairness and efficiency. Tailor them to fit your own organization. Meetings should be fair so that people who have a point to make are given an opportunity. Meetings should be efficient so that time is spent on discussion relevant to the matter at hand. ~ American Society of Corporate Secretaries.

Order of business–[per agenda circulated in advance]

  1. Opening of meeting (Chair)
  2. Submission of minutes of previous meeting (Secretary)
  3. Reading of reports, i.e. Treasurer’s, Fund-Raising, Program Committee’s and discussion
  4. Old business
  5. Unfinished business from previous meetings
  6. Motions that were tabled from previous meetings
  7. New business–motions to be made for voting by the board
  8. Meeting closing (on schedule)

Discussion

  • Only members and guests recognized by the Chair may speak.

Motions and Voting

  • Generally, before any item can be discussed, there should be a motion made and seconded. Once a motion has been seconded, discussion will follow. After discussion, one of four things can happen:
  • There can be a vote on the motion.
  • The motion can be amended (second required). Then there can be discussion on the amendment. The amendment can be voted. If the amendment passes, the motion automatically passes. If the amendment fails, the motion still stands and can be discussed until voted.
  • The motion can be tabled (second required). There can be no discussion on a motion to table–a vote must be taken immediately. If the vote is to table, no further discussion can take place on the motion.
  • There may be no action on the motion–therefore it becomes old business at a future meeting.
  • Motions must be clear and concise. A motion to “improve fund-raising” would be vague and discussions could meander. However, a motion to “sponsor a benefit golf tournament” is specific and could be effectively discussed and acted on.

Committees

  • Make general board meetings more productive by use of committees and rely on committee reports as a basis for action. Committees can sort through minutiae and come forward with a well-developed proposal for the whole board to consider. Committees can also be a development pool for future board members.

Disagreements

  • The Chair of the meeting is responsible for maintaining order. On procedural questions, the Chair’s ruling will be determinative and final.

Also see: Governance for Nonprofits: From Little Leagues to Universities A Summary of Organizational Governance Principles and Resources for Directors of Nonprofit Organizations By The American Society of Corporate Secretaries and The National Center for Nonprofit Boards.


5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Notes from The Plow 1993

coveredwagon.cartoonFrom the Sherman County Historical Society 1993 spring newsletter:

  • Plowing new ground! Construction of the museum’s new wing, supervised by Society trustees Mike McArthur and Jerry Kirkpatrick, was underway… insulation, sheetrock, paint, light fixtures and carpet.
  • Large overhead door funded by the James Weir Trust.
  • Footings were poured for construction of a footbridge to replace the city’s footbridge under supervision of Jerry Kirkpatrick and Millie Moore Voll.
  • The museum exhibit team had the first interpretive exhibit in progress, Oregon Trails, Rails and Roads in Sherman County. Community artists were painting a mural.
  • An exhibit supplement brochures designed by Jeanney McArthur was funded by grants from Oregon Council for the Humanities and Oregon Development Department. It was entered in the American Association of Museums design competition in March and received an honorable mention in its category.
  • Max, Norma, Susan and Gretchen Barzee donated a cast bronze sculpture, The Promised Land, for the Oregon Trail exhibit.
  • Society president Mike McArthur was elected County Judge. Eileen Moreau assumed Society leadership.
  • Mary Coats Macnab typed the Society’s policies. Treasurer Barbara Bish managed several grant and general fund accounts.
  • For the 1993 summer season, 77 volunteers received orientation under the leadership of Dorothy Benson.
  • The museum cleaning crew swept through the building on brooms: Eilene Eslinger, Penny Eakin, Mavis Olsen, Betsy Martin and Millie Moore Voll.
  • The crew at Hughes Feed responded to a wish list with pruners, hoe and rake.
  • Delbert Wooderson constructed wooden mannequins. Penny Eakin, Mavis Olsen and Reatha Coats sewed period clothing for Oregon Trail mannequins and dress-up clothing for visiting youngsters.
  • Jerrine Belshe spruced up the landscaping. Doris Alley and Diane von Borstel distributed museum brochures in the county and beyond. Doris Alley and Sheila Weber were proprietors of The Museum Store. Vonda Chandler nurtured connections with the county schools.
  • John Zancanella, Prineville Bureau of Land Management archaeologist, led construction of an interpretive Oregon Trail kiosk at McDonald on the John Day River next to the Society’s monument.
  • The county’s Oregon Trail committee arranged for Oregon Trail signs at crossings of county roads and in Wasco, produced by Pat and Erling Jacobsen and funded by Oregon Trail Coordinating Council and Sherman County.

coveredwagon.cartoonFrom the Sherman County Historical Society 1993 fall newsletter:

  • Construction of the new wing, under direction of Jerry Kirkpatrick and carpenter Russell Hiatt of Cove, required many hands for many tasks: Dan Peterson of Coburn Electric, Pat Macnab, Larry and Chris Kaseberg, Floyd Rathbun, Ernie and Chris Moore, Bobby, Pinky and Bob Nisbet, Mike Penners of Nova Security, Orville Blaylock, Allen Miller, Russel Belshee, Eileen Moreau, Sheila Weber, Barbara Cantrall who insisted she “painted the whole gymnasium,” Steve Prinzing of Goldendale, Don Coats who installed chainlink fencing, Neil Pattee who constructed the stairway railings and gate… and generous community-based planning and support, and grants from Oregon Economic Development Department, Oregon Council for the Humanities, Meyer Memorial Trust, Oregon Trail Coordinating Council and Sherman County… by any standard, a remarkable achievement.
  • Production of the Oregon Trail exhibit by an incredibly resourceful and creative volunteer exhibit team through much of 1992 until the opening in June, 1993 involved Myrna Melzer, Cameron Kaseberg, Jeanney McArthur, Pat Jacobsen, Joe and Sheila Weber, Sherry Kaseberg, Millie Moore Voll, Doris Alley, Penny Eakin, Mavis Olsen, Anne Franklin, Eileen Moreau, Dorothy Thompson, Jerry Kirkpatrick, Chet and Reatha Coats, Janet Van Gilder, Gail Macnab Pinkerton, Nancy Fields, Leroy Martin, Malcolm McDermid, Carsten von Borstel, Don von Borstel, Ron Thompson, Betty Rathbun, Ann Bothwell, Jean Woodrum, Deanna Padget, Carole Makinster, Shirley Fritts and exhibit scholar, Ross R. Controneo, Ph.D., Western Oregon State College.
  • The grand opening of the museum’s new wing on June 17th, organized by Jean McKinney and Patty Burnet, included a flag ceremony by Rick Johnson and the Boy Scouts, the invocation by Mac Hall, a welcome by Eileen Moreau, and Jerry Kirkpatrick’s announcement of a significant bequest by Florence Johnston. Jean and Patty introduced honored guests, Carsten von Borstel talked of accessions, Millie Moore Voll described new exhibits in the original wing, Sherry Kaseberg spoke of the Oregon Trail celebration and the exhibit team that produced the exhibits in the new wing, and of volunteers and grant support. Dorothy Benson introduced the county elders who cut the ribbon to dedicate the new wing: Helen Bruckert, Twin Douma and Lela French. Myrna Melzer represented the exhibit team when she officially opened the new exhibit. Bill McKinney played and sang, Mary Eakin played the piano and school children in period costumes danced and sang under Nell Melzer’s direction, giving the day a festive air.
  • The Rock. The six-foot inscribed basalt column located east of Wasco near the fork of the Oregon Trail was permanently installed in June near its original site. After a year of study, preservation and planning, Pat Macnab affectionately called this The Flintstone Project. Pat supervised as the site was prepared by Millard Melzer, Pat Kelley, Roland Simantel, Herb Ramsey, Rick Jauken, Don Coats and Boy Scout Troop #570 of Kirkland, Washington, working on their national trails award, and representatives of BLM and Oregon-California Trails Association.

6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3The Bend Bulletin, Editorial: Plenty to like in records fee suggestion

The Bend Bulletin, Editorial: Hass has good idea for public records council

Project Veritas | Be Brave | Do Something


 

Sherman County eNews #256

CONTENTS

  1. Country Christian Sounds by Charlie Walker at Kent, Oct. 13

  2. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent, Oct. 20

  3. Country Christmas Bazaar, Dec. 7

  4. Condon’s Fall Festival, Nov. 23

  5. A Proper Start to the Day

  6. Become a Youth Ambassador to Germany, Scholarship Program

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Country Christian Sounds by Charlie Walker at Kent, Oct. 13 

music-notes

Country Christian Sounds in God’s Country

by Charlie Walker

Sunday, October 13

6 p.m.

Kent Baptist Church

95202 Dobie Point Road, Kent, Oregon

Questions? Pastor Joe Burgess 541-660-9223


2. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent, Oct. 20

Wasco School Events Center

Presents

An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent

Sunday, October 20

2-5 o’clock

Visit with local artists as you enjoy their work, and enjoy a silent art auction and appetizers with beer/wine. 

Mark your calendar! You won’t want to miss this benefit event! Some amazing items have been donated for the silent auction, and over a dozen artists will have some of their work on display and for sale! Tickets are $10 at WSEC, Wasco City Hall or at the door at the Wasco School Events Center, Sunday, October 20 from 2 to 5 pm. Sponsors are Wheatacres Ranch, 4M Farm, WK Ranch and the Macnab Sisters.


3. Country Christmas Bazaar, Dec. 7

Christmas.holly1

Country Christmas Bazaar

Saturday, December 7
10 am – 2 pm
Grass Valley Pavilion


4. Condon’s Fall Festival, Nov. 23

autumn.treesbareWhat: Condon’s Fall Festival

When: November 23rd

Time: 10-3 pm

Where: Condon Elks Lodge & Veterans Memorial Hall and ALL of our Historic Main Street Businesses.

Free to the Public

Murray’s Condon Pharmacy is doing a Beer & Wine Tasting Event

Over 40 vendors participating!

Questions? Call K’Lynn Lane, Condon Chamber of Commerce, 541-384-7777


5. A Proper Start to the Day

sun.circleAs you wake up, how do you start your day? Does the way you wake up have an effect on how the rest of your day goes?

Everyone knows how important it is that kids get off to a good start in life. How a horse comes out of the starting gate can often make its career, and a sprinter’s ability to come out of the blocks often determines who wins a foot race. Your first experience with something will often color what comes afterward. The way you start your day is no exception.

Do you leap out of bed before your eyes are really open, begin a mad rush to leave for work on time, and spend your whole day trying to get ahead of a schedule that always seems too busy?

Why not try setting your clock a few minutes early for a week? Spend those first few waking moments giving some thought to the way you want the rest of your day to go. Then, as you proceed through preparing for the day ahead, try to bring your full awareness to each activity: showering, brushing your teeth, and selecting your clothes. Do each thing thoughtfully and deliberately, paying complete attention to just that one thing.

Keep your thoughts on the present, and don’t let them leap ahead into the future, or slip back into the past. Just try to be fully present in the moment. This approach is similar to the Buddhist art of mindfulness, and if you practice it for a while, it will change the pace and the feeling of your day! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Become a Youth Ambassador to Germany, Scholarship Program

Have you dreamed of spending an academic year in another country, learning another language, experiencing another cultural, gaining a better global understanding, and representing the USA as a Youth Ambassador?

If so… the US Department of State funded Congress-Bundestag (CBYX) Scholarship Program to Germany is for you! ASSE’s Congress Bundestag Program is currently recruiting applicants for its 2020-2021 program year.

Since 1983, the U.S. Congress and the German Bundestag (parliament) have co-sponsored the prestigious Congress-Bundestag Youth Exchange Scholarship Program to help prepare ambitious young people for a global future.  The CBYX program has enabled more than 26,000 students to expand their global perspectives and make new friends. As youth ambassadors of the United States, Congress-Bundestag students share their life and culture with their German hosts and build greater understanding of the United States and its diversity.

Applicants who wish to be considered for the CBYX Scholarship must be a U.S. Citizen between the ages of 15 years and 18 years and 6 months at the start of the program (born between Feb 1, 2002 – August 1, 2005) and be a high school student with a GPA of 3.0 or better on a 4.0 scale.

The deadline to apply for the CBYX Scholarship Program is December 3, 2019. Students who are ready to apply will need to complete the online pre-application found at www.USAGermanyScholarship.org. Once the students complete the pre-application, they will be emailed further instructions regarding the final application. For more information, students can visit www.asse.com, call (800) 733-2773, or email asseusawest@asse.com.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3“Our ancestors were builders and pioneers and mostly fearless. We are regulators, auditors, bureaucrats, adjudicators, censors, critics, plaintiffs, defendants, social media junkies and thin-skinned scolds. A distant generation created; we mostly delay, idle and gripe.” ~Victor Davis Hanson

Members of Previous Generations Now Seem Like Giants

The OLCC Has Finalized Rules For Flavored Vape Ban That Takes Effect on Oct. 15

Pew Research Center: Digital Knowledge Quiz

Stark partisan divisions in Americans’ views of ‘socialism,’ ‘capitalism’


 

Sherman County eNews #255

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

God’s Got This
church.family1In Acts chapter 9 we read about the salvation of the apostle Paul (Saul). He was a fierce opponent of the early followers of Jesus and had gone to extremes to have them arrested and even put to death. While traveling 135 miles to Damascus, Saul was stopped in his tracks by a light from heaven with Jesus speaking to him asking him why he (Saul) was persecuting Him (Jesus). Saul was then instructed to go to Damascus to wait for further instruction. Being blinded he was led into the city where he waited three days, praying while not eating or drinking.

As Saul was waiting, God also prepared Ananias who was being sent to this notorious opponent. The details given to Ananias in a vision were very specific, even to the point of him being told that Saul also had a vision that Ananias, by name, would come to him. As specific as the instruction was, Ananias still responded with a “but,” fearing that Saul may actually be given access to them to further their persecution. Jesus responded to Ananias with, “Go, for he is a chosen instrument of Mine, to bear My name before the Gentiles and kings and the sons of Israel…”

Ananias had a choice. He could disregard the instruction from God and live in fear of Saul, or he could listen and go, trusting Jesus to do as He said. Ananias went and became the one blessed to lay hands on this most famous apostle to the Gentile world.

God may not speak to us through visions as was done with Saul and Ananias, but every day we have choices to make as we seek His leading in the varied situations of our lives. The encouragement for all of us is to trust His leading on our hearts and in the situations laid before us, and obediently go forward to see what He does knowing God has it under control.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, First Baptist Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)  

eNEWS POLICIES:

glasses1CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers. 

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

ThankYou1EDITOR’S NOTE. The nicest THANK YOU note came our way from Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at Maryhill Museum of Art, and it must be shared! She wrote, “I just wanted to thank Sherman County for bringing students to Maryhill Museum yesterday. They were so wonderful and we enjoyed having them. Other visitors remarked repeatedly at the well behaved students… yours!! Thank you!”

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

 JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

AN AFTERNOON OF SHERMAN COUNTY TALENT: SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 10/11

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Being a trustholder of the community means serving as would a good steward. The good steward views the community as a gift from previous generations, but a gift with strings attached. One is obligated to pass the gift to future generations in a better state than that in which it was received…. The community is both our inheritance and our legacy.” ~National Association of Community Leadership, Taking Leadership to Heart (1996)

Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

EMPLOYMENT:

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer:$13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: Amberlena ShafferRecruiter | OFFICE: (541) 303-5093 | Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  | Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

HOUSE. 1400 SQ Foot 3 bedroom 2 full bath; Remolded bathrooms, Heat Pump, Wood Stove; Located in the City of Grass Valley. Please call Judy 928-851-2340 or 541-370-2454. 10/11

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

sign.freeFREE:

Freestanding basketball goal (it could use a new net but has one and works just fine). It’s heavy as the bottom is weighted, of course.  Free – You haul and it’s yours.  Call Jeanne at 541-714-5740.10/25

Antique Sewing Machine in original wood cabinet – unusual Craftsman style cabibet- great shape I believe it is from the early 1900’s, original book and accessory box included. It’s heavy – you arrange to pick it up and it’s yours- originally from a local Sherman county resident.  Call Jeanne 541-714-5740. 10/25

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED:

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

Halloween.scare.sunOCTOBER

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators’ Meeting 12 China Gorge, Hood River

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30 Condon

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

16 American Red Cross Blood Drive 9:30-2:30 Sherman County School

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

25 Trunk or Treat 6-7 Senior Center Parking Lot, Moro

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

31 HALLOWEEN 

flag.starsNOVEMBER

3 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 ELECTION DAY

5 Moro City Council 7

6 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6-10 American Agri-Women Convention in Tigard

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

11 VETERANS’ DAY

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Rufus City Council

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

StarYellowDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE