Sherman County eNews #163

CONTENTS

  1. Correction: Contact Information for The Times-Journal

  2. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, June 25

  3. Sherman County Court & Cities Public Work Session on Fiber Broadband, June 27

  4. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda and Notice, June 29

  5. Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District Special Meeting, June 25

  6. Not the Finished Product

  7. Opal Mae Steele 1923-2018

  8. Sherman County History Tidbits: 1919 School Statistics

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Correction: Contact Information for The Times-Journal 

The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | 541-384-2421 timesjournal1886@gmail.com $35/year

*** EARLY DEADLINE DUE TO JULY 4TH***

All information must be received by NOON on Friday, June 29th.

Thank you.

The Times-Journal Staff

Ph. # 541-384-2421

Fax # 541-384-2411


2. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, June 25

fireworks1July 4th fireworks displays are just around the corner so now is a good time to learn how to capture the moment with your camera. Tori Macnab Medina will share her skills of catching fantastic fireworks photos as well as photographing the beautiful summer night skies. The Sherman County Photography meeting starts at 6pm at the OSU Extension Building in Moro on Monday, June 25. Meetings are open to everyone and new members are always welcome.


3. Sherman County Court & Cities Public Work Session on Fiber Broadband, June 27

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court and Sherman County cities will conduct a joint work session on Wednesday, June 27, 7 until 8:30 p.m. at the Wasco School Events Center in Wasco. The purpose will be to discuss the Fiber Based Broadband Initiative for City Fiber to Homes. Sherman County residents with questions about the fiber optics initiative may contact Carrie Pipinich, carrie@mcedd.org, or call 541-296-2266, or city administrators.


4. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda and Notice, June 29

Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda

June 29th 10:00 AM

OSU Extension Office Conference Room, 66365 Lonerock Road Moro, OR

1.0 Call To Order & Director Roll Call

2.0 10:00 Final Budget hearing

 Open hearing

 Allow for public input

 Closing hearing

 Vote on final budget

3.0 Directors’ Changes or Additions to the Agenda

4.0 Minutes Review and Approval

5.0 Financials Review and Approval

6.0 IT and System updates and progress report

7.0 Business and Marketing report

8.0 Other items for the good of the order

9.0 Public Input/Comment

10.0 Next Meeting

11.0 Adjournment

The Frontier TeleNet board reserves the right at its sole discretion to enter into Executive Session under ORS 192.660 (a), (g), (j), (n),(D). For those requesting a call in number or other accommodations, please contact Mike Smith at 541-306-1202 or mikesmith@connectionsllc.us


5. Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District Special Meeting, June 25

PUBLIC NOTICE OF A SPECIAL MEETING

The Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District will be holding a special meeting on Monday, June 25th at 7pm at the USDA Service Center Office, at 302 Scott Street in Moro, Oregon 97039. The board will review the Annual Work Plan.

Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District

SPECIAL MEETING AGENDA

June 25, 2018

7:00 PM

Old Moro Elementary School

302 Scott St. Moro, OR 97039

  1. Call Meeting to Order
  2. Annual Work Plan
  3. Other Business
  4. Adjournment

~Amanda Whitman, Sherman County SWCD

PO Box 405,Moro, OR 97039

541-565-3216 ext 109  amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net


6. Not the Finished Product

As individuals, human beings are constantly changing, even though it may not seem like it in the short term.

In what Harvard psychologist, Dan Gilbert, calls the “end of history illusion,” human beings seem to think that the people we are today are the people we are going to be in the future. Not so, according to his research and a presentation featured on TED.com.

One of the benefits of a long-term study was the inescapable fact that people in Gilbert’s studies actually changed far more than what they expected to change, in an imagined 10-year period into the future. At every point in the age range, actual reported change – in such things as personal values, personality, likes and dislikes – was far above the predicted change levels.

So,” you ask, “why does this matter?” Well, it ties in with the way we make decisions. We know that everything that has happened to us – every experience, learning moment, discovery – is stored in our subconscious, along with the emotions that we associate with those experiences. Then, as we are confronted with some new situation, our brains immediately attempt to associate the new situation with something filed away in the subconscious. If nothing resonates, then the brain files this new experience for future use.

If we do connect with something in the past, then our brains immediately go into “association mode,” evaluate whether the past experience was good or bad, and then we make decisions according to what happened to us in the past. When we try to imagine something in the future, we have nothing on which to base our judgment, except the past. No surprise, it is easier to remember than it is to imagine – unless we can let go of the belief that we are a “finished product” with no more growing to do.

The good news is that we are NOT finished growing and changing, even if we think we are. As Gilbert reported, “The person you are right now is transient, as fleeting and as temporary as all the people you have ever been.”

The question is: Who do you want to be tomorrow? And the tomorrow after that, and the tomorrow after that? Let go of feeling “finished” and embrace the “want to be” in you. Your brain will be fully engaged in the future – and you’ll be happier for it. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Opal Mae Steele 1923-2018

flower.rose.starOpal Mae Steele, 94, of Quartzsite, Arizona, and Salmon, Idaho passed away on June 19, 2018 in Salmon.  Opal was born to Otto and Alice (Caddy) Obermiller on September 5, 1923 in Loup City, Nebraska.

Opal married Clyde Steele; they had four children: Clyde Jr., Jim, Linda Kay and Shirley.

Opal retired from the commercial garment business in the Portland, Oregon area, working with the Pendleton and White Stag Companies. She loved to square dance, and did so for many years. She enjoyed traveling between Quartzsite and Salmon as a “snowbird” for the last 20 years staying with her daughter Shirley.

She is survived by her children: Jim (Jan) Steele and Shirley (Richard) Kempf; one grandson Jimmy (Amanda) Steele; two brothers Harold Obermiller, Raymond Obermiller. She was preceded in death by her parents; the following siblings: Frank, Earl and Mary: her husband Clyde; children: Clyde Jr., and Linda Kay; grandson Chaddrick James; and son-in-law Richard Kempf. Memorial Services will be held in Loup City, Nebraska at a later date. Arrangements are under the direction and care of the Jones & Casey Funeral Home of Salmon, Idaho. http://www.jonesandcaseyfh.com.


8. Sherman County History Tidbits: 1919 School Statistics

1919 Sherman County School Statistics

~Grass Valley Journal, February 28, 1919

    54 teachers employed in county

    27 teachers in rural schools

    27 teachers in town schools

    10 teachers in Wasco

    9 teachers in Moro

    8 teachers in Grass Valley

    4 teachers in Kent

    30 school districts in county

    26 rural districts

    4 high school districts

    1 school pays $65 for teacher

    8 schools pay $75

    5 schools pay $80

    7 rural schools pay $90

    5 teachers in town schools get $85

    3 teachers in town schools get $90

    4 teachers in town schools get $95

    7 teachers in town schools get $100

    $81.96 average monthly wage for rural teachers

    $93.75 average monthly wage for town grade teachers

    $100 lowest wage paid for high school teachers in county

    1118 boys and girls in county between ages of 4 and 20

    535 pupils enrolled in town schools

    384 pupils enrolled in rural schools

    919 total enrollment in county for 1918-1919

    192 pupils enrolled in Wasco

    139 pupils enrolled in Moro

    114 pupils enrolled in Grass Valley

    90 pupils enrolled in Kent

    54 high school pupils in Wasco

    49 high school pupils in Moro

    23 high school pupils in Grass Valley

    13 high school pupils in Kent

    140 high school pupils in county

    33 in 8th grade rural schools

    60 in 8th grade town schools

    93 total enrollment in 8th grade.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

Bird.Black.EnvelopeNew mill to convert wheat straw to pulp expects to hire 80 people

 

Commentary: 5 Reasons Why I Don’t Have Solar Panels on My Roof…Yet

Oregon to allow students to identify as neither male nor female

 

21 small wildfires ignited by hundreds of lightning strikes across Oregon

Fire forces evacuations in Jefferson County; Gov. Kate Brown declares conflagration

 

Government Employees File Suit To Destabilize Oregon Union Payments


 

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Sherman County eNews #162

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS: 

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life.

Your willingness to put it into words

is all that is necessary.

~ Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

EMPLOYMENT:

COACHING POSITIONS for Sherman County School Fall, Winter & Spring. In order to better align Sherman County School’s Athletic Program from Grades 5-12 there are openings for the following Coaching positions:

Fall

5th-8th Volleyball (2 positions)

5th-8th Football (2 position)

Winter

5th-8th Boys Basketball (2 positions)

5th-8th Girls Basketball (1 position)

Spring

5th -8th Boys and Girls Track (2 positions)

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing will be required for all positions. For further information and application materials please email Gary Lewis at glewis@sherman.k12.or.us or Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

OFFICE DEPUTY, ASSESSOR’s OFFICE. Position Type: Full Time; Starting Salary: $42,624. Open Until Filled. General Statement of Responsibilities: Provide administrative support to the Assessor’s office through conducting and organizing administrative duties and activities including receiving and handling information. Assist in the daily activities of the Assessor’s office related to the assessment and tax roll, processes deed and map changes, and provides front counter assistance to the public. Obtain an application and full job description from the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us or from the Sherman County Assessor’s office. Must return completed application to the Sherman Assessor’s Office PO Box 283, Moro, Oregon 97039. Sherman County is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 6/29

RETAIL | HUMAN RESOURCES |RECEPTIONIST | LABORER | DRIVER.

Mid Columbia Producers is now hiring for multiple positions.

  • Full Time Retail Associate– Wasco, Oregon (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Part Time Retail Associate– Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Retail Associate – Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Petroleum Delivery Driver– Moro, Oregon
  • Full Time Grain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations
  • Part TimeGrain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations

For complete job descriptions please visit www.mcpcoop.com. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: HR, PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039 Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  HR@mcpcoop.com

FOR SALE:

MORO PROPERTY. NEW PRICE OF $44,900.00 A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. RMLS# 17410095. Contact tiffany@drysideproperty.com 9/28

MORO LOTS. Two, One acre lots for sale in an area with new homes on large parcels.  Has city water and power at the road on edge of lot. Gravel road access only a couple hundred yards off pavement. Great view of town, the fairgrounds, Lots of fields, see the top of Mount Hood and Mount Adams on clear days.  The Washington side of the gorge, 20 miles away! Has never had a house on it and was a wheat field until a few years ago. Rectangle in shape, 273.53 x 159.26. Horses, livestock, etc. All Ok in city limits. (No pigs unless 4-H). Zoned agriculture and buildable for one house per acre.  Located just on the outskirts of the city of Moro. To view the property travel out first street in Moro and take a right on Pinkerton (across from the extension office). The lots will be located on the right side of the road. Two acres available for $60,000. For pictures visit: https://portland.craigslist.org/grg/reo/6611735601.html   For more information, contact Brittany at 541-413-1616.  7/13

UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED OUTDOOR FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS AND FURNITURE REHABILITATION: Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 6/15

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

SERVICES:

THE LEAN-TO CAFÉ & GOOSE PIT SALOON.  Daily Specials: Tuesday Hamburgers, Wednesday Soft Tacos, Thursday Chicken Fried Steak, Friday Fresh Clam Chowder and Saturday Night Prime Rib. 541-442-5709 in Historic Downtown Wasco. 6/22

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/29

 NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:

 HOUSE. Looking to rent or buy. Our small family of myself my husband and our two beautiful boys are wanting to move to Moro OR. We live in Newport but have family that live there. Open to ideas. For rent we are looking for a 2-3 bed. And to buy we would like an owner carry 3-4 bed. You can email or call/text. Lexxieadams@gmail.com. 6/29

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION, and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)  

lawnmower.boyJUNE

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman Co. Historical Museum Artist Series: Sherman County Photography Club

22 Columbia Gorge Bi-State Renewable Energy Zone Meeting 12:30 Casa el Mirador

22 Family Bingo Night 6-8 Grass Valley Pavilion

23 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Start Your Miniature Rock Garden

23 Tango at Maryhill Museum of Art 6-9

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Annual Meeting 11-1

25 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Moro

25 Korean War Began 1950

26 Sherman County Public/School Library 10 S.T.E.A.M. ages 6-12

26 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

26 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

26 Moro Rural Fire Protection District Budget Hearing 8 Moro

27 OSU “Food Hero” Volunteer Training 9-2 One Community Health, The Dalles 

27 Sherman County/Cities Broadband Meeting 7-8:30 Wasco School Events Center

27 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

27-30 4-H Summer Conference, OSU Campus, Corvallis

28 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Footloose

29 Frontier TeleNet Budget Hearing & Board Meeting 10 Moro

29 Home Run Derby, Condon

30 Barnett Memorial Independence Day Open Golf Tournament 8 Condon

30-July 1 Harvester’s Classic Coed Soft Ball Tournament, Condon

American flag.kidsJULY

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Linda Krasfic’s Baby Quilts

3 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

3 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Independence Day

4 HYATUS Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Grass Valley Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

5 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

6 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

7 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

7 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Art Walk in Moro

7 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

7 Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

7 14th Annual Fossil Cruz-in 9-4 Fossil

7-15 Moro’s 2nd Annual Quilt and Fiber Event 10-4

8-11 Portland Horseless Carriage Club Tour: Journey Through Time Scenic Byway, John Day

8-12 Sherman County Historical Museum Quilt Display

9-12 Sherman County 4-H Food Preservation Day Camp, Extension Office

9-15 Summer Fishtrap Gathering (Writers in the American West) Wallowa Lake

10 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Sherman County Public/School Library 6 Hogwarts Mystery Night

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

10 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Meeting 12:30

12 Sherman County Courthouse Surplus Silent Auction 8-9 a.m.

12 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Coco

12-15 National Association of Counties Conference, Nashville, Tennessee

13 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

14 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Rock Necklaces ages up to 4

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Traffic Jam Show

14 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

14 Starry Night Camp-out at Maryhill Museum of Art

16-19 Sherman County 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Day Camp, Extension Office

17 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

17 Sherman County Public/School Library 11 Oregon Rocks! K-6

17 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

18 Sherman County Court 9

18 Kids Pioneer Day at Sherman County Historical Museum

19 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

21 Sherman County Public/School Library 1 Adam Miller, Old Songs for Young Folks

21 Sherman Library Summer Reading Program End of Summer Party 3

21 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

21-22 Maryhill Museum Free Counties: Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Klickitat

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

23 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 3

23-27 Summer Art Institute at Maryhill Museum 8:30-4 daily

24 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

24 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

25 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County

25-28 Jefferson County Fair, Madras

26 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Love, Simon

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

28 WWI Began 1914

28 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

30-Aug. 3 Pacific NW Plein Air Paint Out

30-Aug. 25 Pacific NW Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge

31 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31-Aug. 4 Malheur County Fair, Ontario

starCircleAUGUST

1 All County Prayer Meeting, Rufus Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

2 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

1-4 Union County Fair, LaGrande

1-5 Deschutes County Fair, Redmond

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Abbey Phelps, Knitting & Fiber Arts

3 Jawbone Flats Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

3 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

3 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

4 Class: Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine 10-12 Wasco School Events Center

4 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

4 Plein Air Reception 5-7 Maryhill Museum of Art

4 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

4 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

4 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

4 Art Walk in Moro: Wool Spinners & Quilts

4-11 Wallowa County Fair, Enterprise

6-10 Sherman County Summer Drama Day Camp

7 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Vietnam War Began 1964

7-10 Baker County Fair, Baker City

7-11 Umatilla County Fair, Hermiston

8 Sherman County Community & Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

8-11 Crook County Fair, Prineville

8-11 Yakima Valley Fair & Rodeo, Grandview

9 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 My Little Pony

10 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

11 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

11 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Helicopters

14 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

14 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

16 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

17-18 Sherman Class of ’68 Reunion

18 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

20 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Silvies Valley Ranch

20-26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Activities Every Day

21 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

21-26 Sherman County Fair & Rodeo, Moro

23 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Pacific Rim Uprising

23-26 Wasco County Fair, Tygh Valley

28 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

28 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot

31-Sept.2 Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games – Historic Maryhill Loops.

food.sack1SEPTEMBER

1 Art Walk in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

1 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

1 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

1 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families / Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Photographs John Day Dam, 50 years Ago

2 V-J Day WW II Japanese Surrender 1945

3 Labor Day

5 All County Prayer Meeting, Moro Presbyterian Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

8 Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction, Paradise Rose Dinner

8-9 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Hood River Fly-In

9 Grandparents Day. Free Admission at Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5

11 Patriot Day & National Day of Service & Remembrance

15 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

22 Smithsonian Museum Day Live at Maryhill Museum tickets at www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-2017

22 Romanian Cultural Festival at Maryhill Museum 10-5

23 Autumn Begins

29 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

 

Sherman County eNews #161

CONTENTS

  1. Life Flight Celebrating 40 Years with a Special Registration Deal

  2. Basic Sewing Class: Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine, Aug. 4

  3. Oregon Department of Energy Facility Siting Council Meeting, June 29

  4. The Genuine Article

  5. Sherman County History Q & A

  6. License plate transfer law to change July 1

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The bosom of America is open to receive not only the Opulent and respectable Stranger, but the oppressed and persecuted of all Nations and Religions; whom we shall welcome to a participation of all our rights and privileges, if by decency and propriety of conduct they appear to merit the enjoyment. ~George Washington 1783


1. Life Flight Celebrating 40 Years with a Special Registration Deal

If you have been thinking about signing up for Life Flight, but just haven’t found the time or a good reason to, now would be a great time to do so.  From now through Labor Day, It will only cost $40 to sign up.  This will be for new members only.  You can access the website at www.lifeflight.org.

Also, when it is time to renew your membership next year and you are a veteran or first responder, it will be only $50 per year.  Otherwise it is $65 per year.

If you have any questions regarding the Life Flight membership, please contact Shawn at 541-565-3100.


2. Basic Sewing Class: Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine, Aug. 4

Basic Sewing Class: Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine

Saturday, August 4th 10 until noon

sewing.machine.woman

$15

Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine

Understanding and trouble-shooting your sewing machine.

Bring your sewing machine, thread, Schmedts #80/12 jeans needles, basic equipment, pins, scissors, your manual, etc.

Wasco School Events Center on Barnett Street.


3. Oregon Department of Energy Facility Siting Council Meeting, June 29

wind-turbineEnergy Facility Siting Council Meeting Notice and Agenda Oregon Department of Energy Meitner Conference Room 550 Capitol Street NE Salem, OR Friday, June 29, 2018 – 8:30 a.m. https://www.oregon.gov/energy/facilities-safety/facilities/Council%20Meetings/2018-06-29-EFSC%20Agenda.pdf


4. The Genuine Article

What does it mean to be authentic in today’s world? It doesn’t mean just being different or standing out from the crowd, but it does mean having a firm understanding of just who you are.

“Genuineness.” “Authenticity.” These words are kind of hard to say and, for many people, even harder to be. However, there are some hallmarks that illustrate what it means to be authentic.

First of all, authentic people are aware of their thoughts and feelings, and they behave in ways that reflect those feelings. They don’t see any need to “Put on an act” to impress or control others. They accept their vulnerabilities as well as their strengths, and they know that accepting something isn’t necessarily the same thing as liking it. Do you know something else? Because they accept themselves for who they are, they accept other people, too.

Authentic people don’t laugh at jokes they don’t think are funny. They don’t change their identity, like chameleons, depending on who they are with, or where they are. So, if you want to grow as a person, take time to really know yourself. If you’re not completely happy with what you find, don’t worry too much. Work on accepting yourself for what you are, right here, right now, and work on being truly authentic.

Carl Rogers, a world-famous psychologist, once said that when we accept ourselves exactly as we are, change becomes much easier. There is a very good chance he was right, because then the change process has a solid place from which to start. We measure growth from where we are to where we want to be. If we don’t know where we are, it’s a little difficult to pin down just how we are going to get to where we want to be.

If you are the boss, you may not always like what your employees do. But in your role as leader, you do have skills to guide them toward a more fully-realized version of who they can be. If you are a parent, take a tip from another famous Mr. Rogers: Let your kids know that even though you may not always like what they do, you love them for who they are – just the way they are! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Sherman County History Q & A

question.mark.circleQUESTION. Imagine the map. Explorers came down the Columbia River in October 1805. They identified a river that falls in on the Larboard side, Lodges of Indians on the Starboard side … a round topped mountain immediately in front that they were going towards … an Island of rocks about 4 miles long … the entrance of a large river on the Larboard Side …and the commencement of the pitch of the Great falls. Who were they and where were they?

ANSWER. The answer is with the Links.


6. License plate transfer law to change July 1

Oregon.Flat.poleWhat you should know before buying license plates from a private seller

SALEM – A new Oregon consumer protection law will change requirements for transferring license plates from one vehicle to another as of July 1, 2018.
Under House Bill 4062, passed by the 2018 Legislature, you will still be able to transfer plates with unexpired registration tags to another vehicle that you own. However, in a plate transfer between vehicles with different owners, both vehicles will begin new registration periods and both vehicles are subject to all registration requirements.  

“Some people were using plate transfers as a way to avoid making vehicle repairs to pass DEQ emissions testing,” DMV Administrator Tom McClellan said. “We also believe some people were stealing license plates and selling them online to unsuspecting buyers. This law change is intended to prevent those abuses.”

The new law will help protect consumers in several ways:
* It will prevent the use of plate transfers to evade emissions testing requirements that apply to the Portland and Medford areas. 
* It is likely to decrease the incentive for plate theft to feed the market of individuals either seeking to evade air quality laws or looking for a bargain in registration fees.
* It will reduce the loss to victims of plate thefts by preserving their vehicle registration if the plates are transferred to another vehicle. 

For registration to transfer with your plates, you must be:
* Listed as a registered owner in DMV records for the vehicle from which the plates were removed, and apply for a title and plate transfer for the vehicle receiving the plates; OR
* Listed as the registered owner in DMV records for both vehicles.

If either of the vehicles involved in the plate transfer are owned by more than one person or business, at least one commonly registered owner must be listed in DMV records for both vehicles in order to transfer the registration with the plates.

Vehicles in  areas around Portland and Medford that are subject to DEQ requirements must provide proof of compliance with DEQ emissions testing prior to registration or registration renewal.  This means that a DEQ emissions test certificate is required if the plate being transferred is due for registration renewal, or if new registration is required because the plate transfer occurred between vehicles not owned by the same person or business.

Any time you need to visit a DMV office, first check www.OregonDMV.com to find office hours and locations, and to make sure you have everything you need before your visit. You also can do some DMV business from home at OregonDMV.com. You can renew your vehicle registration, file a change of address or file notice of the sale of your vehicle online without getting in line at an office.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Golden Hills Wind Project near Wasco

 

Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility near Heppner

American Thinker

Congressional Quarterly Roll Call

Sherman County History Q & A: Answer: Lewis & Clark Expedition; William Clark’s journal; John Day River; Miller Island; Deschutes River; Celilo Falls

 

Dean Martin with John Wayne: What Wayne wants for his daughter

Opinion. The Politics Behind Separation Anxiety


 

Sherman County eNews #160

CONTENTS

  1. Ribbon Cutting at Cottonwood Canyon State Park Experience Center

  2. Starry Night at the Museum, July 14

  3. More Than One Way

  4. Sherman County History Q & A

  5. Wasco County Historical Society Program, June 30 

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Ribbon Cutting at Cottonwood Canyon State Park Experience Center

The Oregon State Parks Department and the member-based non-profit organization Oregon State Parks Foundation have cut the ribbon to open the Experience Center at Cottonwood Canyon State Park, together with the first group of students to use the facility, the Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute.

Cottonwood Canyon State Park, an 8,000-acre park that straddles the John Day River in eastern Oregon, is the second largest park in the State Park system, and one of the newest.

The Experience Center is the heart of the $1.6 million project, which will ultimately include eight cabins, a restroom and shower facility, and a new group camping area. The grand opening for the full Experience Center complex is scheduled for September 18.

The Oregon State Parks Foundation raised $800,000 for the Experience Center build-out, furthering the member-based organization’s mission to help support the Oregon State Parks through additional funding, to enhance the visitor experience and educational opportunities in State Parks.

The overarching goal of the Experience Center project is to provide a space for both an outdoor school and a gathering place for groups coming to Cottonwood Canyon.

At a modest 1,700 square feet, the sustainably designed multi-use Experience Center will include classroom space, interpretive displays, activity and meeting areas, a park-specific library, and relaxation and contemplation space. There will be a shaded outdoor area with a fireplace, and walkways connecting the Experience Center, campsites, and cabin areas.

The space will provide an opportunity for residential outdoor learning, regional activities, environmental education, and cultural events that will serve the community, the region, and state park visitors from across the state and nation.

The Experience Center was built using a variety of sustainable building practices, including smart site design, and sustainable material and solar energy usage.

Notably both the interior and exterior have extensive Juniper finishes. Juniper is seen by many as a water-hoarding nuisance in the region; the Juniper used in this project was harvested locally and resulted in a truly beautiful design aesthetic. The building demonstrates that Juniper is a viable commercial construction element that yields great results.

About the Oregon State Parks Foundation  The Oregon State Parks Foundation is a state-wide, member-supported, non-profit partner of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. The Foundation is dedicated to raising funds to enhance and preserve special places and experiences in Oregon’s State Parks.

You may not know that NOT A SINGLE PENNY of state taxes has gone to support the State Parks since 1998. Instead, user fees cover about 55 percent of the operating costs, and the Oregon Lottery covers about 44 percent. Hence, your parks need your support by becoming a member of the Foundation.

Since 1995, the Foundation has supported many vital projects such as restoring Vista House at Crown Point, helping to renovate five Oregon Lighthouses, and preserving the Kam Wah Chung & Co Museum.

The Foundation strives to connect all Oregonians with their State Parks, to enrich the visitor experience through interpretation and education, and to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.  To learn more about the Foundation, and to become a member, go to: http://www.oregonstateparksfoundation.org.


 2. Starry Night at the Museum, July 14

Join us at Maryhill for a magical overnight campout and stargazing experience in one of the most majestic settings imaginable. Volunteers from Rose City Astronomers will provide telescopes to give visitors awe-inspiring views of the summer night sky. Catch glimpses of the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy, Sagittarius, and even some meteors if we are lucky! Troy Carpenter from the Goldendale Observatory will be our guest lecturer and Will Hornyak will share a selection of star stories. Arrive early in the afternoon for a festive line-up of live music in the sculpture garden. Don’t miss this fantastic, family-friendly event! 

Cost for Tent or RV Campsite: $50 members | $60 non-members; Includes campsite in the gardens at Maryhill, and one (1) free admission to the museum for each member in your party. Tent and RV sites accommodate one tent or RV. Campers provide their own tents and camping gear. No cooking or fires permitted. There are no RV (electrical) hook-ups or showers. Deadline to register for tent or RV site is July 11.

Visitors who wish to stargaze without camping, are welcome. Stargazing only is FREE on the grounds of the museum.

To register complete the form http://www.maryhillmuseum.org/starrynight and use PayPal to complete your transaction. If you prefer, you can also reserve by phone at 509.773.3733 ext. 25.


3. More Than One Way

When you are learning something new, what helps you learn more easily and what interferes with the process? Today, let’s talk about learning styles.

There are different styles of almost everything you can do or buy, from playing a guitar to picking out a new car. But, did you know that there are also different styles of learning? Some folks are visual learners; they literally need to see relationships with their eyes before they can understand. Other people learn best when they can hear new ideas.

Some people like to think a problem through before they try to solve it, while others feel more comfortable with a trial and error approach. Some people like to see an overview of how what they’re doing fits into the big picture before it makes sense. Others feel just fine working on one isolated area of a larger project, as long as they understand how their particular part works.

You see, there is no one best way to learn or to teach. The best teachers adjust their styles to suit individual learners, and the best learners learn to make their needs known, or they set up circumstances that facilitate their own unique style. Remember, your child may not have the same learning style that you do, and two kids in the same family may learn equally well but by very different methods.

One other thing to remember: child learners become adult employees. When there is learning to be done on the job – and there always is in thriving, growing organizations – wise leadership provides for different learning styles, and benefits even more because of this respect for diversity of thought. If organizations only think or learn in one way, locking on to what they do and how they do it, then they automatically lock out everything else. A better way or opportunity isn’t even recognized when it crosses their path.

For best results, honor these differences. Open up your field of vision! Find out all you can about your children’s and your employees’ learning styles, and refrain from trying to force square-peg-learners into round-hole-experiences. You’ll both be happier. Along the way, you might just learn something new about yourself in the process. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Sherman County History Q & A

QUESTION. They practiced pontoon bridging on the Columbia River to prepare for the crossing of the Rhine River during World War 2. Who were they and where?

The answer is with the Links.


5. Wasco County Historical Society Program, June 30 

The second program in the Historical Society series will be “From Pioneer Drugstore to Community Icon: the Waldron Drugstore” presented by Eric Gleason on June 30, 2018, at 11:00 a.m.  It will be at the Wing Hong Hai Building (aka the Chinese Building) at 210 E. 1st Street in The Dalles.  Eric will have information on the Waldron Building, including history and old photos.  Come to hear the facts about the oldest commercial building in The Dalles! For more information call 541-980-7453.  


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.Envelope2016 Per Capita Personal Incomes in Gilliam and Wheeler Counties

Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Neilsen: ‘Well-Coached’ Illegal Aliens Using Children To Pose As Families

 

Wordless cues say so much

 

Sherman County History Q & A

Answer: U.S. Army Engineers at Rufus, Oregon; Camp Rufus.

Republicans Can Pass Another Tax Cut … By Killing The Ethanol Mandate

 

Idaho child gets bubonic plague — officials say it could have been spread in Oregon 

Here are 11 common sea stars (starfish) found on Oregon’s coast

Starbucks Gets Millions from US Government


 

Sherman County eNews #159

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Why This Oregon School District Will Consider Arming Its Staff

  3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem by the Numbers

  4. Taking Command of You

  5. Sherman County History Q & A

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is now open on Summer Hours -11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm Saturday

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

June’s Book Club – Thursday, June 21 at 6pm.
The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton.

Young Adult Night – Thursday, June 21 from 6pm to 8pm
Jr/Sr high students, come hang out, eat snacks, do crafts, watch a movie or start a book club, we decide! Come help plan our new young adult space!!

Crafts in Stacks Rock Garden Planters – Saturday, June 23, 2pm-4pm
We will create a small rock garden planter using cold and drought hearty plants. These little starts are perfect for growing your rock garden at home.
Each person will receive 6-8 tiny plants, but be careful, these sedums and succulents won’t stay small for long. Please bring your own shallow 6-12 inch planter that MUST have good drainage. These plants do not tolerate wet feet! Small strawberry planters work well. We will provide all other supplies


2. Why This Oregon School District Will Consider Arming Its Staff

More than two dozen school shootings have taken place across the United States so far in 2018. Now, an Oregon school district is considering arming its staff.

The Sherman County School District is working with the county sheriff’s office and other local agencies to decide whether to implement a number of safety measures before school starts next fall. One of the ideas includes starting a program where staff could volunteer to be armed and undergo firearms training.

Sherman County School District Superintendent Wes Owens said officials there are weighing what the best options are to prevent a school shooting… …

Continue here:  https://www.opb.org/news/article/arm-teachers-oregon-sherman-county-school/


3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem by the Numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories.

  • $904:Statewide fair market rent for a one-bedroom apartment in Oregon, according to the National Low Income Housing Coalition.
  • 45:Hours per week the average Oregonian would have to work to afford that rent.
  • 41:Oregon water systems that are threatened by the possibility of toxic algae, according to The Statesman-Journal.
  • 172:Traffic fatalities in Oregon so far this year, according to the Oregon Department of Transportation.
  • 17.8:Percentage that amount has increased from this time last year.
  • 70:Fatalities from distracted driving in Oregon, 2012-2016.
  • $214 million:Settlement a federal appeals court revoked from the Moda Health Plan, an Oregon insurer, this week, according to the Portland Business Journal. Moda sued the federal government in an attempt to recoup its financial losses during the rollout of the Affordable Care Act.
  • 22: States, including Oregon, where requiring union fees even if you don’t want to be a member is permitted. Those fees are under review by the Oregon Supreme Court, which his expected to make a decision
  • 53.1:Percentage of Oregon public workers who are union members, according to The Oregonian
  • 16:Percentage of all Oregon workers who are part of a union

4. Taking Command of You

What happens when you feel an emotion but refuse to admit it? Perhaps, more than you think.

From the time we were children, most of us have been taught that it’s OK to express certain feelings, but not express others. Early on, we learned to hide emotions that made other people uncomfortable or that somehow put us in a less than favorable light. It was OK to feel grateful but not angry, OK to feel confident but not scared, OK to defer to our parents but not to question them, and so on.

Sometimes we even learned to hide these unacceptable feelings from ourselves. We feel frightened of social contact but deny it and pretend boredom. We feel hurt and rejected but deny it and call it anger. We feel resentful of abusive behavior but deny it and call it a successful relationship because we believe we need it to survive.

Unacknowledged feelings almost always cause trouble. We may be able to stuff them down inside temporarily, but they invariably find another escape route. They are like pressure building up under the surface, which then explodes in fire, ash and the molten lava of a volcano as it destroys whatever is in its path. Unacknowledged feelings will often manifest themselves in physical ways – in backaches, headaches, ulcers, or other more serious illnesses – in reaction to the stress of denying reality.

What were you taught about feelings as a child? Now that you’re older, perhaps you’d like to learn what others have to say. Try reading John Bradshaw on shame, or Martin Seligman on depression and optimism, or Harriet Lerner on anger, for starters. An abundance of literature is available on the effects of suppressed anger, for example. Then, take the time to make up your own mind. Journaling your feelings will help you come to terms with them and find solutions that reduce the anxiety, stress and pressure.

You are in charge of your own feelings. You always have been. Take the time, get to know you, and take command of your life. ~The Pacific Institute


 5. Sherman County History Q & A

car.vacation1Q.When you start your road trip on The Journey Through Time Scenic Byway at Biggs and drive south out of Sherman County, where will you go? Name 2 towns on this route and the destination city.

A.The answer is with the Links.

 


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbWhy This Oregon School District Will Consider Arming Its Staff

Sherman County Group Facebook Page

The Truth About Separating Kids at the Border

Unaccompanied Minors at the Border – U.S. Department of Justice Flores Consent Decree Executive Summary

How Trump Came to Enforce a Practice of Separating Migrant Families

Key Facts About Unauthorized Immigrants Enrolled in DACA

Key Facts about U.S. Immigration Policies & Proposed Changes

Sherman County History Q & A

Answer: Shaniko, Antelope, Fossil, Service Creek, Spray, Kimberly, Mt. Vernon, John Day, Canyon City, Prairie City, Sumpter and Baker City

 

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services

Matthew McConaughey | 5 Minutes for the rest of Your Life

American Thinker

 

Pulling Back the Curtain on DNA Ancestry Tests


 

Sherman County eNews #158

CONTENTS

  1. Leslie Leonard Edwards 1933-2018

  2. Be a Community “Food Hero,” June 27

  3. President Trump’s Flag Day Proclamation

  4. American Agri-Women Photo Contest

  5. Sherman County History Q & A

  6. Expanding Definitions

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


We live in a society bloated with data, yet starved for wisdom. We’re connected 24/7, yet anxiety, fear, depression and loneliness is at an all-time high. We must course-correct. ~Elizabeth Kapu’uwailani Lindsey 


1. Leslie Leonard Edwards 1933-2018 

flower.rose.starLeslie Leonard Edwards

June 12,1933 – June 7, 2018

Our dear, loving husband, father, and grandfather passed away after a battle with Hodgkin’s Lymphoma that was officially confirmed just a few days prior to his passing. He collapsed in his front yard on April 29 and was revived through CPR by two angel passersby. This kindness of total strangers was a great blessing that enabled the family to gather in love, support, peace, joy, and forgiveness, and to say our final goodbyes to this beautiful spirit.

Les was a man of high principles and very devoted to his family. He adored his daughters and four precious grandchildren and took great delight in loving, praising, and cheering them on. He was very proud of his wife’s music and travel adventures and always enjoyed being around friends from all over the globe.

Les began life in central Oregon. As the eldest son in a large laboring family, he learned farming, hunting, carpentry, mechanics, tractor/truck driving, horse jockeying, and his strong work ethic. The GI bill enabled his study of mathematics at Eastern Oregon College, Willamette University, and the University of Oregon, where as teaching assistant he met his wife of 56 years. Employment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory brought the couple to Livermore, where they raised their family. His 30-year career included the beginning of the computer age and important contributions to simulation of nuclear waste management and the atmospheric physics of nuclear winter.

Les fully enjoyed his passion for golf as a devoted member of the Springtown Men’s Golf Club, by running Springtown Golf Course for a four-year period, and by marshaling at Wente Golf Course. In school and in his early years in Livermore, he was quite involved with local theater and was an active participant in Cask and Mask. This interest led him to work on two committees pursuing the construction of a performing arts center in Livermore. For many years, Les was deeply involved with the Livermore Cultural Arts Council and its local Fall Arts Festival and Summerfest. He was a proud member of the “infamous” A Crew that did general set-up, clean-up, procurement, and repairs for these events. The work was vital to the organization, and over time the workers became like family.

Les was a very private person who enjoyed a quiet life. He will be greatly missed by his family and by those whose lives he touched. He is survived by his wife Barbara, his daughters Donna Edwards Weber and Julie Edwards Ponder, and his grandchildren Amy and Eric Weber, and Madison and Kaitlyn Ponder.

At this point in time there is no public memorial service being planned. In honor of him, donations can be made in his name to the Bankhead Theater, Livermore Valley Opera, Hope Hospice, or the charity of your choice. The family is most grateful for your outpouring of help and support during this difficult journey.

~The Independent, Livermore, California (with photo) http://www.independentnews.com/obituaries/leslie-leonard-edwards/article_05beb400-6f5b-11e8-96df-f363ae50986e.html

Editorial Note: Les Edwards was the son of William M. “Bill” and Marguerite (Dickinson) Edwards of Moro and grandson of LeRoy and Mary Jane (Helyer) Edwards. The family lived in Moro where the children attended school: Mary, Wilma, Les, Viola, Rose, Elmira, Rebecca, Joyce and Bill.


2. Be a Community “Food Hero,” June 27

Folks who enjoy cooking, healthy eating and love to serve their community, here’s your chance to get free training as a “Food Hero” Volunteer!  Oregon State University Extension Service, along with community partners, will offer Food Hero Volunteer Training Wednesday, June 27 9am-2pm at One Community Health, 1040 Webber Street, The Dalles. 

Food Hero volunteers will receive training in modeling healthful eating and cooking, food safety, community resources and basic nutrition, with ideas for stretching dollars through demonstrations and cooking workshops at schools, food pantries, farmers’ markets, grocery stores and health clinics.

Trained volunteers will receive a Food Hero t-shirt and apron, a resource notebook and recipes, and volunteer opportunities to contribute to their community, plus a delicious lunch featuring Food Hero recipes. 

The training is free and pre-registration is required by Friday, June 22.  Contact Lauren Kraemer at 541-386-3343 x 38258 or email Lauren.Kraemer@oregonstate.edu for more information or to register.

Food Hero mission is to help low-income Oregonians improve their health through the increased consumption of fruits and vegetables. 


3. President Trump’s Flag Day Proclamation

American flag2More than two centuries ago, on June 14, 1777, the Second Continental Congress formally adopted the Stars and Stripes as the official flag of our new Republic.  Through the many triumphs and trials of our Nation, our flag has reflected our heritage of liberty and embodied the American virtues of bravery, justice, and loyalty.  Each year, we celebrate Flag Day and National Flag Week to honor our timeless national emblem.

Our flag symbolizes our solemn pride and eternal gratitude to our service members, who willingly raise their hand in front of our Nation’s colors and take an oath to support and defend the Constitution of the United States.  Our flag also serves as a final acknowledgement of our country’s gratitude to the families of those soldiers, sailors, airmen, marines, and coastguardsmen who have given their last full measure of devotion to our country.  After the echo of the last rifle volley and the final notes of “Taps” fade away, the flag is carefully folded and presented to the grieving families of our fallen heroes to serve as a source of comfort and strength in times of immense sorrow.

Our majestic flag flies during our country’s most memorable occasions.  In the early morning of May 10 of this year, a large American flag undulated in the breeze over the homecoming of three Americans released from captivity in North Korea.  It also presided during our astronauts’ many missions exploring the moon’s surface, the heroic triumph of the Marines at the battle of Iwo Jima, and the recovery operations at New York City’s ground zero and the Pentagon immediately following the attacks of September 11, 2001.  Our country’s colors — bold and brilliant — symbolize to the world those values we hold sacred, freedom and liberty, and our hope for a better world.

Today, we celebrate the ideals of our country’s founding, which are represented so proudly by the broad stripes and bright stars — that all men are created equal and endowed by their Creator with unalienable rights, including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.  May we never forget the tremendous sacrifices required to secure and maintain our freedom.  Let us proudly stand and remember our founding principles and our country’s ever continuing march to achieve a more perfect Union.  As we raise our flag, let us resolve always to cherish it with reverence and eternal gratitude so that the red, white, and blue may forever wave from sea to shining sea.

NOW, THEREFORE, I, DONALD J. TRUMP, President of the United States of America, do hereby proclaim June 14, 2018, as Flag Day, and the week starting June 10, 2018, as National Flag Week.  I direct the appropriate officials to display the flag on all Federal Government buildings during this week, and I urge all Americans to observe Flag Day and National Flag Week by displaying the flag.  I also encourage the people of the United States to observe with pride and all due ceremony those days from Flag Day through Independence Day, set aside by the Congress (89 Stat. 211), as a time to honor America, to celebrate our heritage in public gatherings and activities, and to publicly recite the Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this eighth day of June, in the year of our Lord two thousand eighteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and forty-second.

DONALD J. TRUMP


4. American Agri-Women Photo Contest

Are you a grower (farmer/ rancher/ fisher)? Processor? Grocer? Cook? Foodie? Show off your photos of our Ag Day 365 theme of “Food: How It’s Made.” Send us your photos and enter to win a swag prize pack filled with goodies and a mystery gift card.

Send your photos to social@americanagriwomen.org or message them to us through Facebook to be entered into our monthly contest (running from May to Oct 2018).

This promotion is open to those 18 and over who reside in the United States. Void where prohibited. This promotion is in no way associated with, administered by, or endorsed by Facebook. Limit 1 photo per entrant per month. Winners will be chosen at random. By entering, you release your photos to be used as a part of American Agri-Women and Ag Day 365 promotional and marketing purposes.


5. Sherman County History Q & A

Q.Hundreds came through Sherman County in great clouds of dust! They did not stay. Who were they?

A.The answer is with the Links.


6. Expanding Definitions

How creative are you? If your answer is, “Not very,” don’t be so sure. Let’s knock the mystique out of creativity today.

If you find yourself in a discussion about creativity, perhaps with family, friends or co-workers, most likely the talk is about some piece of music, sculpture or painting. The conversation is about “the arts” and you find that the group winds up defining creativity by the works of the Masters (Michelangelo, da Vinci, and so on), or some piece of time-honored literature. This is a fairly narrow definition of creativity, and one that most of us won’t be joining.

However, by merely expanding that definition, so much more is possible. What about a delicious meal, with food that is both nutritious and appealing to the eye? What of a home that is a picture of warm colors and casual comfort, a welcome haven for a weary spirit? Everywhere you look there are unique experiences that speak to creativity, from a blooming rose garden to a walk on a beach.

Here’s the thing: being creative just means bringing something new into the world. It could be an object or an idea, simple or complex, as long-lasting as the pyramids of Giza, a moment in time that touches the heart of a loved one and is burned in memory forever, or as transient as a sandcastle on an incoming tide.

One of the world’s most creative thinkers, Albert Einstein, once said, “Imagination is more important than knowledge.” So, if you want to be more creative, exercise your imagination as you might exercise your dog. Take it out for a good run every day. Let it off the leash and see where it goes. Practice “What if” thinking and break up your routines.

To help out, get yourself a journal – any blank book – and fill up those empty pages with your thoughts, doodles, ideas, wonderings – anything that your active mind brings to the surface when you give it the space and time to do so. Affirm your creative spirit, and watch it bloom! All it needs is the opportunity. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkThese 5 Changes Would Fix the Nation’s Budget Woes

 

Architect Robert Konieczny’s Safe House

 

Stratfor: The World Leading Geopolitical Intelligence Platform

Answer: Sherman County History Q & A

John Fremont’s 1843 Exploration Party; Oregon Trail pioneers 1843-1863; stagecoaches; miners with pack trains; and freighters.


 

Sherman County eNews #152

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1

Bridges

Oregon has a rich history with covered bridges. In their heyday in the early 1900’s there were an estimated 600 of them. But due to newer roads, better bridges, negligence and decay there only remain about 50. In 2006 one such bridge came crashing down in Wimer, Oregon. The people were in shock at the loss of their historic treasure, and the headlines of the local paper simply read, “It’s Gone.”

So often when we cross ways with people or even churches we speak of “burning a bridge” or “not going there again,” and it is not until someone dies or something tragic happens until we rethink our actions or role. It is then that we think about what we should-of or could-have done to draw closer, to resolve that long-standing issue or even rebuild the bridge.

The people of Wimer, Oregon, were so moved by their loss that they committed huge blocks of time and resources to rebuilding the bridge. It wasn’t easy, and it didn’t happen overnight, but they made the commitment, pooled their resources, and they got to work.

“Let all bitterness and wrath and anger and clamor and slander be put away from you, along with all malice. Be kind to one another, tender-hearted, forgiving each other, just as God in Christ also has forgiven you.” (Ephesians 4:31–32)

Is there a broken bridge in your life that needs some attention? Maybe from your perspective the bridge might even be gone, and maybe you don’t even know how to take the first step. Start with your heart. Rejoice even in the fact that you recognize the need. Then ask God for an opportunity, and as the first plank is laid take the first step realizing that you may not get very far on your first attempt.

Joe Burgess
Pastor
Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

THE TIMES-JOURNAL has a new e-mail address: timesjournal1886@gmail.com. Please begin using this new e-mail with all e-correspondence with the newspaper. Thank you. ~The Editor

SPIRITUAL MATTERS for Sherman County Churches and Faith Groups. A Friday column, Spiritual Matters is intended to welcome, inform and inspire. 

First: Recognized/organized churches and faith groups in Sherman County are invited to participate. 

Second: The Current Rotation

1st Friday: Wasco Church of Christ, Christian & Moro Community Presbyterian

2nd Friday: Grass Valley Baptist & Wasco Catholic

3rd Friday: Baha’i  & Kent Baptist

4th Friday: Wasco United Methodist, Rufus Baptist & Grass Valley Catholic

5th Friday [to be determined by the Editor or proposed by a participant] 

Third: Articles must be submitted by 5 p.m. Wednesday for Friday publication. Please limit messages to 300 words or less.

Fourth: Attacks on another faith, a previous Spiritual Matters article or author will not be published. 

Fifth:   The subject matter should be spiritual and inspirational, calling people to faith, and may include doctrinal understandings. 

Sixth:   The editor reserves the right to decline to publish articles.

Seventh: Please let us know if your group wishes to participate in this rotation.

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

EMPLOYMENT:

COACHING POSITIONS for Sherman County School Fall, Winter & Spring. In order to better align Sherman County School’s Athletic Program from Grades 5-12 there are openings for the following Coaching positions:

Fall

5th-8th Volleyball (2 positions)

5th-8th Football (2 position)

Winter

5th-8th Boys Basketball (2 positions)

5th-8th Girls Basketball (1 position)

Spring

5th -8th Boys and Girls Track (2 positions)

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing will be required for all positions. For further information and application materials please email Gary Lewis at glewis@sherman.k12.or.us or Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

OFFICE DEPUTY, ASSESSOR’s OFFICE. Position Type: Full Time; Starting Salary: $42,624. Open Until Filled. General Statement of Responsibilities: Provide administrative support to the Assessor’s office through conducting and organizing administrative duties and activities including receiving and handling information. Assist in the daily activities of the Assessor’s office related to the assessment and tax roll, processes deed and map changes, and provides front counter assistance to the public. Obtain an application and full job description from the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us or from the Sherman County Assessor’s office. Must return completed application to the Sherman Assessor’s Office PO Box 283, Moro, Oregon 97039. Sherman County is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

RETAIL | HUMAN RESOURCES |RECEPTIONIST | LABORER | DRIVER. Mid Columbia Producers is now hiring for multiple positions.

  • Full Time Retail Associate– Wasco, Oregon (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Part Time Retail Associate– Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Retail Associate – Goldendale, Washington (Closes 6/15/2018)
  • Full Time Petroleum Delivery Driver– Moro, Oregon
  • Full Time Grain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations
  • Part TimeGrain Elevator Operation Harvest Help – Various Locations

For complete job descriptions please visit www.mcpcoop.com. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: HR, PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039 Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  HR@mcpcoop.com

FOR SALE:

 MORO LOTS. Two, One acre lots for sale in an area with new homes on large parcels.  Has city water and power at the road on edge of lot. Gravel road access only a couple hundred yards off pavement. Great view of town, the fairgrounds, Lots of fields, see the top of Mount Hood and Mount Adams on clear days.  The Washington side of the gorge, 20 miles away! Has never had a house on it and was a wheat field until a few years ago. Rectangle in shape, 273.53 x 159.26. Horses, livestock, etc. All Ok in city limits. (No pigs unless 4-H). Zoned agriculture and buildable for one house per acre.  Located just on the outskirts of the city of Moro. To view the property travel out first street in Moro and take a right on Pinkerton (across from the extension office). The lots will be located on the right side of the road. Two acres available for $60,000. For pictures visit: https://portland.craigslist.org/grg/reo/6611735601.html   For more information, contact Brittany at 541-413-1616.  7/13

UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED OUTDOOR FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS AND FURNITURE REHABILITATION: Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 6/15

 FOR RENT OR LEASE:

 FREE:

 SERVICES:

 THE LEAN-TO CAFÉ & GOOSE PIT SALOON.  Daily Specials: Tuesday Hamburgers, Wednesday Soft Tacos, Thursday Chicken Fried Steak, Friday Fresh Clam Chowder and Saturday Night Prime Rib. 541-442-5709 in Historic Downtown Wasco. 6/22

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/15

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:

HOUSE. Looking to rent or buy. Our small family of myself my husband and our two beautiful boys are wanting to move to Moro OR. We live in Newport but have family that live there. Open to ideas. For rent we are looking for a 2-3 bed. And to buy we would like an owner carry 3-4 bed. You can email or call/text. Lexxieadams@gmail.com.

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION, and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

cowboyyeehawJUNE

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman Co. Historical Museum Artist Series: Sherman County Photography Club

15 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 1- Burnet Building, Moro

15 The June Bugs Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

16-17 A-Town Throwdown: Kite, SUP & Windsurf Competition, Arlington

17 Father’s Day

17 Father’s Day Free Admission at Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5

18 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 7 Public/School Library

18 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Union County

19 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Hood River Country Club

19 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

20 Sherman County Court 9

20 Sherman County Court Biggs Service District Hearings 9 & 10 a.m.

20-22 Sherman County 4-H Camp

22 Columbia Gorge Bi-State Renewable Energy Zone Meeting 12:30 Casa el Mirador

22 Family Bingo Night 6-8 Grass Valley Pavilion

23 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Start Your Miniature Rock Garden

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Annual Meeting 11-1

25 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Moro

25 Korean War Began 1950

26 Sherman County Public/School Library 10 S.T.E.A.M. ages 6-12

26 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

26 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

27 City Broadband Meeting 7 Wasco

27 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

27-30 4-H Summer Conference, OSU Campus, Corvallis

28 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Footloose

29 Frontier TeleNet Budget Hearing 9 & Board Meeting 10

29 Home Run Derby, Condon

30-July 1 Harvester’s Classic Coed Soft Ball Tournament, Condon

Wheat4JULY

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Linda Krasfic’s Baby Quilts

3 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

3 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Independence Day

4 HYATUS Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Grass Valley Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

5 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

6 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

7 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

7 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Art Walk in Moro

7 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

7 Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

7 14th Annual Fossil Cruz-in 9-4 Fossil

7-15 Moro’s 2nd Annual Quilt and Fiber Event 10-4

8-11 Portland Horseless Carriage Club Tour: Journey Through Time Scenic Byway, John Day

8-12 Sherman County Historical Museum Quilt Display

9-12 Sherman County 4-H Food Preservation Day Camp, Extension Office

9-15 Summer Fishtrap Gathering (Writers in the American West) Wallowa Lake

10 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

10 Sherman County Public/School Library 6 Hogwarts Mystery Night

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

10 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Meeting 12:30

12 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Coco

12-15 National Association of Counties Conference, Nashville, Tennessee

13 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

14 Sherman County Public/School Library 2 Rock Necklaces ages up to 4

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Traffic Jam Show

14 TriCounty Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

14 Starry Night Camp-out at Maryhill Museum of Art

16-19 Sherman County 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Day Camp, Extension Office

17 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

17 Sherman County Public/School Library 11 Oregon Rocks! K-6

17 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

18 Sherman County Court 9

18 Kids Pioneer Day at Sherman County Historical Museum

19 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

21 Sherman County Public/School Library 1 Adam Miller, Old Songs for Young Folks

21 Summer Reading Program End of Summer Party 3

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

23 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 3

24 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

24 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

25 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County

25-28 Jefferson County Fair, Madras

26 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Love, Simon

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

28 WWI Began 1914

31 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31-Aug. 4 Malheur County Fair, Ontario