Sherman County eNews #214

CONTENTS

  1. Exquisite Gorge Project: Steamroller Print Event at Maryhill Museum, Aug. 24

  2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor, Oct. 19

  3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  4. Following the Rules

  5. PragerU’s Going to Court to Fight for Freedom of Speech in America

  6. Energy Facility Siting Council to Meet August 22-23 in Boardman

  7. Sherman County Fair Schedule, Aug. 20-24


1. Exquisite Gorge Project: Steamroller Print Event at Maryhill Museum, Aug. 24

Steamroller Print Event
Saturday, August 24 | NOON to 5 p.m.

Come join in the fun as we create a massive 60-foot woodblock print using a steamroller! This is the culmination of the Exquisite Gorge Project, a collaborative printmaking project featuring 11 artists working with communities along a 220-mile stretch of the Columbia River.

Artists worked with community members from their assigned stretch of river and carved images on 4 x 6 foot wood panels. Each completed panel will be connected end-to-end and printed using a steamroller to create a massive 60-foot print. Washington State Poet Laureate, Claudia Castro Luna, will be at Maryhill to create a poem commemorating the event and the Columbia River. Meet the artists at noon, then enjoy kids printmaking activities, music and more. Free on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art.

SCHEDULE of EVENTS:
12:00 P.M.
Meet the artists
McClain/Gamblin printmaking activity for kids and adults
Exquisite Corpse game for families
Artist Demonstrations
1:00 P.M.

Remarks and introductions
1:15 to 2:00 P.M.
First print pass/start will depend on the wind, ink, day
3:30 to 4:30 P.M.
Remarks and second print pass.


2. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor, Oct. 19

The Sherman County School District will be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one team into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Cafeteria that will begin at 5:30 p.m. on October 19, 2019.  There will also be a special presentation and celebration of 151 years of education in Sherman County (From One-Room Schools to One Campus). The Booster Club will be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. Please join us for the $12.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased at the door or you may attend the event for free if not purchasing dinner.

The 2019 inductees include United States Military Academy Graduate and Captain Deron R. Kaseberg; former State FFA President and OSU College of Agricultural Sciences Hall of Fame Member Michael S. Macnab; Teacher and State Champion Coach Ron Townsend; the first female Sherman County Superintendent Grace Zevely (posthumously); and the 1989 1A State Champion Football Team.

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District.

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.


3. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 19: Percent of Black Portland Public School third-graders who met state reading benchmarks in 2018, according to The Oregonian.
  • 34: Of Latinx third-graders who did.
  • 74: Of White Oregon third graders who did.
  • 1013: Senate Bill that narrows the state crimes that qualify for the death penalty. The change was not supposed to apply to pending cases, but a new interpretation by the state’s Department of Justice said this week that it did. Lawmakers want to revise the bill, possibly in a special session, OPB reports.
  • 21: Length, in feet, of a juvenile humpback whale stuck, then euthanized, near Waldport this week, according to The Register-Guard.
  • 50: Approximate number of community organizations at a Portland event led by the mayor to reject white supremacy this week ahead of an expected far-right demonstration in the city Aug. 17, according to OPB.
  • 8: Oregon legislators appointed to a committee to deal with replacing the I-5 bridge across the Columbia River to Washington state, according to The Columbian.
  • $3 billion: Cost of the failed Columbia River Crossing project, which tanked in 2013 after Washington backed out due to cost.
  • 9: Public employees suing the state over recent changes to the state’s retirement benefits.
  • 655: New e-scooters expected added to Portland’s fleet this week, according to Willamette Week.

4. Following the Rules

How often do you find yourself feeling irritated by things that other people do? If it is more often than you’d like, read on.

People who are easily irritated usually blame others for it. But to find the reason – and we are not talking about blame – these folks need to look inside themselves, instead of at those around them. Of course, irritability can have many causes, but one of the most common is having too many restrictive zones. In other words, too many rigid ideas and rules about right and wrong behavior.

These folks believe there is a right way to squeeze the toothpaste tube, a right way to load the dishwasher, a right way to do just about everything, and they have all the so-called “facts” to back them up. Now, the problem is not so much that they feel compelled to follow these restrictive and unnecessary rules themselves, but they have the same compulsion about other people following the “rules” as well!

Sometimes others go along with them, just to keep the peace and reduce their own stress. Often others will deliberately or unconsciously break these needless rules, just to drive the compulsive folks at bit “around the bend.” Passive aggressive? Yes, and in any type of community setting, whether it’s the workplace or someplace else, it is destructive to the overall culture.

It is important to become aware of the self-imposed rules we live by. We want to analyze why we have them, and whether or not they are helping us or not. Then we can get rid of those that keep us rigidly confined, for no important reason. It is also important that we refrain from imposing our personal standards on others.

Why spend our days stressed out and irritated, wondering why our relationships don’t work? We do need to take into account our own well-being, as well as that of those around us. So, relax! Loosen up a little! It’s a near-guarantee everyone will feel better for it. ~The Pacific Institute


5. PragerU’s Going to Court to Fight for Freedom of Speech in America

In just three short weeks, PragerU will head to court to fight for freedom of speech in America.

PragerU has a court date in our lawsuit against Google/YouTube scheduled for August 27th in the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. The outcome of this case is critical, and it will determine whether Americans can continue to express their views freely online.

There is no doubt about it: Conservative values are under attack.

We are seeing an outright assault against conservatives by Big Tech. Not only are these companies using their algorithms to suppress accounts and content that present a conservative point of view, but they are also preventing millions of Americans from even seeing videos from PragerU.

Currently, over 100 of our videos are restricted by YouTube, and many others are demonetized on its platform. Even our videos on the 10 Commandments have been restricted!

Last month, Dennis Prager testified before the U.S. Senate on how Big Tech censorship is the greatest threat against free speech today. The hearing revealed how Big Tech companies have a long-running pattern of targeting conservatives.

This is why our lawsuit is so important. We are taking on the world’s two largest search engines: YouTube and Google. These two platforms control the content that billions of people see worldwide, and with that power, Google is using its platform to ban ideas and perpetuate the misinformation of the Left. We cannot — and will not — let that happen on our watch. ~Dennis Prager, PragerU.


6. Energy Facility Siting Council to Meet August 22-23 in Boardman

SALEM — Oregon’s Energy Facility Siting Council will meet next on August 22-23, 2019 in Boardman. The public meeting begins Thursday at 3 p.m. at the Port of Morrow Riverfront Center, 2 Marine Drive NE. The meeting resumes on Friday at 8:30 a.m.

The main items on the Council’s agenda:

  • Site Certificate Amendment Process Rulemaking: On August 1, 2019, the Oregon Supreme Court invalidated administrative rules the Council adopted in 2017 regarding its site certificate amendment process. At this meeting, the Council will consider adopting temporary rules to address the issues cited by the Supreme Court. For details, please see the Oregon Department of Energy’s staff report.
  • Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility (Morrow, Umatilla counties): Wheatridge is approved but not yet built. The Council will receive a presentation Thursday on the Draft Proposed Order on Request for Amendment 4 of the Wheatridge Wind Energy Facility site certificate and a public hearing will be conducted later in the day. The comment period extends through September 9, 2019. Request for Amendment 4 primarily seeks Council approval to add 1,527 acres to the approved site boundary within Morrow County for construction and operation of up to 150 megawatts of photovoltaic solar energy facility components, up to 41 distributed energy storage (battery) system sites and expansion of the Wheatridge West collector substation.
  • Perennial Wind Chaser Station (Umatilla County): Perennial is approved but not yet built. The Council will receive a presentation Thursday on the Draft Proposed Order on Request for Amendment 1 of the Perennial Wind Chaser Station site certificate and a public hearing will be conducted later in the day. Request for Amendment 1 seeks Council approval to extend the construction start and completion timelines by two years for the previously-approved 450-megawatt natural gas-fueled power generation facility and related or supporting facility components.

The full meeting agenda and materials are available on the ODOE website: www.oregon.gov/energy/facilities-safety/facilities/Pages/Council-Meetings.aspx. The next Council meeting is tentatively scheduled for September 26-27 in Clatskanie.


7. Sherman County Fair Schedule, Aug. 20-24 

2019 SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SCHEDULE ~ 541-565-3510

www.shermancountyfairfun.com

Tuesday,  August 20

8:00 – 3:00 4-H Static Judging @ 4-H Pavilion

1:00 pm    4-H Horse Show (Showmanship followed by English, Western Equitation, Trail Horse & 4-H Gaming)

ARENA WILL BE CLOSED AFTER 4-H HORSE SHOW EVENT IS FINISHED

Wednesday , August 21

10:15 am                    Queen (2020) Applications due @ fair office

10:00 am-11                 All Beef Weigh-In

11:00 – 12:00 noon       All Turkey Weigh-In

11:00 am-6 pm             All Open Class Entries/Contests to be entered

1:00 pm-2 pm               All Swine  Weigh-In

2:00 – 3:00 pm             All Sheep & Goats Weigh In

3:30 pm                       Dale Coles Classic Car Show  Ck in

4:30 pm                       Long Horn show on Mid-Way

5:00 pm                       BBQ Burgers/Hot Dogs Cooked by Fair Board

5:10 pm                       Classic Car Show Awards

5:30 pm                       4-H style show

7:00 pm                       Cattle Sorting

Thursday, August  22

7:00 am – 9:00am    High School Sports Practice

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:00 am                       4-H Poultry, Rabbit & Cavie Show (market & showmanship)

8:30 am                       Final placement for all Open Class Baked Goods & Flowers

9:00 am                       Open Class Pavilion Judging starts

9:30 am                       4-H & FFA Records Books Due  (4-H Pavilion @ grounds)

9:50 am-10am              Showmanship Clinic (4-H & FFA)

10:00 am-11am            4-H & FFA Swine Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

11:00 am-12:00            4-H & FFA Sheep Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

12:30 pm-2:00 pm        4-H & FFA Goat Market Judging,

Followed by Breeding Class

2:00 pm-3:30 pm         4-H & FFA Beef Market Judging, followed by Breeding Class

7:00 pm                      Down on the Farm Chore Course

Friday, August 23

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:00 am                                    4-H Home Economics Contests @ 4-H Pavilion

ALL OPEN CLASS ANIMAL’S WILL SHOW AFTER THEIR SPECIFIC 4-H/FFA LIVESTOCK CLASSES.                  

RDO Breakfast time will be announced at beginning of fair week

8:00 am – 9:00             4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)                

9:15am-10:45 am          4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

11:00-12:00pm             4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

12:15 pm-1:30 pm        4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship (SR./INT/JR)

2:30 pm                        Livestock Judging Contest                                 

7:15 pm –                     Special intros In Rodeo Arena

7:30-9:30 pm                CCT Bull Riding

Saturday August 24

TBA LONGHORN & MUTTIN BUSTIN SHOWS

8:30 am                     Horse & KIDS Games @ main rodeo Arena

9:00 am                       Premium Payouts @ Fair Office

10:00 am                      Queen’s Reception @ grounds

12:30 pm                      4-H Grand Champion All Around Showmanship Contest

4-H/FFA awards will follow all-around

3:00pm- 4:00 pm          4-H & FFA Livestock sale

TBA                              FFA ANNUAL BBQ MEAL           

 6:30pm                        Derby Check in

7:30 pm –                    Demo Derby

9:30 pm -1:00 am         Dance with “Countryfied”

 Sunday, August 25 >>> NO PUBLIC EVENTS TO SEE >>> 

8:30 am                       Finish of all barn and building clean-up & picking up of exhibits

9:30am                        All Premium Payouts @ fair office

12:00 noon           ALL FAIR EXHBITS GONE AND THE FAIR IS CLOSED

LIVESTOCK EXHIBTS RELEASED AT BARN SUPERINDENDENTS DECISION ## ON SUNDAY

Sale Animals load out time will be posted at fair

****DENOTES APPROXIMATE TIME****

>>> SCHEDULE IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE<<<<<


 

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Sherman County eNews #213

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1The Face of an Angel

It’s so hard when we are challenged in some way to not let it show in some way. In Acts chapter 6 a man named Stephen was selected with six others to care for the needs of some of the widows who were not being helped. The qualifications for the six in being chosen were that they had good reputations, full of the Spirit and of wisdom. Additionally, we read that Stephen was also full of faith and of the Holy Spirit.

As we move on to the rest of chapter 6 and then all of chapter 7, we learn Stephen was also full of grace and power. We find that beyond caring for the widows, he also was actively speaking about Jesus Christ in the synagogues of non-native Hebrews or Hellenists, and that the Spirit of God was working miraculous signs and wonders as proofs of God’s sending him. As this was happening, we learn that the leadership in one of the synagogues challenged him. When they could get nowhere in their debate, they then hauled him before the greater Council of leadership who listened as false charges were brought against him. When his accusers had finished the Council turned their attention to Stephen. This is what we read in Acts 6:15, “And fixing their gaze on him, all who were sitting in the Council saw his face like the face of an angel.”

Imagine that, having the people you had worshipped with growing up now coming against you because of your faith in Christ. Add to that the entirety of the Jewish leadership. Yet, this man as he sat before them and they observed him even in disagreement, had a countenance that could be spoken of as comparative to how one would imagine the face of an angel.

We all have challenges in our lives and things that might tend to rock our boats. Stephen demonstrated for us how a firm faith in God, knowing His security in Christ and living according to the power of the Spirit made all the difference.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

thankyou.guyCLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES: 

THANK YOU, CATHY BROWN & JAMIE WILSON!  The Sherman County Senior & Community Center extends a special thank you to Cathy Brown and Jamie Wilson of WB Ranch for their generous donation of beef. We received 380 pounds of local beef, and only had to pay the cut, wrap and kill fee, which allows us to serve good quality local beef to our seniors over the next year. Thank you so much for your generosity and your donation to the community!  ~Kari Pinkerton Silcox, Sherman County Senior Center, PO Box 352, Moro, OR 97039 | 541-565-3191 | kari@shermancounty.net

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN 4-H RAFFLE BASKETS!  Do you enjoy shopping and contributing to positive youth development in Sherman County at the same time? The Sherman 4-H Association would love your creative, amazing, awesome “theme” basket for their annual raffle at the fair. Proceeds are used to send deserving youth to Sherman County 4-H camp and other youth development activities. Drop your basket off at the Sherman Extension Office before Tuesday, August 20…we can wrap them and put together a tag.  Thank you so much!  ~Cindy Brown, Educator Oregon State University, OSU Extension Service – Sherman County, College of Public Health & Human Sciences, 4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed, 66365 Lonerock Rd., Moro, Oregon 97039 P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291 | extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman.

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th!

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SPONSORSHIPS. We are looking for some sponsors to help the Fair Board provide bounce houses for the youth at Sherman County Fair.  The cost of the houses is $125/ hour.  We were hoping to be able to provide free entertainment for youngsters and bring families to the Sherman County Fair to support our 4-H and FFA. Please contact Kristie Coelsch @ 541-980-9883 or email at coelschk@skyride.net to let us know how much you are willing to sponsor.  We will be announcing sponsors throughout fair week! We thank the sponsors who have already donated, and we thank you for your consideration to support the Sherman County Fair. 8/16

Volunteer Smile

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SUPERINTENDENTS. The Sherman County Fair is looking for Superintendents for the Open Class Kitchen and Kids Corner Divisions! The superintendent is responsible for taking, displaying, and releasing exhibits, as well as, assisting the division judge and ensuring the process moves smoothly. If you are interested in helping out please contact Kya by emailing shermanctyfair@hotmail.com.

QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

EMPLOYMENT:

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY PLACE NAMES, 4th edition, by Sherry Woods Kaseberg, 2019. A collection of names for Sherman County places, streets and roads compiled in honor of storytellers and record keepers – families, teachers, journalists, professors, photographers, cartographers, geologists, archaeologists, geographers, surveyors, historians, genealogists and keepers of the public records. Spiral binding. Bibliography. Rich in local history, it is of interest to the curious, teachers, genealogists and local government personnel. $25 + $4 shipping. Contact Sherry Kaseberg, 69384 Wheatacres Road, Wasco, Oregon 97065 or sherryk@gorge.net. 8/16  

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/ 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information. 

ONLINE CALENDAR. GorgeCurrent Weekly Calendar. http://www.gorgecurrent.com/weekly/index.html 

LOST OR FOUND:

sign.helpwantedWANTED: 

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SUPERINTENDENTS. The Sherman County Fair is looking for Superintendents for the Open Class Kitchen and Kids Corner Divisions! The superintendent is responsible for taking, displaying, and releasing exhibits, as well as, assisting the division judge and ensuring the process moves smoothly. If you are interested in helping out please contact Kya by emailing shermanctyfair@hotmail.com.

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html 

food.watermelon1AUGUST

1-31 Sherman County Museum Artist Series 10-5 Vintage Quilt Blocks

16-18 Equine Mania LLC Summer Escape (541) 980-7394

18 Celebration of Life for Ronald “Huck” Rolfe 2 Molalla

19 Tri-County Mental Health/Center for Living Board Meeting 11

19 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

20 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

20 Wasco City Council 7

20-25 Sherman County Fair

21 Sherman County Court 9

21 Cattle Sorting Competition at the Sherman County Fair

24 Sherman County DUII Prevention Walk 8 a.m. Moro

26 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

26 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

26 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

29 Sherman County School Back to School Night 6:30

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Deadline Sherman County Resident Incentive Application

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon

key3SEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

2 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

3 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

26 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 Hood River 

autumn.treesbareOCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #212

CONTENTS

  1. Support 4-H with your creative, amazing, awesome raffle basket at the fair

  2. Wanted: 8 More Quilts for Cops

  3. Wanted: Sherman County Fair Superintendents

  4. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students!

  5. Living Expectantly

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Support 4-H with your creative, amazing, awesome raffle basket at the fair

4-H clover1Do you enjoy shopping and contributing to positive youth development in Sherman County at the same time? The Sherman 4-H Association would love your creative, amazing, awesome “theme” basket for their annual raffle at the fair. Proceeds are used to send deserving youth to Sherman County 4-H camp and other youth development activities. Drop your basket off at the Sherman Extension Office before Tuesday, August 20…we can wrap them and put together a tag.  Thank you so much!

~Cindy Brown, Educator, OSU Extension Service – Sherman County, 4-H Youth Development. P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291


2. Wanted: 8 More Quilts for Cops

quilt18 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.


3. Wanted: Sherman County Fair Superintendents

sign.helpwantedThe Sherman County Fair is looking for Superintendents for the Open Class Kitchen and Kids Corner Divisions! The superintendent is responsible for taking, displaying, and releasing exhibits, as well as, assisting the division judge and ensuring the process moves smoothly. If you are interested in helping out please contact Kya by emailing shermanctyfair@hotmail.com.


4. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students!

pencil.sharpEditor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society


5. Living Expectantly

Do you think of old age as a time of adventure, self-expression and possibility? Perhaps not. It is hard to think of the later portion of life this way, when the society we live in doesn’t seem to agree.

We sure don’t see many role models of lively, intelligent old people in the media (well, except for Betty White), and our culture continues to be dominated by images of youth. Ask anyone in advertising or marketing, and they will tell you the demographics they covet are 18-25 year olds.

The fact is that life expectancy is up from 45 years in 1900, to an average of 79.38 years (estimated in the U.S.A.) in 2019. It’s even higher in Canada (82.11 years) and Japan (85.77 years)! In a report released on August 1, 2013, the World Health Organization reported that the “dramatic” gains in life expectancy show no signs of slowing down (as reported by Reuters). Things are definitely changing.

Of course, there is still the likelihood of some physical decline as we age, but many older people are discovering that their mental health is more important to them. They tend to shrug off their aches and pains and concentrate instead on growth and development in other areas. And since neuroscientists have discovered that while the brain may slow down, it does not stop growing as long as it’s being used (Alzheimer’s and dementia notwithstanding).

Older folks become much more spiritually aware and keenly interested in things outside of themselves. Some go back to school, others become involved in a community or family project. They do not see the changes happening all around them as threatening. Rather, they respond to change with flexibility, a sense of purpose, and lots of patience with themselves. They want to control their own lives, make their own choices, and stay involved with meaningful activities long after they “retire.”

This sounds like a good way to live at any age, and is not a bad role model, either. Think of it as not life expectancy, but living expectantly. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to D

bird.owl.limbVideo. Carl Sagan on The Pale Blue Dot

A NASA mission was leaving the Solar System when, at the request of Carl Sagan, it was commanded by NASA to turn its camera around, and take one last photo of Earth across a great expanse of space. This video’s accompanying words spoken by Sagan, and written almost 25 years ago, are still relevant today sensitively felt, brilliantly spoken.

Oregon Encyclopedia Custom Word Art Products

Oregon Democrats call for “substantial regulation” of money in state politics

Boil Water Notice Lifted For Warm Springs After 3 Month-Long Crisis

Agricultural land best for solar, Oregon State study finds

Brilliant Maps for Curious Minds: Europe at Night

New Study Confirms That Trump’s Claim About China Paying for Cost of U.S. Tariffs is Untrue

Elkhorn Media Group: My Eastern Oregon

Military Times – Independent News About Your Military

Defense News, Covering the politics, business and technology of defense

Nuclear Vs Non-Nuclear Powered Countries: 2019 Facts

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE! X, Y and Z are more than just The End


 

Sherman County eNews #211

CONTENTS

  1. Resident Incentive Application Deadline, Aug. 31

  2. Quilts for Cops Workshop in Wasco, Sept. 21

  3. An Invitation for Western Oregon University Alumni, Oct. 1

  4. 134-year climate record from Tatoosh Island

  5. State Senator Bill Hansell: To leave or not to leave: that was the question

  6. The Near and Dear

  7. Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Matches Record Low of 4.0 Percent in July


“If by the liberty of the press were understood merely the liberty of discussing the propriety of public measures and political opinions, let us have as much of it as you please: But if it means the liberty of affronting, calumniating and defaming one another, I, for my part, own myself willing to part with my share of it.” —Benjamin Franklin (1789)


1. Resident Incentive Application Deadline, Aug. 31

The deadline for Sherman county residents to submit their Resident Incentive application is August 31st. If you have misplaced your BRIGHT ORANGE application, forms can be found on the Sherman County website Finance Department page. You can also get a form from the Finance Department at the courthouse or call 541-565-3623 to have one mailed to you.


2. Quilts for Cops Workshop in Wasco, Sept. 21

Thread-and-needleWHEN…Saturday, Sept 21,2019

WHERE…Wasco School Events Center, 809 Barnett St, Wasco Oregon

TIME…9 am to 4:30 pm

COST…$35.00 includes, Quilt top kit, light breakfast of muffin/coffee/tea & lunch.

All completed quilt tops will be returned to the organization to be finished and mailed to recipients.

BRING… your sewing machine and usual sewing supplies. (I would mark each) Ironing boards, irons and rotary cutting mats will be provided       .

PLEASE PRE REGISTER! We are hoping to have 40 or more participants. Unfortunately, too many of these quilts are needed in today’s times. They are given to all wounded police, firemen and EMS injured in the line of duty.

Feel free to come to Wasco to see what is happening in this workshop. $$Donations gladly accepted– it is expensive to send these quilts (60”X80”)!  If you want to help but not sew, ironers and cutters will be needed. That is what I plan to do, and I  gladly will pay the fee.

CONTACT Carol MacKenzie, PO Box 85, Wasco, Ore, 97065 or 541-980-7738.

Write and mail check payable to “Quilts for Cops” to Carol. This is tax deductible donation as the organization is a 501 3C  organization. You will be given a receipt for your taxes.


3. An Invitation for Western Oregon University Alumni, Oct. 1

Emily Lafon, Alumni Relations Coordinator for Western Oregon University, is extending an invitation to all Gorge WOU Alumni and their guests to attend a gathering Tuesday, Oct. 1st, 6:00-8:00 p.m. in the Shoreline Room at the Best Western, Hood River.

A RSVP is requested by Sept. 25th by contacting Emily at either wou.edu/alumni or by calling 503-838-8710. This free event is an opportunity to enjoy conversation with former classmates, meeting new friends, partaking of refreshments and hearing WOU President Rex Fuller share “What’s New at WOU”.  There will also be drawings for great prizes.


4. 134-year climate record from Tatoosh Island

thermometer.degreesAbout one mile off the NW corner of Washington State sits Tatoosh Island.  We are fortunate to have a 134 year climate record from this location.  The mean annual temperature has changed only slightly since observations began in October 1883:

Years      # Yrs    Mean Temperature (deg. F)

——————————————–

1884-1949    61      48.9

1932-1965    34      49.2

2007-2016    10      49.3

Since 1890 we have seen 7 years with mean annual temperature greater than 51 F.  Only one of these seven years occurred in the 21st century:

1) 1941  51.6 F

2) 1940  51.5

3) 1958  51.5

4) 1926  51.4

5) 2015  51.4

6) 1997  51.3

7) 1934  51.1

~ Mark Albright
Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences
Box 351640
University of Washington
Seattle WA 98195-1640  USA.


5. State Senator Bill Hansell: To leave or not to leave: that was the question

Oregon.Flat.poleMuch has been written, discussed, opined, and debated about the denying of a quorum for 9 days, when the 11 Oregon Senate Republicans made the decision to leave. Since I was one of what became known as the “Oregon 11”, and as I have tried to do with every decision I have ever made as an elected official, I want to explain why I did what I did. It is also important to explain the events leading up to that decision.

With all I have read or listened to, especially social media, I have come to the conclusion I am either a hero or a zero. There isn’t much in between. My purpose here is not to debate the merits and flaws of HB2020, the Cap and Trade bill, that precipitated the decision to leave. I personally believe there were huge problems with HB2020 as it was written. But that is not the reason I walked.

My primary reason for leaving was the refusal of the majority party to refer this bill to the people for a vote. Oregonians deserved to be able to vote on this bill. I believed the costs, the impacts, and the insignificant results of actual carbon reduction, needed to be decided by the citizens, not the supermajority of one party.

There were two ways Cap and Trade could have gone to the voters. First, the legislature could have amended the bill to refer it. I believe such a referral was included in several of the 117 proposed amendments offered to the bill but all were turned down by the Joint Committee on Carbon Reduction. The second way was for the legislature to remove the infamous “Emergency Clause.” Without getting too far into the weeds, when an emergency clause is attached to a bill it becomes law upon signature of the Governor. It makes it much more difficult for citizens to refer it to the ballot. Technically it is not impossible for the referral but much harder and more difficult. In my opinion, that is why the emergency clause was attached to HB2020. I was hard pressed to see any reason to justify an emergency. There was none.

Without an emergency clause, any bill becomes law six months after the governor signs it. In those six months, signatures can be gathered and a vote taken prior to the bill becoming law. The referendum process is a check and balance Oregonians have on their Legislature. Oregonians have used it to repeal or adopt legislation over the years.

On Tuesday, June 18th, a good friend and member of the Senate Democratic leadership came to my office and asked me what it would take to keep me from “walking.” I replied, remove the emergency clause from HB 2020. Let the people have the opportunity to vote on something this monumental. It needs to be on the ballot. That senator indicated that made sense and they would try and see what could be done. I believe my friend tried, but to no avail.

The Republican Caucus was also informed that three of our colleagues across the aisle were no votes, but we were unable to satisfactorily confirm their position. Later, when Senate President Courtney publicly announced he did not have the votes, it set the stage for our return.

Next on Wednesday, June 19th, two events happened which might have averted the walkout. The first would have been delaying the second reading of HB2020. The Oregon Constitution requires every bill be read three times before voting on it. The bill is first read by title only and then sent to a committee. If the bill survives the committee process, it comes back to the floor for the second reading again by title only, and the next day it is read for a third time and a vote taken.

Republican leadership urged the Senate President to not second read HB2020 in order for negotiations to continue. However, HB2020 was second read on Wednesday, with the emergency clause intact, and it would be third read the next day, June 20th. That meant the walkout was on for Thursday unless negotiations could hammer out something of a compromise.

Three individuals began meeting on Wednesday morning at 10:00am and for the next seven plus hours came up with some kind of a proposal. Those individuals were Senator Cliff Bentz, vice chair of the Carbon Committee, Nik Blosser Chief of Staff for Governor Brown, and Representative Karin Power the Co-Chair of the Carbon Reduction Committee. Two Democrats and one Republican, worked into the early evening. Fifteen minutes after the proposal was presented to Governor Brown, House Speaker Tina Kotek and Senate President Peter Courtney, a call was made to Senator Bentz informing him that the proposal had been rejected. Had either of these two events produced a different result, we would have stayed.

On Wednesday evening the emergency clause remained in HB2020. It would be third read on Thursday, and the citizens, for all practicable purposes, would be denied the opportunity to consider and debate the merits of the bill in the referendum process. I felt this was wrong and I joined my fellow Republican Senators in leaving and denying a quorum on Thursday.

So there you have it, why I decided to leave. If you believe impediments should not have been removed enabling the good people of Oregon the opportunity to vote on this proposed legislation, then we disagree and I’ll continue to be a zero. But at least you know why I did what I did. This is what I owe all my constituents whether I’m a hero or a zero or something in between, and with apologies to Mr. Shakespeare regarding how I answered the question to leave or not to leave.

Sincerely,

Senator Bill Hansell


6. The Near and Dear

Do you ever feel that the people who are closest to you are the ones who resist the most as you try to change for the better? Sometimes, when we are committed to personal growth and change, family members or others who are close to us will do everything they can to try and get us to change back to the way we were – even when the way we were wasn’t so great.

Did you ever wonder why that might be? Well, for one thing, when people are used to their lives being a certain way, any change – even when it is an improvement – can be threatening. It is also fairly common for people who are stuck in negative habits to have a hard time tolerating others who are making positive efforts toward change.

If you can convince your family to join you in your quest for personal growth, you will all have an easier time of it. You can support each other through the tough times and give each other encouragement and approval as you begin to see results.

If you have no choice but to go through it alone, let those significant others in your life in on what you are trying to do, and tell them how positive results will benefit them as well as you. Paint them a vivid word picture of what the end-result will look like, and ask for their help in achieving it.

If you don’t get that help, be patient. It may take time to convince them that you are serious, and that you intend to stay close to them even though you are changing. They may be waiting for proof before allowing themselves to believe you. Belief without evidence is difficult even in the best of times, with the best of people.

If it ever comes down to the difficult choice between continuing a painful relationship and developing yourself as a person, remember that you always have the right to choose growth without guilt. If you want to do better for the world, then you first need to do better by and for yourself. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Matches Record Low of 4.0 Percent in July 

Oregon.Flat.poleOregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in July, the same as the revised June rate of 4.0 percent. This was Oregon’s lowest unemployment rate in the current series dating back to 1976. It tied the 4.0 percent unemployment rate reached in the state in May, June, and July 2018. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.7 percent in both June and July 2019.

In July, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment added 2,400 jobs, following an over-the-month loss of 1,000 jobs, as revised, in June. Monthly gains for July were strongest in professional and business services (+1,300 jobs); health care and social assistance (+1,100); and construction (+800). Two industries cut more than 1,000 jobs in July: leisure and hospitality (??’1,100 jobs) and government (??’1,300).

Newly revised payroll employment figures show that there was minimal growth of only 2,000 jobs between December 2018 and March 2019, which was much weaker growth in the first quarter of 2019 than was originally estimated. Oregon’s total nonfarm employment for March is now pegged at 1,931,900 jobs.

Looking at longer-term trends, the new numbers show Oregon’s economy growing moderately for quite some time. Since July 2018, total nonfarm payroll employment was up 29,600 jobs, or 1.6 percent. In fact, Oregon’s over-the-year job growth has averaged 1.6 percent during the past 16 months.

The most rapid gains since July 2018 were in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+4,500 jobs, or 7.0%) and construction (+4,500 jobs, or 4.3%). Construction’s growth rate, although still rapid, has slowed from the 8.2 percent annual growth it averaged in 2015 through 2018. Several industries contributed to Oregon’s expansion since last July, including health care and social assistance (+8,200 jobs, or 3.2%); manufacturing (+5,000 jobs, or 2.6%); and professional and business services (+5,500 jobs, or 2.2%). However, six major industries were nearly flat or down over the past 12 months, led by retail trade (-2,800 jobs, or -1.3%) and information (-1,500 jobs, or ??’4.4%).


 

Sherman County eNews #210

CONTENTS

  1. OSU Sherman County Extension Kids’ Summer Drama Day Camp

  2. Sherman County Court Session, Aug. 21

  3. Karla Chambers, Stahlbush Island Farms – Empowering, Mentoring Women in Ag

  4. True Personal Success

  5. Oregon Historical Quarterly Summer 2018 Special Issue “Oregon’s Manila Galleon” Wins 2019 AASLH Award of Excellence

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.” —Samuel Adams (1779)


1. OSU Sherman County Extension Kids’ Summer Drama Day Camp

Creative juices were flowing August 5-9 at the OSU Sherman County Extension Kids’ Summer Drama Day Camp held at the Sherman County School.  The youth activity was made possible by a grant from the Sherman County Cultural Coalition.  Fourteen youth aged 5 to 15 participated in a weeklong process of developing their own musical production, with help of drama instructor Hayley Hoyt of the TriCities, Washington.  The youth spent four hours a day learning about character development, script writing, stage production, dancing and singing.  The youth worked with Hayley Hoyt to creatively develop the entire production themselves, a storyline focused on a high school for superheroes.  The musical play eventually included a talent show for superheroes, weeping cheerleaders, tough thugs, and two monsters from The Underground!  The week ended with an evening performance for family and friends.

~Cindy Brown, Educator, Oregon State University OSU Extension Service – Sherman County, College of Public Health & Human Sciences | 4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed | 66365 Lonerock Rd., Moro, Oregon 97039  P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291 extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Aug. 21

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, August 21st, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Karla Chambers, Stahlbush Island Farms – Empowering, Mentoring Women in Ag

Words: Mitch Lies
Photos: bylaurastewart.com

Four years ago, Karla Chambers, co-owner of Stahlbush Island Farms, noticed some of the young women she hired in management were not speaking up in meetings.

“They are just very bright minds,” Chambers says, “but they would typically sit in the back of the room or wait to be called on before they would voice their opinion or offer influence in a meeting.”

Chambers, who has long hired women in leadership roles and mentored young women on a one-on-one basis, decided to start a formal mentoring program for women at the Corvallis, Oregon, company. Today, eight young women participate in the program, including an environmental engineer, a chemical engineer, a soil scientist, an agribusiness salesperson and other professionals.

“One of the reasons I run this mentoring program is I want to empower them early in their career to be able to stand up and participate,” Chambers says. “I want them as equals at the table, not waiting to be called on.”

“We hired them because we saw that potential,” she says, “and I want to make sure they see that potential in themselves.”

Stahlbush Island Farms deliberately seeks out diversity for its management team, Chambers says, and over half of the company’s managers are women.

“I think bringing that diversity at the top of this organization has been key to our growth … … continue here with Oregon Family Farm: http://oregonfamilyfarm.com/index.php/2019/08/12/karla-chambers-bright-minds-at-stahlbush-island-farms/.


4. True Personal Success

Most people want to succeed, but whose version of “success” is the best choice? How do you measure your success? How do you know when you have really accomplished something that counts?

Success on other people’s terms may only mean frustration for you, and doing the so-called “right thing” just because you have been told it’s the right thing won’t help, either. If we measure our success by goals that others think worthwhile instead of by our own personal standards, we will wind up being frustrated and unfulfilled.

Personal growth and fulfillment must start with the centered self, and depend on clear personal values and self-knowledge if they are to be sustained. Measuring our success by other people’s values prevents us from recognizing many of our own significant accomplishments. We wind up denying our own unique talents and abilities in favor of someone else’s.

You know, you are not on earth to measure up to someone else’s expectations, but you are here to develop your potential – in the direction and degree that you choose. It is your responsibility, though, to equip yourself to make wise choices – choices that will help you develop and feel good about yourself and your contributions. Now, there is nothing wrong in asking others for advice or information, but in the final analysis, the decision must be yours.

When you count your true personal successes, you build self-confidence and your own sense of efficacy – your appraisal of your ability to cause things to happen for you and the world around you. Your life isn’t a measure of someone else’s success. It’s a measure of your own. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Oregon Historical Quarterly Summer 2018 Special Issue “Oregon’s Manila Galleon” Wins 2019 AASLH Award of Excellence

Oregon.BeaverPortland, OR – The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is proud to announce that the Oregon Historical Quarterly is the recipient of an American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Award of Excellence for the publication’s Summer 2018 special issue, “Oregon’s Manila Galleon.”

The AASLH Leadership in History Awards, now in its 74th year, is the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history. This year, AASLH is proud to confer fifty national awards honoring people, projects, exhibits, and publications. The winners represent the best in the field and provide leadership for the future of state and local history. OHS staff will accept the award on behalf of the Quarterly’s editorial advisory committee at a special banquet during the 2019 AASLH Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, on Friday, August 30.

For more than three centuries, Nehalem-Tillamook people have told stories of shipwreck survivors who washed ashore on or near the Nehalem Spit, established relationships with locals, and, eventually, violated social norms and either departed or were killed. Cargo wreckage accompanied the survivors, including distinctive blocks of beeswax. Until June of 2018, however, the history of Oregon’s “Beeswax Wreck” — now recognized as likely producing the first direct contact between Indigenous people of the region and people of Europe, Asia, and, potentially, Africa — was characterized by mystery. “Oregon’s Manila Galleon,” answers the questions of which ship wrecked, where it was going to and from, who was aboard, and what cargo it carried. The authors reached their conclusions through innovative, collaborative scholarship that brings together Native oral tradition, archival collections on three continents, and archaeological investigations — almost all published for the first time in OHQ.

The AASLH awards program began in 1945 to establish and encourage standards of excellence in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of state and local history throughout the United States. The AASLH Leadership in History Awards not only honor significant achievement in the field of state and local history, but also bring public recognition of the opportunities for small and large organizations, institutions, and programs to make contributions in this arena.

For more information about the Leadership in History Awards, visit www.aaslh.org.


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl5Oregon Eggs Must Come From Cage-Free Chickens in Five Years

What’s behind the confidence of the incompetent? This suddenly popular psychological phenomenon.

The Best Way To Rejuvenate Rural America? Invest In Rural America.

Prager U: True for You but Not for Me

U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics

Derailed BNSF engines, car removed; cleanup, repairs begin


 

Sherman County eNews #209

CONTENTS

  1. Join the DUII Prevention Walk to Stop Drinking & Drugged Driving, Aug. 24

  2. Ronald John “Huck” Rolfe 1937-2019

  3. Sherman County Court News, July 17

  4. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 7

  5. Closing the Distance

  6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Join the DUII Prevention Walk to Stop Drinking & Drugged Driving, Aug. 24

You are invited to participate in the efforts to Stop Drinking/Drugged Driving in Sherman County.

GOAL: 100 participants in the Walk and 100 yard signs displayed around the county.   Yard signs are available at no cost as of Wednesday August 14th.

Please join us in the DUII Prevention Walk on August 24th at 8 a.m. in Moro. We will begin at the north entrance of High School Loop and end at the fairgrounds with breakfast and drinks for all participants.

You can register as an individual or put a team together.  Maybe challenge another group to put a team together as well! You could even decorate your shirt with a team name.

Registration is $5 or $25 for a team of 6.  Registration fees will be used to offset a small portion of the cost of the T-shirts and “breakfast” for participants at the end of the walk. Fee waivers are available if needed! All registrations received by August 15th will have their choice of shirt sizes.  After that sizes will be on a first come first serve basis. All ages are welcome.  Some youth shirts will be available.

Please share and help spread the word. Thank you!

~Amy Asher  541-565-5036   aasher@co.sherman.or.us

In partnership with  Sherman County Prevention, Sherman County Sheriff’s Office and ODOT.


2. Ronald John “Huck” Rolfe 1937-2019

flower.rose.star
Ronald Rolfe, best known to almost everyone as “Huck,” passed away July 25th 2019. He was born August 8th, 1937 in Grass Valley, OR to Johnny and Gladys Rolfe. Huck and his older brother Rodney grew up on the family ranch north of Kent, OR. He graduated from the Moro High School and served in the United States Army stationed in Germany. After serving in the Army, Huck returned home and farmed with his brother, raising cattle, wheat and hay. He lived on the portion of the ranch at Clarno.
After leaving Clarno he lived with his wife Bernice in Molalla, OR. He continued to operate his trucking business out of Antelope, OR for many years.

Huck was known for his sense of humor. Always ready with a joke and laughing. He had a lot of old sayings and poems he’d rattle off at any given moment. He liked to watch sports and especially liked watching westerns.

A celebration of life will be held August 18th at 2:00pm at the Masonic Lodge in Molalla, OR. 123 East Ross Street, Molalla, OR 97038.


3. Sherman County Court News, July 17

ShermanCoLogoQuarterly Reports, Rental Incentive Housing Grant Application Review, Rental Housing Grant Language Modifications, 2020 Census Update, and the Downtown Improvement Funds Follow up, were the main items on the agenda during the July 17th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Carrie Pipinich, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD), gave a quarterly report, stating she continued to work on the Sherman Cities Broadband project. She had worked with County Counsel to develop a Draft Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) for the project, presented the IGA to the Grass Valley City Counsel, and worked with them regarding the questions they had. 

Pipinich presented a new Rental Housing Grant application that had been recommended to be approved by the Housing Grant Review Committee for Ron Mobley. Court motioned to approve $10,000 for the Rental Development Grant application for Ron Mobley to build one new rental unit, and authorize the County Judge to approve project completion and authorize final payment.  

Pipinich stated the Rental Housing Committee had compiled a few language modifications for the Rental and Rehabilitation Housing Grant applications. Modifications for the Rehabilitation Grant would involve Mechanics Lien requirements, before and after pictures of the improvements, and defining a clearer timeline for Rehab applications. She noted the program was not intended for owner occupied homes, but rather for individuals who have purchased a home, plan to fix it up, and eventually occupy it. As a result, the committee would like to include a restriction that applicants must apply for the grant within 30 days of closing on a home, and their move in date would need to be after they had submitted the grant application. The Rental Development Grant modifications would clarify timelines, and update completion documentation. 

Bob Thomas, County Trapper/Wildlife Services, gave his quarterly report, stating the Macks Canyon project was close to being finished, after receiving assistance from two state agencies, the Sheriff’s Department, a neighboring county, and a contract pilot who donated his time. His Spring was spent working dens. He helped out with outdoor school again this year for the 21st year, and said it is always well received by the kids attending.

Jenine McDermid, Clerk, presented her quarterly report, stating she had received a formal response from the County Assessment Function Funding Assistance (CAFFA) grant, and the county will see a return of approximately $88,885.72. The May Special District Election was finalized, with a 33.6% voter turnout, and preparations were underway for the May 19, 2020 Election. She met with Secretary of State, Bev Clarno, who viewed Election equipment and toured the Courthouse.

Bryan Hunt, Veteran’s Officer, presented his fourth quarter activity. He reported his first Veteran’s outreach, held in Arlington, was a success. Many Veterans resource agencies were present, along with a Dentist and Dental Hygienist who donated their time.

Marc Czornij, Community Partnership & Engagement Program, presented information regarding the 2020 Census. The Census is performed every 10 years, is required by the constitution, and its key purpose is to apportion the US House of Representatives seats. The data collected is also used to help distribute Federal funding for many programs, like those such as the National school lunch program, Head Start, Highway planning and Construction, and Medicaid. He stated self-reporting would be available via the internet, by phone, paper, or in-person, beginning March 12, 2020; mailings would be sent out with information on self-reporting, and for those who do not self-report, an enumerator will visit their home to collect data. All data collected is prohibited by law to be released to any person or organization, and all Census employees swear to a lifetime of confidentiality. Czornij discussed some of the challenges involved with collecting data, the questions that will be asked, and the resources available. He stated the bureau is currently hiring enumerators in Sherman County, and suggested interested individuals access available jobs via the Census website.

Kari Silcox, Senior Center Director, reported the Senior Center rented space to 46 events, meetings, or groups last quarter. They held an Easter lunch and bake sale was held, which raised $436, and was the most successful fundraiser to date. She noted the new Head Cook, Kristi Lesh, had been doing an excellent job, and was a wonderful addition. The Cleaning Services position had been filled by Becky Coles, who has been doing a great, thorough job. Elizabeth Harper, Community Action Program of East Central Oregon (CAPECO), hosted a Healthy Dessert class in April; the class was a great success, and they plan to have them on a regular basis.

Perry Thurston, City of Moro Mayor, inquired whether there would be funds added to the Downtown Improvement program, and if the Court intended to have funds available for Moro’s participation. He stated the city of Moro was interested in continuing the program, and had set aside matching funds. Judge Dabulskis stated, funds were not available for Moro at the time, as other Cities had expressed interest in using their portions. He explained the program was set up to be funded one-time, with each City being offered a set amount to use towards the program. The existing funds are the result of the other cities not using their share, as Moro was the only city to use their funds. County court held a discussion on the program requirements, and setting a project submission deadline. Court motioned to set a November 1, 2019, deadline for the Cities of Rufus, Wasco, and Grass Valley to submit projects for the Downtown Improvement Fund.

Ron McDermid, Justice Court, presented his quarterly report, explaining the fiscal year revenue, and budget. He stated there had been a reduction in citation revenue. He noted the recently ended Legislative session did not enact any changes affecting the suspension of driver’s licenses as previously predicted. He attended Judicial training in Bend. The Court thanked McDermid for giving Senator Merkley and Secretary of State Clarno tours of the Courthouse.

Brad Lohrey, Sheriff, gave his quarterly report. He discussed the Sheriffs Event Activity Analysis report: stating they typically see about 600 calls of service per year, but had experienced a higher than normal call volume, with 400 calls thus far, and he believed if the trend continued they could easily see about 800 calls for the year. Lohrey announced, Deputy Sol Jacobsen, had been awarded the Senior Deputy title. Bob Thomas, Wildlife Services, had been deputized as a non-paid Special Deputy, due to his involvement in assisting the Sheriff’s Department with pet removal during traffic incidents, and other special situations.

Angie Irzyk, questioned building codes on behalf of the Times Journal. Brief discussion held. 

Recessed Court Session at 11:55 a.m.. Reconvened Court Session at 1:00 p.m.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • Approved Judge Dabulskis to move forward with researching appropriate means to sell, and the authority to approve the sale as he sees fit for all current surplused vehicles, due to lack of minimum bids being met.
  • Appointed Erik Glover to the Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board of Directors, to serve a two year term beginning September 1, 2019.
  • Approved the Gorge Networks Fiber Build Proposal to the Sherman County RV Park, Sherman County Weed District, and Sherman County Planning Department, in the amount of $259.85 monthly charge and $492.00 one-time hookup fee.
  • Approved the Service Agreement between Community Action Program of East Central Oregon (CAPECO) and Sherman County, for Aging and People with Disabilities (Area Agency on Aging) and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Juvenile Crime Prevention Intergovernmental Agreement Number 11093, Amendment Number 2, between the State of Oregon acting through Oregon Department of Education Youth Development Division and Sherman County, effective July 1, 2019 through June 30, 2021, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved Resolution # 05-07-2019 adopting the County of Sherman Representation in the Updates to the Sherman County Multi-Jurisdictional Natural Hazards Mitigation Plan, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Agreement between Sherman County and the Cities of Moro, Wasco, Grass Valley, and Rufus to reimburse the County for the $43,320.95 Gap Funding for the Sherman County Broadband Initiative Fiber to the Home Project, and authorize County Court to sign.
  • Accepted a share of 10% of the Mid-Columbia Council of Governments (MCCOG) Building Codes reserves distribution, if agreed upon by all parties.
  • Approved minutes of April 24, 2019 Tri County Court, as presented.
  • Approved minutes of June 5, 2019, as corrected.
  • Approved minutes of June 11, 2019 Work Session, as presented.
  • Approved minutes of June 19, 2019, as presented.
  • Approved minutes of June 27, 2019 Special Session, as presented.
  • Approved minutes of July 8, 2019 Work Session, as corrected.
  • Approved the Claims for the month of June 2019, as presented.
  • Approved to Revenue/Expenditure Summary for the month of June 2019, as presented.
  • Approved the Treasurer’s Report for the month of June 2019, as presented.

Topics of discussion were Thank You Card – DeMoss Springs Park, Written Quarterly Reports, Gorge Networks Fiber to the Home Additions, Senior Center Fire Suppression System, Larry Hoctor Property and Commissioner Reports.


4. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 7

By Temporary Administrative Assistant Kristi Brown

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on August 7, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Heard from Elizabeth Mills, regarding the Kent Revitalization Project. She presented ideas to help improve the community of Kent, and discussed an Engineering Study & Report for the Kent Water District Supply & Distribution System.
  • Approved Jayme Mason’s Housing Rehabilitation Grant application in the amount of $14,368.71.
  • Approved a bid from Dan Wilson Painting to refinish the Burnet Building in the amount of $7,500.00.
  • Read Thank you Cards from Scholarship recipients.

5. Closing the Distance

It’s tough to be a good grandparent when your grandchildren are many miles away – but it can be done. Long-distance grand-parenting takes some special attention and creativity if it is to result in the kind of close feelings that transcend miles on the map. Here are some distance-solving tips for you that will help.

First, make the most of the mail. It’s fine if the letters are brief, as long as they are frequent. While you are waiting for food at a restaurant, write a note on the paper place mat and send it, or clippings of cartoons that make your grandchild smile. Use colorful stickers and stamps, and include a self-addressed, stamped envelope if it will speed a response. Regular “snail” mail may be old-fashioned, but there is something special about finding a letter in the mailbox.

E-mail and texting have quickly become wonderful ways to maintain a day-to-day relationship. A quick message every morning, or one that has arrived by the time your grandchild returns home from school, makes a positive impact. They will look forward to them. You are never too old to learn, and texting quick messages or sending e-cards to your grandchildren creates a vital connection. As the Baby Boomer generation actively embraces grandparenthood, they also have the computer skills to creatively keep contact with grandchildren geographically far away.

Video conferencing is terrific, and getting easier by the day. So much can now be done via video emails! Record a favorite children’s story to be played at bedtime, or a one-of-a-kind message filled with love and your special self-esteem building assurances. These days, you can even read the bedtime story directly to your grandchildren via video chats!

The point is, “be there” for your grandchildren, even if you can’t be there with them. Celebrate their successes, while you create special days just for them. Close the distance between you and make it nonexistent. You will never regret it, and they will love you for it – forever. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleCreated: 08 August 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

$6 million: Federal grants that a U.S. District Judge ruled this week were unlawfully withheld from Portland and Oregon by the Trump Administration over Oregon’s sanctuary law, according to OPB.

53,000: Members of the #TimberUnity Facebook group, which arose in opposition to cap and trade, according to Willamette Week.

13: Percent of Oregonians who are Hispanic or Latino, according to the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis.

60.8: Percent of Oregon families where women are the sole, primary or co-breadwinner, according to the Center for American Progress.

$3,000: Amount the Stand With Our Senators Political Action Committee donated to the campaigns of each Republican senator who walked out of the legislature to protest cap and trade, according to The Oregonian.

$3,500: Amount in fines each of those senators face — $500 for each day they were absent.

$12.25 million: Economic damages the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs is seeking in a lawsuit alleging that a rancher, workers and the John Deere farm equipment company are at fault for a 2017 wildfire that impacted the tribes’ reservation, according to The Oregonian.

106: Square miles of land the Nena Springs fire burned, The Oregonian reports.

$48 million: Amount a proposed liquified natural gas pipeline and export terminal would pay in corporate taxes if completed here, the company claimed in a letter to Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, according to The Medford Mail-Tribune. The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality denied the project a needed Clean Water Act permit to move forward.

56,000: Approximate acres of hemp planted in Oregon, according to the Ashland Tidings.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkOregon Encyclopedia Custom Word Art Products 

Oregon Arts Watch. West Coast Wood Cut: Edges of Life at Maryhill Museum

OSU study: Solar panels on 1% of farmland could meet global energy demands

East Oregonian (print & online)

Watch Lightning Strikes Streak Across Oregon with This Time-Lapse Map

Answers to Common Gun-Related Questions After the Shootings in El Paso and Dayton

Brilliant Maps: The Countries In Red Have As Many Murders Combined As The US

Brilliant Maps: Where You Don’t Need A Permit To Buy A Gun

Map Of Total Fossil Fuel Production By Country

How transparent are governments in Oregon? New public records survey sheds light

ICE Workplace Raids Unmask Our Broken Immigration System


 

Sherman County eNews #208

CONTENTS

  1. 2020 Sherman County Fair Queen Contest

  2. Dinner Program: “BPA, WWII & Aluminum in the Pacific Northwest,” Aug. 16

  3. Solar Saturday at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, Aug. 17

  4. Golf tournament fundraiser brings in college scholarship funds

  5. Get your free digital Guide to the Constitution from The Heritage Foundation

  6. Time to Think

  7. ‘Big Read’ arrives in Columbia Gorge this October


There are two old sayings in Washington … ‘A camel is a horse designed by a government committee,’ and ‘An elephant is a mouse designed to government specifications.’ ~Larry Burkett


1. 2020 Sherman County Fair Queen Contest

Would you like to represent the Sherman County Fair? We have changed the requirements for the Sherman County Fair Queen! You are no longer required to have/use a horse. If you are interested in becoming the Fair Queen, visit our website and go to the forms page for more information https://shermancountyfairfun.com/forms. Applicants must be at least 15 years of age and no older than 19 years old. Applications are due Wednesday August 21st, 2019. For more information email shermanctyfair@hotmail.com.


2. Dinner Program: “BPA, WWII & Aluminum in the Pacific Northwest,” Aug. 16

electric.lineJoin Libby Burke, Friday, August 16, 2019, for “BPA, WWII & Aluminum in the Pacific Northwest” at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. Burke will outline the impact of the Bonneville Power Administration’s service during World War II. Historical photos and the rarely-seen color film “Power Builds Ships,” highlight the ship building industry during the war and the rise of the Pacific Northwest aluminum industry. Tickets for the 6 p.m. dinner and program are $18, the 7 p.m. program only is $5. Purchase tickets by August 14. For tickets and information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


3. Solar Saturday at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, Aug. 17

sun.simpleBob Yoesle will present a solar viewing free to the public Saturday, August 17, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in The Dalles. Using special safely-filtered telescopes you can view the surface of the sun. This event is free, and will be held, weather permitting, on the museum lawn. Museum admission still applies for visitors who wish to see the exhibits. For more information visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


4. Golf tournament fundraiser brings in college scholarship funds

golf2Participants, volunteers, and sponsors of Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation’s 20th Annual Founder’s Cup golf tournament helped raise more than $13,000 for Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation’s student scholarship fund. This scholarship benefit was sponsored in part by Columbia State Bank.

Gorge Net and Toole Carter Tissot and Coats LLP teams earned first place trophies in the tournament at Indian Creek Golf Course on Saturday, Aug. 3. Gorge Net won the low gross category and Toole Carter Tissot and Coats LLP took home the low net prize. MHCC +1 and Fore Education won second place awards, while teams Google DC and Arnerich Massena won third place awards.

Rob Pollard took home the closest-to-the-pin for the men and Dixie Schanno for the women. Tim Urness won the longest drive contest for men and Lauri Hausafus for the women. Chris Olson came closest to the pizza box to win a Papa Murphy’s pizza each month for one year.  No one drove home the hole-in-one prize of a new car from C. H. Urness Motor Company.

Twenty-one teams participated in this year’s tournament. Several sponsors provided support, including Mike and Marta Cronin, team and trophy sponsor; NW Natural, power cart sponsor; Ruby Mason Windermere Realty, driving range sponsor; Consumer Cellular, longest drive contest sponsor; Tucker 1147 and Lyle Style, Bloody Mary and juice bar sponsor; Food Services of America, lunch sponsor; and North Wasco County PUD, Northwest Graphic Works, and Walter E. Nelson, hole sponsors. In addition, the foundation raised approximately $4,000 through a general raffle that included 12 fabulous prizes donated by community members and local businesses as well as a wine raffle that included six cases of local, exceptional wine prizes.

Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation board members invite golfers of all ability levels to join next year’s 21st Annual Founder’s Cup golf tournament on Saturday, Aug. 1, 2020, at Indian Creek Golf Course. For more information and/or to reserve a team slot, please email CGCC Foundation at foundation@cgcc.edu.


5. Get your free digital Guide to the Constitution from The Heritage Foundation

constitution-wethepeopleThe Heritage Guide to the Constitution is a landmark, one-of-a-kind book that presents the U.S. Constitution as never before. With your instant access now, you’ll receive:

  • Useful, clause-by-clause analysis of the entire Constitution and each amendment
  • Input from more than 100 constitutional scholars and legal experts
  • 475 pages reviewing what the Constitution actually says and how it applies today
  • A copy of the Constitution and the documents that serve as its foundation

So get your free digital access to The Heritage Foundation’s Guide to the Constitution and have it at your fingertips as your reference. Be able to explain every clause in the Constitution in a way that is clear and understandable. https://www.askheritage.org/constitution/?utm_campaign=constitutionguide&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_content=Facebook_Desktop_Feedwat_purchop&fbclid=IwAR0UukMW5Lb2Q-LZG-nz78ZvdiNfAR4IBT0-Ww-Kiwp1QZ8rxAa2RoQBqIM


6. Time to Think

As we here in the Northern Hemisphere bask in those lazy days of summer, a lot of us find that sunshine promotes some lively daydreaming. It’s a little like letting your mind “off the leash” to wander where it will. This valuable time to think can give us the opportunity for what we like to call “ah-ha!” moments.

How many times have you suddenly, seemingly from out of nowhere, found yourself saying, “Yes! Now that makes sense! Why didn’t I realize this before?” Insights seem to come at the strangest times for some of us. They come in the shower, in the carwash, out for an evening walk, pulling weeds in the garden, or standing in line for your morning espresso – in short, anywhere!

It seems that our insights come when we have given our minds time to think, without forcing answers on the conscious level. How many times have you given yourself a problem to solve, handed it off to your subconscious mind, and then let go of conscious control? Does this not sound “normal” to you? Well, believe it or not, given enough time, the answers you need come through, complete with all the details.

There is great value in giving yourself time to think, for active reflection is the launching pad for change and growth. Those few moments of quiet reflection allow us to drain away the stress of the day, and also focus in on what is truly important in our lives.

Give yourself time to think, time to focus your thoughts on what you truly want in your life. Let go of the conscious demands of the day, and wait for those insights that will surely come – maybe even beyond the end of your “leash!” ~The Pacific Institute


7. ‘Big Read’ arrives in Columbia Gorge this October

books.loveStarting this fall, people in Hood River, The Dalles and surrounding communities will celebrate reading in a very big way, as “The Big Read” brings book readings and discussions, folk dancing, artists, a comedian, theatrical troupe, musical performances and panel presentations to schools, libraries and the campuses of Columbia Gorge Community College.

“The Big Read” is a National Endowment for the Arts partnership with Arts Midwest to broaden understanding of the world, its diverse communities and peoples through the joy of shared reading. Since the initiative began in 2006, more than 5.7 million Americans have attended a Big Read event.

That number will certainly grow this year, as Hood River and The Dalles join 77 other communities across the United States in the 2019 Big Read.

“Money can’t buy happiness, but participating in the Big Read will make you happy — and it’s free!” observed Jeff Wavrunek, director of The Dalles – Wasco County Public Library.

Different authors and books are showcased in each community. Featured author for the Columbia River Gorge is Luis Alberto Urrea, whose book “Into the Beautiful North” sets the theme for dozens of Big Read events beginning Oct. 4 in The Dalles. The book describes the US-Mexico border – the subject of controversy today – as a “dream-line destination and departure point, surrounded by desperation and expectations,” according to the book’s preface.

Urrea was born in a poor neighborhood of Tijuana and moved with his parents to San Diego at the age of five. A graduate of the University of California, San Diego, he re-discovered Tijuana as a relief worker for a church mission. He later secured a writing position at Harvard, and today is a professor of creative writing at the University of Illinois – Chicago.

“No one writes more tragically or intimately about border culture than this son of a Mexican father and Anglo mother,” said journalist Bill Moyers of Urrea, author of numerous works of fiction, non-fiction and poetry.

“Into the Beautiful North” is Urrea’s third novel. He invites readers “to think of the border as more than a stark divide between nations … [but] a place of convergence where meaningful conversations, and even love, between cultures begins.”

Free copies of the book in English and Spanish will be widely available.

Urrea substantially reduced his speaking fee in order for “The Big Read” to come to the Columbia Gorge. Local co-sponsors are The Dalles – Wasco County Public Library and Columbia Gorge Community College, which are teaming up with 34 partner organizations including the Hood River County Library District, local school districts, Columbia Center for the Arts, The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce, The Next Door, Klindt’s Book Sellers, Immigration Counseling Services, local elected officials and many others.

The Big Read opens Oct. 4 in The Dalles Civic Auditorium, followed by a wide variety of events throughout the entire month of October in Hood River and The Dalles: Book readings, discussion groups in English and Spanish, film screenings, workshops, and panel discussions on issues affecting the Latinx community. A total of 44 separate events are planned. A detailed schedule will be posted on the college, Hood River County Library and The Dalles – Wasco County Public Library websites.

Columbia Gorge Community College is a Hispanic Serving Institution. In its successful grant proposal to The National Endowment Endowment for the Arts, Columbia Gorge Community College said its goal is to strengthen the college’s relationship with the Latinx community by providing events that honor their heritage, improve understanding of the immigration process, encourage inter-cultural dialog and strengthen partnerships.

People are invited to watch for upcoming events through local newspaper stories and radio public service announcements, the college and library websites and social media.