Sherman County eNews #185

CONTENT

  1. Sherman Youth 18 and under:  Become a 4-H Junior Master Recycler!

  2. Sherman County School District Announces Hiring Mike Somnis as Principal 

  3. Thirty-fifth Year: Local History by Local Authors, Hot off the Press!

  4. Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips

  5. Teaching By Example

  6. Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever 49¢ Stamp | Sheet of 16

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman Youth 18 and under:  Become a 4-H Junior Master Recycler!

Sherman County youth 18 and under…become a 4-H Junior Master Recycler!  Register now for a free recycling adventures day camp July 5-7 at Sherman Extension Office in Moro.  Your instructors will include Sherman third grade teacher Talese Slay, who is a former Nike employee with a lot of “green” knowledge, and Cindy Brown of OSU Sherman County Extension, who was the Coordinator for the Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program (Sherman, Wasco and Hood River counties).

  • Learn about “talking trash” and why we need to reduce, reuse and recycle
  • How to recycle at home and at school
  • Composting:  recycling in the kitchen, yard and garden
  • Trash to treasure:  arts and crafts using recycled materials
  • Make “recycled” lunches every day using cupboard items plus leftovers!
  • Field trip in Sherman County and The Dalles

The dates and times for the youth recycling day camp is Wednesday July 5 from 9am-noon;  Thursday July 6 from 9am until mid-afternoon (field trip day); and Friday July 7 from 9am-noon.  Busing for the field trip will be provided by Sherman Transit.  Questions or to register, call OSU Sherman County Extension 541-565-3230.  Space is limited to 8 participants.


2. Sherman County School District Announces Hiring Mike Somnis as Principal 

2017-18 New Principal Announcement Mike Somnis 6-23-17 (1)


 3. Thirty-fifth Year: Local History by Local Authors, Hot off the Press!

The Sherman County Historical Society’s Editorial Team put Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 35, No. 1, in the mail to members this week. Gladys Wesley, Editor, and her editorial team are to be commended for keeping this publication going: Terri Bibby, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton, Nancy Allen and Sheri Carlson.

In this issue readers will enjoy Terri Bibby’s interview with Mary Bucholz McKay Fields, Keith Mobley’s story about Anita Hooper and Eilene Eslinger’s story, three women who celebrated their shared 95th birthdays! Amber Tilton and Sherry Kaseberg teamed up with an interview: Patrica French Moore: Ink on Her Hands. Dorothy Coyle Blagg reminisced about teaching school in Grass Valley and Sherry Kaseberg about Miller Island. Jean Zevely Anderson wrote about a memorable character named Ruby Petteys, and Robert “Bud” Root about the Root family west of Wasco. For The Record contains a lot of photographs and a list of memorial gifts to the Society.

The 60th anniversary of the start of construction on the John Day Dam comes up next year. One or two issues of For The Record will be reserved for stories devoted to construction of the dam, the Biggs/Maryhill bridge and relocated railroads and roads. Please send your stories to Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or to info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line “Story for FTR.”

Get your copy at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro!


 4. Red Cross Issues Hot Weather Safety Tips

Sun-Sole
BEND, Ore., June 23, 2017 — Extreme temperatures are in the forecast for the weekend and the American Red Cross urges residents to be aware of the steps they should take to avoid heat related illness. Follow these simple, tried and true steps to keep yourself and others safe before and during a heat wave.

Before
* Listen to local weather forecasts and stay aware of upcoming temperature changes.
* Be aware of both the temperature and the heat index. The heat index is the temperature the body feels when the effects of heat and humidity are combined.
* Check the contents of your disaster preparedness kit to ensure it has enough water and non-perishable food items, just in case. For a full kit list, visit redcross.org/PrepareGuide.
* Look out for your neighbors — people who are elderly, young or sick are more likely to become victims of heat-related illness and may need your help.
* If you do not have air conditioning, locate places you could go to find relief from the heat during the warmest part of the day (schools, libraries, theaters, malls). Many government websites provide a list of available cooling centers.
* Ensure that your animals’ needs for water and shade are met.

During
* Listen to a NOAA Weather Radio for critical updates from the National Weather Service (NWS).
* Never leave children or pets alone in enclosed vehicles, not even for a few minutes. According to the National Weather Service, a car left in 80 degree weather yielded an inside temperature of 95 degrees and rising in just two minutes.
* Stay hydrated by drinking plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty. Avoid drinks with caffeine or alcohol.
* Eat small meals and eat more often.
* Wear loose-fitting, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Avoid dark colors because they absorb the sun’s rays.
* Slow down, stay indoors and avoid strenuous exercise during the hottest part of the day (late afternoon/evening).
* Postpone outdoor games and activities (participants and spectators).
* Use a buddy system when working in excessive heat.
* Take frequent breaks if you must work outdoors.
* Check on family, friends and neighbors who do not have air conditioning, who spend much of their time alone or who are more likely to be affected by the heat.
* Check on your animals frequently to ensure that they are not suffering from the heat.

How to Treat Heat-Related Illnesses
During heat waves people are susceptible to several heat-related conditions. Here’s how to recognize and respond to them.

Heat Cramps
Heat cramps are muscular pains and spasms that usually occur in the legs or abdomen. Heat cramps are often an early sign that the body is having trouble with the heat.
* Get the person to a cooler place and have him or her rest in a comfortable position. Lightly stretch the affected muscle.
* Give an electrolyte-containing fluid, such as a sports drink. Water may also be given.

Heat Exhaustion
Heat exhaustion is a more severe condition than heat cramps. Heat exhaustion often affects athletes, firefighters and construction workers. It also affects those wearing heavy clothing in a hot, humid environment.
* Signs of heat exhaustion include cool, moist, pale, ashen or flushed skin; headache; nausea; dizziness; weakness; and exhaustion.
* Move the person to a cooler environment with circulating air. Remove or loosen as much clothing as possible and apply cool, wet towels to the skin. Fanning or spraying the person with water also can help. If the person is conscious, give small amounts of a cool fluid such as a sports drink or fruit juice to restore fluids and electrolytes. Give about 4 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes.
* If the person’s condition does not improve or if he or she refuses water, has a change in consciousness, or vomits, call 9-1-1.

Heat Stroke
Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that usually occurs by ignoring the signals of heat exhaustion. Heat stroke develops when the body systems are overwhelmed by heat and begin to stop functioning.
* Signs of heat stroke include extremely high body temperature, red skin which may be dry or moist; changes in consciousness; rapid, weak pulse; rapid, shallow breathing; confusion; vomiting; and seizures.
* Heat stroke is life-threatening. Call 9-1-1 immediately if you believe someone is suffering from this condition.
* Rapidly cool the body by immersing the person up to the neck in cold water, if possible OR douse or spray the person with cold water.
* Cover the person with bags of ice or cold, wet towels.
* If you are not able to measure and monitor the person’s temperature, apply rapid cooling methods for 20 minutes or until the person’s condition improves.

Download the Red Cross Emergency App
* Find the FREE Red Cross Emergency App in the Apple Store or Google Play
* It offers a Heat Wave Safety Checklist, among many other resources
* It provides expert medical advice right at your fingertips
* It’s available in multiple languages


5. Teaching By Example

What is the best way to teach children? There are many theories about the most effective way to teach children. Some say repetition is important, while others say hands-on experiences are better. Some say kids learn best in a highly structure environment, while others think the freedom to experiment works best.

Perhaps the best way to teach children – is by loving example. This means that if you want your children to enjoy reading, cuddle them while you read to them, from a very early age. If you want them to be respectful, give them your respect.  If you want them to be honest, tell them the truth. And, if you want them to be affectionate, treat them that way.

If you want your kids to be good communicators, give them plenty of interest and attention. And, if you would like them to eventually be capable of a good, solid relationship with a spouse, work on your own marriage until it shines. You see, it won’t matter what you tell them, if what you do doesn’t match up with what you say.

You can tell them to be honest, but if they know you cheat on your taxes, lie about being sick to your employer, or say one thing in public and another at home, they will learn from your behavior – not from your words. Learning personal accountability won’t have a chance to grow in them.

So, if you want your children to be happy and competent, don’t worry so much about exactly how or what subjects to teach them. If you put your energy into living the best life you can, and make sure your kids know that they are well-loved, you will be teaching them a lesson that will stay with them throughout their lives. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever 49¢ Stamp | Sheet of 16

On August 21, 2017, tens of millions of people in the United States will have an opportunity to view a total eclipse of the Sun. A total solar eclipse was last seen on the U.S. mainland in 1979, but only in the Northwest. The eclipse this summer will sweep a narrow path across the entire country—the first time this has happened since 1918. The U.S. Postal Service® anticipates this rare event with a stamp celebrating the majesty of solar eclipses.

The Total Eclipse of the Sun stamp is the first U.S. stamp to use thermochromic ink, which reacts to the heat of your touch. Placing your finger over the black disc on the stamp causes the ink to change from black to clear to reveal an underlying image of the moon. The image reverts back to the black disc once it cools. The back of the stamp pane shows a map of the eclipse path.You can preserve the integrity of your Total Eclipse of the Sun Forever® stamp pane with our protective sleeve specifically designed for stamp preservation. The stamp uses a photograph taken by astrophysicist Fred Espenak of a total solar eclipse that was seen over Jalu, Libya, on March 29, 2006. Mr. Espenak also took the photograph of the full moon that is revealed by pressing upon the stamp image. The reverse side of the stamp pane shows the path across the United States of the forthcoming August 21, 2017, total solar eclipse and gives the times that it will appear in some locations.


 7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talk Railroads Across the Pacific Northwest

 Sherman County, Oregon History

New high-fiber wheat varieties available to growers this fall

Oregonians Can Now Legally Harvest And Eat Roadkill

Oregon Moves Closer To Stronger Sanctuary State Law

Just The World’s Time Zones

The 28 Best Map Based Strategy Board Games You’ve Probably Never Played

37 Eye-Catching World Map Posters

Judge halts suit over monument expansion

Project born in Pendleton can revolutionize harvest

Sherman County eNews #184

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

Please note: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.

applause1 THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! The Sherman Boys Basketball Program just completed its major fundraiser event of the year – The Sherman County Invitational sponsored by the Sherman County Athletic Foundation.  The event was a huge success with 17 teams from Oregon and Washington participating in the four day event in Moro.  The success of this event would not be possible without the generosity of so many and the countless hours donated by our parent and student volunteers.  I personally would like to thank those of you who helped as I know many of you put in long hours.  I also want to thank those who donated supplies: Mid Columbia Producers, Dinty’s Market, Stephen & Tamar Fritts, Trent & Jill Harrison, Evan & Deanna Christiansen, Jon & DeeAnn Ramos, Dowen & Jill Jones, Bill & Jill Martin, Doug & Sandi Martin, Todd & Espana Coles, Tom & Connie Martin and Chris Kaseberg.  Your support is very appreciated. ~Bill Blevins, Principal, Sherman County School, 541-565-3500

“What if, today, we were grateful for everything?” ~ Charlie Brown

THANK YOU! Sherman County Prevention would like to thank everyone who came to the Family Fair and helped make it a success! Despite the wind and brief rain, we had another excellent turnout! Thank you City of Moro for letting us use the park and for always keeping it in such beautiful shape, and to the Fair Board for allowing us to use the tables and chairs.  Shout out to the Junebug Boys for providing us with excellent music!  We would also like to thank our volunteers and partners for setting up such fun booths and activities.  We can’t wait to do this again next year! Thank you! ~Taylor Olsen, Sherman County Prevention Coordinator

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

THE MUSEUM STORE. Moro, Oregon.

EMPLOYMENT:

PART-TIME RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATE. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a part time retail sales associate.  Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  This position will be based out of The Dalles, Oregon. 

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Cashier-Process customer orders
  • Maintenance of the facilities
  • Sell products and provide product information
  • Carry out and load farm store merchandise
  • Stock Farm Store with merchandise warehoused or stored in the lot or warehouse
  • Clean and rearrange merchandise as needed
  • Open and close store, lot and warehouse areas
  • Pick up orders from vendors
  • Deliver merchandise to Farm Store customers
  • Load and unload bales of straw, hay and feed

Requirements:

  • Lift, carry, push, or pull objects up to approximately 100 lbs.
  • Must possess basic computer knowledge and be able to navigate with little assistance
  • Must be able to accommodate a varying work schedule
  • Operate with initiative, commitment, strong work ethic & sense of urgency
  • Accurate and comfortable with math and currency
  • Valid Driver’s License
  • Must be able to operate a vehicle with a GVW of 10,000 lbs. or more, with or without a trailer in tow
  • Will be required to work in all weather conditions

Schedule:
Schedule varies, store hours of operation will be Monday – Saturday 7:30 – 5:30.  Shifts are assigned as deemed necessary.

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com  or be picked up at the main office in Moro.  Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277      Fax: (503)536-6875

Brittany@mcpcoop.com Closing Date: July 8th, 2017, or Until Filled.

GRAIN FACILITIES OPERATOR. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Facilities Operator.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Facilities Operator is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge 

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license
  • The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

 Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.  — As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.  Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277

Brittany@mcpcoop.com  Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer. 0/0

GRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Operations Laborer.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to maintenance, housekeeping, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge 

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.   

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.  

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277

Brittany@mcpcoop.com  Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer.  0/0

WEED CONTROL TECHNICIANS (2). The Sherman County Weed District is looking to fill 2 positions: Weed Control Technicians. These are full-time, seasonal positions with no benefits, $15.43/hour. Primary duties include: Surveying fields and canyons and identification of targeted noxious weeds; Marking, mapping and documenting data; servicing and repairing equipment. Weed Technicians will work outside, in the environment in all weather and in rough terrain.   Snakes and ticks are not uncommon within the project area.  The technicians will work as part of a team in Sherman County. Experience in operating off-road vehicles, pulling a trailer and use of GPS data is a plus. For more information and to receive an application, contact Rod Asher at 541-980-4345 or rasher@shermancounty.net

Sherman County Weed District, 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039

Applications due by June 16th, 2017, or until filled.  0/0

FOR SALE:

HOUSE IN WASCO. 4 bedroom, 2 bath house with extended lot for RV or garden, 2 car garage, workshop in basement. 2 bedrooms on main floor, 2 large bedrooms on upper floor. Many recent inside improvements. $115,000 by owners. Shown by appointment. 541-467-2345 7/14

CONTINUING USED BOOK SALE at Wasco Annex (old grade school) in Wasco, Oregon. Used books only $5.00 per bag; books on tape, music cassettes and  VHS movies for 25 cents.  Stock up and give for gifts. All funds used for the purchase of new items for the library. ~ Danee Rankin, Librarian, Wasco City Community Library. 7/14

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

 CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Would you like some help with meal preparation, light housekeeping, transportation, etc.? I am a caring and honest woman with excellent references.  ~Synoma Olsen 541 993-6924  7/28

CANES & WALKERS. Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  The church will accept donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446 for more info. 0/0

SHERMAN COUNTY: FOR THE RECORD, Spring 2017 – Hot off the press!

LEAN-TO CAFÉ DAILY SPECIALS! Tuesday hamburgers, Wednesday soft tacos, Thursday chicken fried steak, Friday clam chowder and Saturday night prime rib. 541-442-5709 6/30

WHEELCHAIR to BORROW. The Sherman County Senior & Community Center recently received a donation of an electric wheelchair.  It is available for loan but batteries for the wheelchair must be provided by those using the chair.  For further information, please contact the manager at 541-565-3191.  6/30

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOARD. Sherman County Fair Board is accepting letters of interest for a board position.  Letters should include your experience with our or other county fairs, how you have been involved or have helped out at a fair and the number of years, other community involvement, and your areas of strengths to contribute to our team. Requirements include Sherman County residency, attendance at monthly board meetings, committing to extra time and work days in August, and additional work days, meetings and trainings as they happen.  Send your letter to Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45  Wasco, OR  97065 or to shermanctyfair@hotmail.com to be received by July2nd.  Monthly board meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month.  Contact the Fair Board Secretary with questions and for further information @ shermanctyfair@hotmail.com or 541-980-1821.  6/30

WANTED:

HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS.  Non-Profit Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. — ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. — The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. — To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! — ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 7/28

FREE:

SHERMAN COUNTY, OREGON – A HISTORY COLLECTION  http://shermancountyoregon.com

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

DUPLEX. One bedroom apartment. Located in scenic Grass Valley oregon. Locaterd 55 miles south east of The Dalles. 470 Sq ft. One bathroom. Older style home. Off street parking with views of the town and country. First, last and deposit. No pets. Garbage and water included in rent. $450. Text for pics or a tour. Looking forward to hearing from you. Eric Whitley. 541999517.  6/30


2. Calendar (new or corrected) 

flower.daisypinkJUNE

23 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 1 Library

23 Meeting: The Future of CRP in Sherman County 9-12 Fairgrounds

24 Jean Woodrum Celebration of Life 2 Wasco United Methodist Church

24 Maryhill Museum Family Festival: La Blouse Roumaine

26 Sherman County Photography Club Field Trip 

26 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11-1 White Salmon

27 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

29 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 1 Condon

29 Food Preservation Workshop for Kids & Adults 9-2 Extension Office

30 Sherman County Court Special Session, Biggs Service District Budget Hearing 10

flower.geraniumJULY

1 City-wide Garage & Yard Sale in Rufus 541-739-2321

1 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

1-4 Condon’s Fabulous Fourth of July Celebration

1 Harvesters’ Classic Softball Tournament 19 Condon

1 Cruz-In Car Show & Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

1-9 Experience Moro’s Quilt & Fiber Arts Displays & Activities

2 Dave Barnett Memorial Golf Tournament 10 Condon

2 Gilliam County Historical Society Depot Museum 1-5 Condon

3 4-Wheeler Rodeo 12 Fairgrounds in Condon

3 Artisans’ Market 4-7 Condon City Park

3 Paradise Rose Chuckwagon Dinner 5-8 Condon

3 Sherman County Courthouse will be closed.

3 Summer Concert in Condon, Countryfied & Fireworks 6:30-9:90

4 INDEPENDENCE DAY

4 Breakfast in the Park, Windmill Classic Run, Program 8 & Parade 12, Condon

5 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Grass Valley Baptist Church

5 Sherman County Court 9

5-7 4-H Junior Master Recycler Workshop 9 Sherman Extension Office

9 Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno 2-4 Wasco Annex

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Celebration 1-4 Sorosis Park, The Dalles

11 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

12 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30 Senior Center

19 Sherman County Court 9

24-28 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Workshops 9-1 Sherman Extension Office

eclipse1AUGUST

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Rufus Baptist Church

4 Summer Concert in Condon, Buffalo Kin 6:30-9:90

5 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

16 Sherman County Court 9

18-22 Outlaw Rodeo Bible Camp – Powell Butte, Oregon

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22-27 Sherman County Fair

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90


 

Sherman County eNews #183

CONTENT

  1. Corrected: Sherman County Photography Club, June 26
  2. 2017 Sherman High School Senior Scholarships
  3. Sherman County School Academic & Athletic Awards

1. Corrected: Sherman County Photography Club, June 26

camera.35mm.blueThe Sherman County Photography club will be taking a field trip to the Goldendale Observatory on Monday, June 26. Troy Carpenter, Observatory Director will talk about long exposure and astrophotography. Plan on meeting at the Goldendale Dairy Queen parking lot at 6:30 to carpool up to the Observatory. Parking permits are not required for this event. 


2. 2017 Sherman High School Senior Scholarships

 2017 Senior Scholarships


3. Sherman County School Academic & Athletic Awards

Spring Awards Page 1

Spring Awards Page 2

Spring Awards Page 3

Spring Awards Page 4

Sherman County eNews #182

CONTENT

  1. Photography Club Field Trip, June 26

  2. Jean Woodrum 1927-2017

  3. Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics,” by Bev Clarno, July 9

  4. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, June 30

  5. The Top 30 Two-Year Trade Schools 2017

  6. Oregon State Historic Preservation Office is Going Digital

  7. Ego and Self-Esteem

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Photography Club Field Trip, June 26

StarYellowThe Sherman County Photography Club will be taking a field trip to the Goldendale Observatory on Monday, June 26. Troy Carpenter, Observatory Director, will talk about long exposure and astrophotography. Plan on meeting at the Goldendale Dairy Queen parking lot at 6:30 to carpool up to the Observatory. A Washington State Parks Discover pass is required at the Observatory parking lot.


2. Jean Woodrum 1927-2017

flower.rose.star

Betty Jean Woodrum

Celebration of Life

Saturday, June 24 at 2 o’clock

United Methodist Church, Wasco, Oregon

Potluck reception to follow.

In lieu of flowers, the family suggested Shriners Children’s Hospital Jean Woodrum Memorial 3101 SW Sam Jackson Park Road Portland, Ore. 97239.


3. Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics,” by Bev Clarno, July 9

Bev Clarno will be at the Wasco School Annex on Sunday July 9th from 2 to 4 PM. Bev will speak about her book “Pigs to Politics.” The books are $29.95. She will be available to sign books and looks forward to seeing friends in Sherman County.


4. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, June 30

The Sherman County Court will be meeting in special session on Friday, June 30, 2017, at 10:00 a.m. in the Office of the County Court. The purpose of the special session is the Biggs Service District Budget Hearing and end-of-fiscal-year adjustments to the County budget. If you would like to meet with the court, have action items to add, or have support materials for your appointment, please submit to the County Court Office before 12 noon, June 28, 2017. Agenda updates will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.

 ShCoCourtSp.Mtg.6.30.17


5. The Top 30 Two-Year Trade Schools 2017

The 2017 Top 30 Two-Year Trade Schools list is the first of its kind from Forbes. We find value in highlighting the nation’s 442 two-year trade schools in a time when the country’s high schools, local and federal government efforts and popular culture are so fixated on around the arguably overstated importance of a four-year college degree.

As with our annual Top Colleges rankings, we attempt to put ourselves in students’ shoes. If a student is ready to spend the time and money to attend a trade school, he or she has a right to know if the experience and cost is worthwhile. Will I be able to pay for it? Is it a good school? What kind of salary can I expect?

The focus for this report is “output:” we want to know the return on investment for these schools. For this reason, we honed in on three major areas: earnings, affordability and quality. Our data comes directly from the federal government and is based on figures the schools filed to the Department of Education.  If a school did not report a specific data point, we gave them an automatic zero in that category… … …

Continued with Quality, Affordability & Earnings at https://www.forbes.com/sites/cartercoudriet/2017/06/19/the-top-30-two-year-trade-schools-2017-the-full-methodology/#26748ff81886.

Also see https://www.forbes.com/sites/cartercoudriet/2017/06/19/the-top-30-two-year-trade-schools-colleges-that-fight-the-nations-skills-gap/#6d77ff1d6675 


6. Oregon State Historic Preservation Office is Going Digital

Oregon.BeaverComing Fall 2017, the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO) will offer a new digital review and compliance submittal service called Go Digital. Go Digital will streamline the submittal process and allow our office to assist a greater number of customers while maintaining response times. In response to requests from our customers, our Go Digital service will allow for an easier, quicker way to submit, receive, track, and consult on new and existing projects.

Go Digital Basics:
* Go Digital submittals are heavily encouraged; however, hard-copy or paper submittals will still be accepted via standard mail.
* If a project is submitted via hard-copy or paper, all future correspondence associated with the project must be submitted in the same format, including all updates and revisions.
* Similarly, if a project is submitted via Go Digital, no hard-copy materials associated with the project will be accepted later in the consultation process.
* Archaeological reports and site forms submitted via Go Digital will no longer require a hard-copy or CD.
* Go Digital submittals will not be accepted unless they are sent to the ORSHPO.Clearance@oregon.gov email following the Go Digital Submittal Guidelines.
* Go Digital Submittal Guidelines will be available prior to roll out.

For questions regarding Go Digital, contact Matt Diederich at (503) 986-0577 or matt.diederich@oregon.gov.

The Oregon State Historic Preservation Office is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Other Oregon Heritage programs include the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, the Oregon Heritage Commission, and the Oregon Main Street Program. Learn more about Oregon Heritage by visiting www.oregonheritage.org. 


7. Ego and Self-Esteem

Is it possible to have high self-esteem and humility at the same time? For over 45 years, The Pacific Institute’s education has been teaching people, from all walks of life, to raise their self-esteem and their self-efficacy.  Every now and then, someone will ask, rather nervously, if raising their self-esteem is going to make them into conceited, egotistical or selfish people.

Now, it is true that people with high self-esteem value their worth as human beings and as individuals. They enjoy their own company, and have confidence in their ability to overcome obstacles and to achieve the goals they have set for themselves.

However, it is important that we don’t confuse high self-esteem with egotism, because the two don’t go together at all. High self-esteem people know that all people are, by their very nature, valuable – and they behave accordingly. In addition, they realize that no one gets very far in life entirely on their own, so they feel indebted and extremely grateful to those who have helped them along the way.

In fact, high self-esteem people almost always have a strong sense of wanting to give back and to help others as they have been helped. You have probably met thousands of men and women who clearly value themselves as people. And, you probably noticed that those with warranted high self-esteem hold others in high esteem, as well.  They expect the best for themselves, and they give their best to others, as well.

Working with people who have warranted, high self-esteem is actually a very pleasant experience, and one that we can look forward to every day. The same cannot be said of working with an egotist. ~The Pacific Institute

So, don’t concern yourself with building your self-esteem at the expense of your humility, because these two qualities actually go hand in hand.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

bird.owl.limbWildfire Near Clarno

CNS News 

Mormon Crickets march into Northern Oregon 

Add Your Eclipse Event to This Map

ODOT Trip Check

“I wish to live without hate, whim, jealousy, envy, and fear. I wish to be simple, honest, frank, natural . . to face any obstacle and meet every difficulty unabashed and unafraid.” ― Elbert Hubbard 

 Judicial Watch

 

Ducks, Beavers take over winners’ circle at Oregon Sports Awards

The 2016 Election and the Demise of Journalistic Standards 

Ranchers Fume as Rainbow Family Set to Camp on Federal Land in Oregon

Sherman County eNews #181

CONTENT

  1. Notice. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting, June 23

  2. Discovery Kids Camps #1 and #2, in July

  3. Legal Fireworks in Legal Places: Info and Demonstration, June 23

  4. Eastern Oregon University Alumni Raft Trip and Get-Together, July 8

  5. An Act of Courage: An Everyday Fact of Life

  6. Oregon’s arts and culture industry generates $687 million in economic impact


1. Notice. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting, June 23

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Special Board Meeting on Friday, June, 23 2017 at 1:00 p.m.  A closed Executive Session will precede the Special Meeting at 12:30 p.m. pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(a) to consider the employment of an officer, employee, staff member, or agent and ORS 192.660(2)(d) to conduct deliberations with persons designated to carry on labor negotiations.  These meetings will be held in the Sherman County School/Public Library. 

SchoolBd.6.23.17

Public Participation in Board Meetings

  1. A visitor may be recognized by the chairperson by rising, identifying himself/herself with his/her full name and address and stating his/her purpose for appearing.
  2. A group of visitors with a common purpose should designate a spokesperson for the group.
  3. Discussion or presentation concerning a published agenda item is limited to its designated place on the agenda, unless otherwise authorized by the chairperson.
  4. A visitor may introduce a topic not on the published agenda. However, the Board, at its discretion, may require that a proposal, inquiry, or request be submitted in writing and reserves the right to refer the matter to the administration for action or for study and to report at a subsequent meeting. The Board shall make a decision at the meeting where information is presented only if the issue is considered an emergency by the Board.
  5. At the discretion of the Board chairperson, when meetings are large and controversial, anyone wishing to speak before the Board, either as an individual or as a member of a group, on any agenda item or other topic, may do so by providing information to the board secretary on a sign-in sheet prior to the meeting. This will help the chairperson provide adequate time for each agenda item.
  6. Statements by members of the public should be brief and concise. The chairperson may, at his/her discretion, establish a time limit on discussion or oral presentation by a visitor on any topic.
  7. Speakers may offer objective criticism of school operations and programs but the Board will not hear complaints concerning specific school personnel. The chairperson will direct the visitors to the appropriate procedure for Board consideration and disposition of legitimate complaints involving individuals.
  8. These procedures will be published on the back of every Board meeting agenda. 

2. Discovery Kids Camps #1 and #2, in July

DISCOVERY KIDS CAMP #1 – July 10-14 – entering grades 1-6 

Kids entering grades 1-6 will explore “A Timeless Summer,” through hands-on activities that weave science, history, art, music and play during Discovery Kids Summer Camp #1, July 10-14, 2017, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles. For more information, visit www.gorgediscovery.org.

DISCOVERY KIDS CAMP #2 – July 31-Aug. 4 – Entering grades 6-12

Kids entering 6th-12th grade will learn what it’s like to be a meteorologist or oceanographer during the “Weird World of Weather,” Discovery Kids Summer Camp #2, July 31 to August 3, 2017 from 9 a.m. to noon daily at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles. For more information, visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


3. Legal Fireworks in Legal Places: Info and Demonstration, June 23

WHEN: Friday, June 23, 2017 at 9:30 a.m.

WHERE: Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue Training Center
12400 SW Tonquin Road, Sherwood, Oregon

WHO: The Office of State Fire Marshal, Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, U.S. Bureau of Land Management, Oregon Department of Forestry, Clackamas Fire District #1, Portland Fire & Rescue, Oregon Department of Veteran Affairs, Multnomah county animal services, the Oregon Humane Society, and Oregon fireworks wholesalers will provide information on legal fireworks in Oregon, where fireworks may be used, education, and safety and enforcement efforts. Live fireworks demonstrations are scheduled.

WHAT: Keep it legal, keep it safe
* Legal fireworks in legal places
* Live demonstration — Safer use of fireworks

June 23 opens the season for fireworks sales in Oregon. Legal fireworks may be purchased only from Oregon permitted fireworks retailers and stands. To date the Office of State Fire Marshal has issued 722 retail fireworks permits, and 138 display permits. Oregon law forbids possession, use, or sale of fireworks that fly, explode, or travel more than six feet on the ground or 12 inches in the air, without a permit issued by the OSFM. Bottle rockets, Roman candles, and firecrackers are ILLEGAL in Oregon.

All fireworks are prohibited on all Oregon beaches, in parks, and campgrounds.

Illegal fireworks can be expensive. Under Oregon law, illegal fireworks may be confiscated and offenders fined up to $500 per violation for possession of illegal fireworks and endangering life and property. Offenders may also be arrested. Any fireworks causing damage, or misuse of fireworks carries a liability for the offender, who may be required to pay for resulting fire or other damage. Parents are liable for fireworks-caused damage by their children. Costs may include assessed fines as well as the cost of suppressing fireworks-caused fires.

~ Rich Hoover, Public Information Officer
Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal, Oregon State Police
503-934-8217 desk
richard.hoover@state.or.us


4. Eastern Oregon University Alumni Raft Trip and Get-Together, July 8

Saturday, July 8, 2017
Sage Canyon River Company
Deschutes River – Maupin, OR
$65 per person

Join EOU alumni and friends for the first annual Central Oregon Raft Trip! This family friendly event features three hours on the beautiful Deschutes river. The trip sets out from Harpham Flats and tackles Class III and IV rapids, including Wapinitia, Box Car, and Oak Springs. While on this adventure you will be able to take in the scenery, swim, and make great memories. This is a great trip for those short on time, but high on adventure. For additional details, please visit: http://sagerafting.com/deschutes-river-rafting-trips/3-hour-whitewater-rafting-trip/

After the raft trip, there will be a no-host gathering at The Riverside Restaurant located in Maupin. If you have questions please contact us at 541-962-3740 or email alumni@eou.edu.


5. An Act of Courage: An Everyday Fact of Life

Do you believe that courage is something that only special people display in times of great danger? Many people think that courage is an unusual act of bravery, but it is far more than that, and far more common than we are led to believe.

For most people, the answer to that question would be a resounding, “Yes!” But, if we think about it a little more, we might also agree that courage needs to be an everyday fact of life, if we are going to use more of our potential and become all that we can be. In fact, there is a good chance that courage precedes all positive change. Courage is the magic key that opens the door to the full experience of life.

Of course, no courage is needed if you refuse to take any risks. But, if you don’t risk anything, the truth you must eventually face is that you are actually risking everything! You see, people who react to life from a state of continuous fear instead of courage are stressed out and uncertain, lost in a dark cloud of doubt and worry. They are terrified of change, when change is what is happening all the time.

Courage is an absolute necessity if you are going to succeed, regardless of setbacks and the chance of failure. But it is also what it takes to smile when life is hard, and what allows you to stand your ground when others want to put you down. You see, courage fills up your life with power and it empowers others as well. In fact, you’ve probably seen evidence of courage in the last few days or weeks.

Would you like to have more courage? First, expand your definition of what courage means. For some of us, just getting out of bed in the morning is an extraordinary act of courage. Once you have a larger idea of what courage is, picture how you would behave if you already had it, and begin to act accordingly.

You are stronger than you currently believe you are! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon’s arts and culture industry generates $687 million in economic impact

dollar.bills2Salem, Oregon — Oregon’s arts and culture sector contributed $687 million and 22,299 jobs to Oregon’s economy in fiscal year 2015, according to the latest Arts & Economic Prosperity study from Americans for the Arts. Released June 17 at the group’s national conference in San Francisco, Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 includes first-time data from rural Oregon.

“Arts and culture play a key role in healthy, prosperous communities, particularly in rural Oregon,” said Chris Harder, director of Business Oregon. “While this study highlights the significant impact of artists and cultural organizations on local economies, the resulting vibrant communities are places that are more attractive for overall business growth and investment.”

The data reveals that arts and culture jobs across Oregon generated $469.5 million in household income to local residents and delivered $53 million in local and state government revenue. In addition, the 9,911,552 people who attended arts and culture events spent an average of $42.59 per event, excluding the cost of the admission ticket. Event spending, which totaled $322,956,808, includes meals, parking, souvenirs, babysitting and hotel stays.

“This is the most comprehensive data we’ve ever had on how vital arts and culture are to Oregon’s statewide economic prosperity,” said Brian Rogers, Oregon Arts Commission executive director. “Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 is evidence that the nonprofit arts and culture sector is a significant industry in the State of Oregon. It sends a strong signal that when we support the arts, we not only enhance our quality of life, but we also invest in the State of Oregon’s economic well-being.”

While previous studies have focused only on Portland and Eugene, a statewide consortium led by the Arts Commission enabled Baker, Clatsop, Crook, Deschutes, Jackson, Jefferson, Lincoln, Umatilla, Union, Wallowa and Yamhill counties as well as Ashland, Corvallis, Eugene and the Portland Metro area (Northeastern and Central Oregon did combined county studies) to participate.

Spending by arts and cultural organizations and audience members in the Portland Metro area was $330.4 million, up 30 percent since the last Arts & Economic Prosperity study in 2010. The spending outside of the Portland Metro area (Clackamas, Multnomah and Washington counties) totaled $357 million.

“We are so grateful to the Arts Commission for making it possible for us to participate,” said Sharon Morgan, who was “stunned” to learn that arts and culture spending in Yamhill County totaled $45 million. Morgan, a member of the Yamhill County Cultural Coalition, organized the survey for her county.

Detailed reports for each of the Oregon regions and cities that participated are posted on the Arts Commission website.

The Arts & Economic Prosperity 5 Study was conducted by Americans for the Arts and supported by the Ruth Lilly Fund of the Americans for the Arts. Local, regional and statewide partners, such as the Oregon Arts Commission and its 11 survey partners, contributed time and financial support to the study. Financial information from partner organizations was collected in partnership with DataArts. A full list of the 341 communities who participated in the study is posted on the Americans for the Arts website.


 

 

 

Sherman County eNews #180

CONTENT

  1. Greg Walden to lead panel on combatting national opioid epidemic, June 21

  2. Attention, Citizens of the City of Rufus:  City-wide Garage/yard Sale, July 1

  3. Wasco Methodist Church Offers Use of Canes & Walkers

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society 40th Anniversary Celebration, July 9

  5. Columbia Generating Station Reconnects to Northwest Power Grid

  6. Picture the Future You

  7. Grants awarded for historic cemetery projects throughout the state


1. Greg Walden to lead panel on combatting national opioid epidemic, June 21

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — U.S. Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River), Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, today announced that he will lead a panel discussion Wednesday morning on efforts to combat opioid addiction in Oregon and nationwide. The panel discussion, “Addiction in America”, is hosted by The Washington Post and will feature policy makers, researchers, and health care experts to discuss solutions for combatting addiction in America. Walden’s panel, “Addiction Crisis: A Nation Responds”, will focus on how the U.S. government and Congress are responding to the opioid epidemic.

“This is a vital conversation to have across the country and especially in Oregon, where more people die from drug overdoses every year than car accidents,” said Walden. “Combatting the opioid epidemic is going to require a team effort from our elected officials, health care experts, and those on the front lines of this fight in our local communities. I look forward to participating in this event and taking our discussion back to Oregon as I continue to work towards putting an end to this crisis in our state.”

As Chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, Walden is at the forefront of Congress’ response to the national opioid epidemic. Details on the event are included below, and the event will be streamed live to Facebook and online at www.wapo.st/postlive. 

Wednesday, June 21, 2017

WHAT: The Washington Post Panel Discussion: “Addiction in America”

WHEN: 9:00AM EST (6:00AM PST)

WHERE: Available to stream live online at www.wapo.st/postlive

WALDEN.HOUSE.GOV


2. Attention, Citizens of the City of Rufus:  City-wide Garage/yard Sale, July 1

arrow-right
As discussed and approved by the city council and Mayor on Wednesday, June 14th, 2017: The City of Rufus will enact a city-wide garage/yard sale on Saturday, July 1st, 2017, open to all citizens who sign up with City Hall via email, in person, or by phone. The deadline for registration will be Monday, June 26th, at 4 p.m. The registration list will be posted the following day (Tuesday June 27th) to provide individual garage/yard sale location information.


3. Wasco Methodist Church Offers Use of Canes & Walkers

grandparents.3Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  They are also accepting donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446  for more info.

 


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society 40th Anniversary Celebration, July 9

Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society

40 Anniversary Celebration

Sunday, July 9 ~ Potluck ~ 1-4 p.m.

Sorosis Park, 300 E. Scenic Drive, The Dalles

Bring salad, entrée or side – let us know

CGGS will provide beverages, cake, picnic dinnerware, power

Meet the founding members & current members.

Bring a friend, share stories and photos.

RSVP by June 30 audyarnell@hotmail.com or 508-281-0951.

http//community.gorge.net/genealogy/


 5. Columbia Generating Station Reconnects to Northwest Power Grid

RICHLAND, Wash. – Columbia Generating Station reconnected to the Northwest power grid at 1:43 p.m. following its 23rd refueling and maintenance outage. The outage, originally scheduled for 40 days, ended two and a half days early with a significant amount of work completed that will improve efficiency and output for the next two-year cycle. 

“The tremendous amount of planning that went into this outage paid off for everyone. What we’ve accomplished over the past several weeks will continue to pay benefits to the region through increased carbon-free electricity generation,” said Brad Sawatzke, Energy Northwest chief nuclear officer.

Outage-related equipment replacements, refurbishments and upgrades between 2010 and 2015 increased the nuclear station’s gross generation capacity from 1,150 megawatts to 1,190 megawatts. That capacity will rise further as a result of a previous outage upgrade and recent regulatory approval. 

Three weeks ago Energy Northwest received Nuclear Regulatory Commission permission to proceed with a power uprate. The commission’s decision is based on an assessment of leading-edge flowmeter technology EN installed during Columbia’s 2015 outage. The technology improves measurement accuracy of feedwater flow through the reactor core, allowing operators to the run the reactor at higher output. Testing during the next several months will determine how much additional electrical output has been gained by the flowmeter technology.  

“Refueling and maintenance outages are complex evolutions,” Sawatzke said. “I’m proud of the team for working safely to help us meet our commitments to the region.”

Energy Northwest and the BPA time the biennial outage to coincide with spring time snow melt and runoff that maximizes power output from the region’s hydroelectric system and minimizes the impact of taking the nuclear station offline. Operators are bringing the reactor, currently at less than 25 percent power, to 100 percent power, a process that will take several days.

More than 1,350 skilled outage workers were hired locally and from across the country to support maintenance projects throughout the plant. The added workers join Columbia’s normal work force of about 1,100 employees and bring substantial economic value to the region.

During the refueling and maintenance outage, workers replaced 272 of 764 nuclear fuel assemblies. Every two years, approximately a third of Columbia’s fuel assemblies are removed from the core and placed in the used fuel pool after spending a total of six years in the reactor core. Energy Northwest continues to utilize a newer design in its fuel assemblies, which increases fuel efficiency, ultimately providing a cost-benefit during future refueling outages.

A new low pressure turbine rotor was successfully installed as part of Columbia’s turbine life-cycle plan, a multi-year, $32 million project to refurbish the three low pressure turbines to satisfy the plant’s license extension to 2043.

Columbia Generating Station, with an output of 1,190 megawatts electric (gross), is the third largest generator of electricity in Washington state. All of its electricity is sold at-cost to BPA. Columbia represents about 13.5 percent of BPA’s firm energy and 9.7 percent of Bonneville’s sustained peak capacity. Ninety-two Northwest utilities in six states receive a percentage of its output. Columbia is located 10 miles north of Richland.

About Energy Northwest
Energy Northwest develops, owns and operates a diverse mix of electricity generating resources, including hydro, solar and wind projects – and the Northwest’s only nuclear energy facility. These projects provide enough reliable, affordable and environmentally respon­sible energy to power more than a million homes each year, and that carbon-free electricity is provided at the cost of generation. As a Washington state, joint action agency, Energy Northwest comprises 27 public power member utilities from across the state serving more than 1.5 million ratepayers. The agency continually explores new generation projects to meet its members’ needs. 


6. Picture the Future You

Can the use of visualization techniques really help you achieve your goals in life? Perhaps you know someone who uses mental rehearsal, or visualization, to help them develop the behavior they would like to be a part of them?

There is nothing at all mysterious about how visualization works. You see, human beings think in the form of words, which trigger pictures that have emotions attached to them – and our subconscious cannot tell the difference between something we imagine vividly and the real thing.

Whenever you look forward to something and create a picture in your mind of how you want something to be, you are using visualization even though you may not know it. These days, many successful people use visualization to help them improve their performance and develop their skills.

Here is how it works: If you are nervous about making a sales presentation, for example, just relax and see yourself doing it. Picture every little detail, and see yourself speaking confidently, persuasively and smoothly. Picture your manner of dress, your posture, your smile. Hear the words you will say. Feel your body, comfortable and relaxed.

Repeat the process, over and over, as if you were making a movie starring yourself. When it is time to give the actual presentation, your subconscious will kick in to help you do it exactly as you pictured it. It is a lot like actors rehearsing for a play, only you are rehearsing for real life.

Try it! You will be pleased with the results. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Grants awarded for historic cemetery projects throughout the state

Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, awarded 21 grants totaling $70,265 for projects across the state that support preservation of historic cemeteries. Projects range from monument repair to information kiosks and awards range from $390-$8,000.

Funded projects include:
* Monument repair.
* Placing markers on unmarked graves.
* Fence repair.
* Install kiosks with maps and historical information.
* Tree trimming and felling.
* Road repair.

Projects were awarded to Butteville Pioneer Cemetery, City of Canby, Coquille Indian Tribe, Crooked Finger Cemetery, Deadwood Pioneer Cemetery, Eugene Pioneer Cemetery, Gillespie Cemetery, Inc., Greenwood Hills Cemetery Maintenance Association, Kings Valley Cemetery Association, City of Klamath Falls, Lacomb Cemetery Association, Maple Grove Cemetery, Nehalem Valley Historical Society, Phoenix Pioneer Cemetery Association, City of Salem, St. Johns Lodge #17 Masonic Cemetery Association, Kirsten Straus, City of Ukiah, Wagner Creek Cemetery Association, Weston Cemetery Maintenance District #2, Willamette Valley Jewish Community Burial Society.

This competitive grant program is for projects that support the preservation of historic cemeteries. The state designation of a historic cemetery is one that includes the burial of at least one person who died before February 14, 1909. It is a project of the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries which is comprised of seven citizens and is empowered by the Legislature to develop and maintain a listing of all pioneer and historic cemeteries in Oregon; make recommendations for funding, obtain grants funding, seek legislative appropriations for historic cemeteries, and assist in the coordination of restoration, renovation and maintenance of historic cemeteries statewide.

The Commission is part of Oregon Heritage, a division of Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. To learn more about the Oregon Historic Cemeteries Grant or the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


 

Sherman County eNews #179

CONTENT

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week

  2. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting, June 29

  3. Program: The Great American Eclipse, July 1

  4. Do-It-Yourself Esteem Project

  5. Columbia Gorge Community College courses delve deep into cultivating happiness

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week
Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017

Tuesday June 20th at 5:30pm – Jaws Teen Movie Night.

Come celebrate the anniversary of the theatrical release of Jaws with themed treats and a showing of the movie. Ages 12-20. Rated PG, run time 2hrs 10 min

Thursday June 22 at 11:00am – Baby Lap-Sit Story Time
Come build early literacy skills with your little one as we read a story, sing songs, and play games like “peek-a-boo.”

For a calendar of events please visit http://shermancountypsl.weebly.com/events.html 


2. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting, June 29

 FRONTIER REGIONAL 911 AGENCY

                                             BOARD MEETING NOTICE

                                                       June 29, 2017

                                                           1:00 p.m.

                                 Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

1 –     Burns Paiute Tribe Update on Consolidation with Frontier Regional Dispatch– Mike Smith, Frontier TelNet

2 –     Grant County Update – Mike Smith, Frontier TelNet

3 –     Workers’ Compensation Coverage – Brenda Potter, Wheeler County

4 –     Manager’s Report – April Stream, Frontier Regional Dispatch


3. Program: The Great American Eclipse, July 1

eclipse2THE DALLES— Join Bob Yoesle from Friends of the Goldendale Observatory for “The Great American Eclipse,” Saturday, July 1, 2017 from 12:30-1:30 pm at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles. The program is included with museum admission, or $5 for the program only.

Yoesle will take a look at historical eclipse expeditions, and help you prepare for your own historical journey to view the solar eclipse.

The total solar eclipse the morning of Monday, August 21, 2017, “The Great American Eclipse,” will be the first total eclipse to touch on American soil since 1991; the first on the mainland since 1979; and the first to sweep across the entire country since 1918. This is a once-in-a-lifetime event for most people – if they are lucky enough to witness a total solar eclipse at all.

A total solar eclipse – where the Moon completely hides the blinding disc of the Sun – is one of the rarest and most beautiful astronomical wonders a person can observe. A total eclipse has a profound impact on those who experience the phenomenon; it can alarm animals and affect their behavior as it produces “shadow bands,” rows of shadows that move rapidly across the ground.

What causes an eclipse? An eclipse is caused by the intersecting orbital paths of the Earth and Moon around the Sun. The geometry of the shadows cast by the Sun determines whether the eclipse is observed as a partial or total eclipse.

A solar eclipse occurs at a new moon when, as the Moon orbits the Earth, its path crosses directly between the Earth and the Sun. Depending on the Moon’s distance from the Earth and its path in front of the Sun, a solar eclipse can be seen as total, annular, or partial. In a total solar eclipse the entire Sun is obscured by the Moon for anyone observing along the narrow path of the umbra – also known as the path of totality.

Total solar eclipses take place somewhere on the Earth every year or two, but are confined to a few fleeting moments along a narrow strip about 60 to 100 miles (96 -160 km) wide, and are often located in remote or inhospitable regions of the planet.

In Oregon the 2017 total eclipse will cut a swath through the central part of the state, from the Pacific coast to the Idaho border. The path of totality, or umbra, in Oregon will pass over Lincoln City and Newport, Salem, Corvallis, Warm Springs, Madras, the John Day Fossil Beds, Dayville, John Day, Baker City and Ontario.

Outside the path of totality, it will instead only be seen as a partial solar eclipse and will not be a total solar eclipse anywhere in the state of Washington or even in The Dalles. You’ll need to travel to Central Oregon to view the eclipse as it passes in a wide arc through the middle of Oregon. Learn what you can do to prepare to make this lifetime event the memory of a lifetime.

“Nothing you read, see, or hear can prepare you for the spine-tingling, goosebump-inducing experience of the total eclipse.  You do not simply see a total eclipse. You experience it. You are immersed in it. You are completely overwhelmed by it. Many people say that the experience of totality changes their lives.”   — “Being in the Shadow,” Dr. Kate Russo, author, psychologist, and eclipse chaser.

Be sure to visit the Goldendale Observatory in the days preceding the eclipse for engaging programs and information about the eclipse. For those who cannot make it to the path of totality, the Observatory will be open for viewing the 98% partial eclipse – a very thin crescent Sun – which is still quite blinding, and safety eye protection MUST be used at all times.​​

Make your plans, be prepared, and enjoy this incredible moment in nature.

If you miss the 2017 total solar eclipse, you’ll have another opportunity on April 8, 2024, but the weather prospects for the path through the USA are poorer. You’ll have to wait until August 12, 2045 for the next total solar eclipse in the USA to have an opportunity equal to or better than the August 21, 2017 eclipse.

Resource Links:

Goldendale Observatory: http://www.goldendaleobservatory.com/total-solar-eclipse.html

View the local moon rise/set times: https://www.timeanddate.com/moon/

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum is the official interpretive center for the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.  The museum is open daily 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, phone (541) 296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


4. Do-It-Yourself Esteem Project

Does it seem to you that it is easier to build someone else’s self-esteem, than it is to positively affect your own? Today, let’s talk about some pointers for your own DIY self-esteem construction project.

The most commonly accepted definition of self-esteem is our own estimation of our value or worth as human beings – and there is probably nothing more important when it comes to living a healthy, happy, productive life. However, if you are aware that your self-esteem isn’t what it could be, as a result of poor parenting or other early-life difficulties, what can you do about it?

Quite a bit, actually. You can work on your own awareness – your ability to think and live consciously – rather than going through life on autopilot. You can accept yourself exactly as you are right now, even if there are things you would like to change, and stop calling yourself names! Stop running yourself down!

You can say what you mean, and mean what you say, and try at all times to be exactly who you really are, rather than acting out someone else’s idea of who you should be and how you should behave. Living with a sense of purpose does wonders for your self-esteem too, as does living with integrity, which simply means that your behavior is in line with your values and beliefs.

You can work on trusting yourself, on telling the truth, and on treating others with kindness, even when that is not easy. And, in word and deed, you can affirm the fact that you are a valuable and worthy person. If all this sounds like work, you are correct. It is! But there is no other work you will ever do, that will bring greater rewards, so keep at it! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Columbia Gorge Community College courses delve deep into cultivating happiness

Throughout the ages spiritual teachers and philosophers have pondered the human desire to cultivate happiness.  Ancient wisdom traditions offered contemplative practices to enhance compassion, gratitude, and other virtues that have stood the test of time.  What’s been driving an enduring inquiry into enhancing the state of the human mind? 

Today, evolutionary psychology informs us that modern humans inherited a nervous system from our Stone Age ancestors that predisposes us to over-focus on the bad, exaggerate threats, and be easily susceptible to anxiety, self-doubt, and judgement of ourselves and others.  The good news is that recent advances in neuroscience reveal that with simple practices done in the everyday flow of life we can lay down neural structure that tilts the brain toward the positive, enhancing our sense of happiness (Hanson, 2013). 

“We are in an era in which the intersection of ancient wisdom traditions and modern science offers methods to enhance personal well-being in lasting ways,” says Suzanne Burd, community education coordinator at Columbia Gorge Community College (CGCC). In response, the Community Education program now offers classes on cultivating inner-strengths, bridging the wisdom tradition of Buddhism with neuroscience, psychology, and evolutionary biology.

The pursuit of inner-growth is fairly mainstream in American culture as evidenced by “mindfulness” recently achieving special edition status with Time Magazine.  “Personal wellness in the amenity rich Gorge is a high priority for many residents, and the college wants to respond to this interest,” Burd adds.

“The new Inner Strengths courses cover topics such as self-compassion and growing grit,” explains Burd, “and are taught by Ellen Donoghue, PhD who has an infectious passion for assisting people to cultivate lasting happiness and combines her social science research on well-being with a diversity of evidence-based mindfulness teachings and practices.”

The first course on “Growing Grit,” beginning July 5th for 4 weeks, 6:30 – 8:00pm at CGCC Hood River campus, is for anyone with a heartfelt goal who would like to enhance inner-strengths of perseverance, patience, courage, resilience, and confidence. 

Cultivating self-compassion and learning skills to silence a harsh inner-critic is the focus of a 4-week series running Thursday evenings in August.  And, a Saturday afternoon workshop on August 5th explores teachings and practices to help us overcome the negativity bias of our Stone Age brains and cultivate inner strengths.  For details and registration, call (541) 506-6011 or visit cgcc.edu/schedule.

Citation: Hanson, R. (2013). Hardwiring Happiness: The new brain science of contentment, calm, and confidence. New York: Harmony Books.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.Envelope8 Things To Consider Before Buying A New Phone In 2017 http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/technology/8-things-to-consider-before-buying-a-new-phone-in-2017/ar-BBCOmNX?li=AA4Zoy&ocid=spartandhp 

Pendleton Round-Up princesses steal the Senate floor http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/oci/1011-242813-pendleton-round-up-princesses-steal-the-senate-floor

Capital Chatter: Of socialists, state police and SEIU http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/oci/1004-242770-capital-chatter-of-socialists-state-police-and-seiu

Creepy Crickets Invade Arlington http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/local-news/20170616/creepy-crickets-invade-arlington

The Congressional Baseball Game Has Raised Over $1 Million For Charity; 20,000 Tickets Sold https://townhall.com/tipsheet/christinerousselle/2017/06/15/good-news-the-congressional-baseball-game-has-raised-over-1-million-for-charity-20000-tickets-sold-n2341881?utm_source=thdaily&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nl&newsletterad=

Lyndon Johnson: “If one morning I walked on top of the water across the Potomac River, the headline that afternoon would read: ‘President Can’t Swim.'”

Short History of Colonialism Since 1492 In One GIF http://brilliantmaps.com/colonialism-history/

Americans Learning to Live with Treason http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/06/americans_learning_to_live_with_treason.html 

The Bubble: How conservative and liberal media reacted to Sessions’ testimony https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2017/06/15/bubble-how-conservative-and-liberal-media-treated-sessions-testimony/102900766/

The surprising number of American adults who think chocolate milk comes from brown cows https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2017/06/15/seven-percent-of-americans-think-chocolate-milk-comes-from-brown-cows-and-thats-not-even-the-scary-part/?utm_term=.4ba06b5c3af2

Oregon Watchdog http://www.oregonwatchdog.com/ 

This Simulator Shows What You’ll See During the Great American Solar Eclipse https://www.seeker.com/space/astronomy/this-simulator-shows-what-youll-see-during-the-great-american-solar-eclipse

Solar eclipse 2017: The best places to see the rare phenomenon this August https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2017/6/15/15804336/2017-solar-eclipse-map-united-states-nasa

Oregon Solar Fest in Jefferson County https://www.oregonsolarfest.com/

Contact U.S. Government https://www.usa.gov/contact 

Cyndi’s List – Genealogy Categories http://www.cyndislist.com/categories/ 

Military Times http://www.militarytimes.com/home

Defense News http://www.defensenews.com/