Sherman County eNews #313

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Special Meeting, City of Wasco, Dec. 5

  2. Relieving the Stress

  3. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving

  4. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

  5. “Choose Something Like a Star with Cascade Singers, Dec. 8 & 9

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Notice. Special Meeting, City of Wasco, Dec. 5

Special Meeting-Wasco City Hall-Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 1:00PM.
In accordance with ORS 254.575 (1) & The City of Wasco Charter Chapter VI Section 24, there will be a public meeting to break the tie vote between Erik Glover and William Minter to determine the successful candidate for Wasco City Council Position.


2. Relieving the Stress

We asked you to think about those things that cause you stress and tension during the holiday season. If you did, great! This is the first step in eliminating stress – Defining the Challenge.

If you ask people about their “pet peeves,” waiting in traffic always comes up. Friends will refer to the local freeways as “slow moving parking lots.” So, there you are, stuck in traffic, inching along. Is it a situation that you can control? Probably not. Really, the only thing over which you do have control is how you react to the situation.

So how do you turn this apparent lemon into lemonade? First, it helps to realize that all traffic jams are not caused by stupid drivers. Accidents do happen. After all, we are only human. At any given moment, on any street or highway, there are hundreds of variables to consider. Now, you have the opportunity to fill the time with something productive that makes you feel like you are not “wasting” the time but accomplishing something. (And that would not mean talking on your cell phone or texting!)

Roger Moore, of James Bond fame, said that when stopped at traffic lights, he would suck in his stomach muscles and hold them until the light turned green. Roger may never have had six-pack abs, but he did have good posture. (No self-respecting Bond would slouch.) So, some folks burst into song, relieving the frustration with music. Some folks listen to audio books. Others do simple neck stretching exercises, which benefits the body as well as the mind.

What it comes down to is this: Is the goal to get frustrated and angry, or is the goal to get where you are going, safely, and get on with the business at hand? It comes down to the effective use of your energies. Do you spend them pounding on the steering wheel or yelling out the window? Or do you turn them toward accomplishment?

Once the goal is set, first, you relax and then you unleash that tremendous power within you to get it done. Once again, obstacles become opportunities by simply changing the way you look at them. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving

Christmas.holly1Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving | tax-deductible non-profit organizations |

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman Station Foundation, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Columbia Gorge CASA, P.O. Box 663, Hood River, OR 97031
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, P.O. Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, P.O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Education Foundation, P.O. Box 68, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Food Bank, P.O. Box 14, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039
  • Sherman County Senior & Community Center, P.O. Box 352, Moro, OR  97039
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, P.O. Box 155, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco School Events Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

Consider gifts to these organizations to honor someone with a shared interest, to recognize someone’s achievement or success, in memory or remembrance, to express your appreciation, or as the perfect gift for someone who has everything.


4. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, December 5 @ the Wasco Methodist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You, Red Gibbs


5. “Choose Something Like a Star with Cascade Singers, Dec. 8 & 9

music.notes (2)Cascade Singers warmed up for their Dec. 8 and 9 concerts at the Discovery Center last Saturday under the direction of Miles Thoming-Gale.  “Choose Something Like a Star” is the title for the holiday concert.  The line comes from a poem by Robert Frost set to music by Randall Thompson.  It will be featured along with traditional and contemporary Christmas favorites by the choir, ensemble, and children’s choir. Performances take place at Zion Lutheran Church, 10th and Union Streets, The Dalles.  Saturday’s concert begins at 7 p.m. and the Sunday concert starts at 3 p.m.  Admission is by donation at the door.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbPumped Storage Projects Selected for Techno-Economic Studies 

What happens to all the leftover campaign cash?

Space Weather

State public records advocate finds a litany of flaws in Oregon’s public records laws

Oregon Teachers Call For Solutions To Disruptive Student Problems

Oregon Announces Final Rules For Equal Pay Law Set To Take Effect January 1

Oregon lawmaker: Cap and trade coming 


 

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Sherman County eNews #312

CONTENTS

  1. Biggs Service District Meeting Dec. 5 Canceled

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

  3. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Approved Meeting Minutes, Aug. 17

  4. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Approved Meeting Minutes, Oct. 16

  5. Letter to the Editor: Regarding Two Recent Editorials in eNews

  6. Sherman County Court Notes, Oct. 10

  7. Moments of True Connection


1. Biggs Service District Meeting Dec. 5 Canceled

The Biggs Service District to be held on December 5, 2018 at 8:30am in the Sherman County Courthouse has been canceled due to lack of agenda items.


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, December 5 @ the Wasco Methodist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You, Red Gibbs


3. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Approved Meeting Minutes, Aug. 17

FRONTIER TELENET BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING MINUTES

AUGUST 17, 2018

 The regular meeting of the Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors was called to order by Chairman Steve Shaffer at 1:00 P.M.  This meeting held in the Conference Room of the Jeanne E. Burch Building, 401 Fourth Street, Fossil, Oregon.

Directors Present:  Judge Steve Shaffer and Judge N. Lynn Morley

Also Attending:  Steve Wynn and Ryan LeBlanc, Day Wireless, Melanie Sperry, City of Fossil, Carol MacInnes, Mayor, City of Fossil, Lori Anderson, Columbia Basin Electric, Kathryn Greiner, City of Condon, Mac Stinchfield, Times Journal Newspaper, Debbie Starkey, Wheeler County Commissioner, Barbara Jacobi, and  Roberta Vandehey, Wheeler County Residents.   Mike Smith and Rob Myers, Frontier TeleNet Administrative Service Provider. Steve Shaffer declared that a quorum of Board of Directors present.

Minutes:  July 20, 2018 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors meeting reviewed.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Steve Shaffer that Board of Directors Minutes of July 20, 2018 be approved as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

Financial:  Financial Statement for July 2018 reviewed.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Steve Shaffer to approve July Financial Statement as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

IT Report:  Ryan LeBlanc reported that the Kent Elevator was offline.  Day Wireless focus was on solving power problems and new generator installed.  Still working with RTG on conversion in Wheeler County to the new system.  RTG is testing system with their equipment and working in Mitchell area.  There is an October deadline for RTG to complete conversion.  Mike Smith pointed out that Frontier TeleNet is the wholesale “backhaul provider responsible for the network connecting Gilliam Sherman and Wheeler Counties to the internet hub in Portland and will not be giving RTG permission to control the routers and other equipment used for that purpose.  Frontier’s network is designed to enable more than one company to provide Retail Internet Service and cannot allow one company to control the backhaul routers and equipment.

Carol MacInnes, Mayor of Fossil, along with Melanie Sperry, City of Fossil Counselor, expressed strong concern about the poor internet service being provided in Fossil.  She stated that when the City called the provider they told them to go to the school and tell them they were using too much bandwidth.  Mayor MacInnes stated that this is a serious condition for public as well as private consumers of the local internet.  Mike Smith stated that Frontier TeleNet provides the wholesale internet access to local ISP Providers and do not control what is available to the individual customers.  Mike Smith is talking to another ISP about providing service in Fossil.  If this does work out there will be choices for the individual consumers of the internet and these companies will have to improve their service to keep the customers. Carol MacInnes stated that CenturyTel is no longer a choice in Fossil.

Barbara Jacobi of Mitchell asked if Frontier TeleNet provides the equipment as RTG tells them that they need to install equipment.  Mike Smith stated that RTG does not install anything on the Frontier TeleNet tower sites.

Steve Wynn stated that it is easy to recruit an ISP Provider to consider coming to an area but when it comes time to hook up they must make a business case and quite often there are not enough customers to make it profitable, so they do not come.  Steve Shaffer reported that there is the same problem in the Lone Rock area in Gilliam County.

Roberta Vandehey inquired if the fees from another provider would be the same.  Mike Smith stated that they usually are.

Another question asked was would a new ISP Provider supply equipment?  Mike Smith reported that the new ISP would have to provide equipment.

Steve Wynn reported that the equipment for Public Safety and Emergency Services had been upgraded and available.

Business and Marketing Report: Mike Smith reported the following:

Gorge Net/Sherman Fiber:  Currently in the contracting phase.  Each city will pay a portion of the cost as well as Sherman County to bring service to each home in the Sherman County Cities.

Wildfires:  Not one failure during the recent fires and power outage.

Grey Guns:  Fixed a connection problem in Spray area. The problem was the antenna not installed properly by the provider.

Windwave:  Mike Smith and Jeanne Burch met with Windwave at Boardman.  Went over all the billings and able to cut the price.  It was recommended that this needs to be reviewed every two years.

Inland Development Master Service Agreement:  This agreement is being reviewed by legal counsel.

Generator Service:  Quote for Generator Service was received and approved by Mike Smith under his Board Authorization to approve expenses up to $5,000.00.

Erskine Site:  Erskine was protected during the recent fires.  It was noted the site needs to be cleaned.

Sherman RFP.  Legal Counsel has this RFP and is reviewing.

John Day Wireless:  Grant County ESD and Blue Mountain Cable would like more bandwidth.  Need a quote from Day Wireless to upgrade.

Wasco 911:  Wasco County is in discussion with Frontier Regional 911 to take over Wasco County dispatch.

Next Meeting:  There will not be a Frontier TeleNet Meeting in September.  Board will meet again in October in coordination with the Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting.  Mike will coordinate this meeting and let everyone know the date and time.

Other items:  None

Public Input:

Kathryn Greiner asked about the RFP mentioned in Mike Smith’s report: “Is this from Wasco to Rufus?”  The answer was yes.   Also asked where Frontier TeleNet is on Cottonwood Project.  Mike reported that the $375,000.00 allocated to the project has been partially spent and a better site that has power and an access road nearby is the location of the tower.  Motorola has provided the equipment, which is built, and there is enough money to finish the project.  Still waiting for the NEPA Study to finish.  This tower can also provide cell service.

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 2:02 PM. These minutes transcribed by Jeanne E. Burch, Frontier Telenet Administrative Services Provider, from a recording of the meeting provided by Mike Smith.


4. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Approved Meeting Minutes, Oct. 16

FRONTIER TELENET BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

OCTOBER 16, 2018 MINUTES 

The regular meeting of the Board of Directors of Frontier TeleNet called to order at 10:02 AM by Chairman Judge Steve Shaffer.  This meeting held in the North Central Education District Conference Room, 135 S. Main Street, Condon, Oregon.

Judge Shaffer asked for introductions as follows:

Directors Present:  Judge Steve Shaffer, Judge Gary Thompson, Judge N. Lynn Morley.

Also Present:  Mike McArthur, Frontier Advocates, Kathryn Greiner, City of Condon, Garret Winter, Day Wireless, Aaron Grant, Day Wireless, Andy Crawford, Motorola, Steve Wynn, Day Wireless, Mike Smith, Rob Myers and Jeanne Burch, Frontier Telenet Administrative Services Providers. Legal Counsel Ruben Cleaveland and Jim Deason present by telephone. Judge Shaffer declared a quorum of the Board of Directors present and opened the meeting at 10:05 AM.

Additions or changes to the agenda:  Gary Thompson asked that an update on Mid-Columbia Economic District (MCED) dark fiber.  Dark Fiber added to the agenda under IT and System Updates.

Minutes:  Steve Shaffer had not been able to review the minutes and requested that they be tabled to the next regular meeting.  There was a consensus of Board of Directors to table minutes until the next regular meeting.

Financials:  Financial Statements for August and September 2018 reviewed.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Gary Thompson to approve August and September 2018 financial report as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

IT System Updates and Progress Report:  Steve Wynn reported that Ryan LeBlanc is working with RTG on the conversion to system upgrade in Wheeler County. RTG is converting to the Frontier TeleNet Access Points.  High Speed is available and RTG is installing equipment as needed for their customers.  There is a definite improvement and working much better.  There is a meeting scheduled with the Wheeler County Court about internet service in Wheeler County.  Gray Guns internet problems were solved and definitely working better.  Frontier TeleNet is providing this service as there is not an ISP that serves their location.  The fire at Biggs was able to link emergency agencies together and there was no outage during this fire emergency.  Steve Wynn also reported that they are maintaining generators at all sites and working on the design for the next phase of the Wheeler Broadband Project.  Sherman County Courthouse had a router failure but was taken care of immediately.

New fencing has been installed at Airbase and the area cleaned.  Also a cover on the microwave was replaced and it was noted that Community Service Workers helped with the clean up during the summer. This crew did an excellent job at the Erskine site.

It was requested that Day Wireless go to all the Frontier TeleNet Sites and provide an update on conditions for these sites.  Mike Smith reported that Roosevelt Site needs a new roof and a generator.  The cost will be at least $40,000.00 for these projects.  It was suggested that these projects might be eligible for the federal money coming into Sherman County due to the recent fires.  Mike Smith will research this availability.

Steve Shaffer reported there is an important conference coming up in Hood River.  Steve Wynn also reported there would be a Statewide Radio Conference in Salem.  Radios and Updates and the Statewide Radio Project will be topics at conferences.

Wasco Merger:  A discussion was held regarding the proposed merger with Wasco County with Frontier Regional 911 for dispatch service.  These items will be discussed at the Frontier Regional 911 meeting to be held later this day.  There will be a need for hardware installed in Wasco County and updated and the mobile data system shared with Wasco County will need to be turned on.  At present there are four counsels at the 911 Center and currently 14 employees.  Frontier Regional 911 will need to be expanded if Wasco County is added.  Mike Smith stated that if this project goes forward it is critical that extra expenses and equipment be reimbursed by Wasco County.  Steve Wynn was wondering why there had been an inquiry from Wasco County about the Frontier TeleNet sites.  Steve Shaffer reported that Q-Life had shown some interest.  Steve Wynn suggested if there is a project with Wasco County, it is with dark fiber.

Motorola Presentation:  A lengthy slide show was presented by Andy Crawford representing Motorola.  These slides highlighted new equipment and upgrades available from Motorola for the 911 system and the Frontier TeleNet System Update Agreement (SUA) which is due next year

Steve Wynn also reported that the Boardman Police Department is now on the Frontier TeleNet Network.

Business and Marketing:

Mike Smith reported the following:

Sherman County Dark Fiber:  Mike Smith stated that Gorge Net has the RFP.  They are building out fiber in each Sherman County town.  Frontier TeleNet will manage the fiber and send to Pittock Building in Portland.  Sherman County would like Frontier TeleNet to provide the dark fiber at no cost.  Frontier TeleNet would like Sherman County to participate in this cost.

Gary Thompson noted that Sherman County Government has been receiving free internet for the last few years. Steve Shaffer noted that Frontier TeleNet purpose is to provide service to public safety, schools and Governments.  Jim Deason recommended that Legal Counsel, Ruben Cleaveland, review dark fiber agreements currently in effect.  Grass Valley to Moro, Moro to Wasco, Wasco to Rufus.  Ruben Cleaveland agreed and will be reviewing the files.  Gary Thompson asked what the cost per month would be for this dark fiber.  Mike estimated that it would be approximately $2,000.00 per month.  Jim Deason cautioned that before any agreements are signed that Frontier TeleNet costs be determined.

Mike Smith has been working to test solar repeater sites in Wheeler County.  Working with RTG and Gorge Net demonstrating that the Frontier TeleNet system works and updating the city offices in Wheeler County Cities.

Working with cellular service companies in area and three are interested in purchasing service from Frontier TeleNet.

Cottonwood Park Project:  Still working with an archeologist.

Windfarm:  Discussion on providing service.  Will report at the next meeting.

Roosevelt and Biggs:    Mike Smith reported he just received an update from Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services, and she is working on the generator replacement at Roosevelt.   Blake Lawrence of Windwave is working on the fiber at Biggs.

Zayo:  Jim Deason has been working with Zayo and they are currently issuing a credit to the billings they have been sending to Frontier TeleNet as this service was canceled in February.

E-Rate Funding:  Jim Deason has been working on the E-rate funding.  He feels that all the proper forms and information has been provided for the payment of $236,000.00 that is the current amount due Frontier Telenet for 2017.  Frontier TeleNet has retained Jim Deason and a private company, Inteserra, who specializes in E-rate funding.  Inteserra reports that everything has been done correctly.  A copy of the Interserra report is on file at the Frontier TeleNet Finance Office in Fossil, Oregon.

Other Items:  None

Public Comment:  Kathryn Greiner asked about the RFP from Wasco to Rufus not on the agenda.  Mike Smith replied that he had been working on the E-rate and the Wasco Rufus RFP did not get on this meeting agenda.  Kathryn Greiner also stated that RTG is the only service that reaches South Gilliam County and very important to her home in South Gilliam County.  Important that this be taken into consideration, for the residents in South Gilliam County before making a final decision.

Mike McArthur asked if the RFP with Gorge Net for Sherman County has the pricing to the home mentioned.  Mike Smith replied that this is on their website.

Next Meeting:  This time and place of next meeting were not determined at this time.

Meeting adjourned at 12:20 PM.


5. Letter to the Editor: Regarding Two Recent Editorials in eNews

Two editorials appeared in the recent E-News. One was a repeat from “Mac’s Musings”. Both contain significant flaws, misinformation and false assertions. The author of the new editorial never bothered to attend the publicized public meeting and no minutes are available. No questions were asked of any Frontier TeleNet staff, although they have offered to answer any questions on multiple occasions. It is unknown how the author could come to such hyperbolic and misleading conclusions. We are only left to speculate that it must be rumors and wishful thinking. Far be it for the truth to get in the way of a juicy story.

It has been said that “falsehoods fly and the truth comes limping after”. These “editorials” are perfect examples of that sad reality.

Mike Smith

Moro


6. Sherman County Court Notes, Oct. 10

By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

ShermanCoLogo*NOTE: This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”. These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on October 10, 2018, and in conducting the business of the county,

*County Court ended early due to the fire in Biggs which resulted in lack of quorum during the Session. 

  • Motion by Judge Thompson, second by Commissioner Dabulskis, to approve the appointment of Jeanne Kuettel and Mike McArthur from the Non-Office Holding Pool, and Commissioner Dabulskis with Commissioner McCoy as alternate from the Office Holding Pool to the 2018-2019 Board of Property Tax Appeals.
  • Motion by Commissioner Dabulskis, second by Judge Thompson, to approve the County of Sherman Personal Services Contract for Wildlife Predator and Pest Control Services between Sherman County and Bob Thomas of Thomas Wildlife Damage and Pest Control in the amount of $7,416.66 per month to fulfill the duties of a County Trapper starting on October 1, 2018 and ending June 30, 2024, with a probationary period ending July 30, 2019.
  • Motion by Commissioner Dabulskis, second by Judge Thompson, to approve committing to being included in the Building Codes Program service area in the event that the City of The Dalles assumes the local building services program from Building Codes Division.
  • Motion by Commissioner Dabulskis, second by Judge Thompson, to approve Oregon Department of Transportation Agreement No. 32211, Amendment Number 1, between the State of Oregon and Sherman County to amend the original agreement by moving funds between projects and removing one vehicle purchase.
  • Motion by Commissioner Dabulskis, second by Judge Thompson, to approve the bid proposal from Bend Commercial Glass in the amount of $7,400.00 to remove and install storefront frame and glass to fix the window leak at the Sherman County Public Library, and to have a local contractor to supervise and observe.
  • Discussion held on the County Tables and Chairs deposit. Wasco School Events Center would like to hold some of the deposit to use for their time and the cost of supplies if the tables and chairs are returned dirty or damaged. Court agreed that that the deposit should remain at $250, and if the tables and chairs are brought back dirty or damaged, the entire $250 will forfeited to the renter. The forfeited moneys will be used to reimburse the WSEC for their time and supplies used, which they will be required to bill the County for. If the table and chairs are returned clean and in good shape, the deposit will be returned in full to the renter.

7. Moments of True Connection

Have you given more thought to those pet peeves that drive you crazy during the holidays? Hopefully, you have created your own interventions to alleviate the stress and tension. In fact, when you have a moment, let’s hear about some of them. We are a community, here at the Winner’s Circle Network, and we like to pass along your good ideas!

One of the biggest anxiety-producing events of any holiday season is Shopping For Gifts. “What am I going get…?” “How am I going find…?” “The store is only open when?!?!” and the ever popular, “What if they already have…?” All of this is in search of the impossible – the “perfect” gift.

We all hear (or say), “I don’t have enough money,” or “There just isn’t enough time,” even with the power of internet ordering, you still get, “It won’t get here in time.” And then there is the ever-popular, “What if…” usually ending in “…it’s not good enough?”

People put tremendous pressure on themselves, agonizing over “the gift list.” Little kids are easy, because a lot of them have their “Dear Santa” letters ready in October. And have you noticed that, by and large, little children don’t agonize over what to give Mom and Dad. They know what they want to give, and as parents, we know that our hearts have melted over the precious hand-print in clay, the glittered candles, the macaroni necklace, or the handmade card that says, “I Love You, Mommy and Daddy.”

Perhaps it is time to remind ourselves of our “littler” selves. Put aside the expectations and the stress, and remember that it is the time devoted, the intentions and the love involved that make any gift truly special. When all is said and done, it won’t be the gift that is remembered. It will be those moments of true connection with loved ones that live in our hearts and minds forever. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #311

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

  2. Editorial. Frontier TeleNet: Squandered Trust, Public Monies

  3. Guest Editorial, Repeated. Frontier TeleNet: Mac’s Musings. Chaos

  4. Weather: December Outlook and November Monthly Climate Summary

  5. Moving Beyond Today, on Purpose


1.All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, December 5 @ the Wasco Methodist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You, Red Gibbs


2. Editorial. Frontier TeleNet: Squandered Trust, Public Monies

pencil.sharpFollowing these remarks, we post an informational editorial first published in February, 2017, by The Times-Journal, and shortly thereafter here in Sherman County eNews. It is as relevant today as it was 21 months ago.

As reports of fiscal mismanagement and negligence trickle out of last week’s Frontier TeleNet board meeting there is plenty of blame to go around.

Sadly, board members and contracting personnel squandered the public trust and public monies, and made no serious effort to get Frontier TeleNet back on track.

With relatively few discretionary dollars, the board apparently took steps to terminate contracts with two of their contractors, Mike Smith and Rob Myers.

We are reminded that newly-elected officials in our three counties will need time to deal with the current situation and restore the public’s trust in Frontier TeleNet.


3. Guest Editorial, Repeated. Frontier TeleNet: Mac’s Musings. Chaos

pencil.sharpFrom The Times-Journal, February 23, 2017

Chaos.

That appears to be the circumstances in which Frontier Telenet now finds itself — without a business plan, without short or long range plans, without a strategic plan of day-to-day operations, without a clear picture of from where the entity has come or where it is going, without a budget, without knowledge of what costs lay ahead and the processes by which to obtain these costs, without an idea of from where revenues will come, without the benefit of economic analysis of the assets/infrastructure/operations costs or potential revenue sources and amounts, without effective management and without a consensus or clear focus on its purpose and future.

Add to that a stubbornness that won’t allow the administration or management to admit that circumstances are chaotic.

Frontier Telenet is an ORS 190 entity formed under the auspices of Gilliam, Wheeler and Sherman counties and the North Central Education Service District and administered by the three county judges with a manager in charge of operations. When formed some 15 years ago, it was an entity through which an innovative plan was facilitated to establish a 9-1-1 emergency call center at Condon to serve the emergency communications needs of the three counties via a wireless satellite system, a service that had previously been provided through Morrow County.

Late last year, the North Central ESD removed itself from the ORS 190.

The concept was brilliant and the practical application of that system has worked as planned, creating a reliable, local system of communicating for law enforcement and emergency medical services in the three counties and creating 11 well-paying jobs at the same time.

While the 9-1-1 call center has and continues to function brilliantly and without interruption, and has even added service to Jefferson County, the management of Frontier Telenet, which oversees the mechanical infrastructure of the 9-1-1 system, has become chaotic.

With the changing of the county judgeships in the three counties over the last 15 years, there has been very little continuity and background provided by the management, and/or planning for the future of the system.

Caught woefully off-guard by the sudden realization that the current wireless system had reached capacity and was in need of expensive upgrades to remain viable, Frontier Telenet was forced to spend thousands of dollars to upgrade the current system while also realizing that fiber optics would provide more capacity and more long-range stability to the system.

The realization came too little, too late.

Frontier Telenet now finds itself frantically trying to re-group, but without a clear mission and without a budget, and without knowledge of day-to-day expenses and costs, and without a plan and leadership, Frontier Telenet now appears to be in the way of fiber optics development in Gilliam County, when it could have been in the leadership role in the process to provide affordable high-speed broadband to 9-1-1, emergency medical services, law enforcement, schools, libraries, businesses and homes.

Frontier Telenet needs to take stock of its situation, define its assets and function, put in the necessary time and effort to establish a transparent business plan and a standard fiduciary system that will make it clear where the entity is headed and if that track is affordable, and good in the long range for the wireless system that has, here-to-fore, worked so well.  ~ With permission of The Times-Journal, February 23, 2017 & December 3, 2018.


4. Weather: December Outlook and November Monthly Climate Summary

snowflakesmallYou can find the December outlook and the November monthly climate summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

–Marilyn Lohmann

National Weather Service Pendleton – 541-276-7832 


5. Moving Beyond Today, on Purpose

Many people believe that goals are a good thing. Actually, they are an absolute essential for a fulfilling life. You see, goals sit at the very essence of who we are. Without them, we wander from moment to moment, seemingly without purpose. We enjoy the moments, when they cross our paths more by accident than anything else. With goals, we take the “by accident” out of life, and multiply our chances of truly living.

Humans are teleological beings. In other words, we think in terms of purpose and end-results, and we are naturally goal-oriented. A teleological nature means that it is absolutely critical for us to have goals. For us to change and grow, we need something tugging at us from the future, something to, quite literally, look forward to.

When you give up on your goals or when you have no goals at all, your whole system slows down and eventually shuts down. You become depressed and sluggish, and you may very well become seriously ill. Remember, your mind runs your body, not the other way around.

Prisoners of war have been known to simply curl up and die when their hopes for the future died. Who knows how many suicides or terminal illnesses have been directly or indirectly influenced by lack of goals? Thus, having goals seems to be absolutely essential to our existence.

Keep in mind, too, that we move toward and become like what we think about. So, if you don’t deliberately think about how you want your life to be, you’ll just repeat the past or the present over and over again, with minor variations. You’ll end up, at best, in a rut. It may be a comfortable rut, but it’s still a rut.

We want to move beyond today, and we want to do that on purpose – not by accident. Once you have a clear picture of where you want to go, your end-result, goal-seeking nature will take over and help guide you to realizing your goal. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #310

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

  2. Updated Sherman High School Basketball Schedule

  3. Coming soon to your public/school library

  4. SCHS Fall Program: Beacons of the Gorge, Dec. 9

  5. How Do You Define Success?

  6. Greg Walden elected as top Republican on Energy and Commerce Committee

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Dec. 5

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, December 5 @ the Wasco Methodist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You, Red Gibbs


2. Updated Sherman High School Basketball Schedule

sports-basket2ballSherman High School Basketball

Saturday, Dec. 8, 2018 – Varsity girls game vs Damascus Christian has been cancelled, boys JV is now scheduled for 3:00, varsity boys remain at 4:30

Tuesday, Dec. 11, 2018 – Sherman vs Trinity Lutheran at Sherman High School, not in Bend, buses not needed for this game

Saturday, Dec. 22, 2018 – JV boys game vs Condon/Wheeler has been cancelled, varsity girls remain at 4:00, varsity boys remain at 5:30

Thursday – Saturday, Dec. 27 – 29 – 1A Classic Tournament at McKenzie is cancelled for Sherman.

Friday, Jan. 25, 2019 – JV boys game at Condon has been cancelled, varsity girls remain at 6:00, varsity boys remain at 7:30, bus departs at 4:00


3. Coming soon to your public/school library

45 plus college courses on dvd from highly rated instructors nationwide.

15 to 40 plus lectures depending on subject matter–including graphics,
maps, pictures and diagrams. Each lecture is 30 minutes. These courses are made possible by a donation from your new Sherman County Education
Foundation. Courses cover math, physics, cosmology, world war history,
medieval history, middle eastern and ottoman history, economics, native american history, supreme court history, bill of rights and constitution, geology, meteorology, paleontology, earth’s evolution, philosophy, economic system comparisons, terror in 20th century, history of freedom.  These courses do not require a background in math or science. They are geared toward a general audience. —Sherman County Education@gmail.com


4. SCHS Fall Program: Beacons of the Gorge, Dec. 9

Airplane.vintageairplane2

Susan Buce will share the history of the beacons that were used to light and guide the way for pilots and early mail service in the Columbia Gorge area. Learn when and where these structures were put in place, their importance & enjoy the local connection she has to this interesting presentation, Sunday, Dec. 9th doors open @ 1 p.m. , Presentation 1:30 p.m. at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro, OR.
Questions? Call: 541-565-3232  www.shermanmuseum.org


5. How Do You Define Success?

Most people want to be successful, but not everyone knows what success looks like. In fact, the concept of “success” can be a real subject of contention because everyone has their own definition of success – and we should. Today, let’s try to understand the meaning of success.

What does it mean to be successful? Do you consider yourself a success? If so, why? If not, what will success look like when you have finally achieved it?

These are important questions to ask yourself, because your happiness in life may depend upon your answers. Some people seem to believe that success means a wardrobe full of designer clothes, a fancy car and a beautiful house in a nice part of town. Other people think that success means not having to work at all after they win a few million in the lottery. Still others think that success is giving up everything they own and devoting their lives to helping others.

To a certain extent, all of these folks are correct. For many people, success means getting to do what you really want to do in your work life and in your love life, doing it very well, and feeling good about the fact that you’re doing it. It is about finding your true purpose and using your talents and abilities, and discovering a way to live it out for the time that you have here.

It is perfectly fine to choose a purpose for yourself that doesn’t mean much to the rest of the world. Failure comes only in having no purpose at all. It’s not “failure” to perform poorly at things that don’t have any value to you, as long as it doesn’t intentionally hurt anyone. Failure is performing poorly or haphazardly at something that you have decided is important.

In the final analysis, you are a success when you are actively engaged in becoming the person you most want to be, contributing to society and not just taking up space. And in that, you are the only person who can define “success” for you. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Greg Walden elected as top Republican on Energy and Commerce Committee

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — The House Republican Steering Committee has elected Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) to serve as the top Republican on the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the upcoming session of Congress. Walden today released the following statement:

“I thank my colleagues and am honored to have earned their support to serve as the Ranking Member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee in the next session of Congress. The Energy and Commerce Committee has broad jurisdiction over many of the issues we face in Oregon and across the West. Under my leadership, the Energy and Commerce Committee has worked in an overwhelmingly bipartisan manner to advance key legislation for our district.

“We’ve made historic strides in the fight against the opioid crisis, which takes the lives of more Oregonians than traffic accidents. We’ve modernized the Food and Drug Administration, to help patients in Oregon get access to the best cures and treatments available.  Legislation we advanced to bridge the digital divide will help bring high-speed Internet to our district so rural communities can tap into the 21st Century economy. And we’ve passed into law measures that will help Oregon boost hydropower production, put old industrial sites back into active use through the EPA’s Brownfields Program, and ensure people across our state have safe water to drink by upgrading our drinking water infrastructure. There is much more work to be done, and I look forward to working with my colleagues on the Energy and Commerce Committee to ensure that bipartisan success continues for Oregonians.”


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkHave Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?

A Teacher in 1876 Handcrafted This Quilt to Help Teach Astronomy to Her Class

Instead Bless | Breast Cancer


 

Sherman County eNews #309

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Christmas gift suggestions:
To your enemy, forgiveness.
To an opponent, tolerance.
To a friend, your heart.
To a customer, service.
To all, charity.
To every child, a good example.
To yourself, respect.

~ Oren Arnold.


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

GRATEFUL. Today we celebrate our 60th wedding anniversary, grateful for the support of our family and near and distant relatives and friends through all these many years… having promised before God and those who witnessed our vows on November 30, 1958, to be loving and faithful, in plenty and in want, in joy and in sorrow, in sickness and in health, as long as we both live. It’s been an imperfect journey as we weathered the ups and downs and we thank our relatives and friends for their faith in us, many of whom wrote their names in the guest book we are reading together on this day. ~Larry and Sherry Kaseberg

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

SHERMAN COUNTY PRESCHOOL GALA OF TREES. Sherman County Preschool is pleased to announce the Gala of Trees fundraiser is up and running again this year. Trees & wreaths will be on display at MCP Farm Store in Wasco from November 26 to the time of the drawing on December 8th at noon (you don’t have to be present to win, winners will be called immediately). Tickets may be purchased from any Sherman County Preschool family or at MCP Farm Store. This year we want to thank MCP Farm Store for hosting again, and the following businesses/people for donating or sponsoring a tree or wreath: Dinty’s Market, Husky’s 97 Market, Bank of Eastern Oregon, Apex Auto & Truck Repair, RDO Equipment, Paradise Rose Chuckwagon, Hill Trucking, Kock Farms, Sherman County Emergency Services, Kathy McCullough, and the many people who work for these businesses that come up with such creative & pretty wreaths and trees. Thank you for your continued support of Sherman County Preschool! 11/26

SHERMAN COUNTY MUSEUM STORE HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. Please join us Saturday, December 1st from 10-3:30 for our Holiday Open House. We will be selling a 2019 calendar full of historical Sherman County photos, the Sherman County Photo Book & the Sherman County Place Names book by Sherry Kaseberg. We have some new wooden barns from Melissa & Doug and new designs for both everyday & the Holidays in our flour sack towels. We have wildflower honey, Marionberry syrup & jam from Oregon Growers. We also have many logo items including mugs, wine glasses & caps. We have all your old favorites: books by Jane Kirkpatrick & Rick Steber, Windrift Hill Lotion & horses that sing, walk & talk. Please come to see us at the Sherman County Museum on Saturday, December 1st. https://www.shermanmuseum.org/store/

COUNTRY CHRISTMAS BAZAAR, GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. Country Christmas Bazaar | Grass Valley Pavilion | December 1st 9:30 am – 4:00 pm | Lots of great handcrafted items | Pictures w/Santa | Soup & bread lunch. 11/30

 SHERMAN COUNTY HOLIDAY BAZAAR. December 1st 10-3:30 | Sherman County School. ~Sherman County Fair Board 11/30

 SHERMAN BOOSTER CLUB Sherman Booster Club will be at the Holiday Bazaar at the Sherman County School on December 1st selling school spirit merchandise. December 1 from 10 am -3:30 pm. 11/30
SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL CLASS OF 2021 CHRISTMAS TREE SALE!

Date:  December 1, 2018

Location:  Sherman County School

Time:  8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Tree’s available:

3 – 8 ft Noble Fir

5 – 9 ft Douglas Fir

5 – 7 ft Grand Fir.

Prices starting at $25.00.

11/30

COLUMBIA GORGE CASA, OTHERS. Foster Youth Holiday Gift Drive for over 120 children in the Gorge who will spend their holidays in foster care. Help make them a little brighter by donating a holiday gift!  Avenue Properties, Columbia Gorge CASA and Mid-Columbia Health Foundation have joined forces to create a Foster Youth Holiday Gift Drive that will run from November 27 until December 15. During this time, unwrapped gifts can be dropped off at Avenue Properties offices located in The Dalles (406 E 2nd St) and Hood River (116 3rd St #209).  Gifts can also be brought to the Festival of Trees “Community Day” event on Saturday, December 8th from 9AM to 12PM at The Dalles Civic Auditorium.  CASA will also be on hand with information about their program. 12/14

LOST OR FOUND:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” — Unknown

SUPPORT FOR BRENNAH MILLER

Brennah Miller is a young wife and mother, an electrician and a cancer patient.

EMPLOYMENT:

PT RECEPTIONIST. MCP is looking to hire a PT Receptionist for our main office in Moro, OR. This is a customer service/ technology-oriented position requiring developed interpersonal communication/social skills. Normal hours will be 9 am to 3 pm Monday through Friday, unless covering other employees’ schedules. Please contact Daniel at 541-565-3737 or stop by the Mid Columbia Producers’ office for further details. 

AREA REPRESENTATIVE. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking individuals to serve as Area Representatives in your local community.  ASSE provides academic year and semester exchange programs in the United States for high school students from around the world.  Students are 15 to 18 years of age, have passed a series of academic and character requirements and are awaiting an opportunity to embark on their American Adventure. — Area Representatives recruit and screen prospective host families, interview students to study abroad and supervise the exchange students in their community.  Area representatives are compensated based on the number of students they are supervising. There is also a great bonus opportunity. — ASSE’s primary goal is to contribute to International understanding by enabling students to learn about other languages and cultures through active participation in family, school and community life. ASSE’s Area Representatives are the cornerstone of the organization, making all of this possible! For more information about ASSE or becoming an Area Representative, please call our Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or email us at asseusawest@asse.com. Please check out our website at host.asse.com.  We look forward to welcoming you to the ranks of Area Representatives nationwide – striving towards a world of understanding, one child at a time! 11/30

FOR SALE:

VEHICLES AT PUBLIC AUCTION. Trans-Tow Towing will hold a Public Auction on Saturday, December 8th, 2018 at 10:00 a.m. Viewing of these vehicles will be available the morning of the Auction beginning at 9:00 a.m.
1983 Dodge D150 – Flatbed
1992 Honda Civic
1998 Pontiac Bonneville
1995 Honda Accord
The Auction will be held at 1007 1st Street in Moro.
If you would like more information, please contact us at 541-565-3005. 12/5

CHRISTMAS TREES! Sherman County School Class of 2021

Date:  December 1, 2018

Location:  Sherman County School Holiday Bazaar

Time:  8:00 am – 5:00 pm

Tree’s available:

3 – 8 ft. Noble Fir

5 – 9 ft. Douglas Fir

5 – 7 ft. Grand Fir

Prices starting at $25.00. 11/30 

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL SPIRIT MERCHANDISE. Sherman Booster Club will be at the Holiday Bazaar at the High School on December 1st selling school spirit merchandise. December 1 from 10 a.m. -3:30 p.m. 11/30 

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & GIFTS will be at the Country Christmas Bazaar in Grass Valley on December 1st! Considerately Handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available. Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 11/30

PIANO. Baldwin Spinet Piano – Maple colored – $300 OBO negotiable, would like it to find a home where it will be used. Thanks Very Good shape, I just want space for exercise equipment. Call or text Jeanne Kuettel @ 541-714-5740.  11/30 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

SERVICES:

FRIDAY KIDS’ GYM. Beginning this Friday, and continuing most every Friday through March, Wasco School Events Center (WSEC) will be hosting “Kids Gym.”   This will be an opportunity for parents and their pre-school children to play inside for a couple of hours when the weather is too cold to be outside.   Kid Gym will go from 10 a.m. to noon, and parents who attend with their pre-schooler(s) will need to sign a release form to participate. Cost is $5/week, or free if you are a member of the WSEC Fitness Center. This is not a babysitting service; children must be accompanied by an adult.   Feel free to bring toys, trikes, etc. for your child(ren) to play with. 12/28

FALL PHOTO SHOOTS. Now is the time for fall photo shoots! The leaves are turning colors and the air is getting cooler. It’s a great time to schedule a family or senior photo session. Lots of openings available. Ask for discounts by bundling a family and a senior session or two senior sessions. ~Jeremy S. Lanthorn | Jlanthorn@gmail.com | (541) 993-2446 | (541) 333-2013 |Jeremylanthorn.com

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 11/30

NEWSPAPERS

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

Sherman County School District Calendar

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

DECEMBER

1 Old-Fashioned Christmas Bazaar 11 Arlington United Methodist Church

1 Country Christmas Bazaar 9:30 – 4 Grass Valley Pavilion

1 Sherman County Fair Board’s Holiday Bazaar 10-3:30 Sherman County School

1 Christmas Tree Sale 8-5 Sherman County School

1 Sherman Historical Museum Christmas Open House & Museum Store Sale 10

1 Fossil’s Holiday Bazaar 9

1 Condon’s Light Festival & Parade 4 & 5:30

1-8 Gala of Trees Preschool Benefit – MCP Farm Store, Wasco

3 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10 Rufus

3 Grass Valley City Council 7

4 Moro City Council 7

5 Biggs Service District Board Meeting 8:30 Sherman County Courthouse

5 Sherman County Court 9 Moro

5 Gilliam County Court 10 Fossil

5 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Methodist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

8 Gala of Trees Drawing 12 noon MCP Farm Store

8 War Declared on Japan 1941

8 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Flying Around the World

8 Cascade Singers’ December Concert 7 Zion Lutheran Church

9 Cascade Singers’ December Concert 3 Zion Lutheran Church

10 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

11 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

11 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

12 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

12 Rufus City Council 7 City Hall

14 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

15 BILL OF RIGHTS DAY; Iraq War Ended 2011

18 Wasco City Council 7 City Hall

19 Sherman County Court 9

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR, The Dalles

21 Winter Begins

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

31 Official End of WWII 1946


 

Sherman County eNews #308

CONTENTS

  1. Frontier TeleNet Mission and Purpose

  2. Enjoy Holiday Fun with The Story of Ebenezer Scrooge, December 1

  3. Decorate the Mitten Tree at Sherman County Public/School Library

  4. Surviving the Holidays

  5. Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation?

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Frontier TeleNet Mission and Purpose

Mission and Purpose of the Organization

  1. To expand and enhance telecommunications capabilities for the efficient

provision of local government services and educational services; and

  1. To provide for the coordination and interoperability of communications

services in Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties; and to cooperatively

establish and maintain a consolidated, highly reliable system for the

provision of educational services, 9-1-1, law enforcement, emergency

services and other public health and safety communications services;

and,

  1. To promote economic growth and the expansion and/or addition of

business and industry both within the geographic boundaries of Gilliam,

Sherman and Wheeler counties; and where appropriate or in the best

interests of the counties’ citizens, the surrounding communities of

interest through the development of telecommunications infrastructure

and related programs and services.


2. Enjoy Holiday Fun with The Story of Ebenezer Scrooge, December 1

Join in the holiday fun! The Traveling Lantern Theater Company presents The Story of Ebenezer Scrooge! The show starts at 11:00 on Saturday, December 1st at the Sherman County Public/School Library… during the Holiday Bazaar at the Sherman County School.


3. Decorate the Mitten Tree at Sherman County Public/School Library

mittens1Bring your donations of gloves, mittens, hats, and scarves to decorate the Mitten Tree at Sherman County Public/School Library located in Moro. Community, school staff, and students are encouraged to adorn the bare branches with warmth. We are also requesting warm throws and blankets to place under the tree. The Mitten Tree will be up through the end of December and all donated items will be given to our local food bank and other agencies which serve Sherman County.


4. Surviving the Holidays

Christmas.candle1Between mid-November and the end of the year, there are at least 29 different holidays in different cultures around the world. For some of us, this holiday “season” becomes the “season of stress and tension.” The good news? It doesn’t have to be.

Let’s talk a little bit about how we perceive holidays, regardless of where they land on the calendar. For most of the world, upcoming holidays signal a lot of preparation – to get home, to physically connect with family and friends we haven’t seen in a long while, the food, the weather, the endless lines/queues, and on and on and on.

When we look at these events, and all the effort that goes into making them happen, it would be easy to slip into panic mode. “How do we get there?” “When am I going to have the time to get the grocery shopping done?” “The timing has to be perfect, or we’ll miss the plane!” “What on earth am I going to get for presents?!?!?” Do you recognize anyone you know in these scenarios? Perhaps yourself?

With all of the “how’s” and “have to’s”, we get ourselves all tied up in knots – literally and figuratively. Every traffic tie-up becomes a crisis. Finding a parking place becomes the ultimate in gladiatorial combat. “To do” lists grow lists of their own. We seem to lose our ability to make even the simplest of decisions. Headaches ensue. At its worst, all some of us want to do is pull the covers over our heads, and avoid the holidays altogether.

So, how do we get past the stress and tension? We’ll talk more about this in the days ahead. In the meantime, give some thought to those stress points that cause you tension during the holidays. Ask yourself “why” they do. This is a little self-reflection exercise that may uncover some “old tapes” you can throw out or “saved files” you can update or delete. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Has the Smartphone Destroyed a Generation?

~ Some excerpts from https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphone-destroyed-a-generation/534198/

“The allure of independence, so powerful to previous generations, holds less sway over today’s teens.”

“The arrival of the smartphone has radically changed every aspect of teenagers’ lives, from the nature of their social interactions to their mental health. These changes have affected young people in every corner of the nation and in every type of household. The trends appear among teens poor and rich; of every ethnic background; in cities, suburbs, and small towns. Where there are cell towers, there are teens living their lives on their smartphone.”

“Today’s teens are also less likely to date. The initial stage of courtship, which Gen Xers called “liking” (as in “Ooh, he likes you!”), kids now call “talking”—an ironic choice for a generation that prefers texting to actual conversation. After two teens have “talked” for a while, they might start dating. But only about 56 percent of high-school seniors in 2015 went out on dates; for Boomers and Gen Xers, the number was about 85 percent.

The decline in dating tracks with a decline in sexual activity. The drop is the sharpest for ninth-graders, among whom the number of sexually active teens has been cut by almost 40 percent since 1991. The average teen now has had sex for the first time by the spring of 11th grade, a full year later than the average Gen Xer. Fewer teens having sex has contributed to what many see as one of the most positive youth trends in recent years: The teen birth rate hit an all-time low in 2016, down 67 percent since its modern peak, in 1991.”

“Why are today’s teens waiting longer to take on both the responsibilities and the pleasures of adulthood? Shifts in the economy, and parenting, certainly play a role. In an information economy that rewards higher education more than early work history, parents may be inclined to encourage their kids to stay home and study rather than to get a part-time job. Teens, in turn, seem to be content with this homebody arrangement—not because they’re so studious, but because their social life is lived on their phone. They don’t need to leave home to spend time with their friends.”

“So what are they doing with all that time? They are on their phone, in their room, alone and often distressed.”

“You might expect that teens spend so much time in these new spaces because it makes them happy, but most data suggest that it does not. The Monitoring the Future survey, funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and designed to be nationally representative, has asked 12th-graders more than 1,000 questions every year since 1975 and queried eighth- and 10th-graders since 1991. The survey asks teens how happy they are and also how much of their leisure time they spend on various activities, including nonscreen activities such as in-person social interaction and exercise, and, in recent years, screen activities such as using social media, texting, and browsing the web. The results could not be clearer: Teens who spend more time than average on screen activities are more likely to be unhappy, and those who spend more time than average on nonscreen activities are more likely to be happy.”

“Social-networking sites like Facebook promise to connect us to friends. But the portrait of iGen teens emerging from the data is one of a lonely, dislocated generation. Teens who visit social-networking sites every day but see their friends in person less frequently are the most likely to agree with the statements “A lot of times I feel lonely,” “I often feel left out of things,” and “I often wish I had more good friends.” Teens’ feelings of loneliness spiked in 2013 and have remained high since.”

“WHAT’S THE CONNECTION between smartphones and the apparent psychological distress this generation is experiencing? For all their power to link kids day and night, social media also exacerbate the age-old teen concern about being left out. Today’s teens may go to fewer parties and spend less time together in person, but when they do congregate, they document their hangouts relentlessly—on Snapchat, Instagram, Facebook. Those not invited to come along are keenly aware of it. Accordingly, the number of teens who feel left out has reached all-time highs across age groups. Like the increase in loneliness, the upswing in feeling left out has been swift and significant.

This trend has been especially steep among girls. Forty-eight percent more girls said they often felt left out in 2015 than in 2010, compared with 27 percent more boys.

“Girls use social media more often, giving them additional opportunities to feel excluded and lonely when they see their friends or classmates getting together without them. Social media levy a psychic tax on the teen doing the posting as well, as she anxiously awaits the affirmation of comments and likes. When Athena posts pictures to Instagram, she told me, “I’m nervous about what people think and are going to say. It sometimes bugs me when I don’t get a certain amount of likes on a picture.”

“It may be a comfort, but the smartphone is cutting into teens’ sleep: Many now sleep less than seven hours most nights. Sleep experts say that teens should get about nine hours of sleep a night; a teen who is getting less than seven hours a night is significantly sleep deprived. Fifty-seven percent more teens were sleep deprived in 2015 than in 1991. In just the four years from 2012 to 2015, 22 percent more teens failed to get seven hours of sleep.

“The increase is suspiciously timed, once again starting around when most teens got a smartphone. Two national surveys show that teens who spend three or more hours a day on electronic devices are 28 percent more likely to get less than seven hours of sleep than those who spend fewer than three hours, and teens who visit social-media sites every day are 19 percent more likely to be sleep deprived. A meta-analysis of studies on electronic-device use among children found similar results: Children who use a media device right before bed are more likely to sleep less than they should, more likely to sleep poorly, and more than twice as likely to be sleepy during the day.”


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeOffbeat Oregon History: Range Wars Veteran Put Oregon on the Map

America’s Cold Civil War

Oregon budget officials predict $623 million shortfall

Small Newspaper in Rural Oregon is Thriving

Companies blocked from using West Coast ports to export fossil fuels keep seeking workarounds

Peak Oil

Zeugmas Give Verbs a Workout

It’s Time to Rethink The Department of Homeland Security

U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services


 

Sherman County eNews #307

CONTENTS

  1. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving

  2. Correction: Sherman County Preschool Gala of Trees Drawing, Dec. 8

  3. Columbia Gorge CASA Kicking Off 2018 Annual Appeal

  4. Sherman County 4-H Members Put on a Musical Production in November

  5. Adversity Becomes Opportunity

  6. Scholarships for Oregon Wheat Growers League Counties or Regions


1. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving 

arrow.blueswishRemember Local Needs for Year-end Giving || tax-deductible non-profit organizations ||

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman StationFoundation, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Columbia Gorge CASA, P.O. Box 663, Hood River, OR 97031
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, P.O. Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Education Foundation, P.O. Box 68, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Food Bank, P.O. Box 14, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039
  • Sherman County Senior & Community Center, P.O. Box 352, Moro, OR  97039
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, P.O. Box 155, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco School Events Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

Consider gifts to these organizations to honor someone with a shared interest, to recognize someone’s achievement or success, in remembrance, to express your appreciation, or as the perfect gift for someone who has everything.


2. Correction: Sherman County Preschool Gala of Trees Drawing, Dec. 8

Christmas.TreeCorrection: Sherman County Preschool is pleased to announce the Gala of Trees fundraiser is up and running again this year. Trees & wreaths will be on display at MCP Farm Store in Wasco from November 26 to the time of the drawing on December 8th at noon (you don’t have to be present to win, winners will be called immediately). Tickets may be purchased from any Sherman County Preschool family or at MCP Farm Store. This year we want to thank MCP Farm Store for hosting again, and the following businesses/people for donating or sponsoring a tree or wreath: Dinty’s Market, Husky’s 97 Market, Bank of Eastern Oregon, Apex Auto & Truck Repair, RDO Equipment, Paradise Rose Chuckwagon, Hill Trucking, Kock Farms, Sherman County Emergency Services, Kathy McCullough, and the many people who work for these businesses that come up with such creative & pretty wreaths and trees. Thank you for your continued support of Sherman County Preschool!


3. Columbia Gorge CASA Kicking Off 2018 Annual Appeal

Columbia Gorge CASA is kicking off its 2018 Annual Appeal todayGiving Tuesday – with a $500 challenge match! All donations received today will be matched up to $500 by Julie & Mark Nygaard from The Dalles.

Donations will help us to provide a CASA volunteer to every child in foster care in Wasco, Sherman and Hood River counties. Donations can be made via our website or Facebook fundraiser page – see http://gorgecasa.org/page13921.aspx. Can you help us meet this match today?


4. Sherman County 4-H Members Put on a Musical Production in November

4-H clover1Youthful 4-H members in Sherman County enjoyed a new performing arts opportunity in November by participating in a musical production hosted by OSU Sherman County Extension.  Paid for in part by an innovative grant from the Oregon 4-H Foundation, Sherman Extension put on a kids musical called “We Are Monsters” during the week of November 5-9.  The premise of the musical was that everyone wants to be included and accepted, whether you are a monster, a werewolf, a vampire or a human, and that friendships are wonderful.

The musical was led by drama instructor Hayley Hoyt of the TriCities WA, with assistance from Gilliam County 4-H leader Silvia Durfey and new Sherman County 4-H Theatre Arts leader Tabetha Hein.

Although it was a very hectic week for Sherman County youth, ten 4-H members participated in the five days’ worth of afterschool practices for the Friday, November 9 performance for over 40 family and friends at the Sherman School cafeteria.  Participants learned a variety of songs and dance moves, memorized script, followed stage directions, and enjoyed putting together their costumes.

Family and friends are encouraging and supportive of the Sherman 4-H musical performance and new theatre arts programs.  Some comments received on Facebook posts about the musical included: ”What a great event for those lucky kids,” “I am thankful for 4H and the new Drama program. It’s so great for the kids!!! Thank you!!!” and “This is so cool! I love seeing all the new opportunities for 4-Hers.”

Cindy Brown, Educator

Oregon State University

OSU Extension Service – Sherman County

College of Public Health & Human Sciences

4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed

66365 Lonerock Rd

Moro, Oregon 97039

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


5. Adversity Becomes Opportunity

Today, let’s talk a little about the importance of learning how to bounce back from adversity. Lately, a large part of this planet has been hit by major challenges – physical, mental and emotional – and it’s time to focus the amazing power of the human mind on resiliency.

Whether it be loss of your job, the uncertainty about the economy, an illness, or a natural disaster, which can cause you to lose almost everything in one fell swoop, it can really knock you off your feet for a while. And when adversity does strike, how fast you get up again depends on a number of things, such as:

  • how good your support network is;
  • how solid your self-esteem is;
  • the extent to which you believe that you can control your own destiny; and
  • your experiences of overcoming adversity in the past.

If you want to shorten the time it takes to get back on your feet, try this: Ask yourself how it will look when you no longer have your current problems. Spend time visualizing yourself in that future picture and imagining how you’ll feel, how your world will look – what it will sound, taste and smell like.

Do it over and over, day after day, week after week. Make a list of your strengths and past accomplishments and add to that list on a daily basis. At the same time, set and prioritize some immediate, short-term goals to improve your situation. Write a detailed plan of action for the top three, including day and time. Give yourself things to accomplish, which builds your confidence in your ability to take action and succeed.

Once you have accomplished a few short-term goals, you may feel ready to do some long-term vision and goal-setting. Finally – and this is important – no matter how much you’ve lost, take time to help someone else who is struggling. A giving heart heals the fastest, and even the worst adversity can be used to learn and grow.

By changing the way you look at adversity, adversity becomes an opportunity to make positive change. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Scholarships for Oregon Wheat Growers League Counties or Regions

A $1,000 scholarship for graduating seniors is offered to recognize graduates from each of the Oregon Wheat Growers League counties or regions. To be eligible to apply for this award, the student’s family must be a grower member of the OWGL or an employee of a grower member.  The scholarship is also offered to high school seniors who work part time for a grower member.

A scholarship may be awarded in one of the following wheat producing counties or regions: Central Oregon, Gilliam, Klamath, Malheur, Morrow, Sherman, Umatilla, Union/Baker, Wallowa, Wasco, North Willamette Valley and South Willamette Valley.

All applicants must be planning to enroll in a University or two-year Community College with the intent of completing a bachelor’s degree.

Note: Application must be postmarked by February 1st of the current school yea

Download the printable Application.

http://www.owgl.org/foundation/scholarship-award-program/?fbclid=IwAR1qWiJtZok2lDiThxkEgOp7oA0bdRy5o_rLptwNRnpFlPSOs8gZaNw888Q

Congratulations to our scholarship winners!  The Oregon Wheat Foundation awarded $1,000 scholarships to nine high school seniors in May, 2017. Students were judged on their community involvement, academic achievement and an essay on a wheat industry topic.