Sherman County eNews #164

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Scholarship Recipients

  2. In Search of Sherman County Rental Housing

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court Special Session, June 27

  4. July Birthdays, Lunch and Ice Cream Social, July 14

  5. Things to do Related to Oregon’s Culture & History this Summer

  6. Things to do in Sherman County

  7. More Questions

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Caution!

Please do not drive or park your vehicle in dry grass!

Safety First! Prevent fires!


 “Dear Congress, as your employers, your request for a pay raise is denied due to poor job performance. Truth is you should be fired.” ~unattributed


1. Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Scholarship Recipients

The Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District are pleased to announce the recipients of the first Sherman Co. SWCD Scholarship. Applicants must be a graduating high school senior of Sherman County High School or College/Higher Education Student and hold a 2.5 GPA or better. The Sherman SWCD is happy to award a $1,000 scholarship to the following students; Savannah Moe, Tyler Jones, Max Martin, Wyatt Stutzman and Kevin Hart. For more information about the scholarship program contact the office at 541-565-3216 or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net.


2. In Search of Sherman County Rental Housing

ISO: The Sherman County SWCD and NRCS have employees looking for a house or room to rent in Sherman County. If you have something available please contact Amanda at 541-565-3216 x 109 or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net.”


3. Notice. Sherman County Court Special Session, June 27

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court will hold an a Special Session at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday June 27, 2019, in the County Courthouse in the Commissioners Meeting Room, 500 Court Street, Moro Oregon 97039, to hold a supplemental budget hearing, approve the final transfer resolution, and to make the bid award for the Wasco to Rufus Fiber Project.


4. July Birthdays, Lunch and Ice Cream Social, July 14

Celebrating July birthdays especially Eilene Eslinger’s & Nita Hooper’s 98th!

July 14th

Grass Valley Park & Pavillion

12:15-ish

We will start after Grass Valley Baptist church. If you wish to join us for church, it begins at 10:45am, Questions? Call Leta Ann 541-325-2993.


5. Things to do Related to Oregon’s Culture & History this Summer

Looking for something to do this summer? Check out Travel Oregon’s heritage related itineraries. There are so many cultural and historical treasures to explore in Oregon and Travel Oregon has compiled a great list of trips that you can take. Check it out if you are looking for something to do this summer!  For things to do in Oregon related to culture & history visit: https://traveloregon.com/things-to-do/culture-history/.


6. Things to do in Sherman County

We welcome visitors to Sherman County.

Explore our deep canyons, campsites, and parks along the John Day, Columbia, and Deschutes rivers. Follow the Oregon Trail from river crossing to river crossing. And enjoy spectacular mountain views from the ridges.

See for yourself the scale of wind turbines and the John Day Dam. Challenge yourself to world-class windsurfing on the Columbia River, bass fishing on the John Day River, whitewater rafting on the Deschutes River. Venture out for upland game hunting in our wide-open spaces. There’s something for everyone in Sherman County, Oregon.   https://www.co.sherman.or.us/visitors/


7. More Questions 

“Who am I?” This age-old question is probably one of the most important you will ever ask or answer. And, while you are answering that question, another similar, but substantially different, question might present itself: What parts of yourself do you keep secret from others?

What is it you do, when you are alone, that you would rather no one find out about? Do you read trashy novels, talk to your plants, or consume ice cream by the quart? Do you indulge in self-destructive activities like illegal drugs or excessive alcohol use? Do you use language you would be embarrassed to have overheard, or let the dishes pile up in the sink for days?

If you do things you would not want anyone to find out about, another question is likely to present itself: What do you do about that part of yourself that abhors both the behavior and the deceit? Do you have to ignore part of yourself in order to keep your secret? What does it cost you to do that?

Some secrets are just a harmless way to have privacy. Others are terribly destructive. They undermine relationships and cause us to lose self-respect. It is impossible to be a whole and happy person as long as we believe there are parts of ourselves that are so unacceptable that we have to keep them hidden.

While we are on the subject, here are a few more questions that might need to be answered by each of us: What price do you pay to keep your secrets? Do these secrets stop you from being the person you would most like to be? How might you benefit from being more open or eliminating certain behaviors altogether?

Our answers may not come quickly, and some may cause painful emotions when the answers finally arrive. But these questions are important in answering the ultimate question, “Who am I?” And they are even more important when the next question comes: “Who do I want to be?”  ~The Pacific Institute


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Up, up and away: OSU opens Global Hemp Innovation Center

Good hemp seed or ‘garbage’? Growers say standards needed

‘Low-Cost’ Renewable Energy Is Breathtakingly Expensive

The University System Is the Progressives’ Seminary

Amazing Giant Straw Animals Invade Japan’s Fields After Rice Harvest

US Army War College Surrenders to CAIR

Middle Eastern Forum | CAIR Islamists fooling the establishment

On the Moral and Legal Status of Islam in the United States

Watch Your Language: Grammar’s a Grabber


 

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Sherman County eNews #163

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1.SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1Happy Father’s Day

“For you recall, brethren, our labor and hardship, how working night and day so as not to be a burden to any of you, we proclaimed to you the gospel of God. You are witnesses, and so is God, how devoutly and uprightly and blamelessly we behaved toward you believers; just as you know how we were exhorting and encouraging and imploring each one of you as a father would his own children, so that you would walk in a manner worthy of the God who calls you into His own kingdom and glory.” (1 Thessalonians 2:9–12, NASB)

In this passage as Paul is writing to the Thessalonian believers he expresses as a spiritual father many of the traits that we treasure in our own fathers and to which end fathers can seek to be with their own children. No longer in their presence, Paul reminded them of the example of labor and struggle as he put in the time both night and day to do what was necessary for their benefit. In this case, Paul labored for his own provision, but in the case of the father and his family it pictures the diligence that is necessary to tend to the needs of the family as he sets an example of work and perseverance.

There is also the example of teaching. As Paul taught them about God and how to walk before Him, so does the father in the family have the privilege and responsibility to pass on what he has learned to train up his own children both in life and hopefully in their lifelong relationship with God.

Lastly, there is the example of exhortation as a father to a child who encourages them to walk in a manner worthy of who they are and the God who loves them. Fathers have the awesome privilege of setting a pattern for life and encouraging their children as they move forward in the path set before them. We also have a heavenly Father in God who desires we seek Him as He does this for us.

Happy Father’s Day

Joe Burgess
Pastor, First Baptist Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER RUMMAGE SALE. The Wasco School Events Center will be holding a rummage sale on Saturday, Aug. 31 and Sunday, Sept. 1 from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm each day. We are currently seeking VENDORS who would be interested in renting a table for $10 each. If anyone is interested in participating in this event, please contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC – 541-442-5778 or 541-993-0882. WSEC will have a large selection of book shelves, chalk boards, and other items available for sale. Mark your calendar!

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER to FEATURE LOCAL ARTISTS. SThe Wasco School Events Center is excited to announce their fall fundraiser: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent. This event is scheduled for Sunday, October 20, from 2:00 to 5:00 pm at the Events Center. More details will be available as the date gets closer. We are currently looking for local Sherman County artists who would like to participate in this art show by displaying some of their art, and/or donating an item for the silent auction portion of this event. Many local artists have been contacted by mail, but if you were not contacted and would like to participate, we would love to hear from you! Please contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at the WSEC by June 30th. She can be reached at 541-442-5778 or 541-993-0882. Thank you!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

EMPLOYMENT:

PARK RANGER ASSISTANTS. Cottonwood Canyon and Deschutes State Parks are hiring for seasonal Park Ranger assistants. As a Park Ranger Assistant, you will assist year-round State Park staff in the protection, maintenance, operation and repair of state park lands, natural and cultural resources, structures, facilities, equipment and systems. Park Ranger Assistants typically perform basic tasks in multiple areas of park operations (e.g.: janitorial work, landscape maintenance, interpretation or visitor services).  Contact Park Manager David Spangler at 541-739-2322 ext. 23 or david.spangler@oregon.gov

911 CALL TAKER/DISPATCHER – FRONTIER REGIONAL 911
135 S. MAIN ST.
PO BOX 297
CONDON, OR 97823
911 CALLTAKER/DISPATCHER

Frontier Regional 911 is a regional call center covering Gilliam, Jefferson Sherman and Wheeler Counties. We are currently accepting applications for employment. This is an exciting career opportunity, but one that involves working rotating shifts 24/7/365, so please take this into consideration.
DUTIES:
Operates radio and telephone control consoles in dispatching public safety resources and routing other emergency calls to the appropriate agencies. Receive emergency call information; dispatches call to appropriate units or departments; maintains information on units’ activities; accesses computer terminals to obtain, transmit and record information such as vehicle license numbers, driver’s information, warrants and stolen vehicle information; enters record information via computer terminal; maintains status of equipment; completes radio logs, incident logs, and other forms to maintain control and to record activity of dispatched units.
EXAMINATION AND APPLICATION PROCESS:
Interested applicants may apply by emailing your request for an application to renee@frontier911.org or pick one up at Frontier Regional 911 and fill it out in its entirety. Upon receipt of applications, applicants will be notified to complete a series of tests. Applicants that excel in the testing will then move through an extensive background check and a psychological evaluation. 
BASIC QUALIFICATONS:
High School diploma or equivalent
Ability to type 35 words per minute
Ability to pass the National Telecommunicator Dispatch Test
Successful completion of a drug and alcohol screening, criminal background check, psychological evaluation and career specific physical exam; vision, color blindness and hearing.
Ability to simultaneously perform multiple tasks in a distracting environment during emergency situations.

CURRENT VACANCY
Full-time position; 40 hours per week. 
SALARY: $18.30/hour with benefits.Positions open until filled. APPLICANTS CAN TURN IN THE COMPLETED APPLICATION TO FRONTIER REGIONAL 911 IN PERSON, EMAIL TO THE ONE LISTED IN THE POST OR MAIL TO FRONTIER REGIONAL 911 AT THE ABOVE LISTED ADDRESS. YOU MAY CONTACT FRONTIER REGIONAL 911 AT 541-980-2292 OR 541-384-2080 FOR QUESTIONS. WE WILL BE CONDUCTING TESTING ON JUNE 20TH FOR THOSE INTERESTED!

DRIVER. Evergreen State Holdings located at 212 NE North Street in Grass Valley is hiring a driver. A person who has either his or her Farm Endorsement or CDL Class A to deliver product or transport goods and equipment to various locations. If you are interested please drop off a resume at our Grass Valley location or contact Human Resources Director at (971) 400-0248.  6/28 

CENSUS JOBS. 2020 Census Jobs available in Sherman County $14.50 – $16.00 per hour – Paid Training. Thousands of jobs are available nationwide, and many are near you. Help support your community by being a Census Taker. *Great pay
*Flexible hours *Weekly pay *Paid Training. APPLY ONLINE TODAY: WWW.2020census.gov/jobs
Questions, call 1-855-562-2020
Federal Relay Services: 1-877-8339 TTY/ASCII
www.gsa.gov/fedrelay
The U.S. Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 6/14

OYCC CREW LEADER & CREW. For more information regarding the OYCC program visit http://www.oyccweb.com.  Sherman County OYCC is accepting applications for several positions within the OYCC Program.  The positions are scheduled to work 6 weeks beginning July 2019 and ending August 2019; 40hr/week, Monday through Friday.  All applicants must be able to perform manual labor in adverse weather conditions.  Please review the job descriptions and contract before applying on the Sherman County Prevention webpage.  The Student Contract must be signed before a Crew Member application will be accepted.  Applications will be accepted until 5:00 PM on Friday, June 14, 2019 for the youth crew.  The Crew Leader position will be open until filled and required a 3-day training in Bend on June 19-21st. Any applicant over 18 years of age must complete and pass a criminal history background check. Job description and/or employment application can be found at https://www.co.sherman.or.us/departments/prevention/; by email aasher@co.sherman.or.us  or contact the Sherman County Prevention Department at 541-565-5036.  *Submit a letter of interest describing your qualifications, a completed employment application and for youth, student contract, to the Sherman County Prevention Program, PO Box 263, Moro, OR  97039 or in person at the Sherman County Courthouse. 6/14

CUSTODIAN. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified 1.0 FTE custodial candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included.  Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500. Application Method/Materials Required: Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district) and resume if you are interested in the position to: Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039 | (541) 565-3500 | wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. This position will remain open until filled.  Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

SERVICES:

“BE A RISING STAR” CAREGIVER JOB FAIR
–Adult Foster Home / New Career
“Start Your Own In-Home Business”
–Adult Foster Home
Resident Manager, Shift Caregiver
& Substitute Caregivers
–Homecare Worker / In-Home Caregiving
PROCESSING APPLICATIONS & BACKGROUND CHECKS
INFORMATIONAL TABLES
FOR YOUR SUPPORT & KNOWLEDGE.
June 18, 2019 10:00 AM TO 2:00 PM
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
AGING & PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
3641 KLINDT DR. THE DALLES FOR INFORMATION CALL
ADULT FOSTER HOME LICENSOR YULANDA OWEN 541-506-3536
Refreshments provided.  6/14

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/28

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE: 

VEHICLES. Surplus for sale by Sherman County:            

2000 Ford E450 Bus

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 125,490 miles

As Is Condition

VIN #: 1FDXE4553YHB96056.

2008 Jeep Patriot

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 87,058 miles

As Is Condition: Possible Drive Train Issue

VIN #: 108FF28W18D605526.

2014 Dodge Charger

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 99,856

As Is Condition

VIN #: 2C3CDXAT4EH158884.

Sealed bids must be submitted to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 by 5:00 pm Monday July 15, 2019. Bids will be opened and read aloud during County Court on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. ALL ENVELOPES AND BIDS MUST BE LABELED WITH THE ITEM YOU ARE BIDDING ON. Minimum bid for Ford Van: $2,000; Minimum bid for Jeep Patriot: $2,000; Minimum bid for Dodge Charger: $10,000. To request a viewing appointment, contact the Office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416. 7/12

HAND-CRAFTED BARREL STAVE FURNITURE. Locally handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | Call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

 

American flag2JUNE

14 FLAG DAY

14 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

15 Bridal Shower for Krista Perisho 10 Sherman County Extension Office

15-16 Ketchum Calf Rodeo, Glenwood, Washington

15 Cascade Singers Compositori Femminili 7 Zion Lutheran Church

16 FATHERS’ DAY

16 Father’s Day at Maryhill Museum

16 Cascade Singers Compositori Femminili 3 Zion Lutheran Church

16-21 Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute for High School Students

17 Sherman County School District Board 7

18 Caregiver Job Fair 10-6 DHS, The Dalles

18 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators Meeting 12 Hood River Golf Course

19 Sherman County Court 9

19-21 Sherman County 4-H Camp for 4th-6th graders, Wamic

22 Auction Sales Consignment Auction, The Dalles

24-28 Vacation Bible School – Moro Community Presbyterian Church

26-29 OSU 4-H Summer Conference for 7th-12th graders, Corvallis

life-jacket

JULY

1 Grass Valley City Council 7

2 Moro City Council 7

3 Sherman County Court 9  CANCELED

3 All County Prayer Meeting Grass Valley Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

4 INDEPENDENCE DAY

6 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

8-11 Sherman 4-H Kids Food Preservation Day Camp

9 Sherman County Watershed Council 8

9 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

9 North Central Public Health Department 3 The Dalles

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board 11-2

10 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

10 Rufus City Council 7

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12-14 Oregon Country Fair 11-7 Veneta, Oregon

12-14 Athena Caledonian Games, Athena, Oregon

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board 1:30

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7 City Hall

17 Sherman County Court 9

20 Starry Night at the Museum – Maryhill Museum of Art

20-21 Maryhill Museum: Free Admission for Sherman County

21-24 Sherman 4-H Kids Food Science Baking Day Camp

22 Maryhill Museum Summer Art Institute

24 Gilliam, Sherman, Wheeler Tri-County Courts 10 Condon

24-27 Jefferson County Fair

24-28 Hood River County Fair

27 Fifth Annual Veteran Benefit Expo in Pendleton

31-Aug 4 Union County Fair

AUGUST

1 Sherman County Fair Board 7

1-5 Deschutes County Fair

3 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

5 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman

5-9 Sherman 4-H Kids Drama Day Camp, Sherman County School

5 Grass Valley City Council 7

6 Moro City Council 7 City Hall

6-10 Baker County Fair

6-10 Umatilla County Fair

7 Sherman County Court 9

7 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Executive Board Meeting 4

7 All County Prayer Meeting Rufus Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

7-11 Wheeler County Fair

8-11 Crook County Fair

8-11 Grant County Fair

9 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

13 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3:30

14 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

14 Rufus City Council 7 City Hall

16-18 Equine Mania LLC Summer Escape (541) 980-7394

20-25 Sherman County Fair

21 Cattle Sorting Competition at the Sherman County Fair

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center


 

Sherman County eNews #162

CONTENTS

  1. Ceremony for the Disposal of Unserviceable Flags, Flag Day, June 14

  2. Letter to the Editor: Kids, School and Community

  3. Approved Sherman County Court Minutes Now Online

  4. Caregiver Job Fair – “Be A Rising Star” – June 18

  5. Don’t blame children. Blame those who failed to discipline them.

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“It should be your care, therefore, and mine, to elevate the minds of our children and exalt their courage; to accelerate and animate their industry and activity; to excite in them an habitual contempt of meanness, abhorrence of injustice and inhumanity, and an ambition to excel in every capacity, faculty, and virtue. If we suffer their minds to grovel and creep in infancy, they will grovel all their lives.” —John Adams (1756)


1.Ceremony for the Disposal of Unserviceable Flags, Flag Day, June 14

American flag1

Ceremony for the

Disposal of

Unserviceable Flags

Friday, June 14th ~ Flag Day

Klickitat County

Court House Lawn @ 5:15 PM


2. Letter to the Editor: Kids, School and Community

pencil.sharpLetter to the Editor and Sherman County Community,

Just wanted to thank everyone for voting this past month in our county elections.  I received enough votes to win position 5 on the Sherman County School Board.  Just got the letter from the county clerk’s office.  I will do my best to serve the kids, our school and community.  Thanks again everyone.

Paul Bish

Wasco


3. Approved Sherman County Court Minutes Now Online

Approved Sherman County Court minutes for the April 17, 2019, Regular Session, April 19, 2019 Work Session, April 24, 2019 Special Session, May 5, 2019, and May 15, 2019 Work Session are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/


4. Caregiver Job Fair – “Be A Rising Star” – June 18

“BE A RISING STAR”
CAREGIVER JOB FAIR

Adult Foster Home / New Career
“Start Your Own In-Home Business”
Adult Foster Home
Resident Manager, Shift Caregiver
& Substitute Caregivers
Homecare Worker / In-Home Caregiving

PROCESSING APPLICATIONS & BACKGROUND CHECKS
INFORMATIONAL TABLES
FOR YOUR SUPPORT & KNOWLEDGE

June 18, 2019 10:00 AM TO 6:00 PM
DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES
AGING & PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES
3641 KLINDT DR. THE DALLES FOR INFORMATION CALL
ADULT FOSTER HOME LICENSOR
YULANDA OWEN 541-506-3536

Refreshments Provided


5. Don’t blame children. Blame those who failed to discipline them.

Ralph Waldo Emerson once observed, “Our chief want in life is somebody who will make us do what we can.” Although children doubtless do not recognize it at the time, they crave discipline, particularly during their formative years. Discipline defines boundaries for them, provides security, and is an active expression of a parent’s love. Most important, it prepares them for the challenges of adulthood. If your childhood was less than perfect, you are in good company. Most of us have experienced difficulties at one time or another, and we all make mistakes from time to time. The good news is that while your environment as a child will have a profound influence upon the person you become, it is not the sole determinant. The person you choose to be is entirely up to you. Only you can decide who and what you will become in life. ~The Napoleon Hill Foundation


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbGovernor signs bill to change the way Oregon helps choose the president

Oregon’s Minimum Wage Increases July 1, 2019

The Patriot Post, America’s News Digest

The Federalist

New Commemorative Stamp to Honor Former President George H. W. Bush

Opinion: What are the chances that America’s disunion turns into Civil War?

CAIR ‘Demands’ US Army War College Cancel Lecture on Islamic History

Poll: voters like Green New Deal until they see the price tag


 

Sherman County eNews #161

CONTENTS

  1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, June 17

  2. Why Museums Matter

  3. 15th Annual Fossil Cruz-in, July 6

  4. Sherman 4-H News: The Saving Nine 4-H Sewing Club

  5. The Quality of the Questions

  6. College achieves unmanned flight training milestone


We are not born knowing hate. It is taught. It is learned. It is born of ignorance and fear. ~unattributed


1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, June 17

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, June 17, 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library.


2. Why Museums Matter 

By Colleen Schafroth, Executive Director, Maryhill Museum of Art

pen.markerFor 33 years, the last 18 as executive director of Maryhill Museum of Art, I’ve had the enormous privilege to work in a beautiful building, surrounded by awe-inspiring art and artifacts every day. It’s wonderful.

But more importantly, I have had the privilege of working in a museum.

Museums matter.  I believe this whole heartedly and with every fiber of my being. Museums have a huge responsibility. Not just because a museum is a private non-profit with obligations under law, but because of our deeper core reason for existing – to tell stories through objects and, ultimately, bring all of us closer together.

Here are some of the ways that museums do this.

Museums matter because they tell STORIES
Stories about you, me, our neighbors and friends. Museums tell the stories that make us who we are – stories about our families, towns, farms and factories.  Sometimes, they tell us stories we may not know about.  Stories about inventions, new ideas, or accomplishments that shaped civilization as we know. They tell us stories about our towns, counties, states, and country in new ways and with different perspectives.

Museums matter because they keep THINGS.
Things that can help us understand where we’ve been and sometimes where we could be going.

THINGS.  Bird, animal and plant collections in natural history museums contain information about changes in the natural world that can help scientists as they grapple with challenges such as pollution, global warming, or declining populations. In some cases, their specimens represent our only knowledge of extinct animals or plants.

THINGS.  Painting, sculptures and all things beautiful … … … continue right here…

https://www.maryhillmuseum.org/news/why-museums-matter?fbclid=IwAR3rdgW-lbSnl1eZV8KUk_r1HgunPDJQW7f265UwBFMsK_BJV5wg66G7r5Q.


3. 15th Annual Fossil Cruz-in, July 6

Only in America, dreaming in red, white and blue.

car.oldblue

Entertainment. Food. Vendors.

Registration 9-11:30 at Cross Rifle BBQ

Awards 3:30

Bring lawn chairs.

Questions? 541-763-2270


4. Sherman 4-H News: The Saving Nine 4-H Sewing Club

4-H clover1The “Saving Nine” 4-H sewing club met on Tuesday June 4 at Sherman Home Ec Room.  Attendees were:  Sebastian, Lexi, Beth, Emma, T’Sharra, Nicole, Erin, Bella, Coral and Bailey.  Pledge of Allegiance led by T’Sharra and 4-H Pledge by Emma.  Talked about 4-H camp and fair.  Will be meeting weekly, last time next week at school, after that at Extension Office or leaders’ homes.  Will make up schedule that works with each individual as needed.  A special day will be needed to do record books.  All project need to be complete by July 22.  Each person worked on their project, from bags, pillowcases, dresses, skirt, blouse, and pants.  Group was helpful to each other.  Submitted by Karen Thompson Umemoto, leader


5. The Quality of the Questions

No one ever has all the answers, no matter what they may say. However, it is the quest for answers that is fundamentally important to realizing more of who we are. Albert Einstein once said that, “The important thing is not to stop questioning.” His words emphasize something that is extremely important: It is not so much the answers you already have, but rather the quality of the questions you ask, that determines the direction of your life.

For example, what sort of questions do you ask when calamity strikes? Do you ask, “Why me?” or “What’s the use of living if this is what happens?” Or, do you ask questions like, “How can I use this to learn and grow, maybe even to help others?” or “What am I meant to learn from this?”

What kind of questions do you ask your kids? Do you say, “What’s the matter with you?” “Why are you so stupid, or lazy or mean?” Or, do you ask, “What are you looking forward to?” or “How will you show your teacher how smart you are?”

When it comes to your relationships, do you ask questions that can be answered with just “yes” or “no” or do you ask open-ended questions that encourage people to tell you more about themselves? And finally, what kind of questions do you ask yourself? Do you say, “How am I going to get through the day?” or “What can I do to make today really great?”

Do you ask, “what if” questions that help you explore possibilities? How about asking questions that encourage you to think about the purpose of your life and your reasons for doing what you are doing? Change the quality of the questions you ask, and you will be changing the focus of your attention. Change the focus of your attention, and you will change the results you get. Go ahead. Try it and see. ~The Pacific Institute


6. College achieves unmanned flight training milestone

The Columbia River Gorge hosts one of the world’s largest concentrations of design and manufacturing for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Columbia Gorge Community College, located in the midst of all this, is now the first (and so far only) institution in the Pacific Northwest offering “Trusted Operator Program ‘Level One’” certification training for commercial UAV pilots.

“Level One” is the first of three certification levels established by the Association for Unmanned Vehicles International, a global non-profit dedicated to the advancement of autonomous systems and robotics. Pilots holding Level One certification have demonstrated their competence to fly UAVs for certain commercial purposes.

“Columbia Gorge Community College has satisfactorily demonstrated the required level of knowledge, skills and proficiency for safe and reliable operation of unmanned aircraft systems, as established by the Trusted Operators Program, and is hereby certified as a TOP Operator Level 1 Service Provider” states the college’s AUVSI certificate, which is valid through April 2021.

In addition, Columbia Gorge Community College offers a certificate training program for small autonomous aircraft (“sUAS”, defined by weight) comprising three courses of four credits each. The first course prepares students to pass the Federal Aviation Administration’s Remote Pilot Exam (“107” certification). All three courses provide flight training to pass qualification exams for TOP Level certifications.

CGCC instructor Mike Davis, a fifth-generation Tygh Valley resident and pilot who returned home following an international business career, led the process to qualify Columbia Gorge Community College as TOP Level One Service Provider. Until now, Las Vegas been the closest place sUAS pilots could go to obtain a Level One certification. Davis is a commercial pilot with degrees in electrical engineering and international law; he founded Aero Drone, a company based in Tygh Valley that provides UAS training, consulting and flight testing.

Students completing CGCC certificate program will receive an “Unmanned Aircraft System Professional Certificate” from CGCC.

So, what’s next?

Davis, and Mary Kramer, Dean of Career & Technical Education, said CGCC will be seeking TOP Level II certification as a service provider by late summer of this year; UAV pilots holding this certificate demonstrate the ability to operate in more demanding conditions. Ultimately, the college hopes to achieve Level III certification. Pilots who complete this rigorous training will have demonstrated their ability to pilot UAVs for very specialized, industrial applications such as inspection of high-voltage transmission lines and wind turbine blades.

All three certification levels have been developed within the past five years, as regulators and industry attempt to keep up with popular interest in UAVs, which can pose a hazard if flown improperly.

Finally, Davis and Kramer hope to offer some of the training through distance education, reaching people throughout the college’s 10,000 square mile service area.

“We’re on new ground, and this will benefit industry everywhere,” Davis said. “Our approach of building practical skills really fits with our experience in renewable energy and electro-mechanical technology. The added value is, as a service provider, we can now help people who are in this business already, and who need the certificate to grow their business.”

“It has huge potential here,” said Mary Kramer. “We want to grow what we already have in our region. Just as we’ve done with renewable energy training, this is something else that puts CGCC on the map.”


 

Sherman County eNews #160

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Court & Sherman Cities Work Session, June 11

  2. Sherman County Court, June 19

  3. Sherman County Emergency Services May Activity Report

  4. Flora School Education Center Sewing, Blacksmithing, Canning Classes


1. Notice. Sherman County Court & Sherman Cities Work Session, June 11

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court and Sherman Cities will hold a Work Session on June 11, 2019, at 6 p.m. in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039 to discuss Fiber to the Home.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court, June 19 

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, June 19, 2019, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.

Agenda topics include Reading Sealed Bids for the Wasco to Rufus Fiber Build, Workman’s Compensation Policy Renewal, Cybersecurity Policy, DeMoss Springs Park Site Visit, Vehicle Request OSU Sherman County Extension, Vehicle Bid Approval Veteran’s Service Office, Sherman County Representative Appointment to North Central Public Health District, Commissioners’ Reports and Consent Agenda.


3. Sherman County Emergency Services May Activity Report

emergencydial911redSubmitted by Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

Sherman County Ambulance

May 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
5/03 10:42 PM Fall Injury Grass Valley
5/04 12:20 AM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover Scott Canyon Rd & Helms Lane
5/05 1:08 AM Sick Person Nu Vu Motel in Biggs
5/05 5:15 PM Decreased Blood Pressure Wasco
5/05 8:42 PM Chest Pain Linda’s in Biggs
5/06 3:55 AM Difficulty Breathing Moro
5/08 5:46 AM Fall Injury Grass Valley
5/09 11:51 AM Motor Vehicle Crash US 97  MP# 50
5/10 2:44 AM Cold Exposure Hwy 206 & Hwy 30 in Biggs
5/10 8:19 PM Sick Person Grass Valley
5/13 7:03 AM Behavioral Emergency Rufus
5/13 6:51 PM Semi-Truck Rollover 63772 Hwy 97  Grass Valley
5/17 2:17 PM Possible Stroke Wasco
5/19 10:15 AM Sick Person Grass Valley
5/21 10:51 AM Breathing Problem Biggs
5/23 7:15 AM Semi -Truck Crash Scott Canyon Road
5/27 4:47 PM Head Pain Moro
5/28 11:37 AM Back Pain Wasco
5/28 9:06 PM Unknown Illness Rufus
5/29 10:01 AM Possible Drug Overdose I-84  MP# 109
5/30 12:58 PM Chest Pain Emergency Services Building in Moro
5/31 5:31 PM Hand Injury Wasco

 

Moro Fire Department

May 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
5-01 1:14 PM Smoke Detector Going Off Moro
5/13 6:54 PM Semi-Truck Rollover 63772 Hwy 97 Grass Valley

North Sherman County RFPD

May 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
5-03 3:30 PM Illegal Burn Wasco
5-04 12:21 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Scott Canyon Road
5-05 5:15 PM Assist Ambulance Wasco
5-05 8:42 PM Assist Ambulance Linda’s Parking Lot in Biggs
5-09 10:22 AM Grass Fire I-84  MP# 112
5-09   Fire on Train Tracks I-84  MP# 109
5-23 7:16 AM Semi-Truck Crash Scott Canyon
5-28 9:06 PM Assist Ambulance Rufus RV Park
5-29 10:01 AM Assist Ambulance I-84  MP# 109
5-31 5:31 PM Agency Assist – Law Enforcement Hwy 206  Wasco

4. Flora School Education Center Sewing, Blacksmithing, Canning Classes

Flora School Education Center

80974 College LN

Enterprise OR, 97828

phone: 541-828-7911

email: ​info@floraschool.org

http://floraschool.org/shop-classes.html

Flora, Oregon—Skills necessary to life and to creating a home by pioneers begin at Flora School this coming weekend, lasting throughout the summer and into the fall. The Flora School Education Center, dedicated to promoting pioneer skills and the restoration of the actual school building in Flora, will provide several chances to learn blacksmith skills, sewing, quilting, cookies from scratch and many more classes and activities.

Classes vary as to location (a forge building class was held in Walla Walla this spring), skill level and subject matter. Mike Rowley, a “Forged In Fire” Champion, will host and teach a bladesmith class at his smithy in Enterprise (Oregon). The prerequisite for that class is one year of blacksmith experience or the “Intro to Blacksmith” class held at Flora School Saturday and Sunday, June 15-16. The intro class is taught by Nathan Thompson, winner of the School Days 2019 blacksmith competition.

Held that same weekend at the school will be “Rugs of Many ‘Colors’”, a class using many different techniques to create rugs or something smaller—“jelly roll” rugs, handwoven, crocheted, braided, locker hooking and more. This class will be taught by Vanessa Thew Thompson, Flora resident and national award-winning rug weaver.

Soap making, water bath canning, earth oven rebuilding (no charge), spinning, Sip/Sew/Sing (no charge), and Quilts of Valor block building workshop (no charge) are currently on the schedule or will be added before the month is out.


 

Sherman County eNews #159

CONTENTS

  1. Savannah Moe Awarded Oregon Women for Agriculture Scholarship

  2. Frontier Telenet Budget Hearing, June 12

  3. Wheeler County | Think Out Loud | Oregon Public Broadcasting

  4. Space Weather News for June 9, 2019

  5. Wasco County Historical Society Program: Gorge Veterans Museum, June 15

  6. Never Too Late for Change

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Whether driven by partisanship, misguided by perverse media and political incentives, or simply put off by the burdens of responsibility, members of both houses are now reluctant to really legislate. When they do enact statutes, they are frequently broad and vague, setting general goals and then letting the executive branch figure out how to pursue them and letting judges clean up the ensuing mess (as seen in health care, environmental policy, education and beyond). … Instead, they often operate as commentators — criticizing or defending the president like everybody else. This current Congress, like the last one, seems largely to be an arena for debating President Trump. Our constitutional system cannot function this way.” —Yuval Levin


1. Savannah Moe Awarded Oregon Women for Agriculture Scholarship

Savannah Maria Moe, a recent graduate of Sherman High School, has been selected for a $500 scholarship awarded by the Columbia Gorge chapter of Oregon Women for Agriculture.  Savannah plans to attend Eastern Oregon University and major in Agriculture Education. The scholarship is offered annually to a student who is a resident of Hood River, Wasco or Sherman counties a minimum of two years during their high school education.  Preference goes to a student pursuing a major in agricultural studies, with a 3.0 GPA or higher, and female.


2. Notice. Frontier Telenet Budget Hearing, June 12

The Frontier Telenet Board of Directors will hold a budget hearing for the FY 2019-2020 Budget on Wednesday, June 12th at 10am in Fossil. The Budget Hearing Document is on line: https://frontiertelenet.com/minutes-and-agendas/.  Please call Elizabeth Farrar if you have any questions. elizabeth.farrar@co.gilliam.or.us.


3. Wheeler County | Think Out Loud | Oregon Public Broadcasting

Think Out Loud visited Wheeler County and broadcast several shows from WC High School talking with local residents.

https://www.spreaker.com/show/think-out-loud?fbclid=IwAR1_TKswbyQJkwjJciX3iYvgBZ95SQxtLYGxjWprtKwbvvggIBJjoq2_0vk


4. Space Weather News for June 9, 2019

http://spaceweather.com
https://www.spaceweatheralerts.com

HUGE OUTBREAK OF NOCTILUCENT CLOUDS: The best season for noctilucent clouds in years is underway, and last night it intensified with a huge display over the United States. Bright tendrils of frosted meteor smoke were sighted glowing in the night sky over states as far south as Oregon. The apparition may be a side effect of solar minimum. Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and observing tips.


5. Wasco County Historical Society Program: Gorge Veterans Museum, June 15

American-Flag-StarThe Wasco County Historical Society summer program for June will be at the The Gorge Veterans Museum at

11a.m. on Saturday, June 15, 2019 at 203 W. 2nd Street, The Dalles.  Lisa Commander, the Museum Director will present the program and military memorabilia from1898 to the present will be on display.


6. Never Too Late for Change

When is it too late to change? If you get off to a bad start, can you still turn things around when you are an adult?

If you were in trouble all the time when you were a kid, a teenager, and even as a young adult, do you think there is any hope that you will straighten out your life when you get to be 30 or 40? According to findings from two of the longest, ongoing research studies in the nation, many people have an amazing capacity for change throughout life.

There is the example of “Stan.” At the age of 32, “Stan” seemed destined for failure. Abandoned at birth by his father, and orphaned at the age of three when his mother died, “Stan” dropped out of school in the 8th grade, became an alcoholic, and served prison time for rape and vagrancy in his 20’s and early 30’s.

But 15 years later, against all odds, “Stan” had turned his life around. When researchers checked in with him at age 47, he was sober and happily married, had an adopted son he doted on, and owned a trucking business and a house.

These studies – and evidence from an on-going study within corrections in Montana – point out that “Stan’s” story is far from unique. We all have the capacity to change our circumstances – no matter how old we are, and no matter how difficult our early experiences were. It comes down to whether or not we want to change. Once that mindset shift takes place, from “have to” to “want to,” change becomes a whole lot easier. ~The Pacific Institute

If you think you’ve gotten yourself onto the wrong path, you are in a good place to make a change. Awareness is the first step on the way to a new path. Please do not give up on yourself. Be careful about listening to anyone who says it is too late to change. They just may have given up on themselves. You don’t have to. If you really want to – if you are willing to alter your beliefs and your behavior – you can do it. It all starts with changing that internal picture of who you “know” you are.


7. Instructor uses humor to make math fun

What did the acorn say when it had grown up?

“Gee-I’m-A-Tree.”

Geometry. Get it?

If you didn’t, you soon will – and learn to enjoy math in the process – when you enroll in one of Pam Morse’s classes at Columbia Gorge Community College.

Morse appreciates the role of humor in approaching difficult subjects, and like it or not, math is a tough subject for a lot of people.

Just ask employers in our region: They can’t find people who know how to use a tape measure.

“It’s true,” Morse said, explaining how she often encounters students who have never used a ruler, or understand how to make a simple graph.

To change that, says Morse, math needs to be fun and have practical relevance. She still remembers Mrs. Finkenseiper, her fourth grade teacher in New Jersey (“Yep, I’m a Jersey girl – loud and obnoxious, crazy in the classroom,” Pam admits), who taught math by using money.

“I’ve had students who didn’t understand the difference between positive and negative numbers, but you start talking money, and they can relate to it,” Morse said. “Math is a hard subject for a lot of people. They’ve had a bad experience in high school, or they’ve been out of it so long they’re terrified. You’ve got to make it fun, and laughable.”

So … what’s a pirate’s favorite variable? “Arrgh.” (That’s “r”, folks, a notation representing a numeric value. Pam can explain it.)

With assistance from CGCC facilities director Jacob Toda, a couple of months ago Pam placed a purple bulletin board at the Hood River – Indian Creek Campus, posting interesting stuff about math (did you know Florence Nightingale, the Victorian-era “Lady with the Lamp” who founded the modern nursing profession, was a statistician?) and upcoming news, such as start of Fall 2019 enrollment for Math 98.

That board also carries a weekly puzzle. Example: A farmer has a chicken, a fox, and a sack of chicken feed, and needs to get all of them across a river without the chicken eating the feed or the fox eating the chicken. The boat can only carry one at a time. How did the farmer do it? Winners receive coffee gift cards and college bookstore items.

Along with such brain-teasers, Pam posts the occupations that require math … and these days, just about every occupation requires some degree of math. The bulletin board only attracted a couple of readers the first week. After nine weeks, upwards of 40 or more people – students, staff, faculty, the public at large – visit the board regularly to see what Pam has posted.

Pam enjoys seeing the light come on when students make a connection and understand the underlying logic of a math solution. “’How did I ever not know this’,” Pam said, quoting the sudden comprehension of many students, including an adult firefighter who sat in the front row, wide-eyed, eagerly recognizing the mathematical underpinnings of work he performed but never fully understood.

“You might not need to understand string theory, but you need some understanding of math to think outside the box,” Pam said. “Students need to know math facts automatically – they reach for their calculators to figure three times four. Calculators are nice, but you need to understand the fundamentals, so when you do use a calculator, it all makes sense, even for quadratic equations.”

In an earlier day, high school home economics and shop classes taught essential, everyday skills. But these have fallen by the wayside. Now, many people don’t know how to change the oil in their cars, balance their checkbooks or boil a two-minute egg.

“I use sixth grade math in one class,” Pam said, demonstrating the basics of graphing and elementary geometry. The important thing is to make it interesting and relevant.

Example: Back in the Middle Ages people created perfect right angles for home construction using a length of rope with nine knots tied at precise intervals, establishing the proportions of a general right triangle (all right triangles have two legs that meet at a 90-degree angle). By holding the ropes taut, people could quickly determine whether the knots aligned properly to create a right angle. Today’s farmers and orchardists still know the principle (for the record, it’s the “Pythagorean Theorem”) because you can place a second, facing triangle against the first … and thus lay out a perfectly-formed orchard or garden plot.

Pam Morse chairs the college’s math department. She looks forward to helping other departments – from nursing and chemistry to electro-mechanical technology and programs in the college’s soon-to-be-constructed skill center – foster student success and college completion. Sometimes the connection with math is apparent for students, sometimes not, but it’s always important.

“I want to see it come alive, to see more math classes,” Pam explained, “So when you do use a calculator … Oh! It makes sense!”


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

“The Opposites Game” by Brendan Constantine

 

How much glyphosate do farmers use?

Grass Valley Medicinals Facebook

Mind Your Language. Medispeak is for what ails you.

Behind Portland’s blockbuster marijuana deal: a Russian billionaire, cannabis consolidation

IS OREGON REALLY “DISINVESTING” IN EDUCATION?

CARBON REGULATION: ANOTHER LEGISLATIVE CIRCUS


 

Sherman County eNews #158

CONTENTS

  1. Grand Central Travel Center-Biggs Junction Temporarily Closed

  2. Wasco School Events Center Rummage Sale, Aug. 31 & Sept. 1

  3. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent at Wasco School Events Center, Oct. 20


1. Grand Central Travel Center-Biggs Junction Temporarily Closed

The water main to our building was damaged and until it can be fully repaired, and we get permission by the State to reopen, Linda’s Restaurant and Subway will remain closed until Thursday June 13th. However, during this closure the Shell Food Mart and gas island will remain open as well as the Pacific Pride card lock.

— CORY BERNARD

TEL: 541.506.5566 x5 FAX: 541.506.6655

http://www.BiggsJunction.com


2. Wasco School Events Center Rummage Sale, Aug. 31 & Sept. 1

The Wasco School Events Center will be holding a rummage sale on Saturday, Aug. 31 and Sunday, Sept. 1 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. each day. We are currently seeking VENDORS who would be interested in renting a table for $10 each. If anyone is interested in participating in this event, please contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC – 541-442-5778 or 541-993-0882. WSEC will have a large selection of book shelves, chalk boards, and other items available for sale. Mark your calendar!


3. An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent at Wasco School Events Center, Oct. 20

Comment: The Wasco School Events Center is excited to announce their fall fundraiser: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent. This event is scheduled for Sunday, October 20, from 2:00 to 5:00 p.m. at the Events Center. More details will be available as the date gets closer.

We are currently looking for local Sherman County artists who would like to participate in this art show by displaying some of their art, and/or donating an item for the silent auction portion of this event. Many local artists have been contacted by mail, but if you were not contacted and would like to participate, we would love to hear from you! Please contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at the WSEC by June 30th. She can be reached at 541-442-5778 or 541-993-0882. Thank you!