Sherman County eNews #207

CONTENTS

  1. Space Weather: Bright Moon + Jupiter Conjunction, Aug. 8-9

  2. Oregon Zoo’s Pacific Lamprey, Our Ancient Neighbor

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court Approved Minutes Online, July 17

  4. Once We Are Grown


1. Space Weather: Bright Moon + Jupiter Conjunction, Aug. 8-9

StarYellowSpace Weather News for Aug. 8, 2019

http://spaceweather.com

https://www.spaceweatheralerts.com

BRIGHT MOON + JUPITER CONJUNCTION: When the sun goes down tonight, step outside and look south. The waxing gibbous Moon is approaching Jupiter for a beautiful conjunction alongside the red giant star Antares. Closest approach is Friday, August 9th. Visit Spaceweather.com for full sky maps and observing tips.


2. Oregon Zoo’s Pacific Lamprey, Our Ancient Neighbor

The Oregon Zoo’s newest residents are also its oldest. Five Pacific lamprey moved into the Cascade Stream building in the Great Northwest area earlier this month, and the ancient fish are making themselves right at home. Older than dinosaurs and even trees, this 400-million-year-old native species is an important part of the history and culture of the Pacific Northwest.  ~Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission


3. Notice. Sherman County Court Approved Minutes Online, July 17

Approved minutes of the July 17, 2019, Sherman County Court Regular Session, are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/

~Kristi Brown

Sherman County Court, Deputy Clerk/Temporary Administrative Assistant


4. Once We Are Grown

How big is your container? You do have one, you know. Did you know that the size of your life is roughly the shape of your “container”? It is your idea of what you think you deserve.

Years ago, a farmer brought an amazing pumpkin to a county fair. It was big and orange, in every aspect a perfect pumpkin. But it was the exact size and shape of a two-gallon jug. After it had won a blue ribbon, someone asked the farmer how in the world he had managed to produce such a wonder. He chuckled a bit and said, “Shucks! Wasn’t anything to it! Soon as the blossom started to grow, I just stuck it inside a cider jar and the pumpkin took care of the rest.” (In countries where shelf space in grocery stores is precious commodity, square watermelons started appearing the next year.)

Just like that pumpkin, the shape of your life is determined by the size and shape of the container in which you hold it. That container is made up of your beliefs about what is possible, your expectations of what will happen, and – most of all – your thoughts about yourself and the world you live in.

Many of your beliefs about what is possible for you were put there by someone else when you were just starting to blossom. What would your life look like if you were able to let yourself grow without the limits of other people’s ideas about you? Children are often forced to shrink to fit the size of their parents’ containers by adults who don’t know any better. The good news is that, unlike our two-gallon pumpkin or square watermelons, once we are “grown” we still have the choice – and the chance – to grow some more and be different.

Take a look at your beliefs – where they came from and how they limit you. Then, make some choices for yourself based on how big you want your mind and spirit to grow. We all have a lot to offer this world, and it would be a waste of precious talents to hold ourselves to the size of a two-gallon jug. ~The Pacific Institute


 

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Sherman County eNews #206

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Go, Stand and Speak

church.family1In Kent and Grass Valley we have been working through the book of Acts. In the early chapters Luke moves back and forth between glimpses inside the new and quickly growing body of believers that we know as the church and snapshots outside where the Spirit is working miraculous things as people are being healed and hearing the whole message of salvation in Christ in response. But as the message spread, the leadership in the temple began to feel threatened, not because of any signs of uprising, but because the apostles were gaining favor in the sight of the people and responding by belief in Christ. The leadership, we read, had become jealous of what was going on inside the walls they oversaw.

In Acts chapter 4 Peter and Paul were apprehended and commanded by the ruling Council not to speak of Jesus anymore. Then they were threatened and released. In Acts 5, after continuing to speak, all of the apostles were then arrested. Once again after having been released from prison in the middle of the night by a messenger of God and being told to “go, stand and speak” the whole message of Life, and the subsequently then rearrested they were threatened, beaten, and then released (lot more to the story – Acts 5:12-42).

It seems that for fear of the people the ruling Council could not take any significant action yet against these followers of Christ, though things would quickly change. For the time being, their tactic was intimidate to eliminate with the hope that by exercising enough resistance and threat they would give in. The interesting thing in studying these early believers is that even when faced with these things and even death, they responded with respect while always being clear about who they were compelled to serve knowing that their trust and hope was in God and His strong hand. We can trust Him still today.

Joe Burgess

Pastor, First Baptist Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

 eNEWS POLICIES:

SPIRITUAL MATTERS. Sherman County eNews reminds … and welcomes the county faith communities’ participation in Spiritual Matters, published on Friday mornings. Your voices are important to our county communities, as are the notices of monthly prayer meetings.

  • 1st Friday: Wasco Church of Christ, Christian & Moro Community Presbyterian
  • 2nd Friday: Grass Valley Baptist & Wasco Catholic
  • 3rd Friday: Baha’i & Kent Baptist
  • 4th Friday: Wasco United Methodist, Rufus Baptist & Grass Valley Catholic
  • 5th Friday [to be determined by the Editor or proposed by a participant] 

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! While we appreciate your news releases, notices, ads, calendar dates and participation in Spiritual Matters, we strongly recommend your subscription to The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond this area.  The Times-Journal is published every Thursday. Deadline is every Monday by 5 PM with the exception of holiday weeks, then it’s the Friday before by 12 noon. Thank you for helping the new publishers meet their press deadline. ~The Editor, Sherman County eNews

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins 

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR SPONSORSHIPS. We are looking for some sponsors to help the Fair Board provide bounce houses for the youth at Sherman County Fair.  The cost of the houses is $125/ hour.  We were hoping to be able to provide free entertainment for youngsters and bring families to the Sherman County Fair to support our 4-H and FFA. Please contact Kristie Coelsch @ 541-980-9883 or email at coelschk@skyride.net to let us know how much you are willing to sponsor.  We will be announcing sponsors throughout fair week! We thank the sponsors who have already donated, and we thank you for your consideration to support the Sherman County Fair. 8/16

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

EMPLOYMENT: 

MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN. City of Wasco is accepting applications for the full-time position of Maintenance Technician. Position requires individual to be responsible for construction, maintenance & repair of the City’s streets, parks, sewer & water systems; operation of equipment and other power tools; able to perform required work as required. Be certified by the State of Oregon as level 1 water distribution & level 1 wastewater collections and treatment operator or be able to obtain certifications within a reasonable time frame. Background & drug test required. Applications and job description can be obtained at City Hall or by calling 541-442-5515. The City of Wasco is an equal opportunity employer.  8/9

SERVICES:

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 8/30

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

 FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY PLACE NAMES, 4th edition, by Sherry Woods Kaseberg, 2019. A collection of names for Sherman County places, streets and roads compiled in honor of storytellers and record keepers – families, teachers, journalists, professors, photographers, cartographers, geologists, archaeologists, geographers, surveyors, historians, genealogists and keepers of the public records. Spiral binding. Bibliography. Rich in local history, it is of interest to the curious, teachers, genealogists and local government personnel. $25 + $4 shipping. Contact Sherry Kaseberg, 69384 Wheatacres Road, Wasco, Oregon 97065 or sherryk@gorge.net. 8/16

HAND-CRAFTED BARREL STAVE FURNITURE. Locally handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | Call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/ 8/30

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

ONLINE CALENDAR. GorgeCurrent Weekly Calendar. http://www.gorgecurrent.com/weekly/index.html

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED:

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

wheat.sheaf.combineAUGUST

7-11 Wheeler County Fair

8-11 Crook County Fair

8-11 Grant County Fair

9 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

12 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 6 Library

12-13 Peak of the Perseid Meteor Showers

13 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

13 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

13 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

13 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

13 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

13 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3:30

14 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

14 Rufus City Council 7 City Hall

15 Northern Oregon Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 NORCOR

16-18 Equine Mania LLC Summer Escape (541) 980-7394

19 Tri-County Mental Health/Center for Living Board Meeting 11

19 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

20 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

20 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

20 Wasco City Council 7

20-25 Sherman County Fair

21 Sherman County Court 9

21 Cattle Sorting Competition at the Sherman County Fair

26 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

26 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

29 Sherman County School Back to School Night 6:30

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon

clock.793SEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

26 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 Hood River

clock.stopwatch.OCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #205

CONTENTS

  1. Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting, Aug. 8

  2. Sherman County School District Board Meeting, Aug. 12

  3. Oregon Raceway Park Ambulance Service Change, Effective Aug. 1

  4. Ruminating on the Positive

  5. Oregon Heritage Grant is Now Open for Applications!

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Every government degenerates when trusted to the rulers of the people alone. The people themselves, therefore, are its only safe depositories.” —Thomas Jefferson (1781)


1. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, Aug. 8 

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors meeting has been changed to August 8th, 2019. General Discussion & Review of the Budget. The public is welcome to attend! 6p.m at the WSEC (903 Barnett St.).


2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board Meeting, Aug. 12

Public Meeting Announcement

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 6:00 p.m. on Monday, August, 12 2019. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library.

[Editor’s Note. We have not mastered keeping the agenda format as received. We apologize!]

AGENDA

August 12, 2019

6:00 p.m. Regular Meeting
  • CALL MEETING TO ORDER
    • Pledge of Allegiance
    • Approve Board Meeting Agenda, August 12, 2019
  • COMMENTS FROM VISITORS

(The Sherman County School District Board of Directors welcomes and encourages public comment and communication regarding District programs and policies. If you wish to speak, please place your name and the specific topic you wish to comment on prior to the meeting on the signup sheet on the counter near the entrance. Because time available is limited, there may be a time limit placed on each person who wishes to speak. The Chair has authority to keep order and to impose any reasonable restrictions necessary to conduct an efficient meeting. The Board reserves the right to delay discussion on any item presented until later in the meeting or at a subsequent meeting. Objective criticism of operations and programs will be heard but not complaints concerning specific personnel. Thank you.)

  • Audience Communications (Testimony related to agenda items.)
  • PRESENTATIONS/RECOGNITION
    • Recognition of Students, Staff and Community Members
  • ADOPTION OF CONSENT AGENDA

(All items adopted by a single motion unless pulled for consideration)

  • Business
    • Approve Regular School Board Meeting Minutes from July 8, 2019
    • Bill Listing, Financial Statement
  • Personnel
    • Approve 2019-20 Contract for Jen Berry, Confidential Employee
    • Approve 2019-20 Contract for Tionie Kock,.5 FTE Confidential Employee
    • Approve 2019-20 Contract for Kim McKinney, Business Manager
    • Approve 2019-20 Contract for Kari Peters,.5 FTE Confidential Employee
    • Approve Contract for Mike Somnis, Principal
    • Approve final hire of Jessie Flynn, .94 Instructional Assistant
    • Approve hire of Mike Somnis, Head Football Coach
    • Approve hire of Steve Bird, Assistant Football Coach
    • Approve hire of Kyle Blagg, Assistant Football Coach
    • Approve hire of Gary Lewis, Middle School Head Football Coach
    • Approve hire of MJ Walker, Middle School Assistant Football Coach
    • Approve hire of Karissa Gorham, Head Volleyball Coach
    • Approve hire of Julie Justesen, Assistant Volleyball Coach
    • Approve hire of Kari Peters, Middle School Volleyball Coach
    • Approve hire of Kristen Stuart, Middle School Assistant Volleyball Coach
  • REPORTS AND PRESENTATIONS
    • Superintendent Report – Wes Owens
    • Sherman County School K-12 Administrator Report – Mike Somnis
    • Athletic Director Report – Mike Somnis
  • UNFINISHED BUSINESS
    • Hall of Honor Induction Ceremony – October 19, 2019
  • NEW BUSINESS
    • 2018-2021 Strategic Plan Review
    • Draft of 2019-20 7-12 Class Master Schedule
    • Supervision and Office Structure
    • Crisis Prevention Institute (CPI)’s Initial Non-Violent Crisis Intervention (NCI) Training Information
    • Board Training Work Session Discussion
  • COMMENTS FROM VISITORS
    • Audience Communications (Testimony related to non-agenda items.)
  • FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS, CLOSING COMMENTS, AND NEXT STEPS
  • NEXT MEETING
    • Next regular board meeting, September 9, 2019
  • ADJOURNMENT

Working Together To Put Student Success First!


3. Oregon Raceway Park Ambulance Service Change, Effective Aug. 1

car.pavementOregon Raceway Park’s local Ambulance Service is no longer available. We have reached out to other ambulance services and at this time this is what we can provide. If you can secure your own ambulance service for your event we would encourage you to do so. We would also appreciate learning of alternative services as we continue our search to find (or perhaps create) a qualified replacement for our previous provider. Any assistance you might be able to provide would be greatly appreciated and potentially beneficial to all users of the track. Thank you for your help and understanding.

PLEASE SELECT THE AMBULANCE SERVICE YOU WOULD LIKE TO USE FOR YOUR EVENT.

{ } Metro West (Can provide 2 ALS Ambulances)

$77.25 per hour plus 6 hour travel time per unit

6 hour day: $927 per unit

8 hour day: $1,081.50 per unit

11 hour day: $1,313.25 per unit

*If the units are released after 5:00pm we will have to get the crews a hotel due to the amount of hours for the shift. If we have to purchase hotel rooms we will provide a receipt to you and pass the cost on directly with no increase.

{ } Mid- Columbia Fire & Rescue (Only 1 ALS Ambulance Available)

$180 per hour plus 2 hour travel time

6 hour day: $1,440

8 hour day: $1,800

11 hour day: $2,340

{ } I will provide my own ambulance service for my event.

We are continuing to work on a better pricing solution, thank you again for your patience and understanding.


4. Ruminating on the Positive

Do you know what it means to “ruminate?” Cows do it all the time. You see, when cows ruminate, they are chewing their cud over and over, in a repetitive process that is necessary to a cow’s well-being. However, if you are a human being, rumination on the negative can hurt instead of help you.

When you ruminate, you are preoccupied with rehashing perceived or real problems, over and over again. You don’t really resolve anything, but you become an expert at working yourself into a state of high stress that can sometimes lead to a downward spiral. After a while, you find yourself worrying not about the original problem, but about all of the images you have created while chewing on the problem – and you may have ranged far afield from the original challenge.

Despite this vicious cycle, the human mind has a built-in potential for flexibility. Something inside whispers, “There must be a better way.” If you pay attention and look for insight, there is a good chance you will find what you need.

Remember, human beings think in pictures. We are drawn to what we are thinking about. So, if we continue to ruminate and worry over the negative, we will be drawn to the negative. The opposite is also true: ruminate on the positive, on the solutions – even if you don’t know what they are yet – and you will be drawn to discovering the solution you are looking for.

The ability to take charge of your thoughts is not something most of us learn in school. However, it is an essential skill if you want to kick the worry habit and accomplish worthwhile goals. You can learn to substitute images of solutions instead of endlessly ruminating about problems, and you can affirm your ability to deal effectively and calmly with all challenges instead of worrying about possible failure.

Does changing your thinking really affect the outcomes and results you get? Absolutely! It has been proven time and time again. Why not try it for yourself and see? ~The Pacific Institute


5. Oregon Heritage Grant is Now Open for Applications!

arrow-rightThe Oregon Heritage Commission is offering grants for qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon’s cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance.

The grant application deadline is October 1, 2019.

Projects may include theatrical performances, collections preservation and access, exhibits, oral history projects, public education events, organizational archives projects, films and more. Previously funded projects included a variety of projects around the state.

“We hope to see projects from a variety of organizations that engage Oregonians in heritage,” states Kuri Gill, heritage grants program coordinator. “We encourage the documentation, preservation and exploration of all aspects of Oregon’s heritage.”

Applications are submitted online. There is plenty of support for preparing them.

“Our goal is to support organizations of all sizes all over the state in their valuable work. We provide assistance in the application process,” notes Gill. Oregon Heritage grants programs staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.

To learn more about the grants, visit http://www.oregonheritage.org&lt;http://www.oregonheritage.org/&gt; or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov<mailto:Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov> or 503-986-0685.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeSherman County Fair on Facebook

Oregon Raceway Park, Grass Valley, Oregon

Breaking Wind Lodge

Oregon Passed a Law to Take Guns From Troubled People. How’s It Working?

Brilliant Maps: Forest Cover Density Across The United States


 

Sherman County eNews #204

CONTENTS

  1. Amber Tilton, Park Ranger, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Honored

  2. Sherman County Fair, Aug. 20-24

  3. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

  4. Presentation: Fairbanks Station on the Great Southern Railroad, Aug. 24


1. Amber Tilton, Park Ranger, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Honored

Amber Tilton, US Army Corps of Engineers Park Ranger, was honored with a national agency award in Washington D.C. last week.  She is the 24th recipient of the Hiram M. Chittenden Award for Interpretive Excellence; an educator’s award for distinguished achievements in her field.  Amber has worked at The Dalles Lock and Dam for the past twelve years.  She provides educational tours of the dam, brings special events to the community like the annual Eagle Watch, and works in local schools doing classroom water safety programs and other fun lessons.

See https://www.facebook.com/PortlandCorps/

Contact: Amber TiltonPark Ranger, The Dalles Lock and DamPortland District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers NWD/POD Water Safety Representative

O: (541) 506-8471  C: (541) 980-7734   www.nwp.usace.army.mil

Amber’s current work schedule is Friday through Monday.

Don’t be a sinker, be a smart thinker – wear your life jacket!

life-jacket


2. Sherman County Fair, Aug. 20-24

horse.cattlesorting

The Sherman County Fair is coming up, August 20-24, 2019. We are sorry that we don’t have fair books out yet! We hope to have them out soon! Our website has the schedule, events and forms needed. Please visit http://www.shermancountyfairfun.com. You can also email shermanctyfair@hotmail.com for more information. Thank you for understanding and we hope to see everyone at the fair! It’s going to be a great time!!  ~Sherman County Fair Board


3. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 7 @ the Rufus Baptist Church

Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.

Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


4. Presentation: Fairbanks Station on the Great Southern Railroad, Aug. 24

The public is invited to hear of “Fairbanks”, a former station along the Great Southern Railroad, at 11:00 a.m., Saturday the 24th, presented by local historians Bill Johnson & Phil Kaser.  This free presentation sponsored by the Wasco County Historical Society will be at the 1850 Moody/Rorick House, 300 W. 13th St., The Dalles.  Lawn chairs are welcome.  Refreshments will be available.


 

Sherman County eNews #203

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration, Oct. 19

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

  3. Napoleon Hill’s Thought for the Day

  4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Summer safety reminders!

Be mindful of slow-moving tractors and trucks,

just over the hill….

maybe just around the corner in Biggs Canyon/Spanish Hollow on Hwy. 97,

or in Scott Canyon between Rufus and Wasco

or on Hwy. 206 in Fulton Canyon!

Cyclists are encouraged to avoid harvest market roads.

Please keep all vehicles on paved roads to prevent field fires.


1. Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration, Oct. 19

The Sherman County School District will be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one team into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Cafeteria that will begin at 5:30 p.m. on October 19, 2019.  There will also be a special presentation and celebration of 151 years of education in Sherman County (From One-Room Schools to One Campus). The Booster Club will be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. Please join us for the $12.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased at the door or you may attend the event for free if not purchasing dinner.

The 2019 inductees include United States Military Academy Graduate and Captain Deron R. Kaseberg, former State FFA President and OSU College of Agricultural Sciences Hall of Fame Member Michael S. Macnab, Teacher and State Champion Coach Ron Townsend, the first female Sherman County Superintendent Grace Zevely (posthumously), and the 1989 1A State Champion Football Team.

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District.

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 7 @ the Rufus Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.~ Red Gibbs


3. Napoleon Hill’s Thought for the Day

You cannot make all people like you, but you can rob them of a sound reason for disliking you. Even the most popular people have their detractors. Because we are all different, with differing interests and personalities, it is simply impossible for anyone to be beloved by every individual who knows him or her. If your mission in life is to make everyone like you, great disappointment is in store. But if you are always kind and considerate in your dealings with others, they may not like you, but it will be impossible for them to dislike you. You can cement your relationships with others by making sure that you are a person of character, one who is predictably honest, straightforward, and ethical. When you follow such a code of conduct, you may not be sought out by others who do not share your value, but you will be respected by all who know you. And in the end, self-respect will mean far more to you than mere popularity. ~The Napoleon Hill Foundation


4. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbMap of World War 2 Shipwrecks

Environmental Health News: It’s time to break our addiction to farm chemicals

Prager U. – Short Videos. Big Ideas.

Prager U. – The Candace Owens Show

The Charlottesville Lie. Did President Trump call neo-Nazis “very fine people”?


 

Sherman County eNews #202

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

  2. New School Year, New Family Member!

  3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  4. The Other Oregon: A Voice for Rural Oregon

  5. Where is the Why?


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Aug. 7

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 7 @ the Rufus Baptist Church.  Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.  ~ Red Gibbs


2. New School Year, New Family Member!

ASSE International Student Exchange Programs, a highly respected, non-profit, public-benefit organization, is seeking local host families for high school boys and girls from France, Germany, Italy, Thailand, China, and the former Soviet Republics. Students are anxiously awaiting word on who their host families will be for the 2019/20 academic school year. Host families provide room, board, and guidance for a teenager(s) living thousands of miles from home. Couples, single parents, and families with or without children in the home are all encouraged to apply.

The exchange students arrive from their home country to begin the 2019/20 school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his/her own personal spending money and expects to bear his/her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests.

ASSE students are enthusiastic and are excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience.

If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com


3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017
The Library is open BREAK Hours
11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday
10am-4pm Saturday.

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 11am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

Library After Hours
Every Wednesday this summer 6pm-8pm
Grades 7-12 (entering)
Movies, Games, Food, Crafts, Music, Hang Out.
If you need a ride, please email Abbey at aphelps@sherman.k12.or.us or call the library at 541-565-3279 and we will try and arrange it.

Summer Movie Night – August 8 at 6pm
Five Feet Apart
Rated: PG-13
Run Time: 1hr 56min


4. The Other Oregon: A Voice for Rural Oregon

Our aim: to create a stronger connection between urban and rural Oregonians.

The Other Oregon is a quarterly magazine and monthly e-newsletter to address, from a rural perspective, the issues, values, culture and lifestyle uniquely important to rural Oregon. Content will focus on key areas, such as health care, economic development, water, workforce, transportation and education, along with impacts from federal and state legislation and the urban-rural interface.

The magazine celebrates rural life by covering rural culture and the people that uniquely define the non-urban side of Oregon. TOO magazine will be distributed free of charge to key decision makers in state and federal government, economic development groups, chamber boards, and other recipients suggested by our steering committee. Subscribe right here…  https://theotheroregon.com/subscribe/.


5. Where is the Why?

question.mark.circleLet’s delve a little deeper into how to change negative behavior in ourselves or another. We have talked before about how well the process works with a child. The good news is it works with adults, too

As parents, we know that nagging our kids to stop doing something doesn’t really work. They either argue back, make like they are paying attention but continue with the action or behavior, or ignore us altogether. Whichever the response, the result is the same: No change. We do the same thing to ourselves, when we “nag” at ourselves to lose weight, quit smoking, whatever. So, how do we go about changing negative behaviors that could be holding us back?

First thing to remember is that, as human beings, we think in pictures. (While you read words on a page, or hear words, your mind is translating them into pictures, immediately.) How we interpret those pictures is reflected in our beliefs, and our beliefs are stored in our subconscious – forever. Ultimately, we act or behave based on those beliefs. So, if we want to change behavior, we need to change the beliefs – and we do that by changing the pictures.

Now, to change a behavior, the current behavior needs to be recognized and called out. Then we need to halt it with, “Stop it. I am (or You are) better than that.” Getting the behavior stopped is only part of the answer, because the current belief/picture that you want to change is still dominant in the subconscious. We need to provide a replacement picture of what we do want.

So, it’s “Stop it. I’m better than that,” and then you provide the replacement picture. “The next time,” and you go on to describe what that next time looks like. “The next time, I will remain calm when somebody cuts me off while I’m driving.” “The next time, I will order salad instead of a hamburger.” “The next time” provides the replacement picture of what you want.

The challenge is you need to really mean it. What is the personal pay value behind the change you say you want? Where is the “why” behind the pictures? “I am a defensive driver, and remain calm during stressful traffic situations, because I want to get home to my family, safe and sound.” You get the picture. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #201

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services: July Activity Report

  2. North Central Public Health District Board Meeting, Aug. 13

  3. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Vintage Quilt

  4. Sherman County 4-H News: The Tiny Teaspoons

  5. Leveraging the ‘Inside’ Position

  6. Greg Walden Talks Robocalls, Border Crisis, Wildfire Prevention

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Emergency Services: July Activity Report

~Submitted by Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

Sherman County Ambulance

July 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
7/04 6:23 AM Psychiatric Issue Rufus
7/11 12:39 PM Fall Injury US 97  MP# 3.25
7/12 11:45 AM Motor Vehicle Crash Hwy 30 & US Hwy 97 in Biggs
7/12 5:44 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover 92740 Hwy 206
7/13 10:47 AM Cardiac Arrest Rufus
7/14 11:53 PM Fall Injury – Back Pain Wasco
7/17 2:47 PM Unresponsive Male Pilot Station in Biggs
7/18 7:51 PM Diabetic Emergency Moro
7/19 9:56 PM Fall Injury Shift Festival in Grass Valley
7/21 11:34 AM Motor Cycle Crash – Fatality US 97  MP#16
7/22 1:44 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 12
7/22 3:47 AM Carbon Monoxide Poisoning I-84  MP# 108
7/24 12:26 PM Chest Pain Biggs Jct.
7/26 8:05 AM Fall Injury Wasco
7/28 6:43 PM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 110
7/29 6:59 PM Fall Injury Grass Valley
7/30 9:27 AM Welfare Check Grass Valley

Moro Fire Department

July 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
7-06 7:56 PM Grass Fire Biggs-Rufus Hwy
7-07 7:26 AM Grass Fire – Mop Up Biggs-Rufus Hwy
7-10 11:26 PM Powerline Arc in Trees Moro
7-12 5:44 PM Motor Vehicle Crash 92740 Hwy 206
7-13 2:31 PM Mutual Aid Fire Arlington Airport
7-19 4:46 PM Tractor/Wheat Fire 75103 Hwy 97
7-21 7:26 PM Search and Rescue for Drowning Deschutes State Park
7-22 5:31 AM Search and Rescue for Drowning Deschutes State Park
7-22 8:49 AM Structure Fire Hemp Facility in Grass Valley
7-23 8:00 PM Lightning Fires Baseline & Tower Road J
7-25 2:36 PM RV & Grass Fire Rufus

 North Sherman County RFPD

July 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
7-06 8:02 PM Fire Biggs-Rufus Hwy MP#10
7-07 2:37 AM Fire Mope Up Biggs-Rufus Hwy MP#10
7-11 12:39 PM Fall Injury – Assist Ambulance Us 97  MP# 3.5
7-12 5:44 PM Motor Vehicle Crash 92740 Hwy 206
7-13 10:47 AM Medical Assist Rufus
7-13 2:31 PM Fire Mutual Aid Arlington Airport
7-19 4:38 PM Tractor/Wheat Fire 75103 Hwy 97
7-19 11:16 PM Semi -Truck Fire Pilot in Biggs
7-21 11:35 AM Motor Cycle Crash – Fatality US 97  MP# 16
7-21 7:26 PM Search & Rescue Drowning Deschutes State Park
7-22 1:44 AM Motor Vehicle Crash I-84  MP# 112
7-22 6:30 AM Search & Rescue Standby Deschutes State Park
7-24 1:00 PM Medical Assist I-84  MP# 109
7-25 2:46 PM RV & Grass Fire Hwy 30 in Rufus
7-26 8:13 AM Medical Assist Wasco
7-28 6:43 PM Motor Vehicle Crash – Rollover I-84  MP# 109

2. Notice. North Central Public Health District Board Meeting, Aug. 13

The North Central Public Health District Board will be meeting Tuesday, August 13, 2019 at 3:00 p.m. at the North Central Public Health District office, located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


3. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Vintage Quilt Blocks

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Moro, OR – The Sherman County local Artist Series is featuring Vintage Quilt Blocks during the month of August at the Sherman County Historical Museum. The Sherman County Historical Museum has a number of unfinished quilts and quilt blocks in their collection that have been donated over the past few years. These vintage quilt blocks are wonderful works of art. Some blocks are hand stitched, some are appliqué quilt blocks, and some blocks have embroidery on them. On display there is also an unfinished quilt top that demonstrates the intense workmanship of a skilled quilt maker. Unfortunately, little is known about who made these quilt blocks. Some of the blocks were donated by the family of Ked & Nina (Belshee) Dejmal and were kept to make a friendship quilt with the blocks all dating 1932 with embroidered names of women of Sherman County. Please stop by and take a look at this history of Sherman County and some art of the past at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro, Oregon.

Please visit the museum to see these treasures from the archives at the museum. There is no charge for this exhibit which is on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of August. The award-winning Museum in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October.

The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information call 541-565-3232 or visit our Facebook page and website: www.shermanmuseum.org


4. Sherman County 4-H News: The Tiny Teaspoons 

4-H clover1The Tiny Teaspoons 4-H Club met on July 20th at 3pm at the Cranston house. Attending were Madison, Claire, Addison and Debbie Bird. Today we made cannoli, which is an Italian pastry filled with a ricotta cheese filling. We talked about prices of ingredients and how much a cannoli would cost if we were to sell them. We also made an easy cannoli dip. Instead of cannoli shells you use crushed waffle cones. We discussed fair and signed off on many food advancements. Our next meeting will be in October where we will make apple cider again. Meeting was adjourned at 5pm. Signed Madison Cranston.


5. Leveraging the ‘Inside’ Position

The relationships we have with family and friends are generally the ones we value the most. They are an important part of life for each of us. However, there is one relationship that seems to be even more important. It governs all the others – and that is the relationship we have with ourselves. In all likelihood, who is the one person you will know your whole life long? The answer: You.

Every day of our lives, we send ourselves thousands of mental messages that determine how we evaluate our own worth. The evaluation we make of our worth is what determines our level of self-esteem. Of course, the messages we receive from our family, friends, co-workers and others affect our self-esteem, too. But they send only a tiny fraction of the number of messages that we send ourselves, so they don’t have the same opportunity to affect us. And isn’t it easy to discount those positive messages coming from others?

Besides, if we are continually sending ourselves negative, devaluing appraisals, we will drown out the other messages, no matter how positive they might be. It is very important that we, ourselves, become the source of these positive messages, or affirmations as they are sometimes called. When we take control of this process, the leverage we gain from our “inside” position makes tremendous personal growth possible.

Unfortunately, many people spend much more time focusing on their faults and mistakes than they do on their strengths and successes. An interesting fact: Scientists have determined that our negative vocabulary is much larger and more richly descriptive than our positive vocabulary. A quick glance at today’s social media feeds is likely to prove that.

Focusing on the negative is a learned behavior, and learned behaviors can be unlearned. A positive focus can be learned just as easily. If you choose to, you can learn it, as well. So, who are you going to count on, to leverage your inside position, on you? (P.S. the answer is, you!) ~The Pacific Institute


6. Greg Walden Talks Robocalls, Border Crisis, Wildfire Prevention

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) recently spoke on KEX’s The Mark Mason Show about his efforts to stop illegal robocalls, his recent trip to the southern border, and wildfire prevention.

Walden started out by speaking with Mark about the need to put an end to annoying robocalls.

“So, here’s a number for you: 47.8 billion,” said Walden. “Here’s another number: in the 541-area code, which of course I care most about in Oregon, 11.5 million calls in June; all illegal robocalls.”

He then explained that the Stopping Bad Robocalls Act, which passed the House in July, would tell phone companies to use their caller authentication ability to authenticate the numbers and block them if they aren’t real. The phone companies would do this at no cost to the consumer while also allowing the consumer to opt out of the service should they choose.

Walden went on to discuss the dangers of illegal robocalls,”We had testimony from a cancer center in Florida that had gotten spoofed, where someone was using their number, and calling patients and doctors. And you can imagine Mark, if you’re in treatment, you’re going to take that call, you’re going to believe it’s the cancer center in Florida. And you’re going to give them whatever they need, your social security number, your credit card number, whatever it is, right? They were interfering with the doctors’ daily routines and they were scamming patients. And so were going after them, were going to shut them down, and this legislation will go a long way toward achieving that.”

When asked about the humanitarian crisis at the border, Walden spoke about his efforts to combat the problem.

“I supported the funding to deal with the humanitarian crisis to provide for medical assistance, food, shelter — especially for these unaccompanied minors and families. We’ve had an enormous surge. In about 8 years in the early 2000s we’d have between 5,000 and 8,000 unaccompanied minors per year across the border. We’re now approaching 60,000 unaccompanied minors this year alone, Mark.”

He went on to discuss his recent trip to the southern border and how he visited one of the newer facilities in Texas that was built to help handle the influx of people.

“Our facilities were never built to handle this kind of influx. We ramped up with temporary facilities, that’s what I visited in Texas. They had 206 kids when I was there. They all had their own bunks, they had a 1 to 12 ratio of staff to kids, they had full medical services, 3 square meals a day, plus access to snacks anytime.”

Walden also spoke about wildfire season and the critical need to take action.

“These fires have become an enormous business, they are enormously expensive to taxpayers, they are deadly to people, and we shouldn’t have the worst air quality short of Beijing, literally, every summer.”

He then discussed what can be done to prevent these fires. First, he highlighted the need for partnership between local fire officials and the Office of Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Forest Service.

Walden went on, “Second, we did pass some legislation in the Farm Bill that’s given our Forest Service and BLM new tools to manage the forests, but third we need to pass the forest resiliency bill (the Resilient Federal Forest Act) which would allow us to go in after the fires, clean up the mess, plant a new forest quicker.”

He continued, “I really believe that it works well in private land, county land, state land, we go in quickly, tribal land, and cut the burned dead trees where appropriate, while they still have value, and then you replant. On federal forest land, it is just not happening. Roadside clear, hazard trees get taken out and then virtually the rest is left standing until it falls and then it burns again in the next fire and destroys the soils even more. So, there is more work, legislatively, I think we need to do, but we are making some progress.”


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

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