Sherman County eNews #99

CONTENT

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS 

church.family1The Potential of the Harvest

At a recent Wednesday morning men’s study in Kent we read through another section of the book “Disciple” by Bill Clem. In it we read of the consequence of the curse of mans’ fall due to sin in Genesis 3:17-19, “Man was told that it will take pain and sweat equity to get earth to yield its harvest, and there will be thorns and thistles. There is no way for us to know how a pre-cursed garden looked or functioned, but it was surely a paradise. It is hard to imagine what fruits or vegetables would taste like in an un-cursed state.”

As a community reliant on farming for livelihood, you know the work that it takes to produce a harvest. Each year the hard work is done of preparing the ground, removing the rocks, seeding and spraying for those things that will hinder the wheat, feeding and caring for that wheat as it grows hoping for adequate water, proper temperatures, and freedom from things that threaten its outcome such as fires, infestations and equipment failures. Even with all of this, there is still no certainty that the crop once harvested will be well received in the market.

Just what is your real potential though? I’ve been told that if we were to get a June “Million Dollar Rain” that the wheat might even produce a couple of extra kernels per head implying that even what we see as good does not approach what might be perfect. Just what does perfection look like? This is a question we can’t answer because we live in a sin cursed world that the Creator of the world has also chosen to mercifully and graciously intervene in such that even in the trials, we might live with hope.

Next Friday we’ll wrap up this particular thought, so stay tuned. Be thankful for the rain, enjoy the green, pray for the sun, and look for the hope.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, First Baptist Grass Valley

church.family1It is seemly that the servant should, after each prayer, supplicate God to bestow mercy and forgiveness upon his parents.  Thereupon God’s call will be raised: “Thousand upon thousand of what thou hast asked for thy parents shall be thy recompense!”  Blessed is he who remembereth his parents when communing with God.  There is, verily, no God but Him, the Mighty, the Well-Beloved. From The Bab, Selections from the Writings of the Bab, p. 94  ~Erling Jacobsen


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

 eNEWS POLICIES:

 CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.

Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

COMMUNITY DINNER & BINGO. The Wasco School Events Center will be having a Community Dinner & Bingo on Monday, April 22, 2019 at the Events Center. Doors will open at 5:30 and cost for the dinner is $5 per person or family of 5 or more is $20. Dinner will be followed by a few rounds of BINGO with cards available for $1.00 each. On the menu is French Dip Sandwiches, salad, tater tots and dessert. Proceeds will help fund the ongoing renovations of the building. Hope to see you there

EASTER BAKE SALE. The Sherman County Senior & Community Center is holding an Easter Bake Sale on Friday, April 19th from 11am-12pm. We hope to see you all on April 19th for some yummy homemade treats! If anyone in the community is interested in donating some baked goods please let us know: 541-565-3191, kari@shermancounty.net

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

SHERMAN COUNTY PUBLIC/SCHOOL LIBRARY BOARD POSITION. Sherman County Public/School Library has a Board position open for a community representative. The mission of SCP/SL is to provide access to informational materials, technologies, and programs for all residents of the community, birth through senior citizens. Meetings are bi-monthly. Anyone interested in serving on the Library Board may pick up an application at the library, e-mail shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us, or call 541-565-3279.   4/12

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

EMPLOYMENT: 

CITY CLERK/RECORDER. The City of Wasco has an opening for the position of City Clerk/Recorder. Applications and complete job description may be picked up at Wasco City Hall between the hours of 9:00am and noon M-TH. Deadline to submit a completed application is noon on 4/23/19 at Wasco City Hall located at 1017 Clark St. in Wasco OR. For further info. call 541-442-5515.  4/19

CUSTODIAN. Notice of Job Posting: School Custodian. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified part-time Custodial candidate to work at Sherman County School in Moro starting April 29 or before. Benefit package included. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug test required. For information and application materials please email Wes Owens @ wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.

Duties: The school custodian is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance and other miscellaneous duties in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe and sanitary manner.

Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application and resume by April 18, 2019 to: Wes Owens, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039 | (541) 565-3500 wowens@sherman.k12.or.us | Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer. 4/12

ASSISTANT CHILD CARE PROVIDER: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com.  Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. 4/12 

WATERSHED PROGRAM ASSISTANT. Applications are now being accepted for a full time Watershed Program Assistant at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits included, pay DOE. Duties include assisting the execution of day to day management, outreach, education, and administrative tasks for the Sherman County SWCD and Watershed Council. The Program Assistant will provide support for the SWCD and Watershed Council meetings, grant submittals and tracking, project implementation and NRCS Farm Bill support. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net. For more information, call (541) 565-3216 ext. 109. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at http://www.shermancountyswcd.com. The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. 4/12

HELP GILLIAM AND SHERMAN COUNTY STUDENTS SUCCEED. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.30 an hour, Paid training, Flexible schedule, Dental, Vision, Medical Plan, 401 K … And more! Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check, Have a good driving record, Have a valid Oregon driver’s license, Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training. Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: ~Amberlena Shaffer, RecruiterOFFICE: (541) 567-0551CELL: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com www.MidCoBus.com   4/26

SERVICES:

HEALTHY DESSERT CLASS. The Area Agency on Aging is hosting a free Healthy Dessert class on April 24th at 3pm at the Sherman County Senior Center. The recipes will be diabetic-friendly and you will get to learn how to make the recipes and sample the treats afterward. Come and learn to prepare healthy foods with your local Area Agency on Aging Team! Please RSVP to Kari Silcox 541-565-3191 kari@shermancounty.net. 4/19

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 5/17

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR SALE:

HANDCRAFTED INDOOR & OUTDOOR FURNITURE. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 5/17
SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

 SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

HAMILTON PIANO. Free to a good home. Beautiful dark wood Hamilton upright piano available free to a good home. High quality, good working order, tunable. Long bench included. Located at the Parish Hall in Wasco. Please call Molly (541)565-3315 to schedule a viewing.  4/19 

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED: 

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

HOST FAMILY. Host a Foreign Exchange Student. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Asia. These personable and academically select exchange students speak English, are bright, curious, and eager to learn about this country through living as part of a family for an academic year and attending high school. Your support of these students reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world. ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Mongolia, and South Korea. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills.  The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. At the same time the student will be teaching their newly adopted host family about their own culture and language.   If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com  4/26


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

raindropAPRIL

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1 Boardman

13 Beginning Genealogy Class 10:30 Discovery Center

13 Grass Valley’s Annual Egg Hunt, Reptile Zone & Skate Party 10 Pavilion

13 Author Kathy McCullough, Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum 2 Hood River

13 Celebrate National Poetry Month with Poets 5 Klindt’s Booksellers

14 Bill Hulse: Celebration of Life 1 Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

14 Wasco County Historical Society Benefit 40-mile long Poker Run 541-980-0918

14 Ham Bingo 12 noon Goldendale American Legion Post

14 PALM SUNDAY

15 Community Dinner & Bingo 5:30 Wasco School Events Center

16 Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators 12 Clock Tower Ales in The Dalles

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board of Directors Meeting 1:30 Gilliam County

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7

17 Sherman County Court 9

17 Biggs Service District Public Hearing 8:30 Sherman County Courthouse

17 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

18 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Committee 9 NORCOR

18 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR

18 Sherman County Book Club 6 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Easter Bake Sale 11-12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center

19 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

19 GOOD FRIDAY

21 EASTER SUNDAY

21 Easter Brunch Buffet 11 Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

22 Sherman County Photography Club 6 Steve Burnet/OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

22 Wasco Community Dinner & Bingo 5:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

24 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County Courthouse

26 N. Central Livestock Assoc. Bull Tour to Gilliam County starts 9 Wasco School

27 Learn to Crochet 2 Sherman County Public/School Library

27-28 Oregon Ag Fest, Salem

28 Open House and Preview Party at the Sherman County Historical Museum 1-4

flowers.MayMAY

1 Sherman County Court 9

1 Gilliam County Museum Complex Opens for the Season

1 Sherman County Historical Museum Opens for the Season 10-5 Daily

1 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Exec. Board 4 The Dalles

2 North Central Education Service District Board 5 Condon

2 NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

2 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY

2 Sherman County Fair Board 7

2 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3-5 Gorge Artists Open Studios Tour

4 County-wide Clean-up Day

4 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

4 Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting – Fort Dalles Readiness Center

4-5 72nd Annual Arlington Jackpot Rodeo 12:30 Arlington, Oregon

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 North Central Public Health District Budget Committee 1:30-4:30 Burnet Building

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

10-12 Equine Mania LLC Cows & More Clinic w/Mary Jane Brown (541) 980-7394

11 Spring Plant Fair 9 The Dalles City Park

12 MOTHERS’ DAY

14 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 TBA

14 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 TBA

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

14 Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting 6 Library

15-17 National Association of Counties, Western Interstate Region, Spokane

17 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

18 ARMED FORCES DAY

21 Sherman County SPECIAL DISTRICT ELECTION DAY

21 Wasco City Council 7

24 Sherman County Budget Hearing – Courthouse

27 MEMORIAL DAY 

sun.circleJUNE

1 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

1-2 Equine Mania LLC Wheatacres Ranch Trail & Cattle Challenge (541) 980-7394

3 Grass Valley City Council 7

4 Wasco City Council 7

5 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Veterans’ Benefit Fair & Support Services, Earl Snell Park, Arlington

6 D-DAY

11 Pendleton Experiment Station Field Day

12 Moro Experiment Station Field Day

12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

12 Rufus City Council 7

14 FLAG DAY

14 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

16 FATHERS’ DAY


 

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Sherman County eNews #98

CONTENTS

  1. Proclamation: Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 7–13, 2019

  2. Think Differently, Feel Differently

  3. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  4. Do You Understand the Electoral College?

  5. Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum 2nd Saturday, April 13

  6. Walden Calls for Free & Open Internet without Federal Government Takeover

  7. Join NCPHD for Operation OX – A Statewide MCM Exercise, May 1


“We’ve been conditioned to think that only politicians can solve our problems. But at some point, maybe we will wake up and recognize that it was politicians who created our problems.” ~Ben Carson


1. Proclamation: Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 7–13, 2019 

ShermanCoLogoWhereas,     in 1982, the President’s Task Force on Victims of Crime envisioned a national commitment to a more equitable and supportive response to victims;

Whereas,     this commemorative week celebrates the energy, perseverance and commitment that launched the victims’ rights movement, inspired its progress, and continues to advance the cause of justice for crime victims;

Whereas,     crime can leave a lasting impact on any person, regardless of age, national origin, race, creed, religion, gender, sexual orientation, immigration, or economic status;

Whereas,     incorporating communities’ existing experts and trusted sources of support into efforts to fully serve survivors will develop a criminal justice system response that is truly accessible and appropriate for all victims of crime;

Whereas,     with the unwavering support of their communities and victim service providers behind them, survivors will be empowered to face their grief, loss, fear, anger, and hope without fear of judgment, and will feel understood, heard, and respected;

Whereas,     serving victims and rebuilding their trust restores hope to victims and survivors, as well as supports thriving communities;

Whereas,     engaging a broader array of healthcare providers, community leaders, faith organizations, educators and businesses can provide new links between victims and services that improve their safety, healing, and access to justice;

Whereas,     honoring the rights of victims, including the rights to be heard and to be treated with fairness, dignity, and respect, and working to meet their needs rebuilds their trust in the criminal justice and social service systems;

Whereas,     National Crime Victims’ Rights Week provides an opportunity to recommit to ensuring that all victims of crime – especially those who are challenging to reach or serve – are offered culturally and linguistically accessible and appropriate services in the aftermath of crime; and

Whereas,     Sherman County Victim Assistance Program is hereby dedicated to strengthening victims and survivors in the aftermath of crime, building resilience in our communities and our victim responders, and working for a better future for all victims and survivors.

Now, therefore, I, Joe Dabulskis, as Sherman County Judge, do hereby proclaim the week of April 7-13, 2019, as Sherman County Crime Victims’ Rights Week.

And reaffirm Sherman County’s commitment to creating a victim service and criminal justice response that assists all victims of crime during Crime Victims’ Rights Week and throughout the year; and to express our sincere gratitude and appreciation for those community members, victim service providers, and criminal justice professionals who are committed to improving our response to all victims of crime so that they may find relevant assistance, support, justice, and peace.

Joe Dabulskis, Sherman County Judge    2019


2. Think Differently, Feel Differently

Why is it that so many people don’t know what to do with negative feelings? Today, let’s look at some research, collected at Rutgers University some time ago and is still relevant today, that may help explain the challenge.

In a study done with 10-week-old infants and their mothers, results indicated several things. First, our emotions are among the earliest signs of our awareness of patterns of meaning. Second, we naturally self-organize to seek out and become interested in positive feelings. Finally, negative feelings trigger negative responses.

Awareness of negative feelings, and perhaps even more importantly, the ability to channel them appropriately, is not something we are born with. It’s something we must learn. We don’t usually learn it from our parents though, because they didn’t learn it from their parents. We don’t learn it in school either. So what can we do?

Well, we can just go on denying our negative feelings, expressing them in ways that do damage to ourselves and to others. Dwelling on them just causes a downward spiral into depression where helpful information has a hard time getting through. On the other hand, we can seek out education that will teach us how to control what we think, and as a result, get a handle on what we feel.

It is our thoughts (psychological) that trigger feelings (expressed biologically), and there is much you can do to learn to think differently. The first step, on the road to changing the way we think, is to want to change. Once we have made that positive decision, we will see opportunity for the education we need all around us – perhaps as close as a click of a mouse. ~The Pacific Institute


3. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeNational Popular Vote Bill Passes Oregon Senate After Decade-Long Effort

Only in America: 2020 Census Controversy on Citizenship Question

What Happens to a Country When All its Young People Leave?

DNA Test Kits Compared

Oregon Legislature: The bills on the farmers alert list

The Latest Stats Reveal The Border Crisis Is Getting Worse


4. Do You Understand the Electoral College?

Do you understand what the Electoral College is? Or how it works? Or why America uses it to elect its presidents instead of just using a straight popular vote? Author, lawyer and Electoral College expert Tara Ross does, and she explains that to understand the Electoral College is to understand American democracy.


5. Western Antique Aeroplane & Automobile Museum 2nd Saturday, April 13

April 13 – Second Saturday – Highways & Skyways – Moving Freight from Place to Place

Author Talk with Kathy McCullough at 2pm

Join WAAAM as we host local author and pilot Kathy McCullough for a talk at 2PM on Second Saturday.

Kathy McCullough will talk about what it takes to fly cargo airplanes and other behind-the-scenes stories about moving freight from place to place at the dawn of an era when “two-day delivery” is the new normal. McCullough learned to fly at 16 and after building hours as a flight instructor at Troutdale and flying for the US Forest Service, she became the 4th woman pilot hired by Northwest Orient Airlines in 1981 flying airplanes like the Boeing 727, McDonnell Douglas DC10, and the Boeing 747. She piloted trans-pacific carriers for most of her career before retiring as a 747 captain flying freight out of Anchorage, Alaska in 2007.

Second Saturday April 13th is our action day featuring the workhorses of the highways and skyways. From trucks and salesman cars to mail airplanes, passenger airplanes, and more – all of the action happens between 10AM and 2PM.


6. Rep. Walden Calls for Free & Open Internet without Federal Government Takeover

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) is continuing to call for net neutrality solutions that preserve a free and open internet for consumers without allowing a federal government takeover of the internet, as Congressional Democrats are proposing. Speaking in opposition to a Democrat plan to give the federal government near unlimited authority to regulate, tax, and control the internet, Walden said that the bill was a missed opportunity to bring real, bipartisan net neutrality protections to consumers.

“Republicans and Democrats agree more than they disagree on the key net neutrality parameters that protect a free and open internet for consumers. The net neutrality ‘bright line’ rules Republicans support are simple and relatively easy to understand. No blocking. No throttling. No paid prioritization. Period,” said Walden. “Unfortunately, for the last few years Democrats have caved into the misguided idea that only putting unelected bureaucrats in charge of every facet of the internet is the answer.  And they know what all Americans know, the bill before us today is opposed by the President and will not become law.”

Walden today voted against a Democrat bill that would regulate the internet under Title II of the Communications Act, which was originally used to govern monopoly telephone companies in the 1930s. The legislation Walden voted against reinstates the outdated restrictions over the internet that were first implemented by the Obama Federal Communications Commission (FCC) in 2015. In an op-ed published last week, Walden outlined his concerns about the impact of Title II on small internet service providers (ISPs) and their ability to expand broadband into rural communities.

“In a rural district like mine in eastern Oregon, Title II inhibited the ability of small ISPs to expand broadband to underserved communities, saddling these small businesses with onerous reporting requirements that shifted their focus from their customers to new, expensive regulatory interference,” Walden said in the op-ed.

In February, Walden invited Joe Franell, Chief Executive Officer of Eastern Oregon Telecom based in Hermiston, Oregon, to testify before the Energy and Commerce Committee about how Title II regulations affected his business and his customers. “The application of Title II as part of net neutrality had a dramatic chilling effect on rural telecommunication in the Pacific Northwest,” Franell said in his testimony.

Walden has introduced legislation that codifies into law permanent prohibitions on blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization for internet traffic, and requires that ISPs be transparent in their network management practices and prices. Walden’s legislation reaffirms longstanding, bipartisan agreements on net neutrality protections, without imposing Title II regulations over the internet.

Walden said that putting unelected bureaucrats in control of the internet through Title II regulations is not necessary to protect consumers online.

“The fact is, we can permanently address blocking, throttling, and paid prioritization in a bipartisan way because we all believe in an open and free internet. We believe in net neutrality. But, net neutrality is not Title II, near limitless government management of the internet,” said Walden. “Net neutrality does not need the harmful, heavy-handed approach of Title II. Net neutrality does not require a government takeover of the internet.”


7. Join NCPHD for Operation OX – A Statewide MCM Exercise, May 1

North Central Public Health District (NCPHD) is participating in Oregon Health Authority’s Statewide Medical Countermeasures (MCM) exercise, Operation OX 2019.

As part of our participation, we will be exercising an open Point of Dispensing (POD) on May 1, 2019, at Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, and we invite you to join us between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. for a drive-through POD simulation.

Exercising our ability to dispense medical countermeasures, through this exercise, will help NCPHD improve our plan to provide medications or vaccinations, when needed.

Medical Countermeasures are the medications (including vaccines, antiviral drugs, or antibiotics) needed to treat, protect or prophylax an identified population in accordance with public health guidelines and/or recommendations.

PODs are locations organized by the local public health department, where medication/vaccination will be given to people to prevent disease in response to a public health threat. For example, you may remember being invited to a POD for H1N1 vaccine in 2009, or Pertussis vaccine in 2015. 

No medication/vaccination will be given at the exercise; instead the first 75 participants will receive a FREE mini first-aid kit!  

Date/Time: Wednesday, May 1, 2019, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue (MCF&R) 1400 W 8th Street

Directions: Coming from Cherry Heights Road, turn onto W 8th Street, heading West toward MCF&R. Participants will be directed by onsite officials through the drive-through POD exercise. The first 75 participants will receive a mini free first-aid kit!

We encourage everyone to participate in an effort to help community members understand and prepare for public health emergencies.

(For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at http://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.)


 

Sherman County eNews #97

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Victims’ Rights Week, April 7-13

  2. City of Moro Meeting Rescheduled, April 11

  3. Date change on Wasco Community Dinner & Bingo, April 22

  4. Open House and Preview Party at the Sherman County Historical Museum, April 28

  5. Sherman County School Athletic Schedule Update: Baseball, May 10

  6. Seasonal Trail Closures in place to Protect Golden Eagle Nesting

  7. Contagion: Laughter

  8. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Victims’ Rights Week, April 7-13

When victims feel understood and supported, they are more likely to seek services, which leads to a stronger and more resilient community. Building trust and open communication between communities and the victim services professionals who serve them is the first step in working together and creating hope for the future of crime victims’ rights. Communities’ investment in crime victims expands opportunities for victims to disclose their victimization, connect with services, and receive the support they need. To create a future where all victims are served and their voices heard, we must continue making victims services more accessible, welcoming, and culturally sensitive. Looking for information on victim services? Download the Help Series brochures at www.ovc.gov/pubs/helpseries. Do you know what victims’ rights exist in Oregon? Visit https://victimlaw.org to research state, federal, or tribal law.


2. Notice. City of Moro Meeting Rescheduled, April 11

Notice is Hereby Given. Due to scheduling conflicts for Mayor Thurston, the previously scheduled Moro City Council Meeting for Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at 07:00 pm, has been CANCELLED. The meeting has been RESCHEDULED to: Thursday, April 11th at 07:00 PM at City Hall located at 104 1st Street in Moro, Oregon 97039.


3. Date change on Wasco Community Dinner & Bingo, April 22

The Community Dinner and Bingo at the Wasco School Events Center has been changed to Monday, April 22, 2019, NOT the 15th. Same time, same menu. Thanks!


4. Open House and Preview Party at the Sherman County Historical Museum, April 28

Moro, OR – “Hats, Handkerchiefs and Handbags of Sherman County” is the new exhibit at the Sherman County Historical Museum. We are so excited about our new exhibit we will be having a preview event on Sunday, April 28th from 1 pm to 4 pm at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro, Oregon. We will be serving refreshments while you enjoy touring the museum and seeing what is new for 2019! Also on display at the museum is the creative work of the Sherman Elementary Students that are the local featured artists for the month of May. This is a free family event and everyone is invited to attend.

The official opening day of the 2019 season is May 1st and the museum will then be open every day from 10 am to 5 pm May 1st to October 31st.  The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information call 541-565-3232 or visit our Facebook page and website: www.shermanmuseum.org


5. Sherman County School Athletic Schedule Update: Baseball, May 10

sport.baseball1Sherman’s baseball doubleheader at Weston-McEwen has been moved from Saturday, May 11 to Friday, May 10, starting at 2pm.

— Mike Somnis, Sherman County School District K-12 Principal & Athletic Director


6. Seasonal Trail Closures in place to Protect Golden Eagle Nesting

bird.eagle If you have visited Cottonwood Canyon State Park for a hike recently, you may have noticed some of the trail closures we have in place. There are currently two sections of trail closed to give our local golden eagle nests a wide berth during nesting season.

Golden Eagles generally lay their eggs around March and are incubated for 5 to 6 weeks before hatching. After hatching it can be another 10 weeks before the golden eagle chicks fledge (start flying).

We have agreed with the BLM to close the Pinnacles trail at the 3 mile point, and the Hardstone trail at approximately the 2 mile point in attempts to keep the disturbance levels to a minimum for the known nests in the area. These closures will be in place seasonally February 1st until August 31. This is our way of giving any chicks the best chance of survival.

We want to remind everybody that Golden Eagles fall under the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act which is a federal law that prohibits possession, sale, purchase, transport, export or import, of any bald or golden eagle, alive or dead, including any part, nest, or egg. This also includes to pursue, shoot, shoot at, poison, wound, kill, capture, trap, collect, molest or disturb any bald or golden eagle or nest. See this link for details https://www.fws.gov/midwest/eagle/protect/laws.html.

For some more reading on golden eagles, visit Oregonzoo.org. As always, for more information feel free to contact the park by phone at 541-394-0002 or by email at asa.miller@oregon.gov.


7. Contagion: Laughter

How well developed is your sense of humor? Today, let’s talk about nearly everyone’s favorite subject: the importance of laughter and its place in our lives.

President John F. Kennedy once said, “There are three things that are real – God, human folly, and laughter. The first two are beyond comprehension. So we must do what we can with the third.” When we hear laughter, we tend to join in, because laughter is contagious.

These days, we know that humor is a vital sign of life that affects us both physiologically and psychologically. Genuine laughter signals emotional flexibility and is a common reaction to the unexpected, the unpredictable. Some folks claim that one good belly-laugh – that full-out, no-holds-barred, tears streaming down your face laugh – can give you up to 90 days of protection against illness. If that’s true, imagine what a full-on giggle-a-day could do!

Humor and creativity have much in common and, for many people, laughter has given them a new lease on life. As Norman Cousins pointed out, it “interrupts the panic cycle of an illness,” and people who use humor to help them cope can more easily let go of anger, fear, anxiety, hostility, and a host of other negative feelings that hinder healing. Reader’s Digest didn’t name its column “Laughter is the Best Medicine” for no reason.

Laughter is the other side of darkness – a light in the personal wilderness of pain and confusion, frustration and despair. Although we are born with the ability to smile and laugh, a sense of humor must be cultivated, but it’s well worth the time.

The ability to make others laugh is an invaluable quality. However, the ability to make ourselves laugh is even more precious. You become your own built-in, late night comedian! So, develop a ticklish funny-bone, and you’ll be growing in more ways than you might think! ~The Pacific Institute


8. Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries

OCHC maintains a list of all historic cemeteries in the state. A cemetery must include the burial of at least one person who died before Feb. 14, 1909 to qualify as historic. The seven-member appointed commission helps people and organizations document, preserve and promote designated historic cemeteries statewide.

For more information about the grant program or the OCHC, visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.gill@oregon.gov or 503-986-0685.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyEditorial: Rural vs. urban divide splits Legislature

Editorial: Protect those who request public records from lawsuits

K-12: What Happened to Bill Gates and Common Core?

Perspective: Hip-Hop: The Cancer of American Culture

The Stigma of Choosing Trade School Over College

Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley Demand Answers From Juul Labs, the Largest Manufacturer of E-Cigarettes


 

Sherman County eNews #96

CONTENTS

  1. Celebrate the Life of Bill Hulse, April 14

  2. Historical Poker Run to Benefit Wasco County Historical Society, April 14

  3. Ham Bingo, April 14

  4. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, April 16

  5. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, April 17

  6. An Open Mind

  7. Notice. Columbia Gorge Community College Budget Committee Meeting, April 18


1. Celebrate the Life of Bill Hulse, April 14

flower.rose.starColumbia Gorge Discovery Center invites the community to celebrate the life and numerous accomplishments of Bill Hulse.  Bill’s political and professional acumen made so many important things possible in Wasco County and beyond. His kind heart touched the lives of many. Our organization would not be what it is today without his wise and steady guiding hand. Join us Sunday, April 14th at 2:30 for dessert and fond remembrances of this great man.


2. Historical Poker Run to Benefit Wasco County Historical Society, April 14

wheel.rimOn Sunday, April 14, 2019 The Wasco County Historical Society is sponsoring “A Historical Poker Run.”  We are combining a fun vehicle trip with a tour of historical sites in and around Old Columbia River Highway/Rowena and points west.  The tour starts at the Discovery Center & Museum with registration from 10:00-1:00 p.m.  All motorized vehicles are welcome.  Participants will be given a route itinerary taking them to check points and specific historical spots along the way.  Of special interest will be the town of Mosier, with its many historical sites and a chance to visit the Cherry Blossom Smorgasbord at the Mosier Grange (if you so choose).  Tour will end at Casa el Mirador.  Prizes will be awarded at 4:00 p.m.  Additional details from John Brookhouse, 541-980-0918.


3. Ham Bingo, April 14

Ham Bingo

Brought to you by Goldendale American Legion Louis Leidl Post 116

Sunday, April 14th Noon until ???

25 cents per card per game

All winners get a FREE HAM.


4, Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board Meeting, April 16

BOARD MEETING NOTICE

April 16, 2019 – 1:30 p.m.

Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

1 –     Approve March 14, 2019 Minutes

2 –     Presentation of 2019-2020 Budget – Budget Committee

3 –     Frontier TeleNet Update – Lynn Morley

4 –     Termination of Burns/Paiute Tribe Agreement – Renee Heidy

5 –     Review Proposals for General Counsel – Elizabeth Farrar

6 –     Appointment of Reorganizational Committee Members – Gary Bettencourt

  • If necessary, Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660 (1)

(e) Property

(h) Legal Rights

(i) Personnel

  • As this is a regular meeting of the Frontier Regional 911 Board, other matters may be addressed as deemed appropriate by the Board.

Agenda Distributed April 8, 2019

Frontier Regional Board Members:

Chair – Sheriff Gary Bettencourt – sheriff@co.gilliam.or.us

Judge Elizabeth Farrar – elizabeth.farrar@co.gilliam.or.us

Sheriff Jim Adkins – jim.adkins@co.jefferson.or.us

Commissioner Mae Huston – mae.huston@co.jefferson.or.us

Sheriff Brad Lohrey – bradlohrey@yahoo.com

Judge Joe Dabulskis – jdabulskis@co.sherman.or.us

Sheriff Mike Smith – mike.smith@co.wheeler.or.us

Judge Lynn Morley – lmorley@co.wheeler.or.us


5. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, April 17 

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, April 17, 2019, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.

During the April 17 Court session, the Sherman County Court will hold a public hearing at 11:00 a.m. regarding the SHIFT Festival Mass Gathering Application.

Agenda topics include reports by the County Clerk Jenine McDermid, Sherman County School Superintendent Wes Owens, Sherman County Public/School Library director Marylou Martin & Sherman County Historical Museum Director Patti Fields; 10 a.m. Public Hearing: SHIFT Festival Mass Gathering Application; OYCC Storage Shed Replacement; Sherman County Investment Policy; Regional Infrastructure Fund Grant Agreement & Resolution for the Sherman County Cities Broadband Initiative; Consent Agenda.

The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


6. An Open Mind

Do you have an open mind? Most people think they do, but how can you really tell? Let’s talk about open versus closed minds.

Open minds are like a good sense of humor – everybody thinks they have one, but the truth may be another story. And what does it mean to have an open mind, anyway? Well, here’s one description: An open mind is one that knows the difference between fact and opinion and doesn’t get them mixed up. It searches for the truth as best it can, and even when it feels reasonably certain of what’s true, remains open to rational argument.

Open minds tend to be creative, because they seek out options and use them in innovative ways. The open mind is able to flow with the ambiguities and paradoxes of life. Instead of fighting these things, the open mind acknowledges and honors them and moves forward into awareness and constructive use of them.

The closed mind, on the other hand, learns helplessness when it assumes a powerless stance. Even when it is closed in absolute certainty, it gives away its power. Thinking it is exhibiting strength, the closed mind actually becomes rigid and develops blind spots, or scotomas, to new information that may contradict what it thinks it knows.

Open minds may choose to take a position based on personal values and current information, but they are willing to reconsider if it makes sense to do so. Finally, open minds are happier, healthier and much more fun to be around. They tend to think of life as an adventure, and find the possible in every day. Challenges become opportunities to learn and grown.

So let’s ask the question again: Do you have an open mind? How do you know? ~The Pacific Institute


7. Notice. Columbia Gorge Community College Budget Committee Meeting, April 18

A public meeting of the Budget Committee of Columbia Gorge Community College, Hood River and Wasco Counties, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for fiscal year July 1, 2019 to June 30 2020 will be held in the Board Room 1.162, Building One, 400 East Scenic Drive, The Dalles. The meeting will take place on April 18, 2019, at 6:00 pm.  A second meeting will be held if needed on the Hood River Campus in Rm 310, 1730 College Way, Hood River.  This second meeting will take place April 23, 2019, at 6:00 pm.  A third public budget committee meeting if needed will be held on The Dalles Campus in the Board Room 1.162, Building One, 400 East Scenic Drive, The Dalles on Wednesday, April 24. The purpose of these meetings is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget.  A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 11, 2018 at the Business Office or online at cgcc.edu/budget.  This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place.  Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.


 

Sherman County eNews #95

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Emergency Services March Activity Report

  2. Capital Chatter: Bev Clarno takes oath of office

  3. Sherman County Victims’ Rights Week, April 7-13

  4. Teaching Children to Risk

  5. Sherman County Court News, March 20th

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Emergency Services March Activity Report

By Shawn Payne, Sherman County Emergency Services

Sherman County Ambulance

March 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
3/06 1:30 PM Fall Injury Moro
3/06 7:15 PM Unresponsive Male Wasco
3/09 9:10 AM House Fire – Standby Wasco
3/10 1:59 PM Chest Pain North Sherman Fire Station in Wasco
3/10 10:46 PM House Fire Standby Wasco
3/23 12:45 PM Vehicle Fire Standby I-84  MP# 101
3/26 12:11 AM OSP  Assist-Opiate Withdrawals I-84  MP# 105
3/27 6:29 PM Unknown Illness Wasco
3/28 6:41 PM Bleeding Leg Wasco

Moro Fire Department

March 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
3-09 9:10 AM House Fire Armsworthy in Wasco
3-10 10:46 PM Travel Trailer Fire Holiday RV Park in Wasco
3-19 2:19 PM Hay Truck Fire Welk Road

 

North Sherman County RFPD

March 2019 Activity Report

Date Time Incident Location
       
3-06 7:15 PM Medical Assist Wasco
3-09 9:10 AM House Fire Church & Armsworthy in Wasco
3-10 1:59 PM Medical Assist North Sherman Fire Station
3-10 10:46 PM Travel Trailer Fire Holliday RV park in Wasco
3-19 2:15 PM Hay Truck on Fire Welk Rd
3-23 12:45 PM Semi-Truck Fire I-84  MP# 101
3-28 6:49 PM Medical Assist Wasco

2. Capital Chatter: Bev Clarno takes oath of office

Oregon.Flat.poleIt was a personal and political family reunion when new Oregon Secretary of State Bev Clarno took the ceremonial oath of office on Wednesday.

Clarno’s extended family filled two rows of chairs and lined one side of the Governor’s Ceremonial Office in the State Capitol. Add in the politicians and journalists, and — based on the heat generated from the number of bodies in close proximity — I’m sure we exceeded the room’s occupancy limit for fire safety.

As one bystander remarked, the event was quintessentially Oregon: friendships that transcend political boundaries and geographical lines, pledges to serve all Oregonians regardless of political differences, and the well-deserved, button-bursting pride of several generations of Clarno family.

Clarno, 83, privately was sworn in last weekend in Redmond after being appointed by Gov. Kate Brown to fill out the term of the late Secretary of State Dennis Richardson.

Her tenure got off to an awkward start Monday when she ousted three of Richardson’s top executives — Deputy Secretary of State Leslie Cummings, who had been acting secretary since Richardson’s death in February; Steve Elzinga, government and legal affairs director; and Chief of Staff Debra Royal.

Clarno told journalists Wednesday that she wanted to have her own leadership team in place.

In the interim, she does have top-notch advisers. Julia Brim-Edwards of Nike, Kerry Tymchuk of the Oregon Historical Society and Clarno’s son and former legislative aide Randy Hilderbrand are volunteering their time.

When Clarno was speaker of the Oregon House in 1995-96, Brim-Edwards was her communications director, after previously working for Oregon Sen. Bob Packwood on the U.S. Senate Finance Committee. Brim-Edwards now is the political face of Nike as a global senior director for government and public affairs. She also serves on the Portland School Board. Her husband, Randall Edwards, was state treasurer from 2001 to 2009 — an office that Clarno unsuccessfully sought in 1996.

As for Tymchuk, he lives and breathes Oregon history. And politics. In a blog post two years ago, CFM Strategic Communications called him “Oregon’s Living History Master Storyteller.”

Tymchuk is a product of both political nature and nurture. His father and brother were both longtime mayors of Reedsport, where he grew up. A lawyer, he served as state director for Oregon Sen. Gordon Smith and as a speechwriter and adviser for Kansas Sen. Bob Dole and Labor Secretary Elizabeth Dole.

With Clarno taking office, Oregon made history. Women now hold four of the five statewide elected offices. She joins Gov. Kate Brown, Labor Commissioner Val Hoyle and Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum. Oregon Supreme Court Chief Justice Martha Walters — who administered the ceremonial oath of office — also was elected statewide as a justice, and her colleagues then chose her as chief justice.

True to form, Tymchuk talked history while emceeing Clarno’s ceremony. He asked the five women to serve as honorary co-chairs of the Oregon Historical Society’s centennial celebration next year of the 19th Amendment, which gave women the right to vote.

From the OHS archives, he brought with him an 1885 letter that national women’s right activist Susan B. Anthony wrote to Oregon suffragist Abigail Scott Duniway. The letter concludes with, “I trust you will always report every work and word of women.”

Tymchuk went on to say, “I can’t help but think that somewhere today Abigail Scott Duniway is reporting to Susan B. Anthony the exciting news being made in Oregon today.”

Dick Hughes, who writes the weekly Capital Chatter column, has been covering the Oregon political scene since 1976. Contact him at TheHughesisms@Gmail.com, Facebook.com/Hughesisms, YouTube.com/DickHughes or Twitter.com/DickHughes.


3. Sherman County Victims’ Rights Week, April 7-13

Today, April 7th, marks the beginning of National (Sherman County) Crime Victims’ Rights Week. We must work together to create hope for the future of crime victims’ services. Our efforts cannot succeed without the contributions of local law enforcement, victim advocates, prosecutors, probation and parole officers, child and family services, community leaders and members, educators, coaches, parents, and others. The victims’ rights movement began through a shared hope for healing, a hope for change, and a hope to be heard. The legacy of commitment and passion lives on today. Every year, millions of Americans are affected by crime. Many will need ongoing care and resources.

April 7–13 is National (Sherman County) Crime Victims’ Rights Week, a time to celebrate progress achieved, raise awareness of victims’ rights and services, and stand with our families, neighbors, friends, and colleagues whose lives have been forever altered by crime. We resolve to reach out, listen, and support them as they press forward on a path to recovery. We commit to making our services more accessible and to building partnerships across the community so that we can truly honor the past efforts of the crime victims’ movement and look forward to a future of hope and resilience.

This National (Sherman County) Crime Victims’ Rights Week shows victims they are not alone. Call Sherman County Victim Assistance Program at (541) 565-5030 to learn how you or someone you know can get the help they need. For national helpline information, call 855–4–VICTIM or visit www.VictimConnect.org to learn about victims’ rights and options, confidentially and compassionately.


4. Teaching Children to Risk

We all want our children to be safe and happy, but is there such a thing as too much safety, too much protection? Raising children is an exciting process, but sometimes it can seem a little too exciting, especially when you have to call the plumber to get your kid’s hand unstuck from the toilet! It is quite the balancing act, and it takes a lot of nerve and devotion on the part of parents.

How much should parents do to keep their children safe, and how much protection is too much? There is a fine line between mothering and smothering, between fathering and bothering. Over-protective parents, in their desire to save life, may suppress it instead, as they project their own fears onto their children. What they are really doing is protecting their own comfort.

Too many adults go through life afraid of all sorts of things – dogs, heights, meeting new people, going barefoot, riding horses, you name it – because of repeated fear messages and warnings given them by their own overprotective parents when they were small. Keep in mind, there are palpable dangers “out there,” and it is smart to be wary. The question is, do we really need to be “helicopter” (drone?) parents, always hovering over our children?

Teach your kids to be cautious when it’s necessary. But also teach them to risk, to live and laugh and test their own limits. Be there with a guiding hand and an encouraging word, and be ready to haul them away from real danger. Be mindful that you don’t squelch their spirits in your quest to keep them from harm, as you navigate this balancing act called parenting. It’s a matter of guiding children to what they can do, perhaps even more so than what they can’t do.

A study reported in the Journal of Child and Family Studies (Feb. 2013) found that parents being overly involved in their adult kids’ lives can actually do more harm than good. In fact, the adult, college-age students interviewed for the study reported their feelings of incompetence (because mom and dad went to bat for them over issues they could have, and probably should have, taken care of themselves) actually led to greater feelings of depression and dissatisfaction.

If you can teach your young child how to take calculated risks and really live life fully as children, you will be giving them a wonderful blessing that will serve them well as adults. ~The Pacific Insitute


5. Sherman County Court News, March 20th

ShermanCoLogoBy Kayla von Borstel 541-565-3416

Mid- Columbia Economic Development District Updates, Downtown Improvement Match Funds, Watershed Council Annual Report, Veteran’s Officer 2017-2018 Budget Update, and Monthly Payment Request to Northern Oregon Regional Corrections were the main items on the agenda during the March 20th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Judge Dabulskis inquired if there would need to be a plan for the Biggs Service District resolution for rate charge due to new rules and regulations. Carrie Pipinich, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, stated for the current resolution one was not needed, but when it becomes updated, a plan would be needed. Judge Dabulskis would like all documentation to be up to date, completed properly, and filed with the Clerk’s Office during this process. Regarding dark fiber, Judge Dabulskis briefly spoke to Dan Bubb, GorgeNet, and Pipinich reported the process has been waiting on the Cities’ lawyer, Ruben Cleaveland. Brief discussion on franchise fees between the Cities, the County, and GorgeNet.

Erik Glover, Moro Administrator, spoke to the Court on Moro’s Downtown Improvement Program potential to receive match funds for 2019. Glover stated last year was successful as the hotel and Napa store were two projects completed under the program. City council has put aside $10,000 for their program, contingent upon $10,000 in match funds from the County. Commissioner McCoy requested a letter to be sent to the Cities again asking them to state their interest in the remaining funds, and stated Moro’s request would need to go to Budget Committee on April 10-11, 2019; Moro will be contacted with the result.

Jacob Powell, Sherman County Area Watershed Council, presented an annual report. Powell stated since 1999, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board has awarded over three million dollars in grant funds to Sherman County. He reported the Lower Grass Valley Canyon (LGVC) has been an area of focus with noxious weed management through a large grant on private property not already enrolled in other conservation programs; eight species of noxious weeds were identified in over 370 acres. Funding from the Oregon State Weed Board will allow for the treatment for these weeds. Also in the LGVC area is a restoration grant for Terrace Rebuilds, Water and Control Sediment Basins (WASCB’s), Range and Pasture Seeding, and Wildlife Guzzlers. The WC is out of small grant funds for the current biennium. In terms of Outreach, there is a grant to teach elementary students with items such as the Egg to Fry program, providing outreach at Cottonwood State Park, and Arbor Day planting.

Bryan Hunt, Veterans Officer, gave a brief update on the Veterans’ 2017-2018 Budget Funds. The State contacted Hunt on the ability to now use funds to purchase vehicles due to a change in the rules. He would like to purchase a new vehicle with the excess funds in his budget that need to be spent; he has approximately $80,000 of excess carry over funds that the State does not want back. Judge Dabulskis inquired if some of the Veterans’ funds can be sent to the Transportation Department in the Tri County area to transport veterans. Hunt stated in the past, there had been some issues with proper paperwork and it didn’t work out. Brad Lohrey, Sheriff, stated Northern Oregon Regional Corrections (NORCOR) had some programs for Veterans with re-entry, and asked if there would be any way is to use these funds for those programs. County Court motioned to approve NORCOR billing the Veterans Officer for programs attended to Sherman County Veterans while in NORCOR custody on a per person basis. Court agreed for Hunt to purchase a new Traverse using his budget funds.

Brad Lohrey, Sheriff, gave a brief background on his time with Northern Oregon Regional Corrections (NORCOR). After the Administrator left at NORCOR, they restructured the staffing situation; he is the Sheriff that over sees the adult side at NORCOR. At the time of the restructure, all four Sheriff’s agreed it was on an interim basis to see how, or if, the restructure would work, and no compensations was asked for. On his side of the NORCOR budget he included $1,000 per month to be given to which ever County whose Sheriff was overseeing NORCOR. He believed whatever designated County in charge should get reimbursed, and it would be up to the individual County to decide to keep the money, or pass onto their Sheriff. Lohrey’s request for Sherman County if he was chosen going forward, he would like a stipend of $500, and the other $500 go to the County.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • approved the Eastern Oregon Counties Association (EOCA) 2019-2020 annual dues in the amount of $2,600.
  • approved the purchase of a Knox HomeBox in the amount of up to $200, as recommended by Emergency Services Director, Shawn Payne.
  • hired Jacobs Environmental Service in the amount of $350, to professionally empty the grease trap at the Sherman County Senior Center.
  • authorized budget transfers/payments as recommended by the Finance Director, including $578,000 from the County General Fund, and 2,000 from the Parks Fund, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • appointed Linda Thompson to the North Central Public Health District Budget Committee.
  • approved minutes of February 6, 2019, as amended to section 2.7, and supersedes the previous set of minutes adopted on March 6, 2019.
  • approved the minutes of February 20, 2019, as corrected.
  • approved the minutes of March 6, 2019, as corrected.
  • approved the Revenue/Expenditure Summary for the month of February 2019, as presented.

Topics of discussion were Sherman County Outreach Office Location, Sherman County Housing Grant Program, Office of the County Court 2019-2020 Budget, and Commissioner Reports.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbCentral Americans need less violence, more development, and a safe place to stay

An Agenda for American Immigration Reform

Bend Bulletin Editorial: A most sneaky attack on Oregon taxpayers

Small towns are dying everywhere but here – Hamilton, Montana

Heritage Foundation Explains The Equality Act

The Center for Public Integrity

Why China’s Intellectual Property Theft Is a Concern for National Security


 

Sherman County eNews #94

CONTENT

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! Thank you from the bottom of our hearts to the Sherman County Community. Thank you for all of your thoughts, prayers, and well wishes. Thank you for the many, many cards, the visits, the offers of help and support. We are eternally grateful to be part of this community. I felt like we were facing this incredibly difficult time with a crowd of support, I never felt alone. There is no way to adequately express my gratitude for the tremendous amount of support you as a community have provided. Justin is grateful to be home. He has a long slow road of recovery in front of him, but is improving with each day. He is surprising us all with his daily improvement. Please continue to visit, text, or call him with words of support. He is handling the idleness well so far, but will be itching to get off this couch soon. Thank you, a million times, thank you. ~Amanda Payne

 JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

COMMUNITY DINNER & BINGO. The Wasco School Events Center will be having a Community Dinner & Bingo on Monday, April 15, 2019 at the Events Center. Doors will open at 5:30 and cost for the dinner is $5 per person or family of 5 or more is $20. Dinner will be followed by a few rounds of BINGO with cards available for $1.00 each. On the menu is French Dip Sandwiches, salad, tater tots and dessert. Proceeds will help fund the ongoing renovations of the building. Hope to see you there.

EASTER BAKE SALE. The Sherman County Senior & Community Center is holding an Easter Bake Sale on Friday, April 19th from 11am-12pm. We hope to see you all on April 19th for some yummy homemade treats! If anyone in the community is interested in donating some baked goods please let us know: 541-565-3191, kari@shermancounty.net

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

SHERMAN COUNTY PUBLIC/SCHOOL LIBRARY BOARD POSITION. Sherman County Public/School Library has a Board position open for a community representative. The mission of SCP/SL is to provide access to informational materials, technologies, and programs for all residents of the community, birth through senior citizens. Meetings are bi-monthly. Anyone interested in serving on the Library Board may pick up an application at the library, e-mail shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us, or call 541-565-3279.   4/12

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

EMPLOYMENT:

Notice of Job Posting: School Custodian. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified part-time Custodial candidate to work at Sherman County School in Moro starting April 29 or before. Benefit package included. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug test required. For information and application materials please email Wes Owens @ wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.

Duties. The school custodian is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance and other miscellaneous duties in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe and sanitary manner. 

Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application and resume by April 18, 2019 to: Wes Owens, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039  (541) 565-3500  wowens@sherman.k12.or.us Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer. 4/12

ASSISTANT CHILD CARE PROVIDER: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com.  Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. 4/12 

WATERSHED PROGRAM ASSISTANT. Applications are now being accepted for a full time Watershed Program Assistant at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits included, pay DOE. Duties include assisting the execution of day to day management, outreach, education, and administrative tasks for the Sherman County SWCD and Watershed Council. The Program Assistant will provide support for the SWCD and Watershed Council meetings, grant submittals and tracking, project implementation and NRCS Farm Bill support. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net. For more information, call (541) 565-3216 ext. 109. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at http://www.shermancountyswcd.com. The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. 4/12

HELP GILLIAM AND SHERMAN COUNTY STUDENTS SUCCEED. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.30 an hour, Paid training, Flexible schedule, Dental, Vision, Medical Plan, 401 K … And more! Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check, Have a good driving record, Have a valid Oregon driver’s license, Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training. Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: ~Amberlena Shaffer, RecruiterOFFICE: (541) 567-0551CELL: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com www.MidCoBus.com   4/26

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY PRESCHOOL OPEN ENROLLMENT. Sherman County Preschool is looking ahead to next school year.  We will be holding an open enrollment at 6pm on April 5th in the preschool.  We encourage anyone interested in their child attending preschool to complete an enrollment packet.  Space is limited to 20 children and Head Start spots are limited as well.  To be eligible for the 2019-2020 preschool year your child must be 3-5 years of age on or before September 1st, 2019 and be potty trained.  We contract with both North Central ESD and Umatilla Morrow Head Starts to provide Head Start services to qualifying families.  They are both wonderful agencies with great employees who love to help kids and their families, but again spots are limited so you don’t want to miss out on signing up.  Most, if not all, spots will be filled by early summer. Sherman Co. Preschool is a QRIS 5-star program with a Director (Carrie Somnis) & 3 Teachers (Brenda Massie, Sarah Goodenough & Miranda Owens) who love children and have over 30+ years of combined teaching experience.  Sherman Co. Preschool is located in Moro in the elementary wing of the Sherman County School.  We introduce preschoolers to learning in a warm and caring environment that encourages children to learn through play and structured small group activities.  We offer transportation services in the afternoon with stops in Moro and Wasco at each daycare.

If you are unable to make the open enrollment but are interested in your child attending preschool next year please send an email to shermanpreschool@yahoo.com with your name, mailing address, and child’s age/name as of September 1st, 2019.  Feel free to call the preschool directly with any questions.  The phone number is (541) 565-3320, hours are 7:30am-2pm Monday-Thursday.  During preschool hours (8am-12pm) we are busy with kids & may not answer, but please leave a message and someone will return your call as soon as possible. 4/5

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 5/17

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

HANDCRAFTED INDOOR & OUTDOOR FURNITURE. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 5/17

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

HAMILTON PIANO. Free to a good home. Beautiful dark wood Hamilton upright piano available free to a good home. High quality, good working order, tunable. Long bench included. Located at the Parish Hall in Wasco. Please call Molly (541)565-3315 to schedule a viewing.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

HOST FAMILY. Host a Foreign Exchange Student. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Asia. These personable and academically select exchange students speak English, are bright, curious, and eager to learn about this country through living as part of a family for an academic year and attending high school. Your support of these students reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world.

ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Mongolia, and South Korea. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills.

The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. At the same time the student will be teaching their newly adopted host family about their own culture and language.   If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com  4/26


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html 

flower.buttercupAPRIL

5 Sherman County Preschool Open Enrollment 5:30 Preschool

6 Slow Art Day at Maryhill Museum of Art

6 Equine Mania LLC Advanced Sorting Clinic w/Kristi Siebert (541) 980-7394

6 Great Electrifying Event at Bonneville Lock and Dam 10-3

6-7 Spring Farming Days & Ag Museum, Pomeroy, Washington

7 Kent Baptist Church & Mud Springs Gospel Band 6 Kent

8 Sherman County Planning Commission Hearing 5:30

8 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Budget Meeting 1:30 Burnet Building, Moro

10 Rufus City Council 7

10-11 Sherman County Budget Committee Meeting

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1 Boardman

13 Beginning Genealogy Class 10:30 Discovery Center

13 Grass Valley’s Annual Egg Hunt, Reptile Zone & Skate Party 10 Pavilion

13 Celebrate National Poetry Month with Poets 5 Klindt’s Booksellers

14 Bill Hulse: Celebration of Life 1 Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

14 Wasco County Historical Society Benefit 40-mile long Poker Run 541-980-0918

14 PALM SUNDAY

15 Community Center Dinner & Bingo 5:30 Wasco School Events Center

16 Frontier Regional 911 Board of Directors Meeting 1:30

16 Tri-County Community Corrections Board 3:30 Gilliam County

16 Wasco City Council 7

17 Sherman County Court 9

17 Biggs Service District Public Hearing 8:30 Sherman County Courthouse

17 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

18 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Committee 9 NORCOR

18 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR

18 Sherman County Book Club 6 Sherman County Public/School Library

19 Easter Bake Sale 11-12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center

19 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

19 GOOD FRIDAY

21 EASTER SUNDAY

21 Easter Brunch Buffet 11 Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

24 Tri-County Courts 10-2 Sherman County Courthouse

26 N. Central Livestock Assoc. Bull Tour to Gilliam County starts 9 Wasco School

27 Learn to Crochet 2 Sherman County Public/School Library

flower.tulipredMAY

1 Sherman County Court 9

1 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Exec. Board 4 The Dalles

2 NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

2 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY

2 Sherman County Fair Board 7

2 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3-5 Gorge Artists Open Studios Tour

4 County-wide Clean-up Day

4 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

4 Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting – Fort Dalles Readiness Center

4-5 72nd Annual Arlington Jackpot Rodeo 12:30 Arlington, Oregon

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Board 12:30

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

10-12 Equine Mania LLC Cows & More Clinic w/Mary Jane Brown (541) 980-7394

11 Spring Plant Fair 9 The Dalles City Park

12 MOTHERS’ DAY

14 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 TBA

14 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 TBA

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

15-17 National Association of Counties, Western Interstate Region, Spokane

17 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

18 ARMED FORCES DAY

21 Sherman County SPECIAL DISTRICT ELECTION DAY

21 Wasco City Council 7

24 Sherman County Budget Hearing – Courthouse

27 MEMORIAL DAY 

flower.zinnia1JUNE

1 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

1-2 Equine Mania LLC Wheatacres Ranch Trail & Cattle Challenge (541) 980-7394

3 Grass Valley City Council 7

4 Wasco City Council 7

5 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Veterans’ Benefit Fair & Support Services, Earl Snell Memorial Park, Arlington

6 D-DAY

14 FLAG DAY

16 FATHERS’ DAY


 

Sherman County eNews #93

CONTENTS

  1. Notice of Special City of Moro Council Meeting, April 9

  2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, April 8

  3. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting, April 10

  4. Notice. Sherman County Court Citizen-Reporter & Meeting Minutes Online

  5. Sherman County Senior & Community Center Meal Menu Update

  6. Corps begins spring spill operations with new flexibility to benefit fish and hydropower

  7. Standing Up To Fear

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  9. Spanish Scholarship Winners to Study in the United States


1. Notice of Special City of Moro Council Meeting, April 9

CITY OF MORO
Notice is given that the Moro City Council will hold a Special Public Meeting on Tuesday, April 9, 2019 at 07:00 p.m. at City Hall, 104 1st Street, Moro, Oregon 97039.

AGENDA:
1. CALL MEETING TO ORDER
2. 6TH STREET DISCUSSION AND VOTE
3. ADJOURNMENT

Next Scheduled Regular Council Meeting – May 7, 2019 at 7:00 P.M.
**If necessary an Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660.


2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, April 8

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting on Monday, April 8, 2019, that will include an executive session. The executive session will begin at 6:30 p.m. pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i) for the annual evaluation of the superintendent and ORS 192.660(2)(a) to consider the employment of a public officer, employee, staff member or individual agent. The Regular Board Meeting will begin at approximately 7:00 p.m. This meeting will be held in the Sherman County School/Public Library.

Topics on the regular board meeting agenda include Comments related to agenda items from Visitors; Presentations and Recongitions; Consent Agenda; Reports and Presentations by Superintendent Wes Owens, K-12 Administrator Mike Somnis & Athletic Director Mike Somnis; Unfinished business: Complete Superintendent Evaluation, School Signage Updates; New business: Resolution Services, Secretary of State Correspondence, Approve Football Co-op with Condon, Superintendent Contract, 2019-2020 Budget Information Update, Appointment of NCESD Budget Committee Member, Custodial Position Posting/Instructional Assistant Work Hour; Audience Communications related to non-agenda items; Future Agenda Items, Closing Comments and Next Steps. Next regular board meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on May 13, 2019.


3. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors Meeting, April 10

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on April 10th 2019 at 1:00PM at the WSEC (903 Barnett St.) Public is Welcome to Attend!


4. Notice. Sherman County Court Citizen-Reporter & Meeting Minutes Online

The April edition of the Citizen Reporter is currently published online and can be found at https://www.co.sherman.or.us/the-citizen-reporter/.

Approved minutes for the March 20, 2019, Regular Sessions are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/.


5. Sherman County Senior & Community Center Meal Menu Update

For April 24th we will be serving Salisbury Steak with mashed potatoes and gravy instead of Chicken Fried Steak, and on April 26th we will be serving Fettuccini Alfredo with Chicken instead of Ham Fried Rice. We hope to see you all for lunch one day soon! Come say hi to our new head cook Kristi Lesh, and congratulations to Cindy Heater-Judah on her retirement!  ~Kari Silcox, Manager, Sherman County Senior & Community Center


6. Corps begins spring spill operations with new flexibility to benefit fish and hydropower

COLUMBIA-SNAKE RIVERS, OR & WA — USACE NORTHWESTERN DIVISION NEWS RELEASE — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will begin implementing its 2019 Fish Operations Plan at the four lower Snake River dams April 3, and at the lower Columbia River dams April 10. The 2019 plan includes spill and transport operations for the spring and summer juvenile fish passage seasons at these dams, as specified in the NOAA Fisheries 2019 Columbia River System Biological Opinion.

Read more at: https://www.nwd.usace.army.mil/Media/News-Releases/Article/1803704/corps-begins-spring-spill-operations-with-new-flexibility-to-benefit-fish-and-h/


7. Standing Up to Fear

What are you afraid of? It doesn’t matter whether it’s speaking in public or snakes on a plane, if you really want to conquer your fears, you can.

Let’s talk for a few moments about fear. Fear can be either a valuable ally or a vicious enemy. It can keep you safe and prevent you from taking dangerous chances, but it can also stop you from taking the risks you must take if you are to grow and change for the better.

It’s important to understand that fear itself can’t hurt you. One way to look at fear is as a negative rehearsal of the future. You imagine yourself in a certain situation, and you foresee painful results. Now, your imagination is so powerful, that when you see yourself in this painful situation, it produces a response in your body that says, “Stop!” And sometimes, that’s the appropriate thing to do.

But other times, what you really need to do is go forward, especially when you are working toward a goal that is important to you. Fear is just another obstacle to go over, around or through on your way to your goals. It’s a rock in the road, not an impervious force field.

A good technique that will help you go beyond fear is to deliberately and repeatedly imagine yourself calmly moving past it. Then, see the positive results clearly and vividly. If you can stay focused on the beneficial aspects and really feel the good feelings that go with it, you will be creating a positive rehearsal of the future that will far outweigh and overrule your fear.

Each time to blow past your fears, you will be growing stronger and more capable. And, at the same time, providing a role model for others who already admire you for standing up to your fears. ~The Pacific Institute


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 Secretary of State Bev Clarno took her ceremonial Oath of Office

3 Keys to the Economic Viability of Small Towns

Fact Check.org | Keeping Politicians Accountable

Special Counsel Robert Mueller Report of March 22, 2019: The Political Cover-up of the Century?


9. Spanish Scholarship Winners to Study in the United States

ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Spain. All these exceptional students have received scholarships through a partnership with the Amancio Ortega Foundation in Spain. The Foundations goal is to bring Spanish scholarship students to the USA. The Foundation carefully screens and selects 100 students who have passed the high academic qualifications as well as being financial need based to provide a full scholarship for them to study in the USA for one academic year.

The students come from all over Spain, and are chosen as ambassadors of Spain to learn and grow from their year abroad in the USA, in order to come home to Spain and apply what they have learned to their home town, community and country. These students would not have this opportunity if not for this generous Foundation in Spain. ASSE is proud to be a part of this prestigious program, and know that our host families and schools will appreciate these students and their hard work ethic and desire to grow and learn from their American families and schools.

ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from all areas of Spain. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the Spanish scholarship students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills. Upon returning home in the spring, the students will share what they have learned while in America and will make a significant difference in their country!

To become a host family or find out more about ASSE and the prestigious Spanish Scholarship Program, please contact us, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com

Founded by the Swedish National Department of Education, ASSE International (formerly American Scandinavian Student Exchange) is a non-profit, tax-exempt, public benefit organization. ASSE is officially designated as an exchange visitor program by the United States Department of State and cooperates with the Canadian Provincial Ministries of Education.