Sherman County eNews #214

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Preschool Enrollment, One Opening

  2. NOTICE. Sherman County Court, Aug. 20

  3. Oregon Farm Bureau Calls for Oregon Agriculture Photos

  4. Impulses: The Good, the Bad and the Maybe

  5. Farm Bill Facts in a Nut Shell

  6. Active Duty Military Metrics

  7. Editorial. Cell Phone Coverage for Cottonwood Canyon State Park?


1. Sherman County Preschool Enrollment, One Opening

Sherman County Preschool has one spot still available for the upcoming school year! School starts September 5th and for parent’s convenience there will be an afternoon bus offered with a stop in Moro & Wasco. If you have a child who is 3-5 years old as of September 1st and interested in attending preschool, please contact the preschool immediately. 541-565-3320 or shermanpreschool@yahoo.com.


2. NOTICE. Sherman County Court, Aug. 20

ShermanCoLogoSherman County Court will meet on Monday, August 20, 2018, at 11:30 a.m. in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039 in executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (a) Employment for the purpose of holding interviews for Sherman County Counsel position.


3. Oregon Farm Bureau Calls for Oregon Agriculture Photos

Through Sept. 15, Oregon Farm Bureau invites the public to submit their best photos of Oregon agriculture for a chance to be featured in the 2019 Oregon’s Bounty Calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the crops, the cultivation, the landscape, anything that depicts the beauty, culture, enjoyment, technology, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

“What makes the Oregon’s Bounty Calendar so special is that the images are sourced from the public,” said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. “Oregon agriculture is an inspiring, visually interesting subject for photographers.

“We’re looking for what I call ‘gaze-worthy’ images, photos that you can enjoy for a month as the calendar hangs on the wall,” said Moss.

The Oregon’s Bounty Calendar is mailed to nearly 70,000 Farm Bureau members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year. It’s an exceptional opportunity for both amateur and professional photographers to get their work shown broadly.

Horizontal-layout, high-resolution images — both close-ups and panoramic shots — are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons. Subject ideas include rural scenery; scenes from farmers’ markets, roadside stands, u-picks, on-farm events, county fairs, and rodeos; portraits of farmers, ranchers, kids, and farm families; planting or harvest shots; and close-ups of fruits, vegetables, flowers, crops in the field, and farm animals.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, and there’s no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

As thanks for participating, everyone who submits photos with their mailing address will receive a complimentary copy of the Oregon’s Bounty Calendar. Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon’s Bounty, along with six runners up, will receive a photo credit in the calendar and numerous copies.

Images can be submitted in three ways:

  1. Email photos to: annemarie@oregonfb.org, (Note that our email server has a file size limit of 10mb. You may need to send photos individually).
  2. Upload photos to OFB’s dropbox at https://spaces.hightail.com/uplink/OregonFarmBureau
  3. Mail a thumb drive, disc, or printed photos to OFB, attn: Anne Marie Moss, 1320 Capitol St. NE, Suite 200, Salem, OR 97301.

See past calendars and get more information at http://www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grass roots, nonpartisan, nonprofit, general farm organization representing the interests of farming and ranching families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties. For more information, contact Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.


4. Impulses: The Good, the Bad and the Maybe

Have you ever gone shopping to buy just one or two things and come home with a couple of bags full? Let’s talk about the pros and cons of making impulsive decisions.

Do you ever act on your impulses, or make spontaneous decisions to do things? Most of us know that acting on impulse can have negative consequences, like when you are in the grocery store or investing large amounts of money. But did you know it could also be very positive?

Let’s dig a little deeper. You see, an impulse is nothing more than an urge to do something. It is a suggestion from your subconscious that suddenly surfaces in your conscious mind and, as such, it deserves to be considered. In fact, carrying impulses into action can be a good way to become goal-oriented. Of course, it can also be a way to get into serious trouble. So how do you decide whether to act on an impulse?

Try asking yourself if the impulse feels like it could be in harmony with the person you most want to be. If the answer is no, nip it in the bud, or at least defer it. If the answer is yes, do it and do it as soon as possible, because procrastination is the death of too many wonderful impulses.

Now, if you can’t come up with an immediate answer, you have arrived in the Land of Maybe. “Maybe” can be as effective as a “no” response, and only you can decide if this is a good or a bad thing. However, “maybe” can also be the springboard for further thought. “Maybe” can be a signal that perhaps a little self-reflection is in order, to decide on who you want to be. You see, it is vital to a fulfilled life to know who you are, and if that’s not enough, who you want to be.

If the impulse can’t be acted on immediately, you now have the opportunity to set a goal and create a clear mental image of the end-result you most want to bring about. Affirm and re-visit that picture every day. With the fuel of vivid sensory details and a determined spirit, you will begin to see some extraordinary positive changes in your life. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Farm Bill Facts in a Nut Shell

Farm Bill Facts

1933 – first Farm Bill

17 Farm Bills passed since 1933.

September 2018 – current Farm Bill expires.

½ of all land in the U.S. is used for agriculture-crops, forest, pasture and range.

Farm income has been cut in half in the last 5 years.

The Farm Bill is ONE of the most important pieces of legislation that Congress deals with.

80% of the Farm Bill supports the S.N.A.P. program (food assistance).

ALL of the rural population in America is affected by the Farm Bill.

~Stuart Truelson, Capital Press, July 6, 2018.


6. Active Duty Military Metrics

American flag20.5 Percent of the U.S. population serving on active duty – 1.29 million.

84 Percent of Marine recruits age 20 or younger.

64 Percent of enlisted recruits who come from middle-class neighborhoods.

19 Percent of enlisted recruits who come from impoverished neighborhoods.

17 Percent of enlisted recruits who come from high-affluence neighborhoods.

16 Percent of enlisted forces who are women.

~The American Legion Magazine, August 2018.


7. Editorial. Cell Phone Coverage for Cottonwood Canyon State Park?

pencil.sharpThe Cottonwood Canyon State Park website has the answer: “Q. Is there cell phone coverage? A. No. There is no cell phone coverage at the park, including the campground, day-use area and river trails. Do not rely on cell phones for emergency communications.”

The most recent Frontier TeleNet update stated that Frontier TeleNet’s target was to have the emergency communication tower up and working “before fire season 2018.”

So what happened? You decide.

  1. Sherman County received $375,000 from the state for development of the Cottonwood Canyon State Park [Cottonwood] communication tower site.

 

  1. These funds were sent to Frontier TeleNet [FTN] for the construction and implementation of a cell communication tower essential to emergency services.

 

  1. In September, as a separate matter, the FTN board considered a proposal to contract with a marketing/sales specialist for $80,000/year to recruit call center clients and Internet Service Providers, among other things. In October, FTN unanimously approved a contract with Michael Smith dba Connections LLC, for $6,250/month.

On the job, contractor Smith cited progress on tower site selection, funding, radio quotes and permits. He noted how critical tower communication is for emergency services at Cottonwood Canyon State Park. 

  1. Another year rolled around. FTN updates for June, July and August cited continued progress, land use permitting, cell phone company interest … and plans for the tower site, a taller tower, and approval for radio frequencies. October’s update mentioned a lease and a permit, a license forthcoming, and a project within budget. Park rangers reported increases in overnight and day visitors, a substantial rise in repeat visitors at Cottonwood and J.S. Burres State Park, and 71,000 vehicles through the gates compared to 63,000 the previous year.

 

  1. In January Mac Stinchfield inquired about the status of the towers. FTN contractor Smith replied that a landowner contract was pending, Motorola was building radios, the tower site was within the “utility strip” and the Wild and Scenic River Act should not impact the project. He hoped to have the tower up and running in the next six months because emergency and internet service is necessary for the park. In February, he hoped to have towers up and running by fire season 2018. In March, the equipment was here and he hoped to have it completed by summer. In May and June, a National Environmental Policy Act study was underway for which FTN approved $14,100.

What happened? We, the people, paid for more hope, delay, excuses and updates than real nose-to-the-grindstone planning, work and competence. We must not be deceived by cart-before-the-horse procrastination, blame and smooth talk.

When will we have the results, communication towers at Cottonwood? The fire season is not over yet.

It’s not surprising, then, that candidate Mike Smith did not mention or describe his year-and-a-half’s accomplishments as a contractor for Frontier TeleNet during the primary election debate in Wasco this spring or on his campaign flyer.


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #213

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1Whenever I read in John’s record of the last night Jesus had with His disciples, I am stuck again by the powerful messages that He so frequently conveyed by His actions. Throughout the gospels we see Him working miracles with the understanding that they were not His primary reason for coming. Rather, these works were proofs that demonstrated the power and compassion of God as His Son proclaimed the real hope of being permanently rescued through His shed blood on the cross and the subsequent proofs of His burial and resurrection which were witnessed by many.

But on this special night with His disciples it was not a miracle that was so poignant, but a simple action. The disciples were all seated and supper had begun when Jesus got up knowing that His time was near to return to the Father. He proceeded to take off His outer garments. Then, we read in John 13:5, “…He poured water into a basin and began to wash the disciples’ feet and to wipe them with the towel that was wrapped around Him.” (ESV) A few verses later He told His disciples, “If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet. For I have given you an example … a servant is not greater than his master, nor is a messenger greater than the one who sent him. If you know these things, blessed are you if you do them.” (John 13:14–17, ESV)

In this simple act Jesus demonstrated that it doesn’t take a miracle to touch someone. In following His example we display by our actions the love that we’ve learned from Him as He gave Himself fully for us, and maybe then we even get to share why.

Joe Burgess
Pastor
First Baptist Church of Grass Valley


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected) 

REMINDERS: 

CLASSIFIED ADS, NOTICES & NEWS: Please! No posters or flyers.

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! Message to Sherman County: Our belated, but heartfelt thanks to our many friends, neighbors, volunteers and professionals that came to our aid when the Substation Fire jumped the Deschutes and burned the Baker place. We are grateful for your efforts trying to save our crop and are thankful that nobody was hurt fighting this fast moving fire. Thank you also to those of you that jumped from bed and came to help fight the Monkland Road fire that threatened our neighborhood a few short days later. The fire was quickly extinguished because of your help. Despite our sustained losses, we feel very blessed.  During this challenging time, so many residents of Sherman County answered God’s call to serve one another ~ we truly live in a special place. May God continue to bless each of you and keep you safe.  Thank you again!      ~The Belshe Family 

THANK YOU! I know that we all have thanked the firemen, ranchers, families, and friends thru out the last 3 weeks and 4 large fires. Many state agencies responded with support but I especially want to thank our local The Dalles Salvation Army personnel. They brought their trailer to the central command location, giving out water, food and supplies. I understand they even loaded up their van and went out (with an escort) to the fires and handed out water, food and other needed items to anyone working the fire. THANK YOU, SALVATION ARMY, for all you do for our county community! ~Carol MacKenzie, Wasco, Oregon

THANK YOU! My name is Yenika Sayrs. I own a property on Sayrs Road. I wanted to thank all the kind folks who helped save my house during the fire on July 18. I live in Hawaii so I was unable to do anything but hear about the struggle of containing the fire. I would like to thank the fire departments, the volunteer firefighters, the farmers and all my neighbors who created fire breaks and kept my house safe. I am grateful. Keep up the excellent work! God bless you all.

THANK YOU, SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOARD, Bryce Coelsch, Shandie Johnson, Bert Perisho, Rick Jauken Jr., Tom Rolfe & Amanada Whitman, and OSU EXTENSION 4-H, and FFA and 4-H LEADERS for planning and bringing us the 109th Sherman County Fair! ~Larry and Sherry Kaseberg

THANK YOU, SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOOK SPONSORS: C.H. Urness Motor Co., Grand Central Travel Center, Linda’s Restaurant, Subway, Food Mart, Lean To Café/Goosepit Saloon, The Optimist Printers, Sherman County Medical Clinic, Tire Factory, Dinty’s Market & Deli, Devco Mechanical, Bank of Eastern Oregon, State Farm Insurance, Ray Schultens Motors, Mid Columbia Producers, Inc., Rufus Family Market & Deli, Gorge Outfitters Supply, H2O Oregon, Windermere Real Estate, Bob’s Texas T-Bone Restaurant, Wasco Electric Cooperative, Pepsi, Griffith Motors & Cousins Country Inn. 

CONGRATULATIONS, SHERMAN COUNTY ROAD CREW, Sherman County Fair Grand Marshals! The Road Crew of Eight has well-maintained and safe 134 miles of pavement, 295 miles of gravel and 55 miles of dirt roads for residential and field access. Kudos to a job well done!

CONGRATULATIONS, SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR QUEEN SHELBY! Thanks for representing Sherman County at summer rodeos and parades!

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life.

Your willingness to put it into words

is all that is necessary.

~ Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

PUBLIC NOTICE – VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY. City of Rufus Election for Mayor and (2) Council Members. The City of Rufus has an open Mayor and two City Council positions available for the general election on November 6, 2018. 

The volunteer position for Mayor is a two-year term.

The volunteer positions for City Council is a four-year term.

Interested citizens must have been a resident of the City of Rufus for at least the previous 12 months.  Applications are available at Rufus City Hall, located at 304 W 2nd ST Suite 100, Rufus, OR 97050.  Candidates may file by paying a fee or by petition with valid signatures, all applications must be submitted before August 28, 2018. 

If you need further information, please contact:  Aaron Cook, City Recorder – City of Rufus | 541-739-2321 | rufuscityhall@gmail.c

VOLUNTEER AT THE SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR! Send a message through https://www.facebook.com/shermancountyfair/. 8/19

CELEBRATE SHERMAN COUNTY with your Sherman County fair entries! Anyone can enter… just about anything… on Wednesday, August 22 & 23! Get your Sherman County Fair Premium Book at a post office or business near you! Check out www.shermancountyfairfun.com and https://www.facebook.com/shermancountyfair/ for details! 8/19 

EMPLOYMENT:

BANK BRANCH MANAGER. Bank of Eastern Oregon is now hiring for an experienced Branch Manager for their Moro, OR branch. Position is full-time with schedule of 8:00 am – 5:00 pm, Monday-Friday. This position requires a minimum of 3-5 years branch operations and supervisory experience. Successful candidate must pass a pre-employment drug, credit, and background screening. Applicants may apply at http://www.beobank.com, click on Career Opportunities (towards bottom of Home page). Bank of Eastern Oregon is an Equal Opportunity Employer of minorities, women, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities. Application closing date: 8-31-2018

DISTRICT MANAGER. APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED for a full time District Manager at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits included, pay DOE. Duties include providing leadership for and manage the day to day operations of the district, which includes administration; risk management; personnel management and supervision; overseeing financial management and budgeting; grants management; conservation operations; contracting; and the development, updating, and implementation of the Districts’ annual plan of work, long range plan, and business plan. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email shermancountywc@gmail.com. For more information call (541) 565-3216. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at www.shermancountyswcd.com. The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. 8/19 

WATERSHED COORDINATOR. APPLICATIONS ARE NOW BEING ACCEPTED for a part time Watershed Coordinator at the Sherman County Soil and Water Conservation District in Moro, Oregon. Benefits include, pay DOE. Duties include coordinate and administer Sherman County Area Watershed Council, organize Council meetings, write and edit documents/grants and coordinate projects on behalf of the watershed councils and provide public outreach and education. Send cover letter and resume to Sherman County SWCD, 302 Scott Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, or email shermancountywc@gmail.com. For more information call (541) 565-3216. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. Full job description and application instructions can be found at www.shermancountyswcd.com. The SWCD is an equal opportunity employer and service provider. 8/19

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company needs school bus drivers. No experience necessary. Paid training. 401K. Hiring bonuses up to $350. Flexible hours. Holidays off. Please call today: 541-442-5723.

FOR SALE:

LOTS IN WASCO. Sherman County owns lots #11 – 01N1704CB, 1210 and #12 – 01N1704CB, 1211 within the Asher Subdivision located in the City of Wasco, (between Highway 97 and Church Street) which are currently for sale. Lots are side by side and are 10,000 square feet/ 0.23 acres in size. Purchase price per lot will follow current market value and be negotiated by the Sherman County Judge. If interested please contact the Office of the County Court at 541-565-3416; countycourt@shermancounty.net; 500 Court Street, Moro OR 97029. 8/19

ONE-OF-A-KIND HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE, FURNITURE REFINISHING & REPAIR: Considerately Handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |  https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 8/31

MORO PROPERTY. NEW PRICE OF $44,900.00 A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. RMLS# 17410095. Contact tiffany@drysideproperty.com 9/28 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

BRAND NEW HOUSE FOR RENT IN RUFUS, OREGON
* It is a beautiful new house built in 2018, located in Gorge Vista Development. Enjoy this home with all the surrounding view of the Columbia River Gorge. It has an open living room plan for your comfort.
* It has 3 bedrooms located upstairs. The master bedroom has its own bathroom, while the other two rooms share one bath.
* Take advantage of this opportunity, if you love the river, the trails and fishing, this house could be a good option.
* This house comes fully furnished. The price is $1600 per month, utilities included.
* For more information, call this number: 541-340-1773.  8/10

FREE:

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR! No gate admission or parking fee. Enter your baked goods, barley, beer, ceramics, chickens, a collection, crocheting, dried fruits or herbs, ducks, flowers, hay, home canning, house plants, knitting, leathercraft, macramé, needlework, painting, photographs, sewing, soap, vegetables, wheat or wine. Come to see your family, old friends and new ones, exhibits and entertainment! [An exception: Tickets for the Challenge of Champions Bull Riding $15, pre-sale $12.] 8/19

SERVICES:

LOOKING FOR HELP WITH THOSE END OF SUMMER PROJECTS? LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 8/31 

LEAN-TO CAFÉ: CATERING, FULL-SERVICE DELI, BREAKFAST UNTIL 11, DAILY SPECIALS. Sandwiches, Burgers, Salads, Chicken Strips. 541-442-5709 Historic Downtown Wasco 8/31

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL 8/24 


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

boy.farmAUGUST

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Abbey Phelps, Knitting, Fiber Arts

8-12 Wheeler County Fair & Rodeo, Fossil

10 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1 Sunshine Mill

11 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

11 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Helicopters

11-12 Equine Mania, LLC Advanced Cattle Sorting Clinic, Wasco, Oregon

11-13 Perseid Meteor Showers

13 Sherman County School Board of Directors Work Session 5:30, Regular 7 Library

14 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

14 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

15 Sherman County Court 9 Courthouse

16 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting

16 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

17 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 1-2 Fossil

17 Sherman County Fair Cattle Sorting 7 Fairgrounds

17-18 Sherman Class of ’68 Reunion

18 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

20 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Silvies Valley Ranch

21 Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Showmanship, Equitation & Gaming 10

21 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Wasco City Council 7

21-26 Sherman County Fair & Rodeo, Moro

22 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting

22 Dale Coles Classic Car Show 3:30, BBQ 5, Car Show Awards, 4-H Style Show

23 Sherman County Fair Poultry, Rabbit Market & Showmanship 8

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Market Judging 10-11

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Market Judging 11-12

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Market Judging 12:30-2

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Market Judging 2-3:30

23 Sherman County Fair Down on the Farm Chore Contest 7 Arena

23 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Pacific Rim Uprising

23-26 Wasco County Fair, Tygh Valley

23-26 Klickitat County Fair and Rodeo, Goldendale, Washington

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H Home Economics Contests 8 4-H Pavilion

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship 8-9

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship 9:15

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship 11-12

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship 12:15-1:30

24 Sherman High School Football & Volleyball Games 2-5

24 Sherman County Fair Intros & CCT Bull Riding 7:15-9 $$

24-26 Art in the High Desert, Bend, Oregon

25 Sherman County Fair Parade at the Fairgrounds 8:30 a.m.

25 Sherman County Fair Horse & Kids’ Games 9:30-12

25 Sherman County Fair Queen’s Reception 10

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-around Showmanship 12:30

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Awards following all-around showmanship

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Sale 3-4

25 Sherman County Fair FFA Annual BBQ 5:30

25 Sherman County Fair Demo Derby 7:30

25 Sherman County Fair Dance with Countryfied 9:30-1

26 Sherman County Fair Cowboy Church with Susie McEntire 10:30 Main Grandstand

27 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

27 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension – Burnet Building, Moro

28 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

28 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot

31-Sept.2 Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games – Historic Maryhill Loops

31-Sept 3 Sumpter Flea Market, Sumpter, Oregon


 

Sherman County eNews #212

CONTENTS

  1. Correction: Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show, Tuesday, Aug. 21

  2. Public Notice. City of Rufus Election for Mayor and (2) Council Members

  3. Celebrate Sherman County with your Sherman County Fair Entries

  4. Special Sherman County Fair Contests: Pie, Table Decor & Wheelbarrow Flowers

  5. Dale Coles Classic Car Show, BBQ & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 22

  6. Correction: Down on the Farm Chore Contest at the County Fair, Aug. 23

  7. Annual Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social, Aug. 16

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Correction: Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show, Tuesday, Aug. 21

4-H clover1The 4-H Horse Show on Tuesday, August 21st at 10 a.m. includes showmanship, English & Western Equitation, Trail Horse and 4-H Gaming. 4-H exhibitors compete in age appropriate classes with required tack and attire as described in the Sherman County Fair Premium book. Trail Horse contestants will face six to ten timed obstacles to earn points for a final score. The 4-H Ranch Horse program teaches riders to safely handle their horses and cattle in working situations by successfully completing a series of advancements. 4-H Western Games on horseback, individual in nature and timed are Figure 8, Barrels, Key Race, Pole Bending and Flag Race.


2. PUBLIC NOTICE – VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY

City of Rufus Election for Mayor and (2) Council Members

The City of Rufus has an open Mayor and two City Council positions available for the general election on November 6, 2018.

The volunteer position for Mayor is a two-year term.

The volunteer positions for City Council is a four-year term.

Interested citizens must have been a resident of the City of Rufus for at least the previous 12 months.  Applications are available at Rufus City Hall, located at 304 W 2nd Street, Suite 100, Rufus, OR 97050.  Candidates may file by paying a fee or by petition with valid signatures, all applications must be submitted before August 28, 2018. If you need further information, please contact:

Aaron Cook

City Recorder – City of Rufus

541-739-2321

rufuscityhall@gmail.com


3. Celebrate Sherman County with your Sherman County Fair Entries!

Anyone can enter… just about anything… on Wednesday, August 22 & 23! Get your Sherman County Fair Premium Book at a post office or business near you! Check out www.shermancountyfairfun.com and https://www.facebook.com/shermancountyfair/ for details!


4. Special Sherman County Fair Contests: Pie, Table Decor & Wheelbarrow Flowers

  • Sherman County Fair Pie Contest: County residents only. Any flavor. Judged by fair board members on appearance and taste. 1st $50, 2nd $25.
  • Table Decor Contest: Set up a complete table at the Sherman County fair! Choose a theme: Holiday, Fair Theme, Kids Theme, Wild West of Fancy/Elegant. Cash prize 1st & 2nd. See the details at shermancountyfairfun.com.
  • Flowers in a Wheelbarrow Contest: Decorate the fairgrounds with an old chair or wheelbarrow and add your own pretty flowers for the 6th annual competition at the Sherman County Fair. Enter on Wednesday, August 22nd! Cash prizes. See shermancountyfairfun.com.

5. Dale Coles Classic Car Show, BBQ & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 22

car.blueEntertain us with your classic car at the Sherman County Fairgrounds! Check-in at 3:30 on Wednesday, August 22nd. BBQ at 5. Awards 5:10 p.m. followed by 4-H Style Show.

 


6. Correction: Down on the Farm Chore Contest at the County Fair, Aug. 23

Team up for the Down on the Farm Chore Course! Contestants are the entertainment at the Sherman County Fair – the correct date is Thursday, August 23! See https://www.facebook.com/shermancountyfair/ for details.


7. Annual Old Fashioned Ice Cream Social, Aug. 16

Presented by the Friends of Goldendale Community Library

Thursday, August 16, 2018

6:00 – 8:00 pm

On the lawn of the Presby Museum

127 W. Broadway, Goldendale

Thanks for your support of our library!

FREE Ice Cream, Root Beer Floats, Watermelon

Entertainment by The Flute Troupe


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owlVideo: Five Reasons the Model T was Revolutionary

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zu07cS5BmRI&feature=youtu.be  

12 Advances of Civilization by Flawed White American Males

American Thinker

Depositors – Not Taxpayers – Will Take the Hit for the Next ‘2008’ Crash

Hothouse Earth: Demise of the Planetary Life Support System?


 

Sherman County eNews #211

CONTENTS

  1. Create Large Ornaments for U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree from Oregon

  2. Sherman County Fair Ranch Cattle Sorting Competition, Aug. 17

  3. Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show, Aug. 20

  4. NIGHT ON THE LEFT BANK, A Maryhill Museum Benefit, Sept. 8

  5. Public Notice. City of Moro Election of Mayor & Council Members (2)

  6. The Dalles Kiwanis Club Hosts 63rd Annual Steak Feed, Sept. 6

  7. Setting the Pattern


1. Create Large Ornaments for U.S. Capitol Christmas Tree from Oregon

https://www.capitolchristmastree.com/news

Christmas.TreeWe hope to create 2,000 additional large ornaments as part of our larger goal of sending 10,000 ornaments to D.C. this year. All Oregon residents are invited to create and submit ornaments directly to us or to attend an upcoming ornament making event.

Make your own: Large ornaments should be 9-12 inches, reflective and colorful, lightweight and waterproof. They cannot include any logos.  Download this brochure for specifications and themes. For ornament ideas, check out our photos and instructions posted here. Keep in mind these are just ideas; feel free to get creative! All ornaments must be received by October 1 and can be dropped off in person at any one of our drop locations located here or mailed to the Sweet Home Ranger District at: 4431 Hwy 20, Sweet Home OR 97386.  


2. Sherman County Fair Ranch Cattle Sorting Competition, Aug. 17

horse.cattlesortingDon’t miss this awesome event at 7 p.m. on August 17th! The Sherman County Fair Ranch Sorting in Moro, Oregon, is a great, family friendly evening of horsey fun. Added money and prizes for the top teams!  Classes: Open (everyone!), Pro/Novice (a team of one money winning and one beginner sorter), Family, and Draw Pot. Contact Carrie for more information: 541-980-7394.


3. Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show, Aug. 20

4-H clover1The 4-H Horse Show on Monday, August 20th at 10 a.m. includes showmanship, English & Western Equitation, Trail Horse and 4-H Gaming. 4-H exhibitors compete in age appropriate classes with required tack and attire as described in the Sherman County Fair Premium book. Trail Horse contestants will face six to ten timed obstacles to earn points for a final score. The 4-H Ranch Horse program teaches riders to safely handle their horses and cattle in working situations by successfully completing a series of advancements. 4-H Western Games on horseback, individual in nature and timed are Figure 8, Barrels, Key Race, Pole Bending and Flag Race.


4. NIGHT ON THE LEFT BANK, A Maryhill Museum Benefit, Sept. 8


Saturday, Sept 8 | 5 p.m.

Join us overlooking the Columbia and under the stars for a night you won’t soon forget – Maryhill’s annual benefit auction. This year we celebrate the heartland of the Pacific Northwest with wine tastings from Cascade Cliffs Vineyard & Winery, Maryhill Winery, Phelps Creek Vineyards, and Sno Road Winery, along with brews and a fabulous array of traditional western foods from Paradise Rose Chuckwagon. Nab amazing auction lots, such as exclusive dinners, trips, wine and more.  All proceeds support the museum’s annual exhibitions and programs.

 Cost: Tickets are $100 per person. $50 is tax-deductible. Purchase tickets at 509.773.3733  ext. 20.  THANK YOU to our SPONSORS for 2018: Schommer and Sons, Weinstein PR, Tiffany and Jamieson Grabenhorst, Kathy and Bob Moco and Norm Johnson. Interested in becoming a sponsor? Contact Colleen at 509.773.3733 ext. 23.


5. Public Notice. City of Moro Election of Mayor & Council Members (2)

CITY OF MORO PUBLIC NOTICE
ELECTION OF MAYOR AND COUNCIL MEMBERS (2)

Notice is hereby given that on November 6, 2018, an election will be held for the purposes of electing a mayor, and two council members.

The position of Mayor is a two-year term and the positions of City Councilors are four year terms.

City candidates may file with the city elections office by paying a fee or by petition with valid signatures.

Candidates must be a qualified elector and have resided in the City of Moro during the 12 months preceding the election. Candidate filing packets can be obtained at the City Hall Office, 104 First Street, Moro, OR 97039.

All forms must be returned to the City Administrator no later than 4:00 p.m. August 28, 2018.

If you have any questions, contact: Erik Glover, City Administrator, via phone, 541-565-3535 or via email, moro@embarqmail.com


6. The Dalles Kiwanis Club Hosts 63rd Annual Steak Feed, Sept. 6

The Dalles Kiwanis Club hosts its 63rd annual Steak Feed Thursday after Labor Day, this year Sept. 6, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Sorosis Park.  The Steak Feed is the club’s major fund-raiser for community projects serving children and youth.  Adult meals include an eight ounce sirloin steak, baked potato, coleslaw, roll, dessert and drink for $15.  Free meal for children 12 and under features a hot dog, potato chips, drink and ice cream.  There will be activities for children and musical entertainment for everyone.  Tickets are available from Kiwanis members or may be purchased at the Habitat ReStore, 1001 W. 6th St., The Dalles. Tickets also may be purchased in the park Sept. 6.  


7. Setting the Pattern

When your younger children crave attention, do they throw a tantrum, misbehave or act out inappropriately? If so, perhaps you can show them a better way.

You know, children want many things that they don’t usually ask for directly. In that way, they’re no different from adults. Two things in particular that we all seem to need, but seldom come right out and ask for are recognition and affection.

Now, children who get plenty of each from the start usually grow up to be happy, well adjusted, confident, and well behaved. Employers love these folks, because they typically are contributors to the workplace, without the narcissistic need for attention. Children who don’t get much of either, though, will get very creative. They may try throwing tantrums, and if this succeeds in creating the attention they need, they may grow up believing that when you don’t get what you want, becoming very angry will do the trick. You have probably seen examples of this while driving or at the mall.

Many children misbehave to get attention – not consciously, as a rule, but they do it nevertheless, because even negative attention is better than no attention. If neither tantrums nor acting out works, they may eventually stop trying at all, becoming withdrawn, listless and apathetic.

The thing to do, then, if you want to eliminate these problems or avoid them in the first place, is to give your children plenty of attention and affection when they are behaving well. Children judge adults as much by what they see as what they hear. It’s a pattern that gets followed into adulthood.

Let your children know that it’s OK to ask for what they want. It’s OK to ask for a hug or to say, “Please pay attention to me for a few minutes.” When they do ask, take time to give it to them. Active listening is one very special gift that you can give your child, or any child, for that matter. By doing so, you will be avoiding many future problems – not only for your kids, but also for you. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #210

CONTENTS

  1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors, Aug. 13

  2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Meeting Site Changed, Aug. 15

  3. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

  4. Maryhill Museum’s Free Counties Weekend, Aug. 18-19

  5. Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games on the Historic Maryhill Loops Road

  6. Change = Growth = Change

  7. Wildfire Smoke Inhalation Prevention


Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and he has to buy graphite rods, reels, spinnerbaits, jigs, crankbaits, jerkbaits, plastics, flies, waders, a boat and a truck. ~unattributed


1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors, Aug. 13

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting on Monday, August 13, 2018, that will include a work session and an executive session. The work session will begin at 5:30 p.m. An executive session will follow pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(k) to consider matters relating to school safety at approximately 6:30 p.m. The regular board meeting will begin at approximately 7:00 p.m. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library. 


2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Meeting Site Changed, Aug. 15

The location of the Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, August 15, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. has changed and will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.


3. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

Making the Best of Summer
Strong Sherman County Families 
Networking parent and youth groups

4 week series

***FAMILY DINNER PROVIDED BEGINNING AT 5 PM
***TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE- CALL SHERMAN COUNTY TRANSIT 541-565-3553
***RSVP: aasher@co.sherman.or.us or call 541-565-5036
Moro Community Presbyterian Church basement: 204 4th St. Moro OR, 97039

Mondays :
July 30-August 20, 2018 (4 weeks)
4:30 – 5:00 Optional supervised play for children
5:00 – 5:30 Family meal
5:30 – 6:15 Parent and youth breakout sessions
6:15 – 6:30 Group debrief (parents and youth)

           *

Children ages 5-13 participate in group activities while learning about healthy relationships
(Responsible youth older than 13 who want to volunteer to buddy with younger students are encouraged to RSVP as well.)

          *

We are excited to offer Parent Café for any and all moms, dads and guardians during youth groups. Gather together for casual conversation about factors that strengthen family and community bonds.

Topics focus on Family and Community Relationships

week 1- Resilience- being strong and flexible

week 2-  Knowledge- family dynamic and child development

week 3- Support- everybody needs help sometimes

week 4- Communication- social and emotional intelligence.

THANK YOU TO THE MORO COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FOR THE GENEROUS USE OF THE FACILITIES!


4. Maryhill Museum’s Free Counties Weekend, Aug. 18-19

Saturday, Aug 18 & Sunday, Aug 19 | all day 

For nearly two decades, Maryhill Museum of Art has extended free admission on designated weekends to neighbors in Oregon and Washington. On August 18 & 19, 2018  residents from the following counties are granted free admission upon presentation of an I.D. with address: 

Oregon — Clatsop, Columbia, Grant, Lincoln, Morrow, Tillamook, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill. Washington  — Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Lewis, Pacific, San Juan, and Wahkiakum.


5. Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games on the Historic Maryhill Loops Road

Friday, Aug 31 – Sunday, Sept 2, 2018

Spectators of all ages can experience the thrill of watching the world’s top downhill skateboarders, street luge pilots, and inline racers compete down a winding two-mile course on the Maryhill Loops Road. In addition to gravity sports racing, there will be music and dancing, food, and a variety of vendors. Free admission for spectators at viewing spots along the race course. For more information, including sponsors, see https://www.maryhillwindwalk.com/festival/about/


6. Change = Growth = Change

Why is it so hard for some people to change? These folks deny the need to change, push back against any change, and can make the workplace a difficult place to be. They defend the anchors that keep the organizational “ship” from moving. Before “throwing” these people “overboard,” it is helpful to understand what happens when we try to behave differently.

Did you know that whenever you act differently than you really believe yourself to be, you produce stress? It doesn’t matter whether the new behavior is worse or better than the old. If it’s significantly different, it will generate internal stress. So how in the world do people change? One way is to just grit your teeth and go ahead and throw yourself into the situation, force yourself to act differently, and hang on until the new behavior is repeated often enough to feel comfortable. Change like this takes longer, and the stress involved affects the mind, body and emotional states . . . and cascades to everyone around you.

There is a better way, a less stressful way, a way that takes much of the pain and anxiety out of change. You change the mental picture you have of yourself first. You literally rehearse the future in your head, and you see yourself acting in the new way. You take yourself through it safely and comfortably in your mind, over and over again. Soon it doesn’t feel like new behavior at all. It feels like something you routinely do. It feels normal, or natural.

Then, when it comes time for you to actually change, it’s not such a big deal. You are already in the changed state. It is “like you” to be that way. Any stress you experience will feel more like the excitement of an adventure than the anxiety of change. And those around you will thank you for not stressing them out.

By the way, the process of repeatedly seeing yourself behave in a certain way is called visualization, and it works for countless individuals. Watch the athletes during the next swim meet, track & field contest or gymnastics competition. NASCAR and Formula One drivers. MLS, MLB, NFL FIFA – a lot of them are visualizing their performance, seeing every twist and turn. Chess masters are champions at visualization, as they plot out their strategy many, many moves ahead of time.

Visualizing change can work for you, too, and you don’t need to be a professional athlete. Why not give it a try? Decide what change you want, then see it in your mind first. And remember: it’s not so much change, as it is growth. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Wildfire Smoke Inhalation Prevention

North Central Public Health District would like to remind residents of Wasco, Sherman, and Gilliam Counties to take precautions to avoid illness due to wildfire smoke inhalation.

Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases.

Poor air quality conditions are a health threat and all residents should limit their exposure to smoke. Those with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children, are advised to stay indoors when the air-quality is poor.

Air quality can change quickly. Please visit the Oregon Smoke Blog and the DEQ Air Quality Index links below. DEQ air quality monitoring data is updated hourly and is color-coded for easy to read information. Unfortunately, the only permanent monitor for our region is in The Dalles, with Hermiston and Prineville being the next closest monitors. A link is also provided below with information on the 5-3-1 Visibility Index, if there’s not a monitor near you.

Please take the following precautions to avoid breathing problems or other symptoms from smoke:

  1. Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area. See the links below for DEQ’s Air Quality Index and Oregon Smoke blog or use the Visibility Index.
  2. Avoid working or exercising outdoors when air quality is poor. Limit outdoor sports, work and recreation.
  3. Drink lots of water – staying hydrated can keep your airways moist which will help reduce symptoms of respiratory irritation such as scratchy throat, running nose and coughing.
  4. Try to avoid driving in smoky areas. If you do need to drive in these areas, keep your windows rolled up and vents closed. If you need air conditioning, make sure you set your system on “re-circulate” to avoid bringing smoke into your car.
  5. Avoid smoke by staying indoors, closing all windows and doors and use a filter in your heating/cooling system that removes very fine particulate matter. Portable air cleaners with HEPA filters can also help keep indoor air cleaner in smaller spaces.
  6. People with concerns about health issues, including those suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems, should follow their breathing management plans; keep medications on hand, and contact healthcare providers if necessary.
  7. Use of masks or bandanas doesn’t filter out gases or fine particles. An N95 respirator can provide some protection, but only if the person using it has had a fit-test to make sure it fits properly, and the respirator is worn correctly. N95 respirators are not available in children’s sizes.

For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at 541-506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


 

Sherman County eNews #209

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2018 Fall Grant Cycle

  2. Creating Awareness, Decreasing Stigma Around Teen Mental Health, Aug. 9

  3. Perseid Meteor Shower, Aug. 11-13

  4. Public Notice. City of Moro Election of Mayor & Council Members (2)

  5. Public Notice. Sherman County Court, Aug. 15

  6. Travel Oregon Small Grant Applications Due Aug. 29

  7. Back to Square One

  8. Register Now for the Oregon Museums Association Conference


1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2018 Fall Grant Cycle

music-notesThe Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 4, 2018. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 28, 2018

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:

Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


2. Creating Awareness, Decreasing Stigma Around Teen Mental Health, Aug. 9

ATTENTION…Youth Ages 13-18

Creating Awareness, Decreasing Stigma

around Teen Mental Health

Presented by Erin Rust with Greater Oregon Behavioral Health

School Based Programs Coordinator and

Mental Health First Aid Coordinator and Instructor.

Youth ONLY!

August 9, 2018

1:00-3:00 p.m. (lunch provided at 12:30)

Sherman Extension Office meeting room

MUST RSVP AND HAVE SIGNED PERMISSION SLIP  TO ATTEND

RSVP: Sherman County Prevention , Amy Asher 541-565-5036 or email aasher@co.sherman.or.us

Permission slips also available:

www.co.sherman.or.us/departments/prevention

 Topics:

¨ Mental health awareness and stigma

¨ Mental health facts (media, substance use, suicide)

¨ Mental health illnesses and disorders

¨ Depression signs and symptoms

¨ Suicide signs and symptoms

¨ What to do and resources.


3. Perseid Meteor Shower, Aug. 11-13

StarYellowPERSEID METEOR SHOWER: Earth is entering a stream of debris from giant comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, parent of the annual Perseid meteor shower. Although the shower is not expected to peak until next weekend, NASA all-sky cameras are already detecting dozens of Perseid fireballs every night over the USA. This early activity may be a good omen for the nights ahead, especially Aug. 11th-13th when Earth is expected to pass through the densest part of the comet’s debris zone. Visit Spaceweather.com for more information and observing tips.


4. Public Notice. City of Moro Election of Mayor & Council Members (2)

CITY OF MORO PUBLIC NOTICE
ELECTION OF MAYOR AND COUNCIL MEMBERS (2)
Notice is hereby given that on November 6, 2018, an election will be held for the purposes of electing a mayor, and two council members.

The position of Mayor is a two-year term and the positions of City Councilors are four year terms.

City candidates may file with the city elections office by paying a fee or by petition with valid signatures.

Candidates must be a qualified elector and have resided in the City of Moro during the 12 months preceding the election. Candidate filing packets can be obtained at the City Hall Office, 104 First Street, Moro, OR 97039.

All forms must be returned to the City Administrator no later than 4:00 p.m. August 28, 2018.

If you have any questions, contact: Erik Glover, City Administrator, via phone, 541-565-3535 or via email, moro@embarqmail.com


5. Public Notice. Sherman County Court, Aug. 15

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, August 15, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. in the Hearings Room at the Sherman County Courthouse Addition, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Courthouse Project Update,  Appointment to Senior Advisory Council (SAC) – Mike McArthur, Commissioners’ Reports and Consent Agenda. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


6. Travel Oregon Small Grant Applications Due Aug. 29

The mission of Travel Oregon is: “A better life for Oregonians through strong, sustainable local economies.” Travel Oregon has established a program to make grant awards “to eligible applicants for projects that contribute to the development and improvement of communities throughout the state by means of the enhancement, expansion and promotion of the visitor industry.” Small Grant Program applicants may apply for grants of up to $20,000 per project and may apply for no more than two projects in the current application period. Each project requires its own application. Applicants must demonstrate at least a 10 percent cash match. Projects must be completed within a 12-month timeframe.

The online application period opened on July 30, 2018 with a submission deadline of 5 p.m. on Aug. 29, 2018. The grant award announcement will be Oct. 17, 2018.

2018-2019 Competitive Small Grants Guidelines<http://industry.traveloregon.com/content/uploads/2018/07/FINAL18-19SmallGrantsGuidelines.pdf> (http://industry.traveloregon.com/content/uploads/2018/07/FINAL18-19SmallGrantsGuidelines.pdf)

2018-2019 Competitive Small Grants Application Questions <http://industry.traveloregon.com/content/uploads/2018/07/FINAL18-19-Small-Grants-Application-Questions.pdf>


7. Back to Square One

When adversity strikes, whether it be loss of your job, an illness, a natural disaster or when you take a big hit that really knocks you off your feet for a while, how fast you get up again depends on a number of things – and this is for communities as well as individuals – such as:

  • How good your support network is,
  • How solid your self-esteem is,
  • The extent to which you believe that you can control your own destiny, and
  • Your experiences of overcoming adversity in the past.

It’s not so much “mind over matter” but a purposeful mindset, or attitude, toward moving forward. You don’t ignore the past, but use it as a springboard for what you want in the future. If you want to shorten the time it takes to get back on your feet, try this:

  • Ask yourself how it will look when you no longer have your current problems.
  • Spend time visualizing yourself in that desired picture and imagining how you’ll feel.
  • Repeat the picture over and over, day after day, week after week.
  • List your strengths and past accomplishments and add to that list on a daily basis.

While you are creating this vision for your desired future, and supporting it by reinforcing your strengths – and reminding yourself that yes, you are strong – it is time to set and prioritize some immediate, short-term goals to improve your situation. Once you have a list, it’s time to write a detailed plan of action for the top three, including day and time. There is nothing more gratifying than being able to check something OFF a list!

Once you’ve accomplished a few short-term goals, you may feel ready to do some long-term visioning and goal-setting. Finally – and this is important – no matter how much you’ve lost, take time to help someone else who is struggling. You can always find someone worse off than you, and you usually don’t need to look very far. Even the worst adversity can be used to learn and grow, and contribute to a positive solution. ~The Pacific Institute


8. Register Now for the Oregon Museums Association Conference

2018 Oregon Museums Association Annual Conference Hood River, Oregon

Resilience: Responding to Change

September 9, 10 and 11, 2018

As we convene in Hood River this year we will be thinking about ways in which we have shown resilience in our institutions and communities. We hope to see you in September!

Registration is now open!<https://www.oregonmuseums.org/event-2907856> Note that members must log in at the top right corner of the website BEFORE registering in order to receive member rates.

  *   Member – $95.00

  *   Non-member – $115.00

  *   Student – $50.00

See the draft schedule<https://www.oregonmuseums.org/Annual-Conference-Schedule-2017> for the 3-day conference. The Conference will include half-day workshops and tours on Sunday, September 9 and sessions, panels and networking opportunities on Monday and Tuesday, September 10-11, 2018. The Oregon Museums Association annual meeting of members will occur  on Sunday, September 9, 2018.

Keynote Speaker: Meet Colin Fogarty,<https://www.oregonmuseums.org/page-1860425> Executive Director of the Confluence Project, who will deliver this year’s keynote address.

Lodging: The official conference hotel is The Historic Hood River Hotel <https://hoodriverhotel.com/>. We have a limited number of rooms reserved at $159 + tax per night for conference guests. See lodging information. <https://www.oregonmuseums.org/page-1860417>

The conference will take place at the following locations in Hood River, OR:

*   Hood River Hotel<https://hoodriverhotel.com>, 102 SW Oak Street

*   Columbia Center for the Arts<https://www.columbiaarts.org>, 215 Cascade Avenue

*   History Museum of Hood River County <https://www.hoodriverhistorymuseum.org>, 3300 E Port Marina D, Hood River.


 

Sherman County eNews #208

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Editorial Note: Sherman County, Oregon History

  3. South Valley Fire Update, Aug. 5

  4. Frontier Regional 911: July 2018 Call Source Tally by Agency

  5. Somebody Labored Years Ago…

  6. You Talking to You?

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is now open Summer Hours -11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm Saturday

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

Movie Night – 6:00pm
My Little Pony- The Movie
Rated PG
Run Time: 1hr 39 min
After a dark force conquers Canterlot, the Mane 6 embark on an unforgettable journey beyond Equestria where they meet new friends and exciting challenges on a quest to use the magic of friendship to save their homeland.

Summer Reading Program Party – Saturday, August 11, 2018
If you met your reading goals this summer come anytime between 11am and 3pm to claim your prize and enjoy snacks. Adam Miller will perform at 1pm

Adam Miller presents Old Songs for Young Folks – Saturday, August 11, 2018 at 1pm
It wasn’t that long ago when only kings and queens were rich enough to have other people play music for them. In the old days, regular folks like you and me had to make our own music. That’s why it’s called “folk music!”
All ages welcome.


2. Editorial Note: Sherman County, Oregon History

pencil.sharpSherman County, Oregon History is our personal local history collection on the web. Browsers sometimes find http://shermancountyoregon.com while looking for something else. Inquiries and information received March through July, 2018, include:

  • Where can I find marriage certificates?
  • Sherman County ORGenWeb is no longer on Rootsweb.com. The new link is https://www.orgenweb.org/sherman/
  • Request for address and contact information for purchasing a lot at Sun Rise Cemetery.
  • Request to receive the fundraising letter for Sun Rise Cemetery in order to make a donation.
  • Request for information about Harmony School unable to obtain at the local museum.
  • Where can I find county brochures for a local tourism business?
  • Interest in a new name for Negro Ridge.
  • Request for information about Kenneth Springs Silver Fox Farm.

3. South Valley Fire Update, August 5

Posted: 05 Aug 2018 11:37 AM PDT

The South Valley Fire is in full mop-up. While the fire has reached 40 percent containment, an overnight infrared flight revealed smoldering hot spots in many areas along the fire’s perimeter. Fire crews will be spending the next few days cooling the edges and well into the fire’s interior. The size of the fire remains 20,026 acres.

The post South Valley Fire Update, August 5 appeared first on Central Oregon Fire Information.


4. Frontier Regional 911: July 2018 Call Source Tally by Agency

emergencydial911redFrontier Regional 911 serves Gilliam, Jefferson, Sherman and Wheeler counties. Total calls per agency are based on subtotals for law enforcement, fire, emergency services and others, July 1 through July 31, 2018. Frontier Regional 911 dispatch center is based in Condon. See https://www.facebook.com/frontierregional911/. Courtesy of Sherman County Sheriff Lohrey.

TOTAL – AGENCY

22 Lake Chinook Fire

73 Jefferson County Fire District #1 Madras

33 Jefferson County Fire District #2 Culver

282 Jefferson County EMS

9 Crooked River Ranch Fire

23 Arlington Ambulance

2 North Gilliam County Fire Units

20 Burns Paiute Tribal Police

8 Condon Ambulance

32 Condon Fire Department

8 Fossil Ambulance

3 Fossil Volunteer Fire Department

444 Gilliam County Sheriff’s Office

50 Jefferson County Community

1,405 Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office

54 Moro Fire Department

9 Mitchell Ambulance

8 Mitchell Fire Department

1,326 Madras Police Department

24 NGFD

208 Not Our Jurisdiction

29 North Sherman County Fire Units

3 Spray Ambulance

30 Sherman County Ambulance

573 Sherman County Sheriff’s Office

5 South Gilliam County Fire Units

3 South Sherman Ambulance

14 South Sherman Fire Department

98 TCC Frontier

12 USFS

7 Wheeler County Fire & Rescue

105 Wheeler County Sheriff’s Office

4,022 Total in July


5. Somebody Labored Years Ago…

Somebody labored years ago 
Whose name I do not even know 
Ploughed ground or sailed the open sea, 
And loved a maid that I might be. 
Two centuries ago or more 
A woman at an English door 
Looked fondly at a lilac tree 
And passed that bit of pride to me.
One stood enraptured when he heard 
The music of a singing bird, 
And now with each returning spring, 
I find I do the selfsame thing. 
Could we untangle all our lives 
And learn how much in us survives, 
We might discover just how far 
Goes back what makes us what we are. 
—-Edgar A. Guest


6. You Talking to You?

Yesterday, we talked a bit about what we can do when adversity strikes. There is one more piece that needs to be added to the conversation – and it is a “conversation” – the one you have with yourself 24/7/365.

That conversation we have with ourselves is commonly called “self-talk” – or as it is referred to in today’s neuroscience circles, meta cognition. This conversation we have with ourselves goes on all the time. In fact, self-talk provides the catalyst for hardening the concrete (our beliefs) that forms the foundation upon which we build our lives.

Now, when adversity strikes, no matter what form that adversity takes, if you can, take a moment and really listen to the words you use to describe the situation. Are you talking about what you can’t do, or what you can do? Are you talking about the finality of the situation, or are you talking about the possibilities for turning it around? Is the conversation fixed, or flexible?

The question really is this: Are you positive or negative in your approach to your future? Most of us don’t really listen to the words we use, but we probably should. We choose words out of habit, sometimes, more than intent. The words we use cause pictures in our minds, and those pictures are flooded with what we are feeling – most likely from memories of similar past experiences. These feelings color our moods, our relationships with those around us – everything that makes up our lives.

When adversity hits – whether it is senseless violence, a job loss, a loved one diagnosed with a disease, or something as everyday has a traffic jam – stop, if you can, and listen to what you are saying, either out loud or to yourself. Is this conversation making things worse, or is it making things better?

Earlier, we referred to this control of what goes on in our minds as a learnable superpower, one we can attain with a little mindful attention. So, remember, if you will, two things: Your words, out loud, affect not just you, but those around you; and also, the first person those words affect is you. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbGenealogy: Sherman County Oregon GenWeb

Commentary. Resilience: Extinction vs. Collapse

Pew Research Center

Rasmussen Reports Polls

American Thinker

Commentary: 3 Reasons Why So Many Millennials Love Socialism

Why Americans Go (and Don’t Go) to Religious Services 

Origins and Destinations of the World’s Migrants, 1990-2017

About Douglas Rushkoff