Sherman County eNews #249

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

  2. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

  3. Pans on Fire & Rookie Cooks 4-H Clubs

  4. Oregon eclipse update: info related to smoke, fire, vehicle fuel, eclipse glasses

  5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

  6. Nena Springs Fire Update, Aug. 18

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

The Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 5, 2017. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 29, 2017

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition, P.O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


2. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms for projects and/or programs in Sherman County will be available September 11, 2017. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2017, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2018.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

•A brief description of your project.

•State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.

•Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc., P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions? Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


 3. Pans on Fire & Rookie Cooks 4-H Clubs

4-H clover1The “Pans on Fire” outdoor cooking and food preservation 4-H club met on Thursday, August 17 at 9am at the Extension Office, with Hunter Kenney in attendance and Emma Robbins excused absence.  Hunter worked on his 4-H record book and got it done for fair.  He then made jerky from ground beef, using a jerky gun to make three different shapes. 

The “Rookie Cooks” 4-H club met on Friday, August 18 at 1pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Zach, Logan, and Becca.  Excused absence was Jordan.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Becca, 4-H Pledge by Logan.  We worked on fair entry forms and record books.  Prepared peanut butter cookie dough and shaped in two ways:  criss-cross with forks and with chocolate candy.  Judged and sampled the cookies.  Played game “Barnacle”.  Next meeting is in 2018.  Meeting adjourned at 3:05pm.  Signed, Becca Earl


4. Oregon eclipse update: info related to smoke, fire, vehicle fuel, eclipse glasses

eclipse1Salem OR — As the eclipse quickly approaches, issues related to traffic, wildfires, and smoke are affecting travel. Rumors related to fuel, and a shortage of eclipse-rated glasses, are also prompting concerns. The Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, working with partner centers and agencies around the state, will issue regular updates starting today.

WILDFIRES
+ The State Emergency Communications Center (ECC) elevated from “enhanced watch” for the eclipse to activation at 1 p.m. on Friday in order to coordinate response to the growing number of wildfires in the state.

CONCERNS OF FUEL SHORTAGES
+ Some people have questioned whether enough fuel is available at Oregon gas stations. The Oregon Department of Energy reports fuel trucks are making deliveries around the clock. Even if a station runs out of fuel, its a temporary situation.

+ The terminals report that Oregons supply is in great shape, with no problems. Fuel haulers reinforced that. They’re making their deliveries and not reporting any problems.

+ Should you encounter a fuel shortage at an area gas station, we recommend you visit another fuel station or return to the station that was out of fuel at a later time.

+ Stay calm, fuel on!

WILDFIRE SMOKE
+ Weather and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires. This can vary not only daily, but also hourly. Smoke may also affect one part of a community but not another. This can make it difficult to provide specific health warnings, especially when conditions change quickly.

+ Since smoke from wildfires varies around the state — and can change quickly — we recommend residents and visitors visit the multiagency site for communicating smoke information to the public at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. This site has the best and latest information about smoke conditions in your area.

+ Some people, such as those with chronic heart or lung disease, children and the elderly may experience health effects even when the air is unhealthy for a short time. It is important to take precautions based on your individual health and the smoke levels around you. This may mean staying indoors when air quality is poor. It may also mean not exercising during these conditions.

TRAVEL DELAYS/TRAFFIC
+ Traffic into and around Oregon will increase over the next few days as more and more people arrive to view the eclipse.

+ The best advice is to get where you are going and then stay put. Arrive early, stay put and leave late is your best course of action.

+ Those wanting the best and most current information on traffic conditions around the state should visit the Oregon Department of Transportations Tripcheck web page at http://TripCheck.com.

+ ODOT also has a mobile site at http://TripCheck.com/mobile.

SHORTAGE OF ECLIPSE GLASSES
+ Some areas have reported the supply of eclipse viewing glasses is low or depleted. While genuine protective eyewear is the only safe way to directly view the eclipse, one alternative to glasses includes a homemade pinhole projector. Visit the OEM Facebook page for a link to instructions on How to Make a Pinhole Projector to View the Solar Eclipse. The OEM page is http://www.facebook.com/OMDOEM

+ For additional information on safe viewing, visit the Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology at www.oregoneyephysicians.org, and the Casey Eye Institute www.ohsu.casey.com.

REMINDER
Oregons 211 information line is the best source of information for questions regarding Eclipse issues. Resident and visitors are encouraged to call 211 or visit 211info.org for information.


5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

Do you know what a self-fulfilling prophecy is? Most people know that a self-fulfilling prophecy is an event that, because it is predicted and expected, is therefore more likely to happen, and even caused to happen. 

For example, according to Success magazine, two different groups of psychologists were once asked to observe the same child playing. One group was told beforehand that the child was emotionally disturbed. The other group was told that the child was a genius. When the psychologists were asked to report on their observations afterward, each group had found evidence to support their preconceived ideas. 

Now, it’s important to realize that self-fulfilling prophecies are everyday experiences – not just laboratory experiments. What do you expect your day to be like when you get up in the morning? How do you expect your kids to behave? How much success do you expect for yourself? What do you expect for your organization’s production or sales for this month, this year?

You see, if you predict failure, failure is generally what you will find. And if you expect excellence, excellence is very likely what you will get. How we think about a situation determines how we act, and how we act, more than anything else, determines the results. 

That is how self-fulfilling prophecies work. There’s nothing magical about them. What you get in life is pretty much how you behave, coming back at you. Does that make sense to you? Do yourself a favor this weekend, and see if you recognize areas where you are setting yourself up because of your expectations. If you are setting yourself up for the good, terrific! If not, what can you do to change those internal expectations, and change your life, your work, your business?

And with school about to start again (at least in the Northern Hemisphere), how can you help the school-age children in your life set themselves up to expect the best, and work toward it? ~The Pacific Institute


6. Nena Springs Fire Update, Aug. 18

Warm Springs OR — At approximately 3:20pm Thursday, an ember from the Nena Springs Fire blew out of containment lines near Kishwalk. Driven by high winds, the fire began running in grass and brush. Two helicopters, handcrews and at least 10 engines responded in addition to 150 firefighters that were already assigned to the fire.

Winds pushed the fire over Indian Head Canyon and through Charlie Canyon, then continued move a mile east past the Kah-Nee-Ta Resort. As was planned earlier in the week, in the event an evacuation notice was issued, visitors sheltered in place. Firefighters used Route 8 to burn from the road. This successfully removed grass from around the Resort and forced the fire to stay above and away from the area. While the Resort is still at a Level 3 evacuation, the immediate threat to it is gone.

At approximately 10pm Thursday night, the fire jumped Hwy 3 at Fish Hatchery Grade. Firefighters’ priority was to keep the fire from crossing the Warm Springs River and to prevent it from burning structures. As of midnight Thursday, these objectives had been met.

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Red Team, commanded by Ian Yocum, was mobilized late Thursday night. Two task forces of engines from Marion and Multnomah Counties began working with the existing organization around midnight. Yamhill and Washington Counties engines and personnel arrived this morning. These task forces bring with them a total of 79 firefighters, 19 engines and four water tenders to assist with protecting structures and building upon the work firefighters have already completed.

The fire has grown an estimated 6,000 acres bringing the total acres to approximately 46,000. A flight will occur this morning to get a more accurate account of the fire’s size. It is 40% contained.

Evacuation Notices: The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Spa received a Level 3 evacuation notice Thursday evening. As was planned this week, in the event of a wildfire, visitors will remain in place. Charley Canyon, Webster Flat Road, South Junction, Culpus Bridge, and Wolf Point Subdivision are now at a Level 3 Evacuation Notice.

Evacuation Center: The Red Cross established an evacuation center at the Warm Springs Community Center for residents that have been evacuated.

Road Closures: Hwy 3 to School Flats; Hwy 8 to Kah-Nee-Ta Village; Webster Flat Road, and Culpus Bridge are closed to all traffic.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbEclipse Viewers Urged to Protect Eyes and Guard Against “Painless” But Irreversible Damage

 

US Postal Service Postmarks to Celebrate Oregon’s Eclipse Path

Oregon Wheat Growers League

20 Potent Pieces Of Life Advice, As Told By People Over 60.

 

NW News Network: If you build an eclipse camp will they come?

 

Agent Orange on Arizona Reservation


 

Sherman County eNews #248

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

REMINDERS: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU, TERRI EARL! Sherman County School Clothes Scramble 2010-2017! Thank you for organizing this program offering exchanges of nice used clothing for Sherman County families. THANK YOU, PARTICIPATING FAMILIES and SHERMAN COUNTY PUBLIC/LIBRARY STAFF! We’ve enjoyed following this grass-roots effort that provided opportunities for us all to help one another. ~The Editor

CONGRATULATIONS, DARYN (McDERMID) REYNOLDS, on your Western Oregon University graduation with a Bachelor of Arts in Social Science! ~The Editor

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries] 

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

NON-PROFIT OPPORTUNITY.  Sherman County Emergency Services has cans and bottles to donate to a non-profit.  If interested, please contact Shawn at 541-565-3100.

SOUTH SHERMAN FIRE & RESCUE WOMEN’S AUXILIARY. BIG BAKE SALE! FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 and SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 8 AM to 4 PM or until we run out of baked goods! GRASS VALLEY CITY PARK. QUESTIONS? Call Judy at 928-851-2340.

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

EMPLOYMENT: 

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $20-$27/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.usSubmit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Monday, September 4, 2017.  Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

CHILDCARE PROGRAM. MANAGER/DIRECTOR & ASSISTANT. Little Wheats childcare program is looking to fill TWO POSITIONS: a Program Manager/Director and Assistant; a successful applicant must love children and be dependable. Both positions need 1st Aid/CPR, food handlers and recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect – however we can work with you to provide these trainings for you. Some are online and some are classes. The Director position starts at $15-17hr, the Assistant $10-12hr, depending on experience/qualifications, both are typically 26-35 hrs a week. The manager is required to be on site around 70% of the open hours, though can work more if requested. Highly preferred for the manager to have one year of qualifying teaching experience in the care of a group of children (kindergarten, preschool, child care center, CF home, Head Start) or 30 quarter credits in ECE or a step 8 in the Oregon Registry. Little Wheats does not offer medical insurance – but we do offer a $150 monthly stipend towards whatever medical coverage you choose for the Director. We also provide both positions with 1 week’s paid personal leave each year after a 3 month probation period; it is based on the average number of hours worked per week. (ie – if you normally work 20 hours per week, you would receive a week off paid at 20 hours or if you worked an average of 30 hours per week you would be paid for 30 hours, etc….) We also provide reduced rates for childcare for employees. Please call/text 541-980-5232 with questions, pick up an application at 409 Dewey St. in Moro, or apply online at Indeed.com.  8/18

PREVENTION COORDINATOR. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of Prevention Coordinator. This is a part time position, 20-24 hr./week or .50/.60FTE, Monday-Friday; there is an option for flexible scheduling within the FTE, and potential for expansion. Partial benefits available. Applicant must value collaboration and be skilled in data collection, program implementation, and grant management. This position works closely with youth, the community, and other agencies to identify and implement strategies to prevent drug and alcohol abuse in Sherman County. This is an exciting opportunity to effect local change.  For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, PO Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, September 1st. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

RETAIL YARD ASSOCIATE, PETROLEUM DELIVERY DRIVER, GRAIN FACILITY OPERATOR & GRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. Mid Columbia Producers Inc. is hiring for a variety of positions.  Full Benefits including Health, Dental, Vision, Rx, 401k with robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation and sick leave and more are available to all regular full time positions.  All four positions listed here are full time.

Retail Yard Associate Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  Customer service, deliveries and inventory management are a few of the essential job functions of this position. It can be physically demanding and requires the individual to work in varying weather conditions.  The chosen candidate will work at all three of our locations including The Dalles, Wasco and Goldendale Washington.

Petroleum Delivery Driver This position is based in Bend, OR.The role of the Petroleum Delivery Drivers is to safely transport petroleum products and render outstanding customer service to our patrons.  The deliveries will range from commercial/industrial accounts and home heating oil to bulk and packaged lubricants.  Product knowledge is a plus.  On Site training will be provided.

Grain Operations Laborer This position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County depending on the candidates and business necessity.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.   Maintenance, housekeeping, and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility are some of the essential functions of this position.

Grain Facility Operator This position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County depending on the candidates and business necessity. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.  *This position requires the ability to obtain a pesticide license with space fumigation endorsement.

For more information on joining the MCP team, please visit www.mcpcoop.com. To apply for any of these positions please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277  Fax: (503)536-6875

Brittany@mcpcoop.com  8/18

 FOR SALE:

ECLIPSE GLASSES. Last chance to get your 2017 Oregon Solar Eclipse Glasses at the Sherman County Museum Store. Our eclipse glasses are from Rainbow Symphony, one of the NASA recognized manufacturers that meet the ISO Standard. Glasses are $2.00. Members receive a 10% discount. Open daily 10-5 at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. 8/18

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

STUDDED TIRES ON RIMS. Studded tires, 245/75R-16 on GM Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM). Lightly used asking $700 for wheels and tires. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text). 9/8

RANCH-STYLE HOME IN RUFUS. $209,900. Attractive ranch style home on corner lot in Rufus. Built in 2013. High ceilings. Great floor plan with open concept. 3 bed 2 bath. 1580 Sq Ft. Spacious entry with wide hallway. Large living room. Dining room has sliding glass doors to back patio. Kitchen is great for entertaining with Breakfast bar. Lots of storage with pantry, more than ample counter space for cooking. Nice master bed and bath. 2 Charming bedrooms and 2nd bath. Nicely landscaped. Contact Bonnie Long At Copperwest Properties 541-993-1513. 8/18

WEATHERED OAK WINE BARREL ADIRONDACK CHAIRS. Weathered Oak Wine Barrel Adirondack Chairs – stationary $350, rocker $375 or the set for $650. Local Craftsman. Call for photos… 541-788-9497.  9/8

PROPERTY NEAR MORO. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000. RMLS# 17410095 – Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  11/10

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

APARTMENT FOR RENT. For Rent in Moro, OR is a beautiful 1 bedroom (possibly 2), 1.5 bath apartment. There is a second bonus room that could be used as a bedroom or office. Features an open floor plan, loft bedroom, stainless steel appliances, knotty alder cabinets, and custom woodwork throughout. The apartment is nestled in a barn which includes 3 stalls and a tack room. Plenty of fenced pasture for your horse(s) and a small yard for you to enjoy our beautiful sunsets. $850/month includes water and garbage. Applications and reference checks will be required. Call 509-250-0904 for more information or to make an appointment to view. 9/8

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

SCHOOL CLOTHES SCRAMBLE COORDINATOR. Sherman County School Clothes Scramble, an annual August event, will continue with the next volunteer. Following her 7th annual Scramble, Terri Earl has a file of information she will be glad to pass along. Please text or call Terri at 541-980-2959 for information. 8/25

WANTED:

ART WORK FOR SHERMAN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ADDITION. The Sherman County Project Team is actively seeking Sherman County-themed art work for display in the courthouse addition currently under construction. The team is interested in any two-dimensional media (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, etc) for display inside the addition. Deadline for submittal is August 31. For the initial screening, please provide an 8″ by 10″ color photograph or digital image of the proposed article. Include the dimensions of the actual article, if the size is fixed, along with a description of how the article relates to Sherman County and any relationship between the contributor and Sherman County. If the project team is interested in directly inspecting the article, arrangements will be made with the contributor to do so. We know there are several talented local artists and photographers out there and encourage each one to contribute. There is no restriction upon the number of articles that can be submitted for consideration. Sherman County will offer a stipend, the amount of which is to be determined, for each piece of art work acquired. Submittals can be made by mail to PO Box 282, Moro, OR 97039 or by email to debbieh@co.sherman.or.us Questions may be directed to the same email address. 8/25

FREE:

 NEWSPAPER OBITUARIES from Sherman County newspapers, posted for family historians, were transcribed from microfilm by Chris Sanders. http://shermancountyoregon.com/obituaries/


 2. Calendar (new or corrected) 

AUGUST

1-27 Pacific Northwest Plein Air Exhibition 10-5 Maryhill Museum of Art

18 Frontier Digital Network & Frontier TeleNet Board Meetings 9 Moro

18-19 South Sherman Fire & Rescue Women’s Auxiliary Bake Sale 8-4 Grass Valley

19 Celebration of Life: Bill Vann, Otilia Geiser Vann 1 Discovery Center

19 Great American Eclipse Education & Entertainment in Fossil

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

20 Sherman County Fair Commercial/Community Booth Application Deadline

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade,
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 8 a.m. The Dalles

22-27 Sherman County Fair

22 Sherman County Fair 4-H Static Exhibit Judging

22 Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show 10

24 Healthy Families’ Play Group 10:30-12 Moro City Park (now Aug. 24)

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10:30 The Dalles

23 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 1:15-3 The Dalles

23 Sherman County School District Surplus Sale 9-6

23 Sherman County Fair: Take your entries to the fair! 

23 Sherman County Fair Dale Coles Classic Car Show 3:30

23 Sherman County Fair BBQ Burgers/Dogs with the Fair Board 5

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H Style Revue 5:30

23 Sherman County Fair Horse Games in the Arena 7:15

24 Healthy Families’ Play Group 10:30-12 Moro City Park

24 Kindergarten Registration for Sherman County School

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H Poultry, Rabbit & Cavie Show 8 a.m.

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Market Judging 10

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Market Judging 11

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Market Judging 12:30

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Market Judging 2

24 Sherman County Fair Down on the Farm Chore Course 7

25 Frontier TeleNet & Frontier Digital Network Board Meetings 9 Wasco Annex

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H Home Economics Contests 8

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship 10

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship 11

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship 1

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship 2

25 Sherman County Fair Cattle Sorting Contests 7 Arena

26 Sherman County Fair Wellness Walk 8 Downtown Moro

26 Sherman County Fair Exhibit Parade 9:15 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair Queen’s Reception 10 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-Around Showmanship 12

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Sale 4-5

26 Sherman County Fair FFA Annual BBQ 5:30

26 Sherman County Fair Special Introductions 7:15 Arena

26 Sherman County Fair Bull Riding Contests 7:30-9

26 Sherman County Fair Dance with Countryfied in the Arena 9:30-1

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90

27 Sherman County Fair Cowboy Church with Susie McEntire 10:30

27 Sherman County Fair Demolition Derby 2 Arena

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Burnet Bldg.

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles

31-Sept. 3 Gilliam County Fair, Condon

SEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

2 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell

4 LABOR DAY

5 School resumes in Sherman County

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 Gilliam County Court 10

6 Wheeler County Court 10

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30 Moro

12 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

12 Mid-Columbia Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30 Senior Center, Moro

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District 4-5 Klickitat County

22 Autumn Begins

22 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Reception & Awards

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

26 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting

29 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 TBD


 

Sherman County eNews #247

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

  2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

  3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

  5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

  6. Pushing Through Fear


“It is the manners and spirit of a people, which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” —Thomas Jefferson (1787)


1Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

Sherman County Public/School Library is closed today, Thursday, August 17 due to a temporary water shut off. The library will open again as scheduled on Saturday, August 19th at 10pm. Book Club will continue tonight as planned with tea and treats; please make necessary arrangements. Game night has been canceled.  Thank you for your patience!


2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

Hope this finds you all enjoying summer, getting ready for the Sherman County Fair and back to school.

If anyone wants to “step up to the plate” and make this school year extremely interesting…how about saying YES to a last minute request to host an international student for the academic year?

States’ 4-H, the national program that coordinates 4-H exchange program at OSU, has announced it is “scrambling as there are still 5 academic year students left to place (one girl and four boys) that will be arriving the end of the month from Ukraine, Armenia, Kurgyzstan, and Turkmenistan.”  The 16 y/o girl is into dancing/music/photography;  the boys (15, 17 and 18) all look like they’re into computer science, coding, graphic design, and/or robotics…and want to do things like swimming, basketball, volunteering at an animal shelter, being with pets, or traveling while in the USA.

If you would consider being a last-minute host….(which our family did in the fall of 2008 for a young man from Mexico)…or know of any families that might like to host them….if you have children about the age of these students…or would like to learn more about these amazingly talented/smart international exchange students…immediately contact:

Brenda Coleman, OSU 4-H International Exchange programs

Brenda.Coleman@oregonstate.edu


3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County 

The Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission is asking for recommendations for a cemetery that would be good for a marker cleaning and repair workshop on October 14 when they meet in Sherman County. They would need a water source, some tilting or broken markers in a cemetery that needs a little attention, markers that need cleaning and, ideally, folks who can pull together some gravel and perhaps a port-a-potty. The workshop is usually all day 9-3 or 4, and folks bring their own sack lunch for it. It’s a wonderful opportunity for Sherman County. Please contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov, as soon as possible. ~Sherry Kaseberg


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society will be meeting on Sept. 9, 2017 at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in the Basalt Cafe. General meeting and program will begin at 1:00 pm. This month’s program will be given by Sandy Bisset who will give a presentation on Land Records. The meeting and program is open to the public and those interested in genealogy and family history are encouraged to attend. The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society meets the second Saturday of each month. Event schedules can be found on our blog and general information and newsletter can be found on our main website, https://gorgegen.blogspot.com/.


5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

THE DALLES—Columbia Gorge Discovery Center presents Columbia River Indian Summer on September 9th at 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. This free daytime event feature artisans, musicians and vendors from our regional Native American community.

The programming will includes flute music by Foster Kalama, tule mat making demonstrations by Taaw-lee-Winch, traditional Indian games and drumming with Jefferson Greene, a Northwest Twined Pouch Workshop by Pat Courtney Gold, and local craft vendors.  A salmon lunch and Indian fry bread will be available for purchase on a first come first served basis beginning at 12:00 noon.

“We want to offer the opportunity for local indigenous peoples to showcase their culture and history at our facility,” said Executive Director Carolyn Purcell.  This is part of an ongoing Indigenous Voices Project funded in part by grants from Trust Management Services, Oregon Historic Trails Fund and Wy’East Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Folklife Network.  For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org


6. Pushing Through Fear

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better.

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth.

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the good life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? What steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #247

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

  2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

  3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

  5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

  6. Pushing Through Fear


“It is the manners and spirit of a people, which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” —Thomas Jefferson (1787)


1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

Sherman County Public/School Library is closed today, Thursday, August 17 due to a temporary water shut off. The library will open again as scheduled on Saturday, August 19th at 10pm. Book Club will continue tonight as planned with tea and treats; please make necessary arrangements. Game night has been canceled.  Thank you for your patience!


2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

Hope this finds you all enjoying summer, getting ready for the Sherman County Fair and back to school.

If anyone wants to “step up to the plate” and make this school year extremely interesting…how about saying YES to a last minute request to host an international student for the academic year? 

States’ 4-H, the national program that coordinates 4-H exchange program at OSU, has announced it is “scrambling as there are still 5 academic year students left to place (one girl and four boys) that will be arriving the end of the month from Ukraine, Armenia, Kurgyzstan, and Turkmenistan.”  The 16 y/o girl is into dancing/music/photography;  the boys (15, 17 and 18) all look like they’re into computer science, coding, graphic design, and/or robotics…and want to do things like swimming, basketball, volunteering at an animal shelter, being with pets, or traveling while in the USA. 

If you would consider being a last-minute host….(which our family did in the fall of 2008 for a young man from Mexico)…or know of any families that might like to host them….if you have children about the age of these students…or would like to learn more about these amazingly talented/smart international exchange students…immediately contact:

Brenda Coleman, OSU 4-H International Exchange programs

Brenda.Coleman@oregonstate.edu


3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County 

The Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission is asking for recommendations for a cemetery that would be good for a marker cleaning and repair workshop on October 14 when they meet in Sherman County. They would need a water source, some tilting or broken markers in a cemetery that needs a little attention, markers that need cleaning and, ideally, folks who can pull together some gravel and perhaps a port-a-potty. The workshop is usually all day 9-3 or 4, and folks bring their own sack lunch for it. It’s a wonderful opportunity for Sherman County. Please contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov, as soon as possible. ~Sherry Kaseberg


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society will be meeting on Sept. 9, 2017 at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in the Basalt Cafe. General meeting and program will begin at 1:00 pm. This month’s program will be given by Sandy Bisset who will give a presentation on Land Records. The meeting and program is open to the public and those interested in genealogy and family history are encouraged to attend. The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society meets the second Saturday of each month. Event schedules can be found on our blog and general information and newsletter can be found on our main website, https://gorgegen.blogspot.com/.


5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

THE DALLES—Columbia Gorge Discovery Center presents Columbia River Indian Summer on September 9th at 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. This free daytime event feature artisans, musicians and vendors from our regional Native American community.

The programming will includes flute music by Foster Kalama, tule mat making demonstrations by Taaw-lee-Winch, traditional Indian games and drumming with Jefferson Greene, a Northwest Twined Pouch Workshop by Pat Courtney Gold, and local craft vendors.  A salmon lunch and Indian fry bread will be available for purchase on a first come first served basis beginning at 12:00 noon.

“We want to offer the opportunity for local indigenous peoples to showcase their culture and history at our facility,” said Executive Director Carolyn Purcell.  This is part of an ongoing Indigenous Voices Project funded in part by grants from Trust Management Services, Oregon Historic Trails Fund and Wy’East Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Folklife Network.  For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org


6. Pushing Through Fear

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better. 

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth. 

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the good life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? What steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #246

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library – Out of Free Eclipse Glasses

  2. Space Weather: New Predictions for the Solar Eclipse, Aug. 21

  3. Solar Eclipse: AMR to Deploy 23 Ambulances to Cities & Counties across Oregon

  4. Find Your Purpose for Living

  5. Gov. Kate Brown Signed Progressive Reproductive Health Equity Act

  6. CGCC board, president reach mutually-acceptable separation agreement

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 “History is not easily compartmentalized. It isn’t simply right versus wrong, black versus white, or blue versus gray. But there’s an entire crowd of folks who want to do just that because they believe it is all those things, and most egregiously, they believe there is an individual right for all to go through life unoffended.” ~The Dallas Morning News, Dallas, Texas, August 2017


1. Sherman County Public/School Library – Out of Free Eclipse Glasses

The library has given away all of our free eclipse glasses. We will have glasses available for attendees of our eclipse viewing program that begins at 9:30am the day of the eclipse. [The Museum Store may still have eclipse glasses.]


2. Space Weather: New Predictions for the Solar Eclipse, Aug. 21

eclipse2http://spaceweather.com
https://www.facebook.com/spaceweatherdotcom
NEW PREDICTIONS FOR THE SOLAR ECLIPSE: Next Monday, Aug. 21st, the Moon will pass directly in front of the sun producing an historic solar eclipse over the USA.  Millions of people inside the path of totality will catch a glimpse of the sun’s gossamer outer atmosphere, the corona. In centuries past, the appearance of the corona was unpredictable from one eclipse to the next. But now researchers have developed supercomputer codes to forecast its shape. New predictions for the “Great American Solar Eclipse” are highlighted on today’s edition of Spaceweather.com .


3. Solar Eclipse: AMR Will Deploy 23 Ambulances to Cities and Counties across Oregon

ambulance.back(Portland, Oregon) — Oregon residents and visitors are in for a stellar show as the earth, sun and moon align perfectly on August 21, 2017 to temporarily darken much of the state. This will be the first time since 1918 that the lunar shadow will move across the entire United States. For months American Medical Response (AMR) has worked with the Oregon Health Authority (OHA), Oregon EMS and Trauma Systems Section, and a host of other agencies and communities to help ensure that thousands of Oregonians, and visitors to the state, have a positive and safe experience during the total solar eclipse.

Residents of many Oregon cities are among those who will see a full solar eclipse. These areas will provide prime viewing of the eclipse in the path of totality.

Since Oregon expects a million or more increase in number of visitors to the state, the Governor declared a state of emergency that enabled Oregon to bring additional ambulances and attendant personnel into the state to respond as needed during the eclipse event.
OHA requested AMR to provide ambulance services in many counties and cities across the state to prepare for the onslaught of visitors.

AMR will deploy 23 ambulances and 46 Paramedics and EMTs to work with local jurisdictions to provide emergency services to the following:
–Huntington Fire Department, Huntington, Oregon
–Unity Service Center, Unity Oregon
–Town of Mitchell, Mitchell, Oregon
–Town of Spray, Spray, Oregon
–Maupin Fire Department, Maupin, Oregon
–Cow Canyon Rest Area, South of Hwy 197 at Hwy 97
–Bear Springs, at Junction of Hwy 216 and Hwy 26
–Main Fire Station, Warm Springs- 3 ambulances
–Blue Mountain Hospital, John Day, Oregon

AMR will also provide additional ambulances and personnel to the communities of: Jefferson – 3 ambulances, Suttle Lodge – 1 ambulance, Detroit Lake – 2 ambulances, Lake Billy Chinook – 1 ambulance. The deployment also includes a mechanic with a truck and trailer full of tools, replacement parts, and medical supplies –to be stationed in Madras to handle any restocking or vehicle issues.

“As our country’s national disaster ambulance provider through FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), we are well-practiced in responding to disasters on many levels. Many of AMR’s local leaders act as the Incident Management Team on disasters such as hurricanes, and are able to apply that experience and knowledge locally here in Oregon,” states Randy Lauer, Regional Director for AMR Oregon.

As in deployment for FEMA, the staffing configuration for the eclipse ambulances will be one paramedic and one emergency medical technician (EMT). Most will go into service beginning Friday, August 18 through Tuesday, August 22nd. AMR Operations across the region will provide the following number of ambulances.
–AMR Multnomah and Clackamas Counties, OR – 7 units
–AMR Josephine County, OR — 1 unit
–AMR Pierce County, WA — 4 units
–AMR SW Washington (Clark and Cowlitz Counties) – 2 Units
–AMR Spokane County, WA – 3 units
–AMR Sonoma County, CA – 2 Units

Note: Currently there are 44 AMR Paramedics and EMTs deployed on actively burning wildland fires. Fire certified Paramedics and EMT’s are assigned to fires at Crater Lake, Burns, La Grande, and Medford areas and the Jefferson Wilderness. AMR’s first Wildland Fire Response Team deployment this year was August 7th.
See https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/ for more fire incident details.

Before, during and after the eclipse be prepared for traffic delays with extra food and water.
Tips for safe driving and viewing:
* Do not slow down while driving
* Do not park on the shoulder of the road
* Exit the road to find a safe viewing location
* Do not take photographs while driving
* Do not wear opaque eclipse glasses while operating a vehicle
* Turn your headlights on — do not rely on your automatic headlights
* Watch for pedestrians along roads and yield to emergency vehicles

###
American Medical Response, Inc., is America’s leading provider of medical transportation, provides services in 40 states and the District of Columbia. More than 25,000 AMR paramedics, EMTs, and RNs work together to transport more than 4.4 million patients nationwide each year in critical, emergency and non-emergency situations. AMR, a subsidiary of Envision Healthcare Corporation, is headquartered in Greenwood Village, Colo. For more information about AMR, visit www.amr.net. Locally, AMR NW provides 9-1-1 ambulance services in Multnomah, Clackamas and Clark Counties and non-emergency medical transportation throughout the Portland Metro area. AMR and its predecessor companies have served Portland area communities since 1913.  For more information about AMR, visit www.amr.net and follow @AMR_Social on Twitter.


4. Find Your Purpose for Living

Do you believe that having a purpose in life is important?  Having a purpose contributes a great deal to the quality of our lives. Not surprisingly, having a purpose can actually prolong your life. 

Several years ago, a study done by Judith Roden of Harvard followed two groups of patients in a convalescent home. Members of one group were asked to care for a potted plant during that time. Members of the other group had no such purpose. Those who were plant caretakers lived, on average, twice as long as the others did. You see, a sense of purpose fosters hope, self-motivation and positive feelings about oneself and others.

Viktor Frankl, in his book “Man’s Search for Meaning,” found this same result during his time in Nazi concentration camps during WWII. Purpose, or goals if you will, provided the will to live.

How many examples can we see, when purpose is absent or taken away, that life ceases. Veteran broadcaster Andy Rooney passed away one month after leaving CBS’ “60 Minutes” program. Bear Bryant, iconic coach of Alabama’s football team for 24 years, passed a mere 28 days after retiring. Retiring from something and not to something may have been the catalyst.

Now it is important to remember that, if it’s going to be truly meaningful, your life’s purpose must be something that is chosen freely by you, not something that is chosen for you. And it may have nothing whatever to do with what you do for a living, although, if it does that would be ideal. 

Have you thought about what your purpose is? Have you tried to put it into words? If not, take the time to do so, and then use that purpose as a compass to guide your activities.  You will be surprised at how much energy and clarity you’ll feel.

By the way, age has nothing to do with finding purpose in your life; and if you are wondering when you can start – well, today will do just fine! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Gov. Kate Brown Signed Progressive Reproductive Health Equity Act

~ Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon & Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon
Governor Kate Brown today signed the nation’s most progressive reproductive health policy into law. The Reproductive Health Equity Act (House Bill 3391) is the first legislation in the United States to comprehensively address systemic barriers to accessing reproductive health care, expanding coverage to thousands of Oregonians throughout the state – regardless of income, citizenship status or gender identity.
         Developed by the Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon with input from legislative champions, the new law makes Oregon the first state to establish comprehensive, state-funded reproductive health coverage for women categorically excluded from Medicaid based on citizenship status; the first to codify no-cost abortion coverage in state statute; and the first to stand up to the Trump administration and congressional Republicans by putting the entire list of women’s health services covered without cost-sharing under the Affordable Care Act into state statute. The legislation also bans discrimination against those who identify as transgender or gender-nonconforming so that all people who can become pregnant have access to reproductive health care.
         The Reproductive Health Equity Act, which goes into effect immediately, will significantly benefit thousands of Oregonians:
* 900,000: Oregonians covered by private insurance who now have expanded reproductive health coverage.
* 360,000: Oregon women who now have protected access to copay-free preventive healthcare services under the Affordable Care Act.
* 48,000: Low-income mothers in Oregon whose coverage now extends past delivery to include follow-up visits during the postpartum period.
* 43,000: Oregon women of reproductive age with high-deductible policies who now have abortion coverage at no out-of-pocket cost.
* 18,600: Oregon women of reproductive age whose insurance plans now cannot charge them a co-pay or other out-of-pocket costs for preventive health services, including contraception.

Reproductive Health Equity Act summary: https://reprohealthequity.org/about/about-the-bill/
Reproductive Health Equity Act fact sheet: https://reprohealthequity.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/hb-3391-fact-sheet.pdf
The Pro-Choice Coalition of Oregon is a diverse, statewide coalition that is working to create a world where access to reproductive health care doesn’t depend on who you are, where you live or how much you earn – where every Oregonian who can become pregnant has the opportunity to choose their own path to a healthy and meaningful life. The coalition consists of American Civil Liberties Union of Oregon, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon, Family Forward Oregon, NARAL Pro-Choice Oregon, Oregon Latino Health Coalition, Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon and Western States Center.


6. CGCC board, president reach mutually-acceptable separation agreement

Columbia Gorge Community College president Dr. Frank Toda and the college Board of Education have reached a mutually acceptable separation agreement. The board unanimously approved the agreement at a special board meeting Tuesday, Aug. 15.

Under terms of the agreement, Dr. Toda will officially wrap up 16 years of service to the college on Sept. 29. The board will begin an immediate search for an interim president while it recruits nationally for the college’s next chief executive.

“We want to thank Dr. Toda for his many contributions to the college,” said Board Chair Stu Watson. “The board wishes him well in future endeavors as it pursues initiatives to strengthen the college and expand access to education for our entire community.”

Dr. Toda, after a successful career with the U.S. Air Force, took office as president in July 2001. Four months later, voters approved annexation of central and eastern Hood River County to the existing district, which included most of Wasco County.

During Dr. Toda’s tenure, the college greatly expanded its physical footprint.  It added a building to house its respected health sciences program. By contributing land on the campus, the college secured additional classroom space inside the Fort Dalles Readiness Center, which opened in April 2014. The college shares the facility with the Oregon National Guard.

With bonding support in Hood River County, the college during Dr. Toda’s tenure purchased property on the Heights where it added a new classroom building in 2008.

During Dr. Toda’s time as president, the college added nursing, renewable energy (now electro-mechanical technology) and computer science programs. The college also enhanced agreements enabling students to complete four-year college degrees remotely.

After 36 years operating under the auspices of Portland Community College, in 2013 CGCC achieved independent accreditation during Toda’s tenure, and in the spring of 2017 was selected an Hispanic Serving Institution. This past spring, with Dr. Toda’s support, the college board declared sanctuary status. More than 30 percent of CGCC students are of Latino ancestry.

“Going forward, the college board fully intends to build upon the successes achieved during Dr. Toda’s tenure,” Watson added. “In this on-going journey, we look forward to the continuing contributions of a talented staff and faculty. Of greatest importance is the trust placed in this institution by our students and community. We will endeavor every day to validate that trust.”

In a parting statement at Tuesday’s board meeting, Dr. Toda recognized past and present board members, and identified the college’s achievement of independent accreditation as one of the proudest accomplishments of his presidency.

Citing the college’s mission statement, Dr. Toda concluded, “Let’s continue to build dreams and transform lives.”


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Eclipse Traffic Already Backing Up in Central Oregon

 

A Day in the Life of a Montana Fire Lookout

If we mean to remove memorials of white supremacists, that includes Lincoln.

“It is the duty of every good citizen to use all the opportunities which occur to him, for preserving documents relating to the history of our country.” —Thomas Jefferson (1823)

World GDP in current US dollars seems to have peaked; this is a problem 

Summary of German Armed Forces Peak Oil Study

Western Farmer-Stockman. Bacteria tackles weeds

Examining Farm Sector and Farm Household Income


 

Sherman County eNews #245

CONTENT

  1. Non-Profit Organization Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange

  2. Public Announcement: Sherman County School District Surplus Sale, Aug. 23

  3. State Partners Offer Resources for 2017 Eclipse Visitors and Viewers

  4. Keep Oregon Green During the Eclipse

  5. Sherman Student Qualified to Compete in Oregon Spelling Championship

  6. FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Virtual Kidnapping Scams

  7. Sherman County Fair Commercial/Community Booth Application Deadline, Aug. 20


1. Non-Profit Organization Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students 

boy.puzzledASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few.

ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience.

The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests.

To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today!

ASSE International (formerly American Scandinaviian Student Exchange) is a non-profit, public benefit organization. ASSE is officially designated as an exchange visitor program by the U.S. Department of State, and was founded by the Swedish Ministry of Education, cooperates with the Canadian Provincial Ministries of Education and the New Zealand Department of Education.


2. Public Announcement: Sherman County School District Surplus Sale, Aug. 23

Logo.Sherman High SchoolPUBLIC ANNOUNCEMENT

Sherman County School District Surplus Sale

9:00 am – 6:00 pm on Wednesday, August 23, 2017  

At the August 14, 2017 Regular Board Meeting of the Sherman County School District, the Board of Directors declared an extensive list as surplus items. The following list is not inclusive of all items that may be represented for bid on the date of the sale. Descriptions are general and may not be exact.

  • Musical Instruments sold separately including but not limited to:
  • Various Drums
  • Various String Instruments
  • Various Brass Instruments
  • Sound System Speakers
  • Various Sheet Music
  • Other Miscellaneous Music Items

 

  • Kitchen Equipment/Accessories sold separately including but not limited to:
  • Various size Pots/Pans
  • Various size trays
  • Meat Slicer
  • Various Utensils/Accessories
  • Other Miscellaneous Kitchen Items

 

  • Furniture and Equipment sold separately including but not limited to:
  • John Deer Riding Lawn Mower
  • 50” Lawn Sweeper
  • 10” Dewalt Chop Saw
  • 8 ¼’ Portable Table Saw
  • 5” Delta Bench Grinder
  • Drafting Arms
  • Rollup Door
  • Wax Master
  • Various Photography Equipment/Cameras
  • Various Sports Equipment
  • Various Desks
  • Various Size Tables
  • Various File Cabinets
  • Various Cork Boards
  • Various Mini Blinds
  • Various Chairs/Stools/Rolling Chairs
  • New Metal Door Frames
  • 4’ Fluorescent Light Fixtures
  • Movie Projector
  • Overhead Projectors
  • Record Player
  • Carts
  • Laminator
  • TV
  • Various Other Miscellaneous Furniture and Equipment

The process of selling these surplus items will be done through a sealed bidding process.  This allows for a fair and open sale for interested parties.  Bidders may pick up an Invitation to Bid Packet and view the items during the open bid period from 9:00 am – 6:00 pm on Wednesday, August 23, 2017 in the Sherman County School cafeteria and parking lot. Sealed bids shall be delivered to a designated Sherman County School District representative at the District Office in Moro prior to 6:00 p.m. on Wednesday, August 23, 2017.  Bids received after 6:00 p.m. will be invalid.  Bids will be opened in the meeting room of the Sherman County Public/School Library at 9:00 am on Thursday, August 24, 2017 and winning bidders will be notified as soon as possible.

By bidding, a potential purchaser is confirming their acceptance of these terms and conditions outlined in the Surplus Property Invitation to Bid Packet that is available on the Sherman County School District Website http://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and as stated below;

  • All items are offered “As-Is” and “Where-Is” with no warranty or other guarantee as to its condition or fitness for any use or purpose;
  • Winning Bidder agrees to remove surplus items before 10:00 am on Monday, August 28, 2017;
  • Cash or checks will be accepted and must be made payable to Sherman County School District;
  • There shall be no refunds and all sales are final.

Sherman County School District reserves the right to reject any or all bids received, to award any or all of the various items to separate bidders, to waive any informalities in the bids, and to award as best serves the interest of the District and the Public. All dimensions are approximate.


3. State Partners Offer Resources for 2017 Eclipse Visitors and Viewers

eclipse2With just five days to go until the 2017 total solar eclipse, state agencies in Oregon are working together to provide information on traffic, health and safety, wildfire danger, camping, and weather, among other things to residents and tourists eager to view the once-in-a-lifetime celestial phenomenon.

A wide variety of information about the eclipse can be found on Facebook and Twitter by using #OReclipse and #Eclipse2017.

Up-to-the-minute information will be available through a wide variety of resources:

* 211 Info — This non-emergency eclipse hotline will operate Aug. 16 to Aug. 23, between 7 a.m. and 10 p.m. Dial 2-1-1, visit http://211info.org, or text ECLIPSE to 898211.
* TripCheck.com — Real-time traffic information, along with weather, restrictions and travel times make this interactive website one of the most useful tools available for anyone looking to navigate roadways between now and the days following the eclipse.
* ODF Public Fire Restrictions Map — A clickable map from Oregon’s Department of Forestry allows users to pinpoint their location and learn about (low to extreme) fire danger risk, campfire limitations and other public fire restrictions. Necessary fire mitigation information and equipment is also noted.
* RAPTOR — Also known as Real-Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon, Oregon Office of Emergency Management’s RAPTOR site offers a public version for people to track what’s happening where in the eclipse path of totality and around the state, including events, wildfires, road closures and weather.
* National Weather Service — Weather is everyone’s number one concern. Visitors to the National Weather Service website can get all the information they need to be prepared for rain or shine, clouds or clear skies, with a click on a keyboard.

Oregon Office of Emergency Management Website provides tips for residents, visitors and businesses. A Frequently Asked Questions document delves into answers to common questions.


4. Keep Oregon Green During the Eclipse

eclipse3         Here in Oregon, we are counting down the days to an amazing celestial event. The United States is the only country which will experience the total solar eclipse and Oregon will be the first state where it can be viewed.

         Federal, state, and county agencies have spent a great deal of time in recent months preparing for the challenges associated with this event — traffic congestion, food and fuel availability, and cell phone reception to name a few. But the one overwhelming concern that all agencies involved share is wildfire. The eclipse is occurring at the peak of Oregon’s fire season. As many as a million visitors are coming here to watch it. Thousands will be camping in open fields, forests and campgrounds hoping to get a good view under clear skies. Everyday activities already cause the majority of Oregon wildfires, and the risk will sharply increase when these additional visitors head onto the landscape all at the same time.
         “Oregon residents have high expectations that tourists coming to view the eclipse will be respectful and leave our landscapes as beautiful as they found them,” says Kristin Babbs, president of the Keep Oregon Green Association, a wildfire prevention organization. “That said, it’s a tall order for visitors to fill; our own residents are having a hard time preventing wildfire starts themselves.”

         To date, Oregonians have been responsible for starting 636 fires. “Last week alone, the Oregon Department of Forestry reported 32 fire starts that burned over 450 acres. They were caused by equipment, illegal debris burning, smoking and the dumping of hot coals,” she said.
         August is always a dangerous month for wildfire starts in Oregon because fuels are at their driest. The fire danger level is high or extreme in many areas of the state. Any accidental spark or stray ember can start a fire and spread rapidly.
         Two-thirds of the wildfires in Oregon are started by people, so it is extremely important to check the fire restrictions where you plan to work or play, and be sure that you are prepared to put a fire out should one get started. Any careless act can get traction: a campfire left smoldering; the whirling metal blades of a lawnmower striking a rock; a cigarette tossed from a vehicle; or a hot car idling over tall, dry grass. If you are traveling the roads, carry the essentials: a shovel and a gallon of water or a charged and operational fire extinguisher in case you need to be your own firefighter. In fact, these items are required in your vehicle in many areas. If traffic comes to a standstill during the eclipse, fire engine response time may be delayed.
         One careless act can destroy thousands of acres — not to mention your bank account. Anyone responsible for starting a fire, accidental or not, may be liable for fire suppression costs as well as the cost of damage to neighboring property owners.
         The Keep Oregon Green Association offers common-sense advice and important information on how to prevent fires when traveling through, camping and recreating in Oregon’s scenic areas. Go to www.keeporegongreen.org or @keeporegongreen on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.


5. Sherman Student Qualified to Compete in Oregon Spelling Championship

pencil.sharpSherman County student, Pyeper Walker, has qualified to compete in the OREGON STATEWIDE SPELLING CHAMPIONSHIP sponsored by Oregon Spellers, 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 2nd at the Oregon State Fair in Salem. The OREGON STATEWIDE SPELLING CHAMPIONSHIP is a written contest with cash prizes, and features the best spellers from participating counties throughout Oregon.  The championship is followed by an optional Just for Fun Bee at the Fair verbal spelling bee that is open to all State Fair visitors. 

The mission of Oregon Spellers is to encourage, promote, and recognize spelling excellence for the youth of the State of Oregon and to provide, with our sponsors, an annual state-level spelling championship and just-for-fun verbal bee. Oregon Spellers and the OREGON STATEWIDE SPELLING CHAMPIONSHIP are not part of the Oregon Department of Education, and are not affiliated with Scripps or the Scripps National Spelling Bee.


6. FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Virtual Kidnapping Scams

So what is a virtual kidnapping scam? It starts with a phone call, text or email. The scammer tells you that he has abducted your child, grandchild or maybe a spouse – and he demands money in exchange for their safe return. Sound familiar? It is the opening scene of a lot of movies and TV shows. However, there is a key difference between kidnapping with intent to ransom — which is very rare – and virtual kidnapping — which happens a lot. In a virtual kidnapping, the bad guy hasn’t actually abducted anyone. He just wants you to think that he has.

The scammer’s goal is to stress you out so much that you don’t take time to consider that the kidnapping is fake. He might try to intimidate you by pretending to be a gang member or a corrupt police officer. He might tell you that your loved one owes him money for a car accident, drug debt, or something similar that could discourage you from calling law enforcement. In some cases, scammers have even had an accomplice scream in the background. In almost all cases, the bad guy will threaten violence against his “victim” if you disobey him. He often has the ability to spoof — or copy — the alleged victim’s number. He wants to cause panic, fear, and a sense of urgency, because those feelings stop you from thinking clearly.

So how do you protect yourself?

* Be cautious about what you post on social media. In particular, consider waiting to post about foreign travel until after you return. Some scammers call every number with a certain area code, but others research their targets.
* Let the people close to you know when you will be travelling to places without cell service or internet connection.
* Know the red flags: Did the call come from a phone other than the victim’s? Was the call from an area code far from where your loved one lives? Did the caller insist that the ransom had to be paid by wire transfer? Did he try to keep you on the phone?
* If you do receive a ransom call, try to stay calm. Slow the situation down by writing things down or telling the caller that you need time to do what he’s asking. Request to speak to the victim. Try to contact your loved one by other means, such as text or social media.
* Remember — stranger-to-stranger kidnappings are very rare. However, if you believe a real kidnapping has occurred or if you are not sure, call 911.

Overall, when it comes to online scams — if you feel as though a fraudster has victimized you, report your suspicions to law enforcement. You can file an online report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Compliant Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.


7. Sherman County Fair Commercial/Community Booth Application, Aug. 20 

COMMERCIAL/COMMUNITY BOOTH APPLICATION

FAIR DATES AUGUST 22Nd THRU AUGUST 27TH

See shermancountyfairfun.com for entry form.

COMMERCIAL/COMMUNITY BOOTH NAME                             

CONTACT PERSON’S NAME

PHONE

MAILING ADDRESS

CITY

STATE & ZIP

PRICE PER BOOTH SPACE $25.00

I WILL NEED __________ BOOTH SPACE (S)  (BOOTH SPACE IS 8’ LONG)

YES, I WILL NEED A TABLE __________

NO, I DO NOT NEED A TABLE _______ – I  WILL BRING MY OWN.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR INTEREST AT THE SHERMANCOUNTY FAIR.

PLEASE FILL IN ALL INFO, SIGN, INCLUDE PAYMENT AND SEND TO SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR, P.O. BOX 45, WASCO, OR 97065

BOOTH SHALL BE SET UP NO LATER THAN BY 3:00 PM ON Tuesday AUGUST 22nd.

SPACE IS LIMITED, THESE BOOTHS ARE ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS.

APPLICATIONS MUST BE RECEIVED BY 8/20/17.

QUESTIONS? CALL BETH 541-980-1821.


 

Sherman County eNews #244

CONTENT

  1. Kindergarten Registration for Sherman County School, Aug. 24

  2. Healthy Families’ Play Group Date Changed to Aug. 24

  3. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Women’s Auxiliary Bake Sale, Aug. 18-19

  4. Sherman County High School Class of ’67 Reunion, Sept. 30

  5. Sherman County Fair: Health District 6th Annual Wellness Walk, Aug. 26

  6. Red Cross Urges Community to Take Preparedness Actions Pre-Eclipse

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Kindergarten Registration for Sherman County School, Aug. 24

Kindergarten Registration

When: August 24, 2017 **8:00am – 6:00pm**
Where: Sherman County School
65912 High School Loop
Moro, OR 97039

Please bring the following:
–Birth Certificate
–Immunization Record
–Proof of Address

Contact the school if you prefer to have forms mailed to you. All forms are due August 30th!  Questions?? Call us at (541) 565-3500.


2. Healthy Families’ Play Group Date Changed to Aug. 24

girl.jumpThe new date for the Healthy Families’ Play Group is August 24, 2017, from 10:30-12 at Moro City Park. Sorry for any inconvenience and somewhat short notice.  Thank you for your understanding and I look forward to seeing lots of parents with their children there. Questions? Call Amy Nation, Healthy Families Home Visitor, at 1-877-562-3739.


3. South Sherman Fire & Rescue Women’s Auxiliary Bake Sale, Aug. 18-19

South Sherman Fire & Rescue Women’s Auxiliary

BIG BAKE SALE!

FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 and SATURDAY, AUGUST 19

8 AM to 4 PM

or until we run out of baked goods!

GRASS VALLEY CITY PARK

QUESTIONS? Call Judy at 928-851-2340.


4. Sherman County High School Class of ’67 Reunion, Sept. 30

Sherman County High School Class of ‘67 50th Reunion Celebration.
Hello one and all. The reunion will be on September 30, 2017, at the The Dalles Civic Auditorium at 5:30 PM until 10:00 PM. It’s a great large space that allows room for gathering, dining, dancing and entertainment. The cost is $30 per person.

The invitation is extended beyond the class of 67 so please feel free to share this with your siblings, friends and relatives who may wish to join in.

Reservations can be made through the website. The password is Gohuskies. For FaceBook users there is also a FaceBook group site; “Sherman County High School Class of 67 50th Reunion Celebration” It’s a closed site but just ask to join when you access it.

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/sherman-county-high-class-of-67-50th-class-reunion-celebration-registration-31210936752

Looking forward to a great celebration.


5. Sherman County Fair: Health District 6th Annual Wellness Walk, Aug. 26

6th Annual Wellness Walk

Walk for Wellness

Sponsored by the Sherman County Health District

And the Sherman County Medical Clinic

8:00 A.M.

Saturday, August 26th, 2017

Registration forms with route information are available at the Sherman County Health District Administration Office.

$5 registration fee

****First 25 to register receive t-shirt!****

Post-walk refreshments will be available at finish.

Please call Caitlin at 541-565-0536 for additional information.


6. Red Cross Urges Community to Take Preparedness Actions Pre-Eclipse

PORTLAND, EUGENE, BEND & MEDFORD, Ore., August 15, 2017 — The American Red Cross is urging community members who live in, near or plan to travel into the path of totality during the eclipse to stock up on emergency preparedness supplies now. Specifically, the Red Cross is recommending assembling an emergency preparedness kit for your car and your home.

With one million visitors expected to come to Oregon to view the eclipse on August 21, travelers could be stuck in traffic for hours and people who live in the path of totality may face a supply shortage with the influx of people. It is essential to have emergency supplies on hand and ready now, days ahead of the eclipse event.

The Red Cross recommends having the following items in your car:
* Ensure your vehicle has a full tank of gas
* Bottled water — one gallon, per person, per day. Use heavy plastic bottles made for water storage.
* Non-perishable food items (power bars, canned food, a manual can opener)
* A flashlight
* A battery-powered radio
* A first aid kit
* Daily vital medications
* Supplies for an infant or children if applicable
* A multi-purpose tool
* Personal hygiene items including toilet paper
* Cell phone chargers
* Extra cash in small denominations ($1 or $5)
* Comfort items like toys, games, coloring books for kids, etc. to pass the time if there are delays
* Blankets or a sleeping bag
* Maps of the area (printed copies)
* Jumper cables
* Emergency contact information written out on a card to keep in your wallet

The Red Cross recommends having the following items at home:
* Water — one gallon, per person, per day for a minimum of three days
* The supplies included in your car kit in greater quantities (for a minimum of three days):
* Supplies for your pets if applicable

*View a full Red Cross kit list here: www.redcross.org/PrepareGuide.

How the Red Cross is preparing:
The Red Cross is coordinating with local emergency agencies along the eclipse viewing path to ensure collective preparedness for any contingency. This planning is a standard part of our regular collaborations with local emergency management officials with regard to large-scale, public events. If requested by local authorities, the Red Cross is prepared to shelter and feed those who might be displaced by disasters, residential fires, wildfires, or other events.

As part of normal Red Cross readiness posture, supplies such as cots, blankets and water are already pre-positioned across this area and the country. In addition, more volunteers and resources are on standby in case they are needed. Cellular service could be impacted by the large number of people visiting the region. If networks go down, the Red Cross will use ham radio or top-priority emergency cell channels to communicate.

For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at RedCrossCascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and find us on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbThe World’s Largest Condominium Yacht

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