Sherman County eNews #270

CONTENTS

  1. A Settlement Called Celilo with John Brookhouse & Sherman Historical Society, Nov. 3

  2. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting & Program, Nov. 9

  3. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee, Nov. 12

  4. The Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas,” Dec. 7 & 8

  5. Personal Power

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center November Meal Menu

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. A Settlement Called Celilo with John Brookhouse & Sherman Historical Society, Nov. 3

Please join us at the Pavilion in Grass Valley, Oregon, for our Sherman County Historical Society Fall Program and Volunteer Appreciation Luncheon at 1 p.m. Doors open at 12:30 p.m. and after lunch the Wasco County Pioneer Man of 2019, John Brookhouse, will give a program on the history of a local section of the Columbia River. A small settlement or town called Celilo was located in an area between the mouth of the Deschutes River and Celilo Falls. This small town was known for the construction of steamships that navigated the upper part of the Columbia River. Lunch is $12 and our active volunteers eat for free! Please RSVP by October 31, at the Sherman County Historical Museum or by calling 541-565-3232. We look forward to seeing you at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Sunday, November 3rd at 1pm! ~Sherman County Historical Society Board of Trustees.


2. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting & Program, Nov. 9

November 9, 2019

10:30am – 2:00pm

Linda Colton will be teaching a class on “DNA: Whys, Hows and What to Do With Your Results.”  This class will briefly touch on why testing your DNA is helpful, the various companies and tests available, but mostly the class will focus on what to do with your results and how you can boost your research using DNA cousin matches. Come and learn how to figure out those hundreds of cousin matches and see the latest awesome tools from the testing companies to help you find more relatives!

Our meetings and programs are held in the downstairs classroom at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center on the second Saturdays of each month. Public is welcome; bring a friend! Questions? Contact Georga at 541.296.2882 or georga.foster@gmail.com.


3. Notice. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee, Nov. 12

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be holding a meeting on Tuesday, November 12th, 2019 at 3:00 p.m. at North Central Public Health District located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon.This meeting is open to the general public.


4. The Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas,” Dec. 7 & 8

The Cascade Singers Present “A Parker-Shaw Christmas,” the title for the Cascade Singers’ December 7 and 8 holiday concert.  Performances take place at Zion Lutheran Church, 10th and Union Streets, The Dalles.  Saturday’s concert begins at 7 p.m. and the Sunday concert starts at 3 p.m.  The late Robert Shaw was one of the preeminent choral directors of the second half of the 20th century.   Alice Parker was Shaw’s student who began her own career arranging music for the Robert Shaw Chorale.  She later led her own choirs and continues to compose and arrange music at age 94.  The Parker-Shaw collaboration produced a rich body of choral music, often based on folk tunes, hymns, and in the December event, Christmas carols.  The concert will also include J.S. Bach chorales and a piece for organ and choir from the romantic era.  Admission is by donation at the door.


5. Personal Power

What do the words “personal power” make you think of? These two words together could be perceived as either positive or negative. So, the question for today is, do you see yourself as a powerful person?

What you think about personal power will influence your ability to claim it and exercise it in your life. If you believe that power means either control or loss of control, without knowing why, you will hesitate to claim it.

If you think, even subconsciously, that power is bad, negative, angry, manipulative, abusive or intimidating, you won’t be motivated to empower yourself or others. Too many people have been conditioned to believe that “power” means “having power over,” but it is really not about that at all. Rather, it is about having the power “to” – to act, influence, cause or make happen, to create and to do.

Most importantly, power is not an external force. Instead of coming, as so many people believe, from economic or social status, education, successful careers or material wealth, power is first and foremost internal.

It comes from feeling that you have the final accountability and authority for your own life. It comes from feeling a strong, vital and respectful connection to others – family, friends, community and, in fact, all life on the planet. And this kind of personal power benefits others as much as it benefits you. And if you work it right, it benefits others more.

So, take some time to think about personal power. Then ask yourself, “Do I feel powerful?” If not, why not? If you do, then the next question becomes, “How do I use my power?” There are a great many answers to that question, and each reveals a facet of our personalities, and perhaps, our souls. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center November Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center Meal Menu

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served. If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve! MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
  1
Chicken & Dumplings
Veggies
Salad Bar & Dessert
4 5 6 7 8
Eggs Benedict Quiche Spaghetti w/ Meat Sauce Shepherd’s Pie Mac & Cheese w/ Ham Baked Salmon
Muffins Garlic Bread Biscuits Veggies Rice Pilaf
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
11 12 13 14 15
CLOSED FOR Beef Burritos Beef Stew Lasagna Soup Cheeseburgers w/Bacon
VETERAN’S DAY Refried Beans Homemade Rolls Garlic Knots Tater Tots
  Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
18 19 20 21 22
Baked Potato Bar Chicken Strips Hamburger Gravy Zucchini Beef Casserole Oriental Chicken
Chili & Cheese Potato Wedges Mashed Potatoes Veggies Chow Mein
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
25 26 27 Thanksgiving Lunch 28 29
Chicken Tetrazzini Oven Fried Chicken Roast Turkey CLOSED CLOSED
Veggies Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Mashed Potatoes & Gravy FOR FOR
Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Dessert THANKSGIVING THANKSGIVING

Menu subject to change due to availability. ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

HalloweenBooSend your news and notices to The Times-Journal   timesjournal1886@gmail.com

 

Halloween.Wtich2Oregon Raceway Park

Osage Orange Trees

Judicial Watch

CENTCOM commander releases video of raid on Baghdadi compound

Bend Bulletin Editorial: Flaw exposed again in public records law

Here’s how much land the government owns in your state

Americans Don’t Read… and That’s Affecting Our Elections

Federal government issues hemp growing guidance

Wind, dry conditions fuel nearly 2 dozen fires burning in Western Oregon


 

Sherman County eNews #269

CONTENTS

  1. Tri-County Hazardous Waste Collection Event, Friday, Nov. 1

  2. Sherman County Court Session, Nov. 6

  3. Wasco County Solid Waste Advisory Committee Meeting, Nov. 8

  4. Employment: Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year

  5. Expressing the Purpose Within

  6. History Tidbits: Pennies for the Pool, 1974

  7. Book: The United States of Trump: How the President Really Sees America

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1.Notice. Tri-County Hazardous Waste Collection Event, Friday, Nov. 1

The Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program will be offering a free hazardous waste collection event for households, small businessnes and ag producers this Friday, November 1.  Load up your leftover chemicals and paints, and come to the Wasco Event Center between 10am and 2pm.

Businesses and agricultural producers: Mandatory pre-registration is required. To get an appointment, please contact contractor, John Pitman – Stericycle Environmental Services representative at (360) 772-2838; John.Pitman@stericycle.com. This ensures that proper supplies are ready for your load.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Nov. 6

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, November 06th, at 9:00 a.m.  This session will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Notice. Wasco County Solid Waste Advisory Committee Meeting, Nov. 8

The Wasco County Solid Waste Advisory Committee will meet Friday, November 8th at 3:00 p.m. in North Central Public Health District’s meeting room located at 419 East Seventh Street in The Dalles, OR. The public is encouraged to attend.


4. Notice. Employment: Temporary Instructional Assistant for the 2019-20 School Year

Sherman County School District, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039

Posting

Sherman County School is seeking a Temporary .94 FTE highly qualified Instructional Assistant candidate with preferred previous experience working in an educational setting. The successful candidate will work under the direct supervision of the school administration to support activities as assigned.  This position will start on or close to November 12.  This is a temporary position for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year.

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.

Application Method/Materials Required

Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district), resume, and letters of recommendation if you are interested in the position to:

Wes Owens, Superintendent

65912 High School Loop

Moro, Oregon 97039

(541) 565-3500

wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will remain open until filled.

Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.


5. Expressing the Purpose Within

If your life has an important purpose, does that make you a more valuable human being?

If you are a regular receiver of the Winner’s Circle Network, or if you are familiar with the work of The Pacific Institute, you know that we believe a strong sense of purpose is important – in fact it is vital to fulfilling the promise of the potential that resides in all of us.

Purpose, or contribution beyond self – often for the good of a community of others – provides a not-so-subtle boost to our self-image or self-worth. It’s an internal boost, because we are not relying on others to validate our purpose. So, the challenge becomes to not make the mistake of confusing purpose with worth, as many do who are continually looking outside themselves to feel worthy.

When you determine your personal worth by your job, career, family, social position, income or appearance, you create a dilemma for yourself. The dilemma is that you must constantly work for approval, love, acceptance and control, in order to feel worthy.

If you lose your job, or your children grow up and leave home, or you retire and begin to look and feel older, you may find yourself feeling worthless or even depressed. You can spend a lifetime looking outside yourself to feel worthy. The truth is, all we really need to do is look within.

Every human being is worthy, simply because we exist. And because we exist, we have opportunity in every second of every day to find and fulfill the promise of purpose. You see, we want to look within to find our purpose and then look outside for ways to express it.

A sense of purpose will help you live a more satisfying life, but always remember that you give meaning to what you do – what you do does not give meaning to you. ~The Pacific Institute


6. History Tidbits: Pennies for the Pool, 1974

Engineering Fund Report. [with illustration: Goal $1500, $500 received as of April]

A special Sherman County weekend, May 6-7, entitled, “Pennies for the Pool,” is being planned to raise money for the county swimming pool.

Saturday, May 6, from 9:30 p.m. to 2:00 a.m. the popular group, Mobley’s Sundowners, will provide live western music to dance by at the Grass Valley pavilion. Refreshments will be provided by the Sherman High students and the grade school students will assist in decorating and concession sales.

Sunday, May 7 at 7:00 p.m., the Best of ’72 will be presented at Sherman High School. The entertainment, provided by all six schools as well as adults from the community, will consist of singing selections from the schools’ spring program, one-act plays, gymnastics, ballet and band numbers.

The Sherman County Swimming Pool Committee again wishes to thank everyone who has contributed or pledged to date. A huge thank you goes out to the Sherman High School students for their large donations. Their great enthusiasm makes the attempt worthwhile and could do wonders towards getting the pool.

The Pool Committee wishes to remind all registered voters to respond to the letter sent out even if you don’t feel you can donate. This is important that it be done now. If you did not receive the letter, please contact the chairman, Shirley Blaylock, or the treasurer, Irving Hart.

~ Sherman County Journal, April 13, 1974


7. Book: The United States of Trump: How the President Really Sees America

A rare, insider’s look at the life of Donald Trump from Bill O’Reilly, the bestselling author of the Killing series, based on exclusive interview material and deep research

Readers around the world have been enthralled by journalist and New York Times bestselling author Bill O’Reilly’s Killing series—riveting works of nonfiction that explore the most famous events in history. Now, O’Reilly turns his razor-sharp observations to his most compelling subject thus far—President Donald J. Trump. In this thrilling narrative, O’Reilly blends primary, never-before-released interview material with a history that recounts Trump’s childhood and family and the factors from his life and career that forged the worldview that the president of the United States has taken to the White House.

Not a partisan pro-Trump or anti-Trump book, this is an up-to-the-minute, intimate view of the man and his sphere of influence—of “how Donald Trump’s view of America was formed, and how it has changed since becoming the most powerful person in the world”— from a writer who has known the president for thirty years. This is an unprecedented, gripping account of the life of a sitting president as he makes history.

As the author will tell you, “If you want some insight into the most unlikely political phenomenon of our lifetimes, you’ll get it here.”

https://www.billoreilly.com/p/The-United-States-of-Trump/The-United-States-of-Trump/52904.html


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkBrilliant Maps: Making Sense Of The World, One Map At A Time

Initiative supporters make a new push to repeal driver’s license law

John Day biomass plant preparing for production


 

Sherman County eNews #268

CONTENTS

  1. Lower John Day Basin Current & Future Water Needs Report Public Review & Comments Needed

  2. Sherman County 4-H Clover Buds

  3. Now Is the Time to Get Your Flu Vaccine

  4. Letting Go

  5. Travel Centers of America/Biggs Petroleum LLC at I-84, Exit 104

  6. History Tidbits: Sherman County Farm Products 1900

  7. Oregon Capital Insider: This week, by the numbers

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“You can’t run a free society if you have to hate everybody you disagree with.” —former President Bill Clinton speaking on October 25th at services for Elijah Cummings.


1. Lower John Day Basin Current & Future Water Needs Report Public Review & Comments Needed

The Lower John Day Working Group Place Based Planning group has drafted the Step 3 Report: Quantifying Existing and Future Water Needs and Demands. We are now in the public review phase of this effort and are asking the community to give us their thoughts and comments on the draft report. This is a locally led, voluntary, and non-regulatory water resource planning effort. Become a part of the process and have your voice heard by providing your input.

PICK UP A COPY: Call or stop by the office of your local Soil & Water Conservation District

Gilliam SWCD: 541-384-2672 234 S. Main St. Condon, OR 97823

Sherman SWCD: 541-565-3216 123 S. Main St. Moro, Oregon 97039

Wheeler SWCD: 541-468-2990 40535 Highway 19 Fossil, OR 97830

OR Visit Our New Website lowerjohndaypbp.com ────

Comments due by November 22, 2019

To submit comments and for questions, contact:

Hannah Fatland

Gilliam – East John Day Watershed Council

541-384-2672 x.111


2. Sherman County 4-H Clover Buds

4-H clover1Have a child aged 5-8 as of September 1, 2019? Invite them to join the new Sherman County 4-H Clover Buds! An informal educational program designed for younger youth, with a variety of fun activities and exposure to the 4-H program, group centered, no large animals, non-competitive. Just like regular 4-H (for youth 9-19), Clover Bud 4-H has enrollment forms and a $30 fee to cover project materials, insurance and state fees. Stop by the Sherman Extension Office to learn more and mark your calendar for the November 13 4-H Open House 6pm at the Sherman Fairgrounds. The youth enrollment packet can be found here: https://extension.oregonstate.edu/4h/sherman/get-involved

Cindy Brown, Educator

Oregon State University

OSU Extension Service – Sherman County

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

extension.oregonstate.edu/sherman


3. Now Is the Time to Get Your Flu Vaccine

hand.wash.kidThe most effective way to avoid catching the flu is vaccination. Please visit your primary care provider or pharmacy today! This will help protect you AND help stop the spread of this contagious illness.

The CDC recommends everyone aged 6 months and older should receive an annual influenza (flu) vaccination. It’s especially important for those with chronic medical conditions, those who are pregnant, those caring for babies six months of age and younger, and those over the age of 65. When you get the flu shot, you help protect those that are most vulnerable by stopping the spread of the disease.

The preventive measures listed below will also help stop the spread of flu, but because people infected with the flu may infect others 1 day before they become sick, vaccination is still the best way to avoid catching and spreading the flu:

 Cover your cough and sneeze.

 Wash your hands often, using soap and warm water.

 Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

 Limit close contact with those that are sick.

 Stay home when you’re sick. Protect others at school and work by staying home at least 24-hours after a fever (100+ degrees) subsides.

 Clean surfaces. Flu germs can live for hours on hard surfaces. Make sure your home and workspace are wiped down frequently, especially where children are playing.

Flu symptoms include fever, cough, sore throat, body aches, runny or stuffy nose, headache, chills, fatigue, and sometimes nausea (more often in children than adults). Many respiratory viruses have similar symptoms, but influenza tends to be more severe. Having the flu is NO fun and can lead to hospitalization and sometimes death.

The good news is flu vaccine is available at your clinic and pharmacy! There may be a charge for the vaccine, but it’s often covered by insurance. Please contact your primary care provider, clinic, or pharmacy today for more information and to make an appointment. Many accept walk-in clients as well.

North Central Public Health District currently has flu vaccine available only for uninsured/ underinsured adults, and children covered by the Oregon Health Plan or who are uninsured/ underinsured. Vaccinations are available during our walk-in clinic hours of 8:30 a.m. to noon, and 1:00 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays. For more information, guidance and materials please visit: CDC http://www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/.


4. Letting Go

Do you ever feel jealous? Most of us do every so often, but it is jealous behavior, not feelings, that causes us trouble. The feeling of jealousy in a relationship is normal, but the behaviors that can result are often irrational and destructive. If we want to avoid the trouble jealousy can cause, we can start by accepting responsibility for it.

Blaming others, for what they feel, usually is a mistake, because jealousy is most often a product of our own insecurity and low self-esteem. It happens because we see ourselves as having less to give than the object of our jealousy.

Soon, we become unable to see our own strengths and good points, which leads to feeling devalued, depressed and worthless. The tendency to “act out” in our behaviors becomes too easy to give in to, and others suffer. We forget the simple fact that because another person may not choose or be able to meet the conditions that have been agreed to in our relationship, our inner value as a person is not lessened, nor is theirs.

Jealously ceases to be a problem only when we regain a feeling of worth and self-respect, and when we remember that loyalty in relationships can only be offered, never demanded. When we demand loyalty, it becomes a “have to” situation, and humans automatically push back, when we feel we are being pushed. The other option to pushing back, of course, is to simply walk away.

Learning to let go of demands in any relationship, when we believe that love or affection is based on “holding on to,” is difficult but extremely worthwhile. When we conquer the extremes of jealousy, we emerge as better, stronger, happier people and our relationships inevitably improve. Our health does too. And it all starts with taking accountability for our own view of relationships. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Travel Centers of America/Biggs Petroleum LLC at I-84, Exit 104

WESTLAKE, Ohio–(BUSINESS WIRE)–TravelCenters of America Inc. (TravelCenters) (Nasdaq: TA), has signed a franchise agreement with Biggs Petroleum LLC to add a new TA Express in Rufus, Oregon. A newly-constructed building will sit on a five-acre site located on Interstate 84, Exit 104, at 91464 Biggs Rufus Highway. An opening date is planned for late 2019.

“The addition of this site strategically adds a location in northern Oregon to our network, where our customers can refuel, replenish and refresh,” said Barry Richards, president and COO of TravelCenters. “We’re proud to have Biggs Petroleum join our team.”

“Aligning with TravelCenters of America is the best solution for our growth strategy and our customers,” said Tony Singh of Biggs Petroleum. “As part of TA, we’ll be able to offer our customers many more amenities and options, including fleet fueling. We’re proud to be associated with such a highly-regarded brand in the industry.”

About TravelCenters of America Inc.: TravelCenters of America Inc. (TravelCenters), headquartered in Westlake, Ohio, conducts business in 44 states and Canada, principally under the TA®, Petro Stopping Centers® and TA Express® travel center brands. For more information on TA, TA Express and Petro, please visit www


6. History Tidbits: Sherman County Farm Products 1900

Wheat 2,400,00 bushels

Oats 300,000 bushels

Rye 160,000 bushels

Barley 240,000 bushels

Potatoes 25,000 bushels

Apples 8,000 bushels

Small fruits 5,000 bushels

Hay 282,000 tons

Live stock 27,000 head

Butter and cheese 12,000 pounds.

In 1900 the population was 3,500.

~Columbia Southern Railway Company Homeseekers’ Guide | 10,000 Free Farms | April 1902.


7. Oregon Capital Insider: This week, by the numbers

Oregon.BeaverCreated: 24 October 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • 2: State agency directors who have stepped down since Gov. Kate Brown was reelected last year.
  • $1.4 billion: Amount of damages 14 timber counties are seeking in a lawsuit over the state’s timber management practices, according to OPB. The trial began this week.
  • $35 million: Amount in annual timber revenue the counties say they aren’t getting because the state doesn’t harvest enough timber on its land.
  • 20: Percent of Oregon 11th graders who use marijuana, according to the Oregon Health Authority.
  • 44: Percent of those who use e-cigarettes or a vape pen to get high, up from about 11 percent just two years ago.
  • 14: State police workers, including 10 troopers, that Oregon State University contracts with the Oregon State Police for campus security, according to OPB. The university is terminating its contract with OSP effective June 3, 2020, due to what OSP said was a shortage of workers.
  • 21: Age of a black, female OSU student who was reportedly biking on the wrong side of a street and was stopped by an OSP trooper Oct. 13. She declined to provide her ID and was subsequently arrested, prompting an outcry from civil liberties organizations. The local district attorney did not charge her, saying that there is no state law requiring cyclists to present a driver’s license.
  • 43: Number assigned to an initiative petition that would repeal House Bill 2015, which will allow undocumented immigrants to get Oregon driver’s licenses. The Oregon Secretary of State rejected the petition this week, saying the way it was written was not constitutional.
  • $13 billion: Amount Oregon spent on public assistance programs last year, according to The Salem Reporter.
  • $510 million: Expected cost of an ongoing information technology project to consolidate benefits enrollment.

8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbGreat Big Story: Ancient Windmills Built Over 1,000 Years Ago

Oregon law puts small towns in a bind when big tech demands huge tax breaks

USPS tightens rules on stamped parcels and letters

Quantum entanglement, science’s ‘spookiest’ phenomenon, achieved in space

Our Finite World | How Renewable Energy Models Can Produce Misleading Indications

Video. Rare look into Hopi reservation shows tribe struggles and triumphs

PERSI – The Periodical Source Index | FindMyPast

PERSI provides a simple way to access articles, photos, and other material you might not find using traditional search methods. This can help to build the historical context around your personal research, and the world your ancestors lived in. $$


 

Sherman County eNews #267

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Sherman County eNews welcomes participation by our faith communities in Spiritual Matters. Published on Friday mornings, inspirational spiritual voices are important to our county communities. The current rotation opportunities:

  • 1st Friday: Wasco Church of Christ, Christian & Moro Community Presbyterian
  • 2nd Friday: Grass Valley Baptist & Wasco Catholic
  • 3rd Friday: Baha’i & Kent Baptist
  • 4th Friday: Wasco United Methodist, Rufus Baptist & Grass Valley Catholic
  • 5th Friday [to be determined by the Editor or proposed by a participant].

2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

ThankYou1

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! Janet Pinkerton and I would like to thank everyone for their kind remarks and interest in our 150 year history of Sherman County education timeline.  Granted, it was time consuming but proved fascinating to learn about the journey of education in this county.  We had heard bits and pieces from our fathers but it was interesting to put the whole story together.  Words cannot express our gratitude for the hard work and dedication of the entire community to realize the school system we have today.  We want to recognize Julie Triebelhorn Fong, Lloyd Henrichs’ granddaughter, for donating her creative genius. She took an idea drawn on a napkin and created this eye-popping timeline. Clearly, this presentation would not have happened without Julie’s skill and ingenuity.  She told us that she gives her clients two opportunities to review and alter before she starts charging.   Janet and I lost count of the number of changes but at least 25, all without a charge or a hint of frustration. ~Nancy Henrichs Simpson and Janet Pinkerton.

THANK YOU from Wasco School Events Center! Due to the generosity of so many talented Sherman County people, Wasco School Events Center hosted another very successful fund raiser. This past Sunday, “An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent” saw more than a dozen artists showing and selling their creations in our auditorium, and over 50 items were donated to our silent auction — everything from paintings, jewelry, photos on canvas, metal work, quilts and wall hangings, vinyl signs, solvent transfer prints, cross stitch, wood carving, cut & polished rocks . . . the list goes on. There are too many participants and donors to name personally here, but know that the Board of Directors greatly appreciates all of you who participated and donated so that we may continue to make improvements to our building. Sherman County people are the best!

THANK YOU! The Sherman County Senior Center would like to extend a very special thank you to Chris & Carrie Kaseberg of Wheatacres Ranch in Wasco, for their incredibly generous donation of 160 pounds of ground beef. Donations like this allow us to serve good quality meals to seniors, using local beef, which is very helpful with our monthly food budget. We cannot thank Wheatacres Ranch enough for this donation! Thank you so very much for your generosity!!

CONGRATULATIONS, CINDY! 1st Place Western Region Winner for a Communications Written Press Release at the National Extension Association of Family & Consumer Sciences conference in Hershey PA.  The award was accepted on her behalf by OSU Extension attendees. Her article titled “Picky Eaters? Eat Your Peas, Louise” ran in The Dalles Chronicle’s Extension Cord column April 2018.  Brown is a 4-H Youth Development & Healthy Living Educator serving Sherman County. ~Larry & Sherry

CONGRATULATIONS & THANK YOU! It was a splendid evening with Sherman County School District’s 2019 Hall of Honor inductees Deron Kaseberg, Mike S. Macnab, Ron Townsend, the 1989 OSAA State Football Champions and, posthumously, Grace (May) Zevely, and their families and friends! Old friends, new friends, memories, stories and information! The Sherman Booster Club fundraiser, a tri-tip dinner, was served by FFA members. The Sherman County School Concert Band entertained under the direction of John Gronberg. Superintendent Wes Owens welcomed a large crowd in the event center (gym) and made introductions. Jeremy Lanthorn took photographs. The designated speakers on behalf of the inductees were Jean (Zevely) Anderson, Kyle Blagg, Kevin Coelsch, Joe Justesen, Brett Kaseberg, Twila Kaseberg, Linda Krafsic, Bill Macnab, Nancy McCoy and Ron Townsend. Gary Shelton read the plaques that were presented by Wes Owens. Equally important is the graphic timeline and presentation made by Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Henrichs Simpson, “From One-Room Schools to One-Campus / 150 Years of Education in Sherman County.” They described their valuable research on the 150 years of county education and outlined changes and challenges, decade by decade, recognizing school board members and county school superintendents. Their important research is presented in information graph form on a wonderful large wall installation. The newly-formed Sherman County Education Foundation introduced information at their display table, the result of their vision, mission and thoughtful planning. It’s off to a running start and worthy of our support. That said, we are mindful that a special occasion such as this requires a great deal of planning and attention to detail, hard work, inspiration and many volunteers! Yes, it was a delightful evening, and even more — it was a gift to all of us… the inspiration and wisdom that comes from knowing what others achieve, over time, individually and as members of teams and boards of directors. Thank you, Sherman County School District, Booster Club, FFA, Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Henrichs Simpson and volunteers for this impressive annual event! First class! Well done! Congratulations! ~The Editor.

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins 

CONGRATULATIONS! Sunday afternoon, another splendid event in Sherman County, An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent was a benefit for the Wasco School Events Center! We were pleased to see significant support by local artists, showing their work and donating to the silent auction. Artists showing their work were Anna Alley, Cathy Brown, Vonda Chandler, Nancy Drinkard, Martha Flatt, Dan Hochstetler, Doris Hubbard, Tyson Huckins, Jeanney McArthur, Kathy McCullough, Clint Moore, Roy and Debbie Shafer, Dick Voll and Jessica Wheeler. The generous and talented silent auction donors of paintings, button-craft, greeting cards, gift tags, metal art, photographs on canvas, books, bracelet, quilts, wall hangings, seasonal signs, barrel stave bench, wood bowls, wine bottle holder, wood flag, and cut & polished rocks were Anna Alley, Debbie Bird, Stacy Bird, Keith Blaylock, Cathy Brown, Karla Chambers, Vonda Chandler, Penny Eakin, Martha Flatt, Shirley Fritts, Jessie Fuhrer, Dan Hochstetler, Doris Hubbard, Amy Huffman, Cam Kaseberg, Kevin Kaseberg, Linda Krafsic, Patti Moore, Kaleb Lavine, Carol MacKenzie, Gail Macnab, Jeanney McArthur, Kathy McCullough, Clint Moore, Patti Moore, Janet Pinkerton, Roy & Debbie Shafer, Kathy Thompson, Pat & Clarence Turner, Dick Voll, Jessica Wheeler and Jane Root Winter.  Thank you, everyone! Well done! ~The Editor 

THANK YOU to the local history and art enthusiasts who photographed public art in Sherman County for a photo essay series for Sherman County: For The Record. The project expanded to Public Art categories – Itinerant Sign Painters and Artists; Local Government; Businesses and Organizations; Murals, Mosaics and Mascots; Heritage and Monuments. Two categories have been suggested: Stained Glass and Farm & Ranch Signs… good ideas for another volunteer! ~Sherry Kaseberg

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION. The 8th Max Nogle Dinner-Auction-Dance will be held at the Grass Valley Pavilion on Saturday, November 16 beginning at 5 pm. Proceeds will go toward continuing improvements to the pavilion. Come and enjoy an evening of good food and fun. AND get a look at the upgraded kitchen!

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Being a trustholder of the community means serving as would a good steward. The good steward views the community as a gift from previous generations, but a gift with strings attached. One is obligated to pass the gift to future generations in a better state than that in which it was received…. The community is both our inheritance and our legacy.” ~National Association of Community Leadership, Taking Leadership to Heart (1996)

Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

EMPLOYMENT:

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $21-$28/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us under “Jobs/contracts”. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, 500 Court Street, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 no later than Tuesday, November 12, 2019 by 5:00 pm. Interviews will be held Friday, November 15, 2019. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 11/8

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company Seeks Bus Drivers. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid-Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice.  What we offer: $13.60 an hour; $500 Sign on bonus; Paid training; Flexible schedule; Dental, Vision, Medical Plan; 401 K … And more. Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check; Have a good driving record; Have a valid Oregon driver’s license; Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today. Amberlena Shaffer, Recruiter. OFFICE: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com  Website: www.MidCoBus.com

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

POSTERS. SHERMAN COUNTY EDUCATION TIMELINE. The 150 years of Sherman County Education; One-Room Schools to One Campus Timeline was dedicated on 10/19/19. The timeline will hang permanently in the school outside the cafeteria. Posters of this timeline are available for purchase. The posters are 16 x 36 and are $30/poster.  There are only seven left.  You may purchase them by calling the Sherman School 541-565-3500 and asking for Kim McKinney. 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

ROOMS FOR RENT. 2 rooms for rent at the Just us Inn in Wasco. Completely furnished with internet and cable TV.  Room 7 private entrance private bathroom two bedroom single bed and king size in Main. Use of common areas Kitchen and TV area.  — 1 queen size bedroom with shared bath on second floor. Use of common areas TV room and kitchen. Please contact Ron at 503 – 957 – 6114. 11/29 

FREE:

Freestanding basketball goal (it could use a new net but has one and works just fine). It’s heavy as the bottom is weighted, of course.  Free – You haul and it’s yours.  Call Jeanne at 541-714-5740. 10/25

Antique Sewing Machine in original wood cabinet – unusual Craftsman style cabinet- great shape I believe it is from the early 1900’s, original book and accessory box included. It’s heavy – you arrange to pick it up and it’s yours- originally from a local Sherman county resident.  Call Jeanne 541-714-5740. 10/25 

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED: 

PHOTOGRAPH. Copy of pre-1950 photo of the east side of the Barnett-Crosfield brick general merchandise store in Wasco for a photo essay on itinerant sign painters and artists. ~Sherry Kaseberg sherryk@gorge.net. 10/25


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html 

HalloweenCat2OCTOBER

25 Trunk or Treat 6-7 Senior Center Parking Lot, Moro

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

31 HALLOWEEN

voteNOVEMBER

3 DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME ENDS

3 Sherman Historical Society Volunteer Lunch & Program 1

3 Dewey Thomas’ 105th Birthday 2-4 The Springs at Mill Creek, The Dalles

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 ELECTION DAY

5 Moro City Council 7

6 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6-10 American Agri-Women Convention in Tigard

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7-10 American Agri-Women Convention, Portland

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

11 VETERANS’ DAY

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Rufus City Council

13-16 Tri-State Grain Convention, Spokane

15-17 Young Farmers & Ranchers Leadership Conference, Portland

16 8th Annual Max Nogle Dinner, Auction, Dance 5 Grass Valley Pavilion

17 Antelope Community Harvest Dinner 2-4 Antelope Community Center

19-21 Association of Oregon Counties Annual Conference

20 Sherman County Court 9

21-23 Oregon Cattleman’s Association Convention, Bend

23 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Thanksgiving Dinner 5

28 THANKSGIVING DAY

snowflakesmallDECEMBER

2 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Sherman County

2 Grass Valley City Council 7

3 Moro City Council 7

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5-14 National Rodeo Finals, Las Vegas, Nevada

7 Country Christmas Bazaar 10-2 Grass Valley Pavilion

9 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

10 Sherman County Watershed Council Board Meeting 8

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

10-12 Oregon Farm Bureau Convention, Gleneden Beach

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

12 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board 4 White Salmon

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

23-31 Sherman County School Christmas Break

25 CHRISTMAS

31 NEW YEAR’S EVE

JANUARY

11-13 Columbia River Circuit Rodeo Finals, Yakima, Washington


 

Sherman County eNews #266

CONTENTS

  1. Nominate Now for STEM Education Leader, Tech Leader of the Year

  2. Finding a Way

  3. History Tidbits: Sherman County School Superintendent’s Report, 1903

  4. Governor Brown Announces Committee to Address Rising Health Care Costs

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Nominate Now for STEM Education Leader, Tech Leader of the Year

The Gorge Technology Alliance (GTA) is seeking nominations now through November 8 for its 2019 annual awards program recognizing the Tech Leader and the STEM Education Leader of the Year, with the latter receiving a $1000 award. The Gorge Tech Alliance is the regional industry association that supports, connects and develops the technology community of the Columbia River Gorge. For almost 15 years, the GTA has been supporting the growth of our regional tech industry and encouraging strong science, tech, engineering and math (STEM) education opportunities.

The GTA’s awards are given in December with two categories. Tech Leader of the Year recognizes the outstanding achievement over the last year on the part of an individual or company that principally provides technology products, services, or support in the Columbia River Gorge. The 2018 winner was Maza Brady for her volunteer leadership of the Gorge Women in STEM initiative.

STEM Education Leader of the Year recognizes an individual for outstanding contributions to STEM education in the Columbia River Gorge over the last year. The 2018 winner was Lu Seapy of Wasco County 4-H. The winner of this category receives a $1000 contribution from the GTA towards their STEM education program.

Nominations must be received by 5pm on November 8, 2019 to be considered. The GTA defines the Gorge as the five-county area including Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Skamania and Klickitat Counties. Nominees need not be a GTA member or otherwise involved with the organization. Nomination forms and more details are available on the GTA website at http://crgta.org/about/awards.


2. Finding a Way

When you are presented with a serious challenge, how do you respond? When you have been dealt a difficult blow by life, what do you tell yourself? These are important questions that all of us are going to want to answer as we develop our personal and organizational philosophies.

Thorny issues have been around since the beginnings of human history, and the power to overcome them has been celebrated in song and story almost from the beginning. (Human beings are inveterate story-tellers. In fact, we learn best, and remember best, when stories provide the foundation.)

Take the nearly 2700-year old story of Homer’s “Odyssey” as we talk today about the power of optimism. Odysseus’ son is worried that his father will never come home from the wars. But Pallas Athene, the heroine of the story, gently reassures him by saying, “Your father will not be exiled much longer… trust Odysseus to get free. He always finds a way.”

This is an excellent description of option thinkers: No matter how tough the problem, no matter how great the odds, the option thinker always believes there is a solution. Option thinkers keep trying, experimenting, and looking. And eventually, one of their efforts bears fruit. They just refuse to give up when things get tough.

When Odysseus finally does make it home, in time to drive away his wife’s suitors and reunite his family, it is one of the great homecoming scenes in all literature.

So, what do you tell yourself when you are up against a wall? What do you say when you have been knocked down by life? Instead of looking for someone or something to blame, instead of falling silent in defeat and depression, why not remember Odysseus and tell yourself, “There is an answer, a solution. No matter what, I will find a way!” ~The Pacific Institute


3. History Tidbits: Sherman County School Superintendent’s Report, 1903

Annual Report, Sherman County School Superintendent, W.H. Ragsdale, for the year ending 15 June 1903:

School population – 1,303

School enrollment – 1,205

Teachers – 45.


4. Governor Brown Announces Committee to Address Rising Health Care Costs

Oregon.Flat.pole(Salem, OR) — Today, Governor Kate Brown announced the membership of a committee to control the cost of health care for Oregonians. The committee will set an annual target for health care spending growth and recommend enforcement tools to hold the health care system accountable for meeting the target.

“All Oregonians should have access to the health care services they need to live healthy and productive lives,” said Governor Brown. “Oregon’s community-based approach to health care, which covers 94 percent of adults and 100 percent of Oregon children, is a model for the nation. But if we do not control the rising costs of health care, too many Oregon families, particularly those in historically underserved communities, will again find the care they need is beyond their reach.”

Research shows that Oregonians pay more for health care and have higher deductibles than residents in other states. Between 2010 and 2016, Oregon household income grew by 15 percent, while employer-sponsored health care premiums grew by 25 percent and deductibles for families grew by 77 percent. Oregon has the third-highest health insurance deductibles in the country and is in the top ten highest states for family budgets spent on out-of-pocket hospital costs.

Oregon has already established a 3.4 percent growth rate for public programs, but there isn’t a similar target for the private market, where almost half of Oregonians get their health insurance.

“Rising health care costs mean less money for wages, retirement, and other public investments like housing and education,” said Jeremy Vandehey, director of health policy at the Oregon Health Authority. “A critical step in containing health care costs is bringing everyone to the table to set a common cost growth target that all insurance companies, hospitals, and health care providers have to stay within.”

This citizen and stakeholder led implementation committee, selected by Governor Brown and under the supervision of the Oregon Health Policy Board, was established by Senate Bill 889, passed during the 2019 legislative session. In addition to setting an annual target for costs, the committee will also provide recommendations for the Legislature to adopt in 2021 on how entities with unreasonable cost increases will be held accountable.

The Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target is modeled after a program in

Massachusetts that has saved $5.5 billion for consumers between 2013 and 2016. Rhode Island and Delaware have also adopted similar programs.

Implementation Committee for Oregon’s Sustainable Health Care Cost Growth Target program:

  • Patrick Allen, Director, Oregon Health Authority
  • Kraig Anderson, Senior Vice President and Chief Actuary, Moda Health
  • Kathryn Correia, President and CEO, Legacy Health
  • Angela Dowling, President, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon
  • Kevin Ewanchyna (Vice-Chair), Vice President and Chief Medical Officer, Samaritan Health Services; President of the Oregon Medical Association Jack Friedman (Chair)
  • Jessica Gomez, CEO, Rogue Valley Microdevices
  • Felisa Hagins, Political Director, SEIU Local 49
  • Ruby Haughton, State Director, AARP Oregon
  • K. John McConnell, Director, OHSU Center for Health Systems Effectiveness
  • Mark McMullen, Oregon State Economist, Office of Economic Analysis, DAS
  • William Olson, Chief Operating Officer, Providence Health and Services
  • Jordan Papé, CEO, Papé Group
  • Ken Provencher, President and CEO, PacificSource Health Plans
  • Shanon Saldivar, Chamness Saldivar Agency; Vice-Chair Marketplace Advisory Committee
  • Cameron Smith, Director, Department of Consumer and Business Services
  • Jenny Smith, Chief Financial Officer, Kaiser Permanente Northwest
  • Jenn Welander, Chief Financial Officer, St. Charles Health System.

~www.governor.


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.book1859 | Oregon’s Magazine

Northwest Rail Buffs Signal For Return Of Oregon Trail Amtrak Route To Boise

Oregon’s rural patients deserve access to quality hospice care

Military Times

Defense News

Slide Show | A day in the life of U.S. agriculture

Gorge Grown Food Network | Support Your Local Farmer

Numbers About Which SEIU and the Anti-Union Freedom Foundation Disagree

How Portland Got The Trail Blazers

Oregon Colleges Forced To Adjust As Student Priorities Expand

Oregon Secretary Of State Rejects Ballot Proposal On Immigrant Driver’s Licenses

Editorial. Real ID leads to real mess in Oregon

Science | The Epoch Times

Oregon ranks 4th in homelessness, study finds


 

Sherman County eNews #265

CONTENTS

  1. WANTED: Three for the Sherman County School Football Chain Gang, Oct. 26

  2. Posters for Sale: 150 Years of Sherman County Education

  3. Kids’ Gym Begins, Nov. 8

  4. Editorial: Sherman County Talent at Wasco School Events Center

  5. Child Abuse Hotline Report Highlights First Year of Operations

  6. Learning to Take the Risk

  7. History Tidbits: Moving to Rufus, 1896


1. WANTED: Three for the Sherman County School Football Chain Gang, Oct. 26

sign.helpwantedSherman County School is short 3 people to help with the Chain Gang on Saturday(10/26) at noon for our final football game here against Gilchrist. It should only take a couple hours and is a very easy job. If anyone is willing to help, please contact Mike Somnis @ msomnis@sherman.k12.or.us or the School @ 541-565-3500.


2. Posters for Sale: 150 Years of Sherman County Education

The 150 years of Sherman County Education; One-Room Schools to One Campus Timeline was dedicated on 10/19/19.   The timeline will hang permanently in the school outside the cafeteria.   Posters of this timeline are available for purchase.   The posters are 16 x 36 and are $30 each.  There are only seven left.  You may purchase them by calling the Sherman County School 541-565-3500 and asking for Kim McKinney.


3. Kids’ Gym Begins, Nov. 8

Wasco School Events Center will again be hosting “Kids’ Gym” on Fridays this winter. This is an opportunity for parents/care providers and their pre-school child(ren) to play inside for a couple of hours.

Kids’ Gym begins on November 8, and will be held on Fridays through March, except when there is no school due to holidays or inclement weather. It begins at 10 a.m., and last until noon. Cost is $5 per week, or free if you are a member of the WSEC Fitness Center. This is not a babysitting service; children must be accompanied by a parent/care provider.

Feel free to bring toys, trikes, etc. for your kids to play with. Contact WSEC Director, Melissa Kirkpatrick, with any questions.


4. Editorial: Sherman County Talent at Wasco School Events Center

pencil.spiralSunday afternoon, another splendid event in Sherman County, An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent was a benefit for the Wasco School Events Center! We were pleased to see significant support by local artists, showing their work and donating to the silent auction.

Artists showing their work were Anna Alley, Cathy Brown, Vonda Chandler, Nancy Drinkard, Martha Flatt, Dan Hochstetler, Doris Hubbard, Tyson Huckins, Jeanney McArthur, Kathy McCullough, Clint Moore, Roy and Debbie Shafer, Dick Voll and Jessica Wheeler.

The generous and talented silent auction donors of paintings, button-craft, greeting cards, gift tags, metal art, photographs on canvas, books, bracelet, quilts, wall hangings, seasonal signs, barrel stave bench, wood bowls, wine bottle holder, wood flag, and cut & polished rocks were Anna Alley, Debbie Bird, Stacy Bird, Keith Blaylock, Cathy Brown, Karla Chambers, Vonda Chandler, Penny Eakin, Martha Flatt, Shirley Fritts, Jessie Fuhrer, Dan Hochstetler, Doris Hubbard, Amy Huffman, Cam Kaseberg, Kevin Kaseberg, Linda Krafsic, Patti Moore, Kaleb Lavine, Carol MacKenzie, Gail Macnab, Jeanney McArthur, Kathy McCullough, Clint Moore, Patti Moore, Janet Pinkerton, Roy & Debbie Shafer, Kathy Thompson, Pat & Clarence Turner, Dick Voll, Jessica Wheeler and Jane Root Winter.

It’s heartwarming to join in the support for nonprofit fundraisers – the groups that provide services … Sherman County Child Care Foundation, Little Wheats Daycare, Sherman County Athletic Foundation, Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, Wasco School Events Center and the Grass Valley Pavilion-Max Nogle Dinner. We can imagine the people-power required to produce these events! We’re grateful! Thank you! Well done!


5. Child Abuse Hotline Report Highlights First Year of Operations

(Salem, Ore.) – Since it launched in August 2018, the statewide Oregon Child Abuse Hotline has made significant progress in protecting Oregon’s children by implementing a system that ensures the best possible safety decisions, that calls are handled consistently, and callers are respected and responded to in a timely manner. Dropped call rates have decreased, average call waits have gotten shorter, and 98,404 calls reporting concerns of child safety were screened by hotline staff.

This data is available in the recently released Oregon Child Abuse Hotline Annual Report.

“As the Hotline reflects on progress made during its first year, we also acknowledge that there is still much room for improvement,” said DHS Director Fariborz Pakseresht. “We will continue to use data, customer feedback, predictive analytics, and training to better serve and protect the children in our communities.”

The statewide hotline resulted from the centralization of 15 previously independent, regional hotlines in order to improve consistency in how rule and procedure were applied, including screening reports of child abuse. When someone calls the Hotline, a screener gathers sufficient information to assess whether the allegation meets the criteria of suspected abuse and whether there is imminent danger to the safety of the child. Calls can remain anonymous.

Over the last year, DHS partnered with Action for Child Protection, Portland State University, and other community partners to develop a 56-hour training for DHS screeners. This training, along with the centralization, has increased screening consistency, decreased the potential for bias, and integrated robust and intentional data in the Hotline’s efforts to keep children safe. Along with predictive analytics and access to past reports from multiple sources, screeners now have more information in assessing safety for children at their fingertips.

The management consulting firm hired to assist DHS through Governor Brown’s Executive Order on Child Welfare performed significant work to track and analyze hotline call data to improve screening outcomes. The Hotline will also soon be adding an additional queue for more general child welfare questions, so that screeners can focus on calls that require immediate attention.

Screeners also can now receive reports of child abuse and neglect in multiple languages. By adding an additional queue for Spanish speakers to speak with Spanish speaking screeners this summer, more children are now represented and protected.

Other highlights of the hotline’s first year include the final hiring and training phase of 18 staff expected in November and newly created advanced screener training modules on Tribal Engagement, Commercial Sexual Exploitation, Substance Abuse Disorder, and Domestic Violence.

While great progress has been made, the Hotline is still facing challenges. For example, in September as children returned to school and interfaced with more mandatory reporters, the Hotline saw average wait times increase to approximately 7 minutes. Still, even with the spike in September, more than 60 percent of the calls were answered within 2 minutes. The maximum wait time in September was 100 minutes, an outlier in the month’s average data, and an issue DHS is addressing.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.


6. Learning to Take the Risk

Do you consider yourself a risk-taker? For a great many of us, the answer would be, “No!” In this day and age, that isn’t an unreasonable response. In myriad places around the world, taking a risk, and failing, sometimes requires the ultimate price to be paid. However, today, let’s take a slightly different look at this question regarding risk.

In one of his many books, Leo Buscaglia wrote that, “To laugh is to risk appearing a fool, to weep is to risk appearing too sentimental, to reach out for another is to risk involvement, and to expose feelings is to risk exposing one’s true self.

“To place your ideas and dreams before the crowd is to risk their loss, to love is to risk not being loved in return. To live is to risk dying, to hope is to risk despair, to try is to risk failure.

“But all risks must be taken because the greatest hazard in life is to risk nothing.

“The person who risks nothing also does nothing, has nothing, is nothing. If we avoid risk, we may avoid suffering and sorrow, but we simply cannot learn, feel, change, grow, love or live.”

By now, you are probably agreeing with Leo Buscaglia. If, out of our fears, we refuse to risk, we also forfeit our freedom because only a person who risks is truly free. Only a person who risks can grow, because all personal growth involves risk.

If you stay focused on the benefits of the risk, instead of putting all your energy into worrying about what could go wrong, and if you consistently affirm and visualize what achievement will look and feel like, it will be much easier for you to take the risks you need to take, in order to grow and to be the best you can be. ~The Pacific Institute


7. History Tidbits: Moving to Rufus, 1896

railroad.st.engineThe Dalles Daily Chronicle, Saturday, January 11, 1896:

Moving to Rufus. Ever since the flood of 1894, which almost obliterated the town of Grants, there has been a three-cornered rivalry for the chief town of Sherman County touching the railroad. When the waters receded and dry land appeared, some patriotic citizens began the work of re-building; others who figured out a better location, chose Murray Springs as the site of a new town, while the remainder pinned their faith to Rufus. All three of these towns line the railroad within the space of two miles, and each one has set up claims to be the shipping point of Sherman county. The struggle proves to be unequal and Mr. R.C. Wallis, who was in The Dalles today, informs us that the buildings at Murray Springs are to be removed to Rufus. Mr. Wallis has the contract for moving the large general merchandise store of J.W. Smith, and the stable of George Crosfield and the McDonald Hotel are to take up their beds, so to speak, and walk. Rufus has already become the largest of the towns, and with the consolidation of Murray Springs will be placed in the lead. Of the three sites that of Murray Springs is the pleasantest for a town, but the channel of trade has been diverted elsewhere, and the people must go to meet it. The starting of the distillery again will give Grants a boom and the vigor of the contest between Seattle and Tacoma may be repeated in our neighboring towns.”


 

Sherman County eNews #264

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Oct. 28

  2. Sign up for Veterans’ Day Parade by Nov. 8

  3. Turkey BINGO/Dinner/Veterans Appreciation, Nov. 11

  4. Letter to the Editor: Oregon Funeral Laws

  5. Sherman County Health District Seeking Candidates for Board Vacancy

  6. Sherman County School Hall of Honor

  7. Energy and Enthusiasm

  8. History Tidbits: Grant Personals in The Observer, 1903


1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Oct. 28

Sherman County Photography Club meets this Monday, October 28 at the OSU Extension Building at 6pm. The club will work as a group on retouching straight out of the camera photos. Everyone is always invited to join the meeting.


2. Sign up for Veterans’ Day Parade by Nov. 8

Entry forms for the Veterans Day Parade are available at The Dalles Area Chamber of Commerce, VSO office and the Columbia Gorge Veterans Museum located at 205 E 2nd Street, The Dalles, Oregon. Entry forms need to be returned by November 8, the Friday before the parade. The parade takes place Monday Nov. 11, 2019, beginning at 11a.m. There is no entry fee. Patriotic decorations are welcome. A community Potluck will follow the parade at the Oregon Veterans’ Home. Bring your favorite Potluck food and deserts to share with all. This will be hosted by the VFW Post and Auxiliary 2471. To kick off the parade starting at 11 a.m., the Parade Committee asks that the Churches and Public Buildings with bells, sirens, chimes etc., sound them showing honor and respect to our men and women who have put on the United States Military Uniform in service to this Nation. This Veterans’ Day our intent is to honor all Veterans in The Dalles, OR, and all Veterans from surrounding areas in the Columbia River Gorge. PUT THIS ON YOUR CALENDARS AND ELECTRONIC DEVICES.   ~Mid Columbia Veterans’ Memorial Committee


3. Turkey BINGO/Dinner/Veterans Appreciation, Nov. 11

American flag2Join us Monday, November 11 at Wasco School Events Center for BINGO and dinner. A pulled pork dinner with all the trimmings will be served beginning at 5 p.m. Cost is $6 per person ($5 with a donation of a non-perishable item to the Food Bank, canned veggies & soups preferred), $3 for 6 and under, and a family for $20. In honor of Veterans Day, all veterans eat free. Beginning at 6 p.m., we will begin turkey BINGO. Ten games, ten frozen turkeys given as prizes — just in time for Thanksgiving! Kids BINGO will be held in the library and is free. Thank you to our sponsors: Tribeca Transport for providing the frozen turkeys, and Jeff Baunach from Bob’s Texas T-Bone for donations to the dinner. ~Wasco School Events Center.


4. Letter to the Editor: Oregon Funeral Laws

pencil.sharpI live in Wasco County, on Bakeoven Road. Since the death of my son Max in February 2018, I’ve become involved in advocacy work to inform all Oregonians of their right to care for their own dead. Working with several other women we’ve created a website http://www.oregonfuneral.org. I want to share this important information with my neighbors since I don’t know who will want to exercise their rights.  You can find my story here – https://www.oregonfuneral.org/maxs_story.html.

Keelia Carver

Bakeoven Road, Wasco County, Oregon


5. Sherman County Health District Seeking Candidates for Board Vacancy

Sherman County Health District is accepting applications to fill one open position on its board of directors. The appointee will serve the remainder of the current term, which expires June 2023.

The Sherman County Health District Board of Directors is comprised of 5 board members. Each member is elected by the registered voters of the district to serve a 4-year term. Applicants for the vacant position must be registered voters who reside within the district’s boundaries.

Interested candidates can request an information packet, which includes information about the district, position, and application/selection process, from the district office by contacting Caitlin at 541-565-0536 or by email at admin@shermancountymedicalclinic.net. You may also visit our office located at 110 Main Street, Moro, OR 97039 during regular business hours (Monday -Thursday 8am-5pm, Friday 8-12:30).

This position is open until filled.

About Sherman County Health District: Sherman County Health District operates Sherman County Medical Clinic. The purpose of the Sherman County Health District and the Sherman County Medical Clinic is to provide responsive, preventative, high quality primary health care services to people without regard to social or economic status.

The Sherman County Medical Clinic is a Rural Health Clinic committed to enhancing the quality of life for the residents of Sherman County and Eastern Oregon. We seek to serve the needs of the rural community by providing affordable, comprehensive and accessible medical services in a safe, professional, and caring environment. We believe that by putting the needs of the people first, we will gain trust, respect and compassion for each other. We will work to improve the health of our patients by promoting collaboration and education. For more information, please visit our website at http://www.shermancountymedicalclinic.net.


6. Editorial. Sherman County School Hall of Honor

pencil.spiralIt was a splendid evening with Sherman County School District’s 2019 Hall of Honor inductees Deron Kaseberg, Mike S. Macnab, Ron Townsend, the 1989 OSAA State Football Champions and, posthumously, Grace (May) Zevely, and their families and friends! Old friends, new friends, memories, stories and information!

The Sherman Booster Club fundraiser, a tri-tip dinner, was served by FFA members. The Sherman County School Concert Band entertained under the direction of John Gronberg. Superintendent Wes Owens welcomed a large crowd in the event center (gym) and made introductions. Jeremy Lanthorn took photographs.

The designated speakers on behalf of the inductees were Jean (Zevely) Anderson, Kyle Blagg, Kevin Coelsch, Joe Justesen, Brett Kaseberg, Twila Kaseberg, Linda Krafsic, Bill Macnab, Nancy McCoy and Ron Townsend. Gary Shelton read the plaques that were presented by Wes Owens. We all learned a thing or two!

Equally important is the graphic timeline and presentation made by Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Henrichs Simpson, “From One-Room Schools to One-Campus / 150 Years of Education in Sherman County.” They described their valuable research on the 150 years of county education and outlined changes and challenges, decade by decade, recognizing school board members and county school superintendents. Their important research is presented in information graph form on a wonderful large wall installation.

The newly-formed Sherman County Education Foundation introduced information at their display table, the result of their vision, mission and thoughtful planning. It’s off to a running start and worthy of our support.

That said, we are mindful that a special occasion such as this requires a great deal of planning and attention to detail, hard work, inspiration and many volunteers! Yes, it was a delightful evening, and even more — it was a gift to all of us… the inspiration and wisdom that comes from knowing what others achieve, over time, individually and as members of teams and boards of directors.

Thank you, Sherman County School District, Booster Club, FFA, Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Henrichs Simpson and volunteers for this impressive annual event! First class! Well done! Congratulations!


7. Energy and Enthusiasm

A couple of questions for this week: First, what do you absolutely love to do? And secondly, how well do you do it?

Now, whatever your answer to the first question may be, the answer to the second question will be somewhere between, “very well” and “superbly.” Because, if you love doing something, you are probably good at it.

Do you know anyone who has achieved tremendous success by doing something he or she hates? Most likely, no. Mark Twain once said, “The secret of success is making your vocation your vacation,” and that is exactly what successful people seem to do.

Workaholics who dislike their work tend to get ulcers, and spend the weekend resting up so they can go “do battle” again on Monday. But, workaholics who love their work get ahead. It makes their lives richer and more satisfying, and they have tremendous energy for what they do.

Neuroscientists have determined that when you do something with enthusiasm it only takes one-tenth the energy that it takes to do the same thing with reluctance. When we don’t want to do something, we expend a lot of time and energy mentally running down paths that have nothing to do with what needs to be accomplished. (Formally, this is called procrastination, and some of us are experts at it.)

Let’s face it, some jobs are easier to love than others. The key for you is to work toward getting those jobs that you love. And if you can find creative ways to do what you are doing now, it will make the climb toward your goal of “love-the-work” faster and easier. People in charge will notice your skill, and especially your attitude.

So, bring the same energy and enthusiasm to your work as you do to your play, and watch what happens! ~The Pacific Institute


8. History Tidbits: Rufus & Grant Personals in The Observer, 1903

newspaper-arrowNotes, not quotes unless so indicated, from The Observer town columns for Rufus and our long-gone town of Grant on the Columbia River…

Rufus 8 May 1903:

  • C. Wallis to build new porch on hotel
  • John Coates hauling lumber for addition to his house

Rufus 29 May 1903:

  • R. Fowler struck water on wheat farm, putting up windmill
  • Baseball – Rufus 7- Wasco 5
  • Joe Morris planted 4,000 strawberry plants

Rufus 5 June 1903:

  • Tom Striker purchased Wm. Oehman’s interest in the threshing machine
  • Ben Hailey’s 1500# 4 year old colt killed by train
  • & Mrs. Joe Morris, T. Smith, Wm. Oehman, R.C. Wallis & wife and Ben Hailey fishing on the Deschutes
  • Frank Medler hauling wood from Goldendale
  • Grandma White very ill.

Rufus 12 June 1903:

  • Columbia River still rising
  • Calves have black leg

Rufus 26 June 1903:

  • Wheat looks good since rains
  • Rufus school election… directors John Sinknecht & J.P. Linderman, clerk Chas. Hoggard.
  • 4th of July ice cream picnic at Murray Springs
  • Immense lot of drift ice in the river
  • Grant surrounded by water
  • Shay, section boss at Grant, using sand bags to keep river from washing out the grade, 6 men filling sacks
  • “Trainload of Japs” sidetracked at Rufus working on keeping waves from washing out the grade.

Grant 27 November 1903:

  • Miss Ethel Blackburne returned from California visit.
  • “The Grant Japs have returned from Bingham Springs.”
  • Grant Ferry Co. has a new steamer enroute from Portland to replace the NELLIE which burned last Tuesday.
  • Steamer COLUMBIA making regular trips from upriver to Grants loaded with wheat to be shipped below.
  • Dingle is repairing and papering his home on the Graham place intending to move his family there.