Sherman County eNews #243

CONTENTS

  1. Reminder: Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  2. Kimberly Hulke among Parole & Probation Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy

  3. Oregon Heritage Commission seeks feedback on proposed 2020 Oregon Heritage Plan

  4. What Happens at the Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

  5. Shaniko Ragtime & Vintage Music Festival in Shaniko and Madras, Oct. 4-6

  6. Senator Bill Hansell Welcomes Portland Colleagues to Eastern Oregon

  7. Greg Walden: ‘This trade deal is welcome news for Oregon’s farmers and ranchers.’


Editor’s Note: See the informal poll at the upper right side of the page.


1. Reminder: Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

Check-markGreenApplications are now being accepted for the Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


2. Kimberly Hulke among Parole & Probation Officers to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 80th Basic Parole & Probation Officer Class on Friday, September 27, 2019 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon.  The event will begin at 11:00 a.m. with a reception to follow after the ceremony. Commissioner Sebastian Tapia, of the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission, will be the guest speaker.  All family and friends of students, supervisors, department heads and elected officials are welcome to attend.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy. Reception immediately following.

Roster of Basic Parole and Probation Class 80:

Parole & Probation Officer Alexandra Arneson, Washington County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Taylor Bonawitz, DOC/Linn County Community Corrections

Deputy Sheriff Yvonne Burdick-Garcia, Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office

Parole & Probation Officer Emily Cobb, Jackson County Community Justice

Deputy Sheriff Katrina Curfman, Crook County Sheriff’s Office

Parole & Probation Officer Andrew Gniffke, Klamath County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Kimberly Hulke, Tri-County Corrections [Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties]

Parole & Probation Officer Kasi Jackson, Lane County Parole & Probation

Deputy Sheriff Richard Kirby, Baker County Sheriff’s Office

Parole & Probation Officer John Lambert,  Umatilla County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Catherine Lowery, Jefferson County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Ebuka Mgbadigha, Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Cassandra Newman, Klamath County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Mercedez Popp, Lane County Parole & Probation

Supervisor Juan Rivas, Jackson County Community Justice

Parole & Probation Officer Francisco Robles, Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Heather Simes, Jefferson County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Sandra Torres, Washington County Community Corrections

Parole & Probation Officer Valarie Truelove, Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Nelson Wadman, Lane County Parole & Probation

Parole & Probation Officer Cassidy Wilson, Jackson County Community Justice

## Background Information on the DPSST ##
The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Patricia Patrick-Joling, public citizen representative, serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.


3. Oregon Heritage Commission seeks feedback on proposed 2020 Oregon Heritage Plan

The Oregon Heritage Commission is developing goals for the 2020-2025 Oregon Heritage Plan. In preparation, the Commission reviewed the progress of the 2014 Heritage Plan and recent statewide surveys. Paired with ongoing engagement with the heritage community, feedback from Oregon Heritage MentorCorps participants, and recognition of current cultural and professional trends, the Heritage Commission has identified four opportunities to strengthen heritage in the state.

The proposed 2020 Heritage Plan is a call to action<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/HeritagePlanDraftWhy.pdf> for individuals and organizations leading heritage efforts across the state. In the past, the Heritage Plan has set internal goals for the Commission. In 2020, the Heritage Commission is proposing four statewide goals and asking individuals and organizations to work toward them. Because success depends on your participation, we invite you to provide feedback on the proposed goals and share how these goals overlap with your current and future efforts.

Provide feedback in the following ways:

  1. Submit written comments through an online survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2020HeritagePlan
  2. Provide public comment at the October 18 Heritage Commission meeting in Salem (see agenda<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/OHC_Draft_Agenda%20_Salem_Oct_2019.pdf> for details)

Learn more about the Heritage Plan here: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/index.aspx


4. What Happens at the Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

By Debra Holbrook

music.notes (2)The Shaniko Preservation Guild sees preserving music as an important cultural goal. We sponsor the new Shaniko Hoot, Holler, and Sing spring event, as well as the Shaniko Ragtime and Vintage Music Festival in October each year for the same reason.

If the Jamboree had a timeless dedication, it would be to Sonny Cox and the Sawtooth Mountain Boys Bluegrass Band.  The bluegrass community are some of the best folks around and it was that support and dedication that brought this event from the first humble Shaniko beginnings in 2000, to 20 years of bluegrass music in North Central Oregon.  The second year we held Bluegrass by the River at the Imperial River Company’s beautiful setting, less than two weeks after 9-11.  It was a healing activity. However, the Wasco County Fairgrounds was the perfect place to bring the Jamboree home in 2002.  The setting, the people, and the activities have made the Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree a favorite festival. Many bluegrass friends and family have been the workhorses keeping the chores done from year to year.

The educational parts of the Jamboree and the stage performances all serve to teach, inform and invite new people to experience Bluegrass music which often leads to a desire and motivation to learn to play.  The workshops and slow jam offered by willing musicians are an excellent way for anyone that plays or who is thinking about it, to learn more and enjoy meeting others.

The challenges and the competitive spirit of the Saturday Band Scramble is fun and some of the band names created is priceless. Everyone goes home with a token of participation and a memorable send-off finale for the audience.  Speaking of memories … the 2019 theme for the 20th year is, Thanks for the Memories.  Look forward to performers all weekend sharing memorable moments from past Jamborees or why they love the event.

Kathy Boyd of the host band, Phoenix Duo spearheads the scramble, has a pie tasting activity by the Sacajawea festival folks at her camp on Saturday (bring a pie at 6 and eat at 7 pm), also holds a slow jam for beginning musicians Saturday at 2 pm, and sponsors a scavenger hunt or scrabble board activity that entertains young and old all weekend, ending Sunday at the end of the Jamboree with a big prize.  Instructions for all this fun is found on the Jamboree program.

The workshops offered start out a little early (especially for those who jam most of the night), but there is a mighty assembly at the stage where the teachers take groups out in all directions.  In addition to traditional bluegrass instruments from beginning to advanced instruction (Banjo, Guitar, Bass, Fiddle, and Mandolin) you might find harmonica, uke, vocals or even, what to do between songs. These all depend on the performers from year to year.

The Jamboree has food, vendors, a magical music petting zoo of instruments to sample, and a taxi service!  Model T’s & some A’s, provided by the Badger Camp and Dennis Prince’s Madras folks, give rides from the stage area to camp if you need that or just want a ride for the fun of it.

The original goal was to create a musicians retreat at the end of the bluegrass music season it succeeds at that for the music is everywhere, day and night … and the treat for those of us that don’t play, never loses flavor.


5. Shaniko Ragtime & Vintage Music Festival in Shaniko and Madras, Oct. 4-6

music.notes (2)The 17th annual Shaniko Ragtime and Vintage Music Festival will take place on Oct. 4-6, 2019.

The Music event begins, Friday at 1 p.m. with Keith Taylor, event founder, at the Historic Shaniko Schoolhouse.  From 1 through 6 p.m., musicians Keith Taylor, Vicki Cox, Meg Graf, Clare Kennedy, and Lance Maclean. Then activities will move to the Sage Saloon for a jam session from 7-10 p.m. Food is available.  These musicians from Oregon, Washington, California and New Hampshire welcome all musicians who sing or play acoustic instruments to join the jam sessions.

Saturday events will be held at the Erickson Aircraft Collection Hanger, at the Madras Airport.  Ragtime event and Airport Museum supporter, Kenny Bicart and friends have established the Air Time Music Festival in Madras and invites the Shaniko Ragtime musicians. In addition to other music, the Ragtime & Vintage Music Artist’s performances take place from 1 p.m. through 6 p.m. and some return to the museum for a jam session from 7 to 10pm.

Back in Shaniko on Sunday, the traditional All-Performer concert in the school rounds out the festival from 2 to 4 p.m. for a suggested donation of $10 per person.

Keith Taylor, of Haines, Ore., began playing ragtime in 1972. With a background in classical music, he has degrees in composition and piano, and studied in Paris with Rene Leibowitz.  The native Oregonian, returned to Azalea, OR. in 1978, then moved to Haines in 2005, where he works as a freelance pianist, composer and teacher.

Vicki Cox, of Eugene, leads the Calamity Jazz Band, plays lead trumpet for the Lincoln Pops Big Band, and performs with Bill Borcher’s Oregon Jazz Band. She majored in musical performance at the University of Oregon. She is multi-instrument talented and a great historian of music pieces.

Meg Graf is a remarkable and versatile musician playing a variety of instruments. From Eugene, she also performs with Calamity Jazz and other music ensembles. Meg comes to Shaniko as many first weekends of the month through the summer to help delight and promote the Ragtime event. She can take one word and play you a concert of songs … the color blue, sunsets, moon/river will get you that song plus double your request. Simply amazing.

Clare Kennedy, from Vancouver, Wash., is a popular and sought-after pianist. She also plays organ and sings. She holds a bachelor of arts in music from Linfield College. She lived in the Clarno area for years and went to Vancouver to be near family and lots of great and grandchildren.

Newest to the lineup is Lance Maclean, a Piano Tuner and Computer Specialist from New Hampshire, returns to Oregon where for years played on the Dixieland Festival Circuit in the band, “The Hot Frogs Jumping Jazz Band” for 10 years. Then he was with, “Night Blooming Jazzmen”, for several years. Lance since the age of 14 has mastered the 5-String Banjo, Bass, Tuba, Guitar, Mandolin, and Piano.

The Ragtime Festival is sponsored by the Shaniko Preservation Guild. For more information, call the event line 541-489-3434 or visit http://www.shanikopreservationguild.com. (event page).


6. Senator Bill Hansell Welcomes Portland Colleagues to Eastern Oregon

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM, Ore.— Senator Bill Hansell welcomed two of his Senate Colleagues to Morrow and Umatilla Counties this past weekend. Senators Michael Dembrow and Lew Frederick participated in a tour along with a dozen of their constituents. The goal of the trip was to show the ongoing work in the Columbia Basin regarding water use and irrigation.

In addition, the group toured the former Lost Valley Dairy site now owned by Easterday Farms. The group saw how the dairy is being revitalized and how area farms are using digital technology to monitor field irrigation systems in real-time. The group also toured the Port of Morrow and the SAGE Center to see how technological advances are making agriculture more energy efficient.

Hansell (R-Athena) released the following statement:

“Ever since I was elected to the Senate, I have extended invitations to my urban colleagues to visit rural Eastern Oregon. These trips show how farmers and ranchers use our abundant natural resources in a sustainable way. My colleagues and their constituents had a full day of learning and were even able to take sweet corn and Hermiston melons home with them from the fields. It was a special day.

This trip would not have been possible without the work of J.R. Cook, the Northeast Oregon Water Association, Bobby Levy and the Eastern Oregon Women’s Coalition. I would also like to thank the Port of Morrow, Easterday Farms, Madison Ranches and Bellinger Farms for their generous hospitality and for showing us their operations. I am proud of the agricultural innovation taking place in Senate District 29 and I’m glad that my colleagues were able to see it firsthand.”


7. Greg Walden: ‘This trade deal is welcome news for Oregon’s farmers and ranchers.’

American flag2Releases statement on Japan signing partial trade deal with U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Today, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) released a statement following the United States and Japan’s announcement that they have a reached a partial trade deal. The deal is set to reduce Japanese tariffs on agriculture and industrial products. It is expected to have a significant benefit for Oregon wheat, wine, potatoes, and beef.

“This trade deal is welcome news for Oregon’s farmers and ranchers,” said Walden. “During my town halls in Sherman and Gilliam counties last month, trade and access to markets for our farmers and ranchers was a recurring topic. Japan is a top market for Oregon wheat, and represents great opportunities to grow markets for beef, blueberries, potatoes, and wine among other Oregon products. I commend President Trump and his team for their efforts to reach this important agreement with Japan. This deal will help level the playing field for American agriculture and provide both certainty and a needed boost for our farmers, ranchers, and their local communities.”