Sherman County eNews #233

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 18

  3. Museum Day Live! at Maryhill Museum, Sept. 21

  4. Oregon Heritage introduces Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit

  5. Oregon Heritage grant deadline approaches on Oct. 1

  6. The Cynics Among Us

  7. Hat Etiquette

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 “Eight million tons of cargo move inland on the Columbia and Snake rivers each year, and 53% of U.S. wheat exports were transported on the Columbia River in 2017 … About $2 billion in commercial cargo travels the entire system annually, according to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and it’s the No. 1 export gate in the U.S. for wheat and barley and the No. 2 export gate for corn.” ~Associated Press


1. Notice. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

The Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals (BOPTA) has board openings for the 2019-20 tax year. These positions are open to non-office holding residents of Sherman County. A non-office holding resident cannot be: a member of the county governing body, a member of the governing body of any taxing district within the county, an elected official within the county, a person employed in or hired by the county or any taxing district within the county, a former county assessor, or any appointee acting in the place of the assessor that held the office or was appointed during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA, or a person previously employed in or hired by the office of the assessor during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA.

Board members hear petitions for reduction of the real market, maximum assessed, specially assessed, and assessed value of property placed on the roll by the county assessor as of January 1, 2019. The board will also consider requests to waive penalties assessed for the late filing of real and personal property returns.

An initial training session is required for new members and for those members returning after a break in service. Board members are required to attend training approved by the Department of Revenue at least every other year unless no petitions are filed. The BOPTA board generally meets for one or two sessions during the year between February and June. The one-year term ends on June 30, 2020.

If you are interested in being considered for the BOPTA board, please contact Jenine McDermid at 541-565-3606 or by email at: countyclerk@shermancounty.net no later than Friday, September 27. BOPTA pool members will be appointed by the county governing body on October 2, 2019.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 18

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 18th, at 9:00 a.m.  This session will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Transportation Plan, Resident Incentive Payment Amount, Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA), County Speed Bumps, Commissioners’ Reports and Consent Agenda. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Museum Day Live! at Maryhill Museum, Sept. 21

In the spirit of the Smithsonian Institution, whose museums offer free admission every day, Museum Day Live! is an annual event created by Smithsonian magazine. Participating museums, including Maryhill, give free admission to anyone presenting a Museum Day Live! ticket on Saturday, September 21.

The Museum Day ticket provides free admission for two people on Saturday, September 21, 2019. Visit here<https://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-2019/&gt; to get your ticket and more information.

There are 20 Oregon museums participating so be sure to visit here to find an Oregon museum near you to visit: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/search/?q=&states=US::OR&.


4. Oregon Heritage introduces Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit

newspaper-arrowOregon Heritage is launching the Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Communications%20Toolkit.aspx&gt;. The toolkit is a set of adaptable resources to help heritage groups recognize and communicate the value of their work. The more we all articulate heritage values and impacts, the more we strengthen public perception of heritage efforts, expand funding opportunities, and encourage long-term support for Oregon’s heritage.

Tools will be added on an on-going basis to provide state and national data, resources to collect and guidance on how to use each tool. Access Initial Tools:

Value of Heritage Message Platform<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/ValueofHeritageMessagePlatform.pdf>-Making the connection between your heritage work and its impact on the community is essential for building support and understanding. This guide will help you communicate both what you organization does and why it matters.

Cultural Value of Heritage Flyer<https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/docs/CulturalValueofHeritageFlyer.pdf>- Stories are powerful ways to illustrate the impact of you heritage preservation and outreach efforts. Use this flyer as an example of how your organization can pair a message, a story, and an image to demonstrate cultural value.

Visit: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/Pages/Communications%20Toolkit.aspx for ideas on how to adapt each resource and take action.


5. Oregon Heritage grant deadline approaches on Oct. 1

wheel.wagon1The Oregon Heritage grant funds qualified projects for the conservation, development and interpretation of Oregon’s cultural heritage. Awards typically range between $5,000 and $20,000. Projects can include anything related to Oregon heritage, and priority will be given to projects that preserve, develop or interpret threatened heritage resources or heritage resources of statewide significance.

To learn a little more about an Oregon Heritage grant project, check out the most recent post on the Oregon Heritage Exchange Blog<https://oregonheritage.wordpress.com/2019/09/06/walking-tour-of-south-portland/&gt;. It features the Oregon Jewish Museum and Holocaust Education Center’s new walking tour, a 2017 Oregon Heritage Grant project.

For more information on the grant, visit https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/FINASST/Pages/grants.aspx#Oregon_Heritage_Grant_Program. Oregon Heritage grants program staff is happy to discuss projects and review applications in advance.


6. The Cynics Among Us

Some people think it is smart and sophisticated to be cynical. We see a lot of this in the world today. It’s an easy mindset to fall into, evidenced by checking any one day’s social media feed. The trouble is, cynicism does not help solve the challenges before us.

Do you know anyone with a cynical attitude? Most likely, you do. Cynics believe that people are motivated by selfishness. Cynics come off as scornful and contemptuous of anything that looks like virtue or integrity. Cynics pride themselves on having a “realistic approach” and mock those with a more optimistic view. But have you ever noticed that cynics, more than likely, are unhappy people? They are not only unhappy, but they seem dead to the spiritual values that give life meaning.

You might have heard cynics described as failed idealists who commit a kind of intellectual suicide. Now that may seem a bit extreme, but think about it. Cynics build no bridges, make no discoveries, and expect people to behave badly. They see no room for improvement, so they abandon hope and, in the process, give up their power to act and bring about change. In effect, cynics give up on themselves before they give up on everyone else.

Now, our minds are nourished by a continual supply of new ideas, which we then put to work with a purpose in mind. But if there are no worthwhile new ideas, as the cynic believes, the mind becomes stagnant. A stagnant mind is a danger to its owner and worse than useless to the community at large. It’s also a tremendous waste of possibility and potential.

So, refuse to be influenced by the nay-sayers and cynics in your midst. Hold to your hope and humor, your ideals and dreams, your compassion and imagination. For it is these things that give life meaning and bring us all a better world. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Hat Etiquette

cowboy6Do you know the proper hat Etiquette?

The popularity and function of headwear in society has changed significantly over time, and consequently, so has hat etiquette. Please refer to the guidelines below to better understand proper hat-wearing behavior.

Men Can Leave Hats On When

  • They are outside
  • At an athletic event, indoors or out
  • In public buildings like post offices, airports, or hotels
  • On public transportation
  • In elevators

Men Should Take Off Hats When

  • They are sitting down to eat a meal
  • In a house of worship unless required by religion
  • Public buildings like schools, town halls, and libraries
  • When the National Anthem is playing
  • In restaurants and cafes

~The Matador Ranch


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.bookWhy are books that shape? From Codices to Kindles, why this rectangle stays golden

Bonneville Dam Lock Closure Stops Inland Northwest Grain Exports To Global Markets

Diary of a Fit Mommy: The Invisible Mother

Oregon Schools Slowly Rolling Out Indigenous Studies Curriculum