Sherman County eNews #231

CONTENTS

  1. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

  2. Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week September 8-14

  3. What do you say?

  4. Howard Zinn’s American Holocaust: A People’s History of the United States

  5. Western Oregon University Alumni Gathering, Oct. 1

  6. Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Sherman, Wasco & Hood River Counties, Sept. 17

  7. Cemetery Tales, 10th Annual Performance at Idlewilde Cemetery, Sept. 20, 21, 22

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 27-29

music.notes (2)Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree

September 27-29, 2019

Wasco County Fairgrounds

Celebrating 20 years of Bluegrass music in North Central Oregon

2019 theme is “Thanks for the Memories”

FRIDAY from 6 to 9 pm

Open Mic & Stage Show

SATURDAY from 9 am to 9:30 pm

Workshops (9am), Band Scramble (10am) ,

Open Mic & Slow Jam (2pm)

AFTERNOON BLUEGRASS SHOW (3 to 5 pm) 

Dinner Break – 5 to 6:30 

Shaniko Preservation Guild Fundraiser BBQ, featuring Oregon Country Beef  $10 plate or two for $18, child $5 (12 & under)

BLUEGRASS  EVENIN’ ROUNDUP

6 to 9

9 pm Drawings, Grand Prize & Lifetime pass

SUNDAY, BLUEGRASS/GOSPEL FINALE

10 am to 2 pm – a Free day

Admissions—Music pass required on grounds- $30 weekend pass at Gate

Daily rates inquire at the gate

Call 541-489-3434 for more information

Camping extra, only hookup reservations are needed, call Joanne at 541-546-4502

Plenty of dryland and tent camping areas

Sponsored by the Shaniko Preservation Guild


2. Suicide Awareness and Prevention Week September 8-14

Be aware. Get involved.

September 8th-14th Follow the Sherman County Prevention page for info all week long.

https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Alcohol-and-Drug-Prevention-133311610687300/


3. What do you say? 

What do you say to a friend who has had a death in the family? While this might seem an odd choice for a daily e-mail message, it is something that affects us all at one time or another. Loved ones die every day, and odds are that many of you reading this have recently dealt with this very situation.

Many people feel bewildered when it comes to the etiquette of death. Because we don’t know what to say or do, it’s easier to do nothing. But even discomfort and ignorance are not good reasons for ignoring friends or acquaintances at this difficult time.

Flowers and notes cannot be sent too soon, and commercial sympathy cards are fine if you add a personal note. If you are puzzled about what to say, look through the cards and find two with messages you like. Buy one card, and write the message from the other inside. Better yet, just look into your heart and write the words and feelings you find there.

At the funeral or memorial service, take your behavior cues from the family. Refrain from suggesting that the deceased is better off, and refrain from imposing your religious beliefs on the mourners. At this time, nerves and emotions are at their rawest, and for some, pain is barely held at bay. Remember, grieving is a process that takes time, and bereaved parents or spouses may not be able to respond to your sympathy at first.

Follow up on your card or note with a phone call, another note, or social invitation in a few weeks or months. And no matter how awkward you may feel, how distant the relative or casual the friend, death should never be ignored. The life did not deserve to be ignored, and neither does the passing of it. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Howard Zinn’s American Holocaust: A People’s History of the United States

If anyone wonders why youngsters today are less patriotic and more inclined toward socialism, they need look no further than the most popular “history” textbook in the United States, Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States — a one-sided work written from the perspective of a Communist activist that contains a plethora of distortions and outright lies.  In 2012, the director of the American Textbook Council noted that Zinn’s text had sold two million copies and was the “best-selling survey of American history.”  By 2018, it was estimated that the book had sold more than 2.6 million copies… … … continue here:  https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2019/09/howard_zinns_american_holocaust.html


5. Western Oregon University Alumni Gathering, Oct. 1

With a RSVP deadline of September 25th, Western Oregon University alumni & friends are invited to a 6:00-8:00 p.m. gathering, Tuesday Oct. 1st, at the Shoreline Room at the Hood River Best Western Inn. Enjoy beverages, food, conversation, connecting with former classmates, raffle drawings & hearing from WOU President Rex Fuller.  Please RSVP to Emily Lafon, Alumni Relations Coordinator, at 503-838-8710 or online at wou.edu/alumni.


6, Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, Sherman, Wasco & Hood River Counties, Sept. 17

Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, will hold their first meeting of the year noon, Tuesday the 17th, at the Portage Grill in the Shilo Inn, The Dalles.  This organization is open to all persons interested in K-12 education from Sherman, Wasco and Hood River Counties.  If not on a telephone tree, make your luncheon reservations by calling 541-478-3429 by the 15th


7. Cemetery Tales, 10th Annual Performance at Idlewilde Cemetery, Sept. 20, 21, 22

The 10th Anniversary Performance of this wildly popular event will be held September 20, 21, and 22. In keeping with the History Museum’s mission of preserving and telling the stories of former Hood River County citizens, Cemetery Tales will once again take place in Hood River’s Idlewilde Cemetery.

The hearts and souls of this year’s selected Idlewilde residents will come alive as local actors, dressed in period costumes, tell the life stories of those former citizens. The event begins at Down Manor, 1950 Sterling Place in Hood River, where you will be taken in a passenger van to the cemetery nearby.  Tickets are NOW on sale through http://www.brownpapertickets.com or at The History Museum in Hood River, (541) 386-6772.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

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