Sherman County eNews #226

CONTENTS

  1. Today is Labor Day

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

  3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

  4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  5. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

  6. There always remains an opportunity to make a new start.


1. Today is Labor Day

Today is Labor Day, and that means the unofficial end of summer on a day of celebration of the American worker. The holiday originated in the late 19th century and was born of the labor movement, though many Americans, led by President Grover Cleveland, pushed for and secured a September date to distinguish it from the socialist/communist “International Workers Day,” or “May Day,” on May 1. Labor Day was made an official federal holiday in 1894. ~The Patriot Post


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday September 3 @ the Moro Presbyterian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


3. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

dollars.coinsSherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms will be available September 3, 2019, for projects and/or programs in Sherman County. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

  • A brief description of your project.
    • State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
    • Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

dollars.coinsThe 2019 Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 3, 2019. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


5. A Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum, Sept. 14

m_returnThe Sherman County Historical Society invites you to the first annual Night at the Museum benefit dinner and auction. On September 14th, the Society will showcase local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the dinner event. VIP tickets are $50.

Dinner and auction tickets are $35, and may be purchased at the museum or from event committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. All ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and improvements.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors.

If you wish to contribute to the auction, we will be over-the-top grateful! Please call 541-565-3232, or deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th~Sherman County Historical Society Trustees and Event Committee

Prohibition History Tidbit: 100 years ago, in 1919, the United States of America was going through an identity crisis. The 18th Amendment, which forbade the making, selling or transportation of “intoxicating liquors,” was ratified on Jan. 16, 1919, and took effect a year later. Politicians voted to enact Prohibition as a “noble experiment” to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve Americans’ health, according to an analysis by the Cato Institute, which characterized the effort as a “miserable failure on all counts.” The amendment was championed by the temperance movement, which mainly was supported by women who saw alcohol as a destroyer of families. They carried signs saying, “Lips that touch liquor shall not touch ours,” according to the National Archives.


6. There always remains an opportunity to make a new start.

Though it may not seem so when you first encounter a serious blow, you can never lose two of the most important assets you have. These are the power of your mind and your freedom to use it. Once you have turned them to understanding what laid you low, you can begin forming new plans. You may not have the money you once had; you may lack the allies you had cultivated. But you still have the benefit of a universe that eventually rewards honest effort, as well as gaining the experience of mistakes you will never make again. Remember, no matter where you are now, whatever you can conceive and believe, you can achieve. ~Napoleon Hill Foundation


 

Sherman County eNews #225

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion, Sept. 21

  2. Oregon Arts Watch: Maryhill’s Exquisite Gorge Woodcut Print

  3. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

  4. OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Schools in 1919

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


1. Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion, Sept. 21

Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion

at CASA EL MIRADOR, 1424 W 2nd Street, The Dalles, Oregon

September 21, 2019

No Host Cocktails 5:30 pm

Dinner to Follow

$36.00 per person

Please remit by September 1, 2019

Payable to:

Sharon Spencer

66902 Hwy 97

Moro, OR 97039.

Questions:

Alison Yamauchi 501-258-7299

Rooms Available at:

The Dalles Inn 541-206-9107

Cousins 541-298-5161

Fairfield Inn & Suites 855-297-1429

Various Senior, AARP or AAA discounts are available on above properties.

Other hotels may be searched via Google.


2. Oregon Arts Watch: Maryhill’s Exquisite Gorge Woodcut Print 

On a bright & shining Saturday, it all came together: Maryhill Museum’s audacious, 66-foot long print project went to press via steam roller.

AUGUST 28, 2019 // ARTSWATCH FOCUSCULTUREFEATUREDVISUAL ART // FRIDERIKE HEUER

THE EXQUISITE GORGE PROJECT

“…a collaborative printmaking project featuring 11 artists working with communities along a 220-mile stretch of the Columbia River from the Willamette River confluence to the Snake River confluence to create a massive 66-foot steamrolled print. The unique project takes inspiration from the Surrealist art practice known as exquisite corpse. In the most well-known exquisite corpse drawing game, participants took turns creating sections of a body on a piece of paper folded to hide each successive contribution. When unfolded, the whole body is revealed. In the case of The Exquisite Gorge Project, the Columbia River will become the ‘body’ that unifies the collaboration between artists and communities, revealing a flowing 66-foot work that tells 10 conceptual stories of the Columbia River and its people.”  – Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at Maryhill Museum

See story and pictures at https://www.orartswatch.org/exquisite-gorge-11-its-a-print/?fbclid=IwAR00jEm6wWJXr6McpNbL5hJYmtHrw4pq51fmeKsxNZuI7R9i4A3kRSn0SQI


3. All County Prayer Meeting, Sept. 3

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday September 3 @ the Moro Presbyterian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. ~ Red Gibbs


4. OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts

Oregon.Flat.pole(1)Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, when met with an actual or potential conflict of interest, a public official shall:

(a)If the public official is a member of the Legislative Assembly, announce publicly, pursuant to rules of the house of which the public official is a member, the nature of the conflict before taking any action thereon in the capacity of a public official.

(b)If the public official is a judge, remove the judge from the case giving rise to the conflict or advise the parties of the nature of the conflict.

(c)If the public official is any other appointed official subject to this chapter, notify in writing the person who appointed the public official to office of the nature of the conflict, and request that the appointing authority dispose of the matter giving rise to the conflict. Upon receipt of the request, the appointing authority shall designate within a reasonable time an alternate to dispose of the matter, or shall direct the official to dispose of the matter in a manner specified by the appointing authority.

(2)An elected public official, other than a member of the Legislative Assembly, or an appointed public official serving on a board or commission, shall:

(a)When met with a potential conflict of interest, announce publicly the nature of the potential conflict prior to taking any action thereon in the capacity of a public official; or

(b)When met with an actual conflict of interest, announce publicly the nature of the actual conflict and:

(A)Except as provided in subparagraph (B) of this paragraph, refrain from participating as a public official in any discussion or debate on the issue out of which the actual conflict arises or from voting on the issue.

(B)If any public official’s vote is necessary to meet a requirement of a minimum number of votes to take official action, be eligible to vote, but not to participate as a public official in any discussion or debate on the issue out of which the actual conflict arises.

(3)Nothing in subsection (1) or (2) of this section requires any public official to announce a conflict of interest more than once on the occasion which the matter out of which the conflict arises is discussed or debated.

(4)Nothing in this section authorizes a public official to vote if the official is otherwise prohibited from doing so. [1974 c.72 §10; 1975 c.543 §7; 1987 c.566 §15; 1993 c.743 §15]


5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Schools in 1919

books4Some 1919 School Statistics of Sherman County

    54 teachers employed in county

    27 teachers in rural schools

    27 teachers in town schools

    10 teachers in Wasco

    9 teachers in Moro

    8 teachers in Grass Valley

    4 teachers in Kent

    30 school districts in county

    26 rural districts

    4 high school districts

    1 school pays $65 for teacher

    8 schools pay $75

    5 schools pay $80

    7 rural schools pay $90

    5 teachers in town schools get $85

    3 teachers in town schools get $90

    4 teachers in town schools get $95

    7 teachers in town schools get $100

    $81.96 average monthly wage for rural teachers

    $93.75 average monthly wage for town grade teachers

    $100 lowest wage paid for high school teachers in county

    1118 boys and girls in county between ages of 4 and 20

    535 pupils enrolled in town schools

    384 pupils enrolled in rural schools

    919 total enrollment in county for 1918-1919

    192 pupils enrolled in Wasco

    139 pupils enrolled in Moro

    114 pupils enrolled in Grass Valley

    90 pupils enrolled in Kent

    54 high school pupils in Wasco

    49 high school pupils in Moro

    23 high school pupils in Grass Valley

    13 high school pupils in Kent

    140 high school pupils in county

    33 in 8th grade rural schools

    60 in 8th grade town schools

    93 total enrollment in 8th grade.

Source: Grass Valley Journal, February 28, 1919


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Free New Oregon State Map

Oregon has more than a dozen license plates

OregonLaws.org 2017 ORS 244.120 Methods of handling conflicts