Sherman County eNews #222

CONTENTS

  1. Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

  2. More 2019 Sherman County Fair 4-H and FFA Results

  3. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 21

  4. Sherman County Court News, Aug. 7

  5. Finding Your Gift

  6. Slug Race Excitement in Brightwood on August 24th

  7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

toolbox4An education at Perry Technical Institute is more than just one or two years of time spent in a program — it’s a pathway to a better life.

The time you invest at Perry Tech will put you on the fast track to success. No wonder we were ranked number one nationally by a study featured in the New York Times. Our programs are unique and we collaborate with industry leaders to keep our curriculum up-to-date in every way.

Employers come to us looking for skilled workers who are trained to go above and beyond. Our graduates are known to work hard and raise the bar. Many Perry Tech grads secure jobs even before they graduate.

See https://www.perrytech.edu/?utm_campaign=Brand&utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc&utm_term=%2Bperry%20%2Btechnical%20%2Binstitute&utm_content=2858351xEAIaIQobChMIzaPV7ryj5AIVAsZkCh2bZAu-EAAYASAAEgIjMPD_BwE


2. More 2019 Sherman County Fair 4-H and FFA Results

SMALL ANIMALS – Rabbits

Grand Champion Rabbit Showman:  Izabella Montesanti

Reserve Grand Champion Rabbit Showman:  Arabella White


3. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 21

  • By Temporary Administrative Assistant Kristi Brown

ShermanCoLogo*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on August 21, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Heard from Nate Stice, presenting his quarterly report, and addressing concerns with building codes and housing issues.
  • Heard from Representative Greg Smith, reporting on the 2019 Legislative session. He reviewed controversial topics during the session, explaining his participation and stance for each of the following bills: HB 2020, the Cap and Trade bill; Commercial Activity tax, raising funds for education; Measure 11 reform, allowing eligibility for a review of sentence.
  • Approved the surplus of the Demoss Park Bandstand, and the Hoctor Mobile Home.
  • Heard from Ted Swindells, Evergreen Holdings, regarding issues with building codes.

4. Sherman County Court News, Aug. 7

ShermanCoLogoContact: Kristi Brown 541-565-3416

Vacant Office Space Discussion, Kent Revitalization Project, and Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents, were the main items on the agenda during the August 7th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Amber DeGrange, Juvenile Director, proposed a temporary Family Resource room in the vacant Prevention Office. The room would offer a comfortable environment during interviews with children victims, as the current interview room was housed within the Sheriff’s department, and was not child friendly. KIDS Center had purchased furniture, via grant funds, to be used by the County, and she would provide toys and games. She stated the room could be used for other instances as well, such as families during court hearings. The Court explained the room was vacant due to the need for sound proofing, and long term availability was unknown. They liked the idea of a Family Resource room, but still wanted to follow through with having the room sound proofed. Consensus of the Court was to approve the temporary use of the vacant Prevention Office as a Family Resource room. 

Elizabeth Mills presented a revised Kent Revitalization project on behalf of the Kent Community, and a water analysis report for the Kent Water District. The 2019 Revitalization proposal included: a general clean-up of the community, Highway 97 safety, water systems improvements, road improvements, business ideas, housing needs, potential community center, creating a park, tourist attractions, high speed internet, paving of roads, and the addition of Kent to County brochures. The Kent Water District water analysis study contained information and quotes for improvements ranging from current system repairs, to piping new lines, adding fire hydrants and more storage. Additional quotes were provided for electrical updates, and installing a new pump at the non-working Norton Well. The Court asked Mills to research what could be done to help the water supply with $150,000, and present the information to the Budget committee during the 2020-2021 meeting.

Court motioned to enter into Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents. Entered into Executive Session at 9:30 a.m. Discussion was held on a Housing Grant Application. Exited Executive Session at 9:41 a.m. Court motioned to approve Jayme Mason’s Housing Rehabilitation Grant application in the amount of $14,368.71, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to approve project completion.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • Approved an Intergovernmental Agreement between the Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD) and Sherman County, for the provision of Local Economic Development Services from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, in the amount of $45,000 as per the adopted 2019-2020 budget, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved a Memorandum of Understanding between Sherman County District Attorney’s Office and the law firm Peachy Davies Myers & Dunn, P.C., for telephone legal consults for victims, from October 1, 2019 to September 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved a Memorandum of Understanding between Sherman County District Attorney’s Office and Mid-Columbia Center for Living, for behavioral health services for victims referred by Sherman County District Attorney’s Office, from October 1, 2019 to September 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved an Intergovernmental Agreement between Gilliam County, Jefferson County, Wheeler County and Sherman County creating Frontier Regional 911 Agency, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Agreement #14288 between the Oregon Youth Authority and Sherman County for Juvenile Crime Prevention Services, from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved Supervising Physician Agreement between Sherman County Ambulance and Dr. Erin Burnham, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Sherman County Ambulance Reduced Staffing Exception letter to Oregon Health Authority, and the Reduced Staffing Exception letter to Shawn Payne, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved bid from Dan Wilson Painting to refinish the Burnet Building in the amount of $7,500.00.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Grant Agreement number 160965 between Oregon Health Authority and Sherman County, for the Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Education Program Grant, from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2021, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Agreed to pay the County’s share of the additional cost to provide fiber to missed locations within the City of Rufus, if the City of Rufus agrees to pay their share.
  • Approved minutes of July 17, 2019 County Court session, as corrected.
  • Approved the Revised June 2019 Treasurer’s Report, as presented.
  • Approved Claims for the month of July 2019, as presented.

Topics of discussion were Written Quarterly Reports, Thank You Card – Scholarship Recipients, Gorge Networks Fiber to the Home Additions, Retired Veteran’s Services Vehicle, and Commissioner Reports.


5. Finding Your Gift

Did you know that you have a gift that no one else in the world possesses? Maybe you have already discovered it. It is your ability to live a life that expresses your unique personality and your individual talents through the work that you choose to do, the way you spend your free time and through your relationships.

Although it may seem hidden at first, when you search for your gift with an open mind and a free spirit, it will be there. Once you have found it, if you follow it with courage and persistence, it will reward you with a happiness and deep satisfaction that nothing else can provide.

Now, it does not matter how big or important your gift is, and it does not matter what others think it should be. All that matters is that, 1) it is yours and, 2) that you are free to give it. When you do give of it, it doesn’t deplete you. It validates and fills you, because giving reaffirms the meaning, the purpose in your life. You look at achievement with a whole new perspective.

Finding and living your gift has some interesting side effects. Stress and tension fall away, as your mental well-being rises. Living your gift allows positive emotions to fill your days. You are easily engaged with the world around you, and your relationships take on deeper meaning that fills you up, allowing you to give away even more.

It is hard to go comparison-shopping when it comes to finding your special gift, because you can’t try on someone else’s life. But in order to truly live your own, you need to be willing to listen to your heart, pay whatever it costs, and make a firm commitment not to turn back.

If you do these things, you will find your gift, and you also will find that you have more to give to others than you had ever dreamed possible. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Slug Race Excitement in Brightwood on August 24th

car.raceflagsThe Brightwood Tavern’s annual Slug Races took place with contestants in light, medium and heavyweight slugs vying for the championship. Contestants were directed to bring their own slugs in this hospice benefit. Another attraction was the goldfish race. Lots of prizes.


7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu  

Sherman County Senior & Community Center Meal Menu – September 2019

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2 3 4 5 6
CLOSED Chicken Strips Salisbury Steak Chicken Tetrazzini Clam Chowder
TO CELEBRATE Hash brown casserole Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Veggies Salmon Cakes
LABOR DAY Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
9 10 11 12 13
Bacon & Swiss Quiche Macaroni & Cheese Shepherd’s Pie Pesto Chicken Bake Beef Taco Bar
Muffins Veggies Biscuit Penne Pasta Refried Beans
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
16 17 18 19 20
Swedish Meatballs Chicken a la King Oven Fried Chicken Zucchini Beef Casserole Baked Fish
Egg Noodles Biscuits Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Salad Bar Rice Pilaf
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
23 24 25 26 27
Orange Chicken Hot Turkey on Roll Lasagna Pork Chops Stromboli loaded w. Meat
Chow Mein Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Garlic Bread Au Gratin Potatoes Salad Bar
30

Beef Chili
Cornbread
Veggies, Salad & Dessert
Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Sherman County School Calendar

Oregon Flora Project

Prager U. Is college worth it?  

Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

Turning Point USA: Winning America’s Culture War

Brilliant Maps: The 4037 Cities In The World With Over 100,000 People

Real Clear Energy: Climate Alarmists Foiled, No US Warming Since 2005


 

Sherman County eNews #221

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Area Watershed Council Grant Opportunity

  2. Sherman County History Tidbits: County Fair Quiz

  3. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 4

  4. Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand and Reserve Champions

  5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

  6. Class: Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles, Sept. 3

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Area Watershed Council Grant Opportunity

The Sherman County Area Watershed Council is interested in applying for a large grant through the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) this fall to provide cost share on riparian and upland cross fencing, along with rangeland restoration. Potential rangeland restoration practices include range seeding, annual grass control, spring developments, and other practices improving range health. Landowners will have 4 years to complete projects and cost share is 75% without a project cap. In addition to addressing resource concerns in riparian and rangeland areas, our hope is that this grant will allow landowners to fence off riparian buffers under the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) and utilize existing pastures outside of CREP buffers. Upland cross fencing will allow for increased rotational grazing management to improve rangeland and livestock health in Sherman County, along with other rangeland practices. If interested, please contact the SWCD Office by September 15th at (541) 565-3216 so we can complete required site visits and start getting an application together.


2. Sherman County History Tidbits: County Fair Quiz

pen.markerDid you notice the Sherman County Fair Quiz on the upper right corner of Sherman County eNews #217 on August 22nd?

 

 


3. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 4

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 4th, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners’ Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at https://www.co.sherman.or.us/sherman-county-court-draft-agendas/.


4. Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand and Reserve Champions

4-H clover1“Cow Pies and Curly Fries” was the theme for the 2019 Sherman County Fair, with Grand Marshalls Mark and Sharon Spender and Leo and Krista Coelsch of Moro.  Sherman County 4-H and FFA members entered a variety of competitions, with Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion winners listed below:

4-H RECORD BOOKS:    Grand Champion Record Book: Mercedez Cardona, Reserve Grand Champion:  Bailee Owens

PHOTOGRAPHY:  Grand Champion: Tierra Cyrus, Reserve Grand Champion:  Savanna Blagg

FIBER ARTS:  Grand Champion: Codie Lee Haner, Reserve Grand Champion:  Beth Burgess

HOME ECONOMICS – Clothing Grand Champion: Sebastian Burbank , Reserve Grand Champion: Erin Burbank

Food Preparation:  Grand Champion: Coral Mansfield, Reserve Grand Champion: Emma Robbins

Fashion Revue Grand Champion:  Beth Burgess,  Reserve Grand  Champion: Lexi Holt

Food Preservation:  Grand Champion:  Emma Robbins, Reserve Grand Champion:  Emma Robbins

LIVESTOCK – Poultry

Grand Champion Market Poultry:  Renan Christiansen

Reserve Grand Champion Market Poultry:  Dillian Stanfield

Grand Champion Poultry Showman:  Cali Johnson

Reserve Grand Champion Poultry Showman:  Joseph Ramos

LIVESTOCK – Sheep

Grand Champion Market Lamb:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Market Lamb:  Jordan Barrett

Grand Champion Sheep Showman:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Sheep Showman:  Courtney Coelsch

LIVESTOCK – Beef

Grand Champion Market Steer:   Rhyder Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Market Steer:  Rhyder Smith

Grand Champion Beef Showman:  Natalie Martin

Reserve Grand Champion Beef Showman:  Kole Martin

LIVESTOCK – Swine

Grand Champion Market Hog:  Addison Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Market Hog:  Cadence Smith

Grand Champion Hog Showman:  Cadence Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Hog Showman:  Bailey Coelsch

LIVESTOCK – Goats

Grand Champion Market Goat:  Kiara Peters

Reserve Grand Champion Market Goat: Kaelex Peters

Grand Champion Goat Showman:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Goat Showman:  Bailee Owens

HORSE – Showmanship

Grand Champion Horse Showman:  Mercedez Cardona

Reserve Grand Champion Horse Showman:  Bailey Coelsch

HORSE – Western Equitation Grand Champion:  Mercedez Cardona, Reserve Grand Champion:  Addison Smith

HORSE – Trail Grand Champion:  Addison Smith, Reserve Grand Champion:  Mercedez Cardona

LIVESTOCK – Grand Champion All Around Showman:  Jordan Barrett, Reserve Grand Champion:  Bailee Owens


5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

Do you know what a self-fulfilling prophecy is? Most people know that a self-fulfilling prophecy is an event that, because it is predicted and expected, is therefore more likely to happen – some would say, caused to happen.

For example, according to Success magazine, two different groups of psychologists were once asked to observe the same child playing. One group was told beforehand that the child was emotionally disturbed. The other group was told that the child was a genius. When the psychologists were asked to report on their observations afterward, each group had found evidence to support their preconceived ideas.

Now, it’s important to realize that self-fulfilling prophecies are everyday experiences – not just laboratory experiments. What do you expect your day to be like when you get up in the morning? How do you expect your kids to behave? How much success do you expect for yourself? What do you expect for your organization’s production or sales for this month, or this year?

You see, if you predict failure, failure is generally what you will find. And if you expect excellence, excellence is very likely what you will get. How we think about a situation determines how we act, and how we act, more than anything else, determines the results.

That is how self-fulfilling prophecies work. There’s nothing magical about them. What you get in life is pretty much how you behave, coming back at you. Does that make sense? Do yourself a favor this week, and see if you recognize areas where you are setting yourself up because of your expectations. If you are setting yourself up for the good, terrific! If not, what can you do to change those internal expectations, and change your life, your work, your business?

And with school about to start again (at least in the Northern Hemisphere), how can you help the school-age children in your life set themselves up to expect the best, creating self-fulfilling expectations, and work toward them? ~The Pacific Institute


6. Class: Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles, Sept. 3

Check-markGreenRegister today! Join Oregon Care Partners for free training in Hood River on September 3.  Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles starts at 9:00 am at the Best Western Plus Hood River Inn.

Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles 

HOOD RIVER – Tuesday, September 3

9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Check-in starts at 8:30 am

Best Western Plus Hood River Inn

1108 E. Marina Way, Hood River, OR 97031

CEUs: 5.5

In this class, our expert instructor and a licensed pharmacist will teach you how to apply best practice tools and strategies to improve medication safety and communication within your care setting using a team approach to provide optimal care to the person(s) in your care.

In this class, you will:

  • Learn how medicines can work in older adults, including risk factors, age-related changes and adverse medication side effects
  • Develop a plan to implement or enhance a process for medication review and documentation in your care setting
  • Learn how to apply quality improvement techniques and communication strategies to improve medication safety practices
  • Learn to promote person-centered care through a team approach

Please help spread the word! Forward this email, print and share the attached flyer and talk with those who may benefit.

Oregon Care Partners provides free access to high-quality trainings designed to help professional and family caregivers of all levels improve the lives and quality of care of older adults living in Oregon. Create a free training profile at OregonCarePartners.com to register for classes.

For assistance, email info@oregoncarepartners.com or call 1-800-930-6851.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbNeedle Felting by Barby Anderson

Enforcing “Public Charge” Rule in Immigration Is Common Sense

How Federal Grant-in-Aid Programs Drive Irrational Policymaking and Undermine Democratic Accountability

It Happened Here: Sam Hill campaigns for better roads in Washington state