Sherman County eNews #224

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Booster Club Annual Meeting, Sept. 10

  2. Sherman County Court Session, September 4

  3. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee Meeting, Sept. 10

  4. It’s all about the Numbers: BLM Releases Annual Almanac

  5. Sherman County History Tidbit: The Teacher in an E. Oregon Rural District

  6. Self-Worth and Behavior

  7. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


We should be unfaithful to ourselves if we should ever lose sight of the danger to our liberties if anything partial or extraneous should infect the purity of our free, fair, virtuous, and independent elections. —John Adams (1797)


1. Sherman County School Booster Club Annual Meeting, Sept. 10

The Sherman County School Booster Club annual meeting will take place on September 10 at 5:30 p.m. at OSU Ext office, Burnet Building in Moro.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, September 4

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 4th, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Cindy Brown, OSU Extension vehicle; Debbie Hayden, Finance Director, PERS; Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents; Sherman County Public/School Library window replacement; Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facilities Inspection; Biggs Motel Property; Gorge Networks IGA; Consent Agenda; and Commissioners’ Reports.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Notice. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee Meeting, Sept. 10

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be holding a meeting on Tuesday, September 10, 2019 at 3:00PM. Meeting will be held at North Central Public Health District located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


4. It’s all about the Numbers: BLM Releases Annual Almanac

compass3Portland, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in Oregon and Washington is proud to announce the release of the latest BLM Facts, our annual illustrated almanac answering the diverse and detailed questions one may have about public lands in the Pacific Northwest.

BLM Facts has lots of numbers, and those figures do tell a story. In most cases, your public lands are located within an hour’s drive from where you live or work. You can find an amazing array of resources and opportunities at almost any site you visit.

This 2018 report has the latest BLM news and updates – from wild and scenic rivers and exciting recreation sites to wildlife, cultural, and archaeological programs. BLM Facts also shares information about management plans for minerals and energy, forestry, mining, wild horses, and much more.

In addition to maintaining our commitment to delivering an updated volume every year, we continue to make improvements such as full-color maps, photos, and a plethora of timely, user-friendly data. You can read it online at:

www.blm.gov/sites/blm.gov/files/documents/files/orwa-blmfacts-2018.pdf

You can also swing on by your local BLM Office to pick up your copy of BLM Facts: www.blm.gov/contact/oregon-washington

-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $96 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2017. These activities supported more than 468,000 jobs.


5. Sherman County History Tidbit: The Teacher in an E. Oregon Rural District

arrow-rightThe Teacher in an Eastern Oregon Rural District

By Miss Grace L. May  [later Mrs. Zevely]

Read at Class State Normal, Monmouth.

Source: Sherman County Observer, September 1, 1916

The rural school problem is becoming greater every year. Since it is one of the many problems that must be faced we should begin to consider the responsibility at once.

The main feature in an eastern Oregon rural community is the loneliness and the lack of co-operation and enjoyment of neighborhood life. The farm homes are usually from two to five miles apart. Almost their only connection is the country telephone, which is, indeed, a godsend when not over used.

I think the farmers themselves have the better time of it, for the discussions of crops and current events at the post office are often of more value than might be imagined. Since it is much more difficult for the farmer’s wife to leave her duties, she quite often leads a life of drudgery and loneliness. Then, too, there is so much to be done that she seldom has time for good reading if she happens to be lucky enough to have good books or magazines in her home.

Many families become so accustomed to the lack of ready money and the habit of eternally saving that they seldom venture from home for so much as a short vacation trip. The owning of automobiles is fast lessening many such difficulties but there are many families for whom a car is only a dream. Even so, automobiles are not necessity and people can be interested in their homes and in their community without automobiles.

The grave need of better trained persevering teachers is evident, but the average trained teacher dislikes to take a rural school for even one year. This is by no means a wonder for all know that a country school is generally a hard proposition and very often an extremely lonely one.

At this point comes the need for change and improvement. We sometimes wonder how one teacher can manage eight grades, be a social leader and exert some of the other influences that a rural teacher is supposed to have. Here is where some of the funds that the country district must have could be used to advantage.

We hear much about the farmer being the mainstay in the nation and we are coming to realize that this is true. Rural credit systems and improved farming methods are doing much to make the farmer more independent, but the farmer would be greatly helped if more attention were given the schools. True, many wonderful changes have been brought about in the last ten years, but year before last the rural school enrolled over half of all the pupils in the United States and sixty per cent of these were in one room buildings. The startling fact is, that at the same time the nation was spending three times as much to educate the city boy as the country boy.

Of course this isn’t fair to the country child, nor is it fair to the country teacher. The need for trained teachers would be more easily met if consolidation and more co-operative work were made possible. I know of a community in eastern Oregon where there is a good two-room school building next the railroad. This school has a large enrollment and often more grades than one teacher can well handle. Four miles on each side there are small one-room buildings, poorly built and equipped and poorly attended. Co-operation of the three districts has been suggested but as yet no action has been taken. Three $60 salaries are now being paid to untrained teachers, where the same money would hire two competent teachers who could give more by their combined efforts than the three. Consolidation is not practical in some country districts, but in others it is and one of the responsibilities of the present teachers is to encourage the idea.

As it is, the trained teacher who goes to the rural districts should have many ideals for her school. Only of late have we heard anything of the advantages for work offered in the country districts. Of course work is plentiful in the city and work is what we want, but what about the enjoyment of the reward offered: “Teaching demands that you shall give — give yourself — and he who gives most receives most.” Because of the many channels for a teacher’s effort I believe the country is the best place to see comparatively quick results.

The work of the rural teacher is indeed varied but in a broad sense of the term it may all be classed as social work. Her leadership, her educational work and all the influences she has on a community affect its social system in some way.

Great, indeed, must be the reward of a teacher when he knows that even one person has been strongly influenced for good through his efforts. What a God-given work is that of the rural teacher! In her hands, I believe, as much as in any other lies the welfare of the nation.


6. Self-Worth and Behavior

Whether you are raising kids or trying to improve your own self-esteem, the relationship between who you are and what you do is important. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, or simply trying to build your own self-esteem, it is important to realize that we need to separate our sense of self-worth from our behavior.

Imagine this scene: A three-year-old asks repeatedly, “Mama, do you love me?” Each time, Mom answers, “Of course I do.” Then the child takes her hand and leads her to a broken vase or shattered toy and looks at Mother questioningly.

Here is a little child, on this earth only three short years, already asking one of the most profound psychological questions any of us can ask: “Is my ability to be loved tied to what I do? Am I the same as my behavior?” The answer for most of us, no matter how old we are, should be the same, “No, indeed!”

The importance of this point cannot be overemphasized. To increase self-worth, it is vital that we respond to behavior while remaining friendly and respectful toward the person. This means that when a child misbehaves, we should not call him a “bad boy.” And when a child does what we want her to, we should not say, “What a good girl!” In either instance, we want to comment on the behavior – with celebration of something done well, or a clear “next time” picture to change the negative behavior – and hug the child.

Psychologists, psychiatrists, therapists are likely to disagree with at least part of this premise, when it comes to those with out of control mental illnesses – those classified as clinical sociopaths and psychopaths, and those with other mental disorders. And they are correct to disagree. But for the majority of people, we want to make sure that the self-worth is in line with positive, contributive behaviors, and not vice versa.

One other caveat for adults: While we are not simply what we do, our actions are a reflection of what we think. So, if the actions you see yourself taking do not line up with the person you think you are, then perhaps it’s time for some much-needed self-reflection. Step outside yourself and look at what you do and how you act. If it is not what you’d like to see, you do have the power to change. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.pole~Created: 29 August 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

6,607: People whose personal information was exposed in a phishing attack at the Oregon Judicial Department last month, the judicial department said this week.

6.3: Magnitude earthquake that struck off the southwest Oregon coast, according to CNN.

3.4: Miles deep the earthquake occurred.

$1.6 billion: “Kicker” tax rebate that Oregonians will receive next year, according to The Oregonian.

$1.4 billion: Amount state economists predicted the size of next year’s rebate would be several months ago.

39: Age of Jessi Combs, who died Tuesday, Aug. 27 in Southeast Oregon’s Alvord Desert trying to break a land speed record in a “supersonic vehicle made from the fuselage of a jet plane,” according to NBC News.

546: Height, in feet, of the Wells Fargo building in Portland. The tallest skyscraper in the state, it was closed Thursday due to flooding.

14: Oregon counties that have not recovered the jobs lost during the Great Recession, according to Willamette Week, citing Oregon Center for Public Policy data. They are Baker, Crook, Coos, Curry, Douglas, Gilliam, Grant, Harney, Klamath, Lake, Lincoln, Malheur, Umatilla and Union counties.

1894: Year the heat record for Astoria, Oregon on Tuesday, Aug. 27 was set, at 88 degrees Fahrenheit.

91: Tuesday’s high temperature in Astoria, breaking the 125-year-old record, according to The Oregonian.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbInteresting Map Showing The Importance of Canada-USA Trade By State/Province

Which Country Would You Like To Live In (Besides Your Own)?

Judicial Watch: Majority of Federal Arrestees are Foreigners, Thousands of “Unknown Citizenship”

Rediscovering the Wisdom in American History

Video. A Day Without Oil

Video. Life Without Oil

Public Can Comment On Killing Sea Lions In The Columbia River

Urban/rural divide puts lawmakers at loggerheads

After Washington State Ban, Oregon Becomes the Last West Coast State Where Consumers Can Buy CBD-Infused Food and Beverages

JustSecurity: Expert Summaries of Mueller Report: A Collection

Everything You Know About the Civil War is Wrong


 

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Sherman County eNews #223

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES: 

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

ThankYou1

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU! Bryan, Forest, Scott and Kari Peters would like to thank all who helped with wheat harvest this year while Bryan was recovering.  We hope we didn’t forget anyone, if so, we apologize.  Thank you very much to:  Rick Jauken, Taner Elliot, Garrett Peters, Justin Miller, Nate Smith, Charlie Miller, Ryder Smith, Colton Shull, Ryan Thompson, LP McClennan, Max McClennan, Colton Kock, Cody Jauken, Sarah Bibby, Jeff Kaser, Amy Mcnamee, Gary Shull, Dee Richelderfer, Don Hilderbrand, Josh Hilderbrand, Rory Wilson, Travis and Michelle Lawrence.  It was amazing to have so many people come to help and offer to help. We really appreciate all the support from this awesome community! 

THANK YOU, CATHY BROWN & JAMIE WILSON!  The Sherman County Senior & Community Center extends a special thank you to Cathy Brown and Jamie Wilson of WB Ranch for their generous donation of beef. We received 380 pounds of local beef, and only had to pay the cut, wrap and kill fee, which allows us to serve good quality local beef to our seniors over the next year. Thank you so much for your generosity and your donation to the community!  ~Kari Pinkerton Silcox, Sherman County Senior Center, PO Box 352, Moro, OR 97039 | 541-565-3191 | kari@shermancounty.net

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th! 

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

VOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com.  If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13 

SERVICES:

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE: 

LAWN MOWER. Husqvarna 23hp riding lawn mower with 48″ mower deck, only 47 hours and new battery. $1,000 or OBO. Contact: (541) 980-3406. 9/27 

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE: 

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

WHEELCHAIR. I would like to borrow a wheelchair with leg rests that can be elevated. That way I could take mom out for some fresh air. She has to keep her right leg straight not bent so it needs to support it. 541-325-2993. Thanks. Leta Ann Reckmann. 9/27

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

LogoShermanCoSchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

AUGUST

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Deadline Sherman County Resident Incentive Application

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon

food.sack1SEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

2 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

3 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

24 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council Meeting 5:30 The Dalles

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

27 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 2 

sport-football-whistleOCTOBER

1 Moro City Council 7

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Church of Christ social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

5 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation Meeting 10-12 Sherman

7 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

9 Sherman County Scholarship Association 5:30 Library

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 COLUMBUS DAY

14 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

15 Frontier Regional 911 Board Meeting 1:30

15 Tri-County Community Corrections Board Meeting 3:30 Gilliam County

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Celebration

20 Afternoon of Sherman County Talent (art show, silent auction) 2-5 Wasco School Events Center

23 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Fossil

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #222

CONTENTS

  1. Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

  2. More 2019 Sherman County Fair 4-H and FFA Results

  3. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 21

  4. Sherman County Court News, Aug. 7

  5. Finding Your Gift

  6. Slug Race Excitement in Brightwood on August 24th

  7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

toolbox4An education at Perry Technical Institute is more than just one or two years of time spent in a program — it’s a pathway to a better life.

The time you invest at Perry Tech will put you on the fast track to success. No wonder we were ranked number one nationally by a study featured in the New York Times. Our programs are unique and we collaborate with industry leaders to keep our curriculum up-to-date in every way.

Employers come to us looking for skilled workers who are trained to go above and beyond. Our graduates are known to work hard and raise the bar. Many Perry Tech grads secure jobs even before they graduate.

See https://www.perrytech.edu/?utm_campaign=Brand&utm_source=google&utm_medium=ppc&utm_term=%2Bperry%20%2Btechnical%20%2Binstitute&utm_content=2858351xEAIaIQobChMIzaPV7ryj5AIVAsZkCh2bZAu-EAAYASAAEgIjMPD_BwE


2. More 2019 Sherman County Fair 4-H and FFA Results

SMALL ANIMALS – Rabbits

Grand Champion Rabbit Showman:  Izabella Montesanti

Reserve Grand Champion Rabbit Showman:  Arabella White


3. Sherman County Court Notes, Aug. 21

  • By Temporary Administrative Assistant Kristi Brown

ShermanCoLogo*NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at http://www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on August 21, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Heard from Nate Stice, presenting his quarterly report, and addressing concerns with building codes and housing issues.
  • Heard from Representative Greg Smith, reporting on the 2019 Legislative session. He reviewed controversial topics during the session, explaining his participation and stance for each of the following bills: HB 2020, the Cap and Trade bill; Commercial Activity tax, raising funds for education; Measure 11 reform, allowing eligibility for a review of sentence.
  • Approved the surplus of the Demoss Park Bandstand, and the Hoctor Mobile Home.
  • Heard from Ted Swindells, Evergreen Holdings, regarding issues with building codes.

4. Sherman County Court News, Aug. 7

ShermanCoLogoContact: Kristi Brown 541-565-3416

Vacant Office Space Discussion, Kent Revitalization Project, and Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents, were the main items on the agenda during the August 7th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Amber DeGrange, Juvenile Director, proposed a temporary Family Resource room in the vacant Prevention Office. The room would offer a comfortable environment during interviews with children victims, as the current interview room was housed within the Sheriff’s department, and was not child friendly. KIDS Center had purchased furniture, via grant funds, to be used by the County, and she would provide toys and games. She stated the room could be used for other instances as well, such as families during court hearings. The Court explained the room was vacant due to the need for sound proofing, and long term availability was unknown. They liked the idea of a Family Resource room, but still wanted to follow through with having the room sound proofed. Consensus of the Court was to approve the temporary use of the vacant Prevention Office as a Family Resource room. 

Elizabeth Mills presented a revised Kent Revitalization project on behalf of the Kent Community, and a water analysis report for the Kent Water District. The 2019 Revitalization proposal included: a general clean-up of the community, Highway 97 safety, water systems improvements, road improvements, business ideas, housing needs, potential community center, creating a park, tourist attractions, high speed internet, paving of roads, and the addition of Kent to County brochures. The Kent Water District water analysis study contained information and quotes for improvements ranging from current system repairs, to piping new lines, adding fire hydrants and more storage. Additional quotes were provided for electrical updates, and installing a new pump at the non-working Norton Well. The Court asked Mills to research what could be done to help the water supply with $150,000, and present the information to the Budget committee during the 2020-2021 meeting.

Court motioned to enter into Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents. Entered into Executive Session at 9:30 a.m. Discussion was held on a Housing Grant Application. Exited Executive Session at 9:41 a.m. Court motioned to approve Jayme Mason’s Housing Rehabilitation Grant application in the amount of $14,368.71, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to approve project completion.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • Approved an Intergovernmental Agreement between the Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD) and Sherman County, for the provision of Local Economic Development Services from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, in the amount of $45,000 as per the adopted 2019-2020 budget, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved a Memorandum of Understanding between Sherman County District Attorney’s Office and the law firm Peachy Davies Myers & Dunn, P.C., for telephone legal consults for victims, from October 1, 2019 to September 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved a Memorandum of Understanding between Sherman County District Attorney’s Office and Mid-Columbia Center for Living, for behavioral health services for victims referred by Sherman County District Attorney’s Office, from October 1, 2019 to September 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved an Intergovernmental Agreement between Gilliam County, Jefferson County, Wheeler County and Sherman County creating Frontier Regional 911 Agency, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Agreement #14288 between the Oregon Youth Authority and Sherman County for Juvenile Crime Prevention Services, from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved Supervising Physician Agreement between Sherman County Ambulance and Dr. Erin Burnham, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved the Sherman County Ambulance Reduced Staffing Exception letter to Oregon Health Authority, and the Reduced Staffing Exception letter to Shawn Payne, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Approved bid from Dan Wilson Painting to refinish the Burnet Building in the amount of $7,500.00.
  • Approved the Intergovernmental Grant Agreement number 160965 between Oregon Health Authority and Sherman County, for the Alcohol and Drug Prevention and Education Program Grant, from July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2021, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Agreed to pay the County’s share of the additional cost to provide fiber to missed locations within the City of Rufus, if the City of Rufus agrees to pay their share.
  • Approved minutes of July 17, 2019 County Court session, as corrected.
  • Approved the Revised June 2019 Treasurer’s Report, as presented.
  • Approved Claims for the month of July 2019, as presented.

Topics of discussion were Written Quarterly Reports, Thank You Card – Scholarship Recipients, Gorge Networks Fiber to the Home Additions, Retired Veteran’s Services Vehicle, and Commissioner Reports.


5. Finding Your Gift

Did you know that you have a gift that no one else in the world possesses? Maybe you have already discovered it. It is your ability to live a life that expresses your unique personality and your individual talents through the work that you choose to do, the way you spend your free time and through your relationships.

Although it may seem hidden at first, when you search for your gift with an open mind and a free spirit, it will be there. Once you have found it, if you follow it with courage and persistence, it will reward you with a happiness and deep satisfaction that nothing else can provide.

Now, it does not matter how big or important your gift is, and it does not matter what others think it should be. All that matters is that, 1) it is yours and, 2) that you are free to give it. When you do give of it, it doesn’t deplete you. It validates and fills you, because giving reaffirms the meaning, the purpose in your life. You look at achievement with a whole new perspective.

Finding and living your gift has some interesting side effects. Stress and tension fall away, as your mental well-being rises. Living your gift allows positive emotions to fill your days. You are easily engaged with the world around you, and your relationships take on deeper meaning that fills you up, allowing you to give away even more.

It is hard to go comparison-shopping when it comes to finding your special gift, because you can’t try on someone else’s life. But in order to truly live your own, you need to be willing to listen to your heart, pay whatever it costs, and make a firm commitment not to turn back.

If you do these things, you will find your gift, and you also will find that you have more to give to others than you had ever dreamed possible. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Slug Race Excitement in Brightwood on August 24th

car.raceflagsThe Brightwood Tavern’s annual Slug Races took place with contestants in light, medium and heavyweight slugs vying for the championship. Contestants were directed to bring their own slugs in this hospice benefit. Another attraction was the goldfish race. Lots of prizes.


7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu  

Sherman County Senior & Community Center Meal Menu – September 2019

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2 3 4 5 6
CLOSED Chicken Strips Salisbury Steak Chicken Tetrazzini Clam Chowder
TO CELEBRATE Hash brown casserole Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Veggies Salmon Cakes
LABOR DAY Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
9 10 11 12 13
Bacon & Swiss Quiche Macaroni & Cheese Shepherd’s Pie Pesto Chicken Bake Beef Taco Bar
Muffins Veggies Biscuit Penne Pasta Refried Beans
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad Bar & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
16 17 18 19 20
Swedish Meatballs Chicken a la King Oven Fried Chicken Zucchini Beef Casserole Baked Fish
Egg Noodles Biscuits Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Salad Bar Rice Pilaf
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
23 24 25 26 27
Orange Chicken Hot Turkey on Roll Lasagna Pork Chops Stromboli loaded w. Meat
Chow Mein Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Garlic Bread Au Gratin Potatoes Salad Bar
30

Beef Chili
Cornbread
Veggies, Salad & Dessert
Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Sherman County School Calendar

Oregon Flora Project

Prager U. Is college worth it?  

Perry Technical Institute. Real Skills, Real World. Real Success.

Turning Point USA: Winning America’s Culture War

Brilliant Maps: The 4037 Cities In The World With Over 100,000 People

Real Clear Energy: Climate Alarmists Foiled, No US Warming Since 2005


 

Sherman County eNews #221

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Area Watershed Council Grant Opportunity

  2. Sherman County History Tidbits: County Fair Quiz

  3. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 4

  4. Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand and Reserve Champions

  5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

  6. Class: Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles, Sept. 3

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Area Watershed Council Grant Opportunity

The Sherman County Area Watershed Council is interested in applying for a large grant through the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB) this fall to provide cost share on riparian and upland cross fencing, along with rangeland restoration. Potential rangeland restoration practices include range seeding, annual grass control, spring developments, and other practices improving range health. Landowners will have 4 years to complete projects and cost share is 75% without a project cap. In addition to addressing resource concerns in riparian and rangeland areas, our hope is that this grant will allow landowners to fence off riparian buffers under the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) and utilize existing pastures outside of CREP buffers. Upland cross fencing will allow for increased rotational grazing management to improve rangeland and livestock health in Sherman County, along with other rangeland practices. If interested, please contact the SWCD Office by September 15th at (541) 565-3216 so we can complete required site visits and start getting an application together.


2. Sherman County History Tidbits: County Fair Quiz

pen.markerDid you notice the Sherman County Fair Quiz on the upper right corner of Sherman County eNews #217 on August 22nd?

 

 


3. Sherman County Court Session, Sept. 4

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, September 4th, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners’ Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at https://www.co.sherman.or.us/sherman-county-court-draft-agendas/.


4. Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand and Reserve Champions

4-H clover1“Cow Pies and Curly Fries” was the theme for the 2019 Sherman County Fair, with Grand Marshalls Mark and Sharon Spender and Leo and Krista Coelsch of Moro.  Sherman County 4-H and FFA members entered a variety of competitions, with Grand Champion and Reserve Grand Champion winners listed below:

4-H RECORD BOOKS:    Grand Champion Record Book: Mercedez Cardona, Reserve Grand Champion:  Bailee Owens

PHOTOGRAPHY:  Grand Champion: Tierra Cyrus, Reserve Grand Champion:  Savanna Blagg

FIBER ARTS:  Grand Champion: Codie Lee Haner, Reserve Grand Champion:  Beth Burgess

HOME ECONOMICS – Clothing Grand Champion: Sebastian Burbank , Reserve Grand Champion: Erin Burbank

Food Preparation:  Grand Champion: Coral Mansfield, Reserve Grand Champion: Emma Robbins

Fashion Revue Grand Champion:  Beth Burgess,  Reserve Grand  Champion: Lexi Holt

Food Preservation:  Grand Champion:  Emma Robbins, Reserve Grand Champion:  Emma Robbins

LIVESTOCK – Poultry

Grand Champion Market Poultry:  Renan Christiansen

Reserve Grand Champion Market Poultry:  Dillian Stanfield

Grand Champion Poultry Showman:  Cali Johnson

Reserve Grand Champion Poultry Showman:  Joseph Ramos

LIVESTOCK – Sheep

Grand Champion Market Lamb:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Market Lamb:  Jordan Barrett

Grand Champion Sheep Showman:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Sheep Showman:  Courtney Coelsch

LIVESTOCK – Beef

Grand Champion Market Steer:   Rhyder Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Market Steer:  Rhyder Smith

Grand Champion Beef Showman:  Natalie Martin

Reserve Grand Champion Beef Showman:  Kole Martin

LIVESTOCK – Swine

Grand Champion Market Hog:  Addison Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Market Hog:  Cadence Smith

Grand Champion Hog Showman:  Cadence Smith

Reserve Grand Champion Hog Showman:  Bailey Coelsch

LIVESTOCK – Goats

Grand Champion Market Goat:  Kiara Peters

Reserve Grand Champion Market Goat: Kaelex Peters

Grand Champion Goat Showman:  Jordan Barrett

Reserve Grand Champion Goat Showman:  Bailee Owens

HORSE – Showmanship

Grand Champion Horse Showman:  Mercedez Cardona

Reserve Grand Champion Horse Showman:  Bailey Coelsch

HORSE – Western Equitation Grand Champion:  Mercedez Cardona, Reserve Grand Champion:  Addison Smith

HORSE – Trail Grand Champion:  Addison Smith, Reserve Grand Champion:  Mercedez Cardona

LIVESTOCK – Grand Champion All Around Showman:  Jordan Barrett, Reserve Grand Champion:  Bailee Owens


5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

Do you know what a self-fulfilling prophecy is? Most people know that a self-fulfilling prophecy is an event that, because it is predicted and expected, is therefore more likely to happen – some would say, caused to happen.

For example, according to Success magazine, two different groups of psychologists were once asked to observe the same child playing. One group was told beforehand that the child was emotionally disturbed. The other group was told that the child was a genius. When the psychologists were asked to report on their observations afterward, each group had found evidence to support their preconceived ideas.

Now, it’s important to realize that self-fulfilling prophecies are everyday experiences – not just laboratory experiments. What do you expect your day to be like when you get up in the morning? How do you expect your kids to behave? How much success do you expect for yourself? What do you expect for your organization’s production or sales for this month, or this year?

You see, if you predict failure, failure is generally what you will find. And if you expect excellence, excellence is very likely what you will get. How we think about a situation determines how we act, and how we act, more than anything else, determines the results.

That is how self-fulfilling prophecies work. There’s nothing magical about them. What you get in life is pretty much how you behave, coming back at you. Does that make sense? Do yourself a favor this week, and see if you recognize areas where you are setting yourself up because of your expectations. If you are setting yourself up for the good, terrific! If not, what can you do to change those internal expectations, and change your life, your work, your business?

And with school about to start again (at least in the Northern Hemisphere), how can you help the school-age children in your life set themselves up to expect the best, creating self-fulfilling expectations, and work toward them? ~The Pacific Institute


6. Class: Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles, Sept. 3

Check-markGreenRegister today! Join Oregon Care Partners for free training in Hood River on September 3.  Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles starts at 9:00 am at the Best Western Plus Hood River Inn.

Understanding Medicines in Older Adults: Care Team Principles 

HOOD RIVER – Tuesday, September 3

9:00 am – 4:00 pm

Check-in starts at 8:30 am

Best Western Plus Hood River Inn

1108 E. Marina Way, Hood River, OR 97031

CEUs: 5.5

In this class, our expert instructor and a licensed pharmacist will teach you how to apply best practice tools and strategies to improve medication safety and communication within your care setting using a team approach to provide optimal care to the person(s) in your care.

In this class, you will:

  • Learn how medicines can work in older adults, including risk factors, age-related changes and adverse medication side effects
  • Develop a plan to implement or enhance a process for medication review and documentation in your care setting
  • Learn how to apply quality improvement techniques and communication strategies to improve medication safety practices
  • Learn to promote person-centered care through a team approach

Please help spread the word! Forward this email, print and share the attached flyer and talk with those who may benefit.

Oregon Care Partners provides free access to high-quality trainings designed to help professional and family caregivers of all levels improve the lives and quality of care of older adults living in Oregon. Create a free training profile at OregonCarePartners.com to register for classes.

For assistance, email info@oregoncarepartners.com or call 1-800-930-6851.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbNeedle Felting by Barby Anderson

Enforcing “Public Charge” Rule in Immigration Is Common Sense

How Federal Grant-in-Aid Programs Drive Irrational Policymaking and Undermine Democratic Accountability

It Happened Here: Sam Hill campaigns for better roads in Washington state


 

Sherman County eNews #220

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting Monday, Aug. 26

  2. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

  3. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum

  4. A United States of America History Tidbit: Prohibition 1919

  5. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

  6. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

  7. Putting Fear in its Place


1. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting Monday, Aug. 26

camera.handheldSherman County Photography Club meets this Monday, August 26, at the Sherman County Extension office at 6pm.

* Come and show us your photo entries from the 2019 Sherman County Fair

* Learn about exposure with a DVD presentation “Determining Exposure” by Rob Sheppard.

* Lowell Smith will show you how to make your Milky Way photos POP.

Everyone is always welcome at the monthly meetings.


2. Help Wanted – ABC Huskies Child Care

children.cartoonABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!


3. A Fundraising Night at the Sherman County Historical Museum

The Sherman County Historical Society event committee is planning the first annual Night at the Museum Fundraiser. On September 14th, the Society will be showcasing local breweries that will bring their favorite brews for an evening dinner at the museum.

A limited number of tickets will be offered for the main event and a limited number of VIP tickets. VIP ticket holders will board a bus bound for a secret location in the county where they will be served a special brew sample and appetizers along with an exclusive tour of this mystery venue. They will return to the museum for the main event.

VIP tickets are $50 and the main event tickets are $35, and may be purchased at the museum or from committee members, Johnathan and Kalie Rolfe, Chris and Carrie Kaseberg or Gail Macnab. Ticket holders will receive free admission to the museum.

The evening’s main event will feature dinner and an amazing silent auction to benefit museum operations and general improvements. If you wish to contribute to the auction, we would be over-the-top grateful! Please deliver your donation to the museum with your name, the value of your donation, and anything else we will need to know. Thank you in advance for supporting this event. We hope to see you on September 14th.

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Mid Columbia Producers, Wheatland Insurance and RDO Equipment are Porter level sponsors; Bank of Eastern Oregon and Apex Truck Repair are Ale level sponsors. ~Sherman County Historical Society Event Committee


4. A United States of America History Tidbit: Prohibition 1919

100 years ago, in 1919, the United States of America was going through an identity crisis. The 18th Amendment, which forbade the making, selling or transportation of “intoxicating liquors,” was ratified on Jan. 16, 1919, and took effect a year later. Politicians voted to enact Prohibition as a “noble experiment” to reduce crime, solve social problems, reduce the tax burden created by prisons and poorhouses, and improve Americans’ health, according to an analysis by the Cato Institute, which characterized the effort as a “miserable failure on all counts.” The amendment was championed by the temperance movement, which mainly was supported by women who saw alcohol as a destroyer of families. They carried signs saying, “Lips that touch liquor shall not touch ours,” according to the National Archives.


5. Sherman Development League Grant Cycle Application Forms

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms will be available September 3, 2019, for projects and/or programs in Sherman County. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2019, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2020.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

• A brief description of your project.
• State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.
• Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc.
P.O. Box 11
Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


6. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2019 Fall Grant Cycle

The 2019 Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 3, 2019. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 30, 2019

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition
P.O. Box 23
Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


7. Putting Fear in its Place

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, thirty years ago, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better.

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth.

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success in areas of your life that are important to you, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the well-lived life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? Actually writing out your fears makes them somewhat smaller and easier to look at and deal with. It gets them out of the realm of your head, and onto the finite space of a piece of paper. Once they are down on paper, what steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #219

CONTENTS

  1. Buy Squares for Chicken Poop Bingo in the Sherman County Fair Poultry Barn

  2. Oregon’s 2nd District Rep. Greg Walden Announces August Town Halls

  3. Sherman County Court August 7 Approved Minutes Now Online

  4. Restore Oregon’s 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop, Sept. 14 in Bend

  5. The Meaning and Quality of Life

  6. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Men of energy of character must have enemies; because there are two sides to every question, and taking one with decision, and acting on it with effect, those who take the other will of course be hostile in proportion as they feel that effect.”           —Thomas Jefferson (1817)


1. Buy Squares for Chicken Poop Bingo in the Sherman County Fair Poultry Barn

chicken.henchicken.familyMake sure to swing by the Poultry Barn and buy some squares for Chicken Poop Bingo. Winner gets 1/2 the pot. The rest goes to the Chicken Tenders 4H club.

 


2. Oregon’s 2nd District Rep. Greg Walden Announces August Town Halls

American flag2Continuing a series of town hall meetings across Oregon’s Second District, Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) announced today he will hold town halls in Sherman, Gilliam, Morrow, Harney, and Wasco counties beginning next week. Details on the meetings are included below.

“I’m looking forward to hearing from people throughout the Second District at these five town halls. These meetings provide just another opportunity to hear from Oregonians and provide an update on the issues I’m working on back in Congress. In addition to the over 74,000 letters, emails, and phone calls I have responded to over the past year, these town halls help me stay updated on the issues people are facing in our communities. This is a top priority for me,” said Walden.

These five meetings will bring Walden’s town hall total to 40 in 2019. He has held more town halls this year than most lawmakers in the U.S. House of Representatives according to Town Hall Project.

Walden’s upcoming town halls will bring his overall total to 188 since 2012. For a complete list of Walden’s previously held and upcoming town hall meetings for 2019, please click here.

Wednesday, August 28, 2019

WHAT: Sherman County Town Hall
WHEN: 9:00 a.m. PT
WHERE: Bob’s Texas T-Bone, 101 1st Street, Rufus, OR 97050

WHAT: Gilliam County Town Hall
WHEN: 11:15 a.m. PT
WHERE: Arlington Fire Hall, 1500 Railroad Avenue, Arlington, OR 97812
WHAT: Morrow County Town Hall
WHEN: 2:15 p.m. PT
WHERE: Heppner City Hall, 111 N. Main Street, Heppner, OR 97836

Thursday, August 29, 2019

WHAT: Harney County Town Hall
WHEN: 11:00 a.m. PT
WHERE: Harney County Chamber of Commerce, Conference Room, 484 N. Broadway Avenue, Burns, OR 97720

Friday, August 30, 2019

WHAT: Wasco County Town Hall
WHEN: 9:30 a.m. PT
WHERE: Tygh School Community Center, 57594 Havens Avenue, Tygh Valley, 97063


3. Sherman County Court August 7 Approved Minutes Now Online

Approved minutes of the August 7, 2019 Sherman County Court’s Regular Session, are now available in the Archive of County Court Meeting Minutes https://www.co.sherman.or.us/county-meeting-minutes-archive/.


4. Restore Oregon’s 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop, Sept. 14 in Bend

barnOn Saturday, September 14, Restore Oregon will host their annual 2019 Heritage Barn Workshop where barn owners will learn practical solutions from experts on how to maintain, rehabilitate, and adapt old barns for today’s needs. Attendees will learn about the history and construction of barns as well as maintenance, stabilization, funding opportunities, and preservation. The workshop will also highlight the crucial steps toward transitioning the family farm to future generations. Attendees will have the unique opportunity to experience live hand-hewing demonstrations by David Rogers, founder and operator of Logs & Timbers, LLC, who has over 40 years experience in log building restoration.

Heritage barns are an iconic symbol of Oregon’s agricultural and rural heritage. With the rapid changes in farming and ranching, diminishing resources, and loss of skilled craftspeople with knowledge of barn preservation and restoration, there is a special urgency for preservationists to partner with the agricultural community. Restore Oregon, through its Heritage Barns Task Force formed in 2011, has made it a priority to bring together the state’s most well-versed experts to share their experiences and skills. We are honored to offer this opportunity to support Oregon ranchers, farmers, barn owners, barn enthusiasts, and their allies in sharing their passion for our agricultural heritage and their ability to retain and enhance its usefulness into the future.

The annual Heritage Barn Workshop will be held in Bend at the Bend Park and Recreation District’s historic Hollinshead Barn. Restore Oregon has partnered with the Deschutes County Historic Landmarks Commission to provide this exceptional educational opportunity. Space is limited, purchase your tickets today at www.retoreoregon.org<http://www.retoreoregon.org>.

Event Details:

When: Saturday, September 14 from 10 AM – 5:30 PM

Cost: $40 per ticket, includes snacks, lunch with choice of sandwich and side, and beverages

Location: Hollinshead Barn in Bend, Oregon, 1235 NE Jones Rd, Bend, OR 97701

For more information, please call 503-243-1923.


5. The Meaning and Quality of Life

Do you believe that having a purpose in life is important? Having a purpose contributes a great deal to our sense of well-being. Not surprisingly, having a purpose can actually prolong your life.

Several years ago, a study done by Judith Roden of Harvard followed two groups of patients in a convalescent home. Members of one group were asked to care for a potted plant during that time. Members of the other group had no such purpose. Those who were plant caretakers lived, on average, twice as long as the others did. You see, a sense of purpose fosters hope, self-motivation and positive feelings about oneself and others. Purpose gives us a sense of being needed.

Viktor Frankl, in his book “Man’s Search for Meaning,” found this same result during his time in Nazi concentration camps during WWII. Purpose, meaning, or goals if you will, provided the will to live. It could be said that the need to be needed is vital to our quality of life.

How many examples can we see, when purpose is absent or taken away, that life ceases. Veteran broadcaster Andy Rooney passed away one month after leaving CBS’ “60 Minutes” program. Bear Bryant, iconic coach of Alabama’s football team for 24 years, passed a mere 28 days after retiring. Retiring from something and not to something may have been the catalyst.

Now it is important to remember that, if it’s going to be truly meaningful, your life’s purpose must be something that is chosen freely by you, not something that is chosen for you. And it may have nothing whatever to do with what you do for a living, although, if it does that would be ideal. The whole point is getting outside of ourselves, and doing something beyond our own personal gain.

Have you thought about what your purpose is? Have you tried to put it into words? If not, take the time to do so, and then use that purpose as a compass to guide your activities. You will be surprised at how much energy you’ll have and clarity you’ll feel.

One more thing: chronological age has nothing to do with finding purpose in your life. If you are wondering when you can start – well, today will do just fine! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon State Capital Insider Index: This week by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.pole22 August 2019 | Written by Oregon Capital Insider

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon news stories.

  • $3,371: Amount an aide to Portland Mayor Ted Wheelerspent on three nights of lodging while attending South by Southwest, according to The Oregonian.
  • 60:Percent of state income taxes that are collected from people in the Portland metro area, according to Willamette Week.
  • 5,000:Classified employees at Oregon’s seven public universities. Those workers, represented by SEIU Local 503, could go on strike next month if they don’t reach an agreement they find satisfactory with university management.
  • $36,000:Median salary for those workers.
  • $717,500:Base salary for Rob Mullens, the athletic director at the University of Oregon, according to Willamette Week, reporting on a recent Washington Post column criticizing college coaches’ stay at a Ritz resort in Southern California for a committee conference.
  • 31:People on death row in Oregon, according to The Oregonian.
  • $9 million:Amount Oregon will spend toward refurbishing the Interstate 5 bridge across the Columbia River, according to The Oregonian.
  • 8:Oregon state troopers per 100,000 residents, one of the lowest ratios in the country, according to KMTR.
  • $80 million:Amount the legislature approved for 100 new troopers by 2021, KMTR reports.
  • $120,000:Amount Gov. Kate Brown — who cannot run for reelection in 2022 — has fundraised from business donors, according to OPB.

7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkBrilliant Maps: If European Borders Were Drawn By DNA Instead Of Ethnicity

Slavery In America Did Not Begin In 1619, And Other Things The New York Times Gets Wrong

Mysterious Oregon cattle killings, mutilations alarm ranchers


 

Sherman County eNews #213

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES:

FREE CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

thankyou.guy

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES: 

THANK YOU! Bryan, Forest, Scott and Kari Peters would like to thank all who helped with wheat harvest this year while Bryan was recovering.  We hope we didn’t forget anyone, if so, we apologize.  Thank you very much to:  Rick Jauken, Taner Elliot, Garrett Peters, Justin Miller, Nate Smith, Charlie Miller, Ryder Smith, Colton Shull, Ryan Thompson, LP McClennan, Max McClennan, Colton Kock, Cody Jauken, Sarah Bibby, Jeff Kaser, Amy Mcnamee, Gary Shull, Dee Richelderfer, Don Hilderbrand, Josh Hilderbrand, Rory Wilson, Travis and Michelle Lawrence.  It was amazing to have so many people come to help and offer to help. We really appreciate all the support from this awesome community!

THANK YOU for the generous donations to sponsor the bounce house at the 2019 Sherman County Fair. The bounce house will be open: Thursday August 22nd from 1:00 to 7:00 p.m. and Friday August 23rd and Saturday August 24th from 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.  Bring the whole family to the fair for fun and to help support our local 4-H and FFA members. ~Sherman County Fair Board

THANK YOU Sherman County 4-H for posting 4-H photos to Facebook for those of us who are not there! Pictures of hard work, success and pride! ~Larry and Sherry

CONGRATULATIONS & THANK YOU, 2019 Sherman County Fair Grand Marshals Leo & Krista Coelsch and Mark & Sharon Spencer, Sherman County Fair Queen Shelby, and Sherman County Fair Board!  ~Larry and Sherry 

THANK YOU! SPONSORS of the SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR: Apex Auto & Truck Repair, Azure, Bandit Glass, Bank of Eastern Oregon, Boot Barn, Coastal, Fritts Crop Insurance, Gorge Outfitters Supply, Grand Central, Grass Valley Country Market, Griffith Motors, GUUD Mfg., Lucas Oil, Mid Columbia Producers, Morrow County Grain Growers, Rolfe’s Angus Acres, Sherman County Drug and Alcohol Prevention Coalition, Sherman County Historical Society, Sherman County Medical Clinic, Sherman County SWCD, The Times-Journal, Wasco Market. 

THANK YOU, SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR VOLUNTEERS!

THANK YOU, CATHY BROWN & JAMIE WILSON!  The Sherman County Senior & Community Center extends a special thank you to Cathy Brown and Jamie Wilson of WB Ranch for their generous donation of beef. We received 380 pounds of local beef, and only had to pay the cut, wrap and kill fee, which allows us to serve good quality local beef to our seniors over the next year. Thank you so much for your generosity and your donation to the community!  ~Kari Pinkerton Silcox, Sherman County Senior Center, PO Box 352, Moro, OR 97039 | 541-565-3191 | kari@shermancounty.net

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY & MUSEUM. A Night at the Museum. Limited tickets available for this fundraiser event. Local brews and local catering for a great Night at the Museum. VIP ticket holders will be bused to a surprise location in the county, receive a special brew sample with appetizers, an exclusive tour of the mystery venue and then bused back for the main event. It will be a great event showcasing local breweries that are bringing their favorite brews and an evening at the museum with dinner provided. There will also be a silent auction. VIP tickets $50 & Regular tickets $35. Call 541-565-3232. Thank you in advance for supporting this event and we will see you Sept. 14th!

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER – SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information. 8/30

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

VOLUNTEER FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, OR 97065.

sign.helpwanted

EMPLOYMENT:

CHILD CARE PROVIDERS. ABC Huskies Child Care currently has available two (2) full-time and two (2) part-time Assistant Provider positions. Applicants must be able to work flexible hours and experience is preferred but will train. For an application and further details, you may contact Mika at 541-442-5024 or email abchuskies@yahoo.com. Employment application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com If you love children, this is a great opportunity to work with professional child care providers in a home-like environment!  9/13

SERVICES: 

SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

OREGON TRAVEL GUIDES. Sherman County Visitor Center at Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro. State and local visitor information.

LOST OR FOUND:

WANTED:

VOLUNTEERS FOR QUILTS FOR COPS WORKSHOP. 8 more “Quilts for Cops” needed. 6 officers in Philadelphia and 2 in Oregon. Consider joining us for the Quilts for Cops” workshop here in Wasco on September 21. 9-4:30. $35.00 includes kit/pattern and food. Please pre-register so they know how many kits to bring or send a donation to me, just write check to Quilts for Cops. It costs about $20-25 to send each quilt to the recipient. Carol MacKenzie. PO Box 85 Wasco, Or 97065.

YOUR STORIES. Sherman County: For The Record Calls for Stories: AFS Exchange Students! Editor Gladys Wesley is working on the next issue of Sherman County: For The Record and needs your stories. She would like to receive stories from AFS exchange students about where they were from, their time in Sherman County, life after Sherman County and what they are doing now. She has one from Penny which was on FB and is a good example of what she is looking for. Please send the stories to Gladys at the email address info@shermanmuseum.org with subject line FTR Story. ~Sherman County Historical Society

SHERMAN COUNTY ARTISTS & CRAFTERS! It is not too late sign on as an artist/vendor for the “Wasco School Events Center Presents: An Afternoon of Sherman County Talent.” This fundraiser will be held on Sunday afternoon, October 20th, and will feature local talents sharing their works. We would love to hear from a few more of the talented folks of Sherman County who would like to be a part of this event to show off their works, make contacts with potential customers and even make some sales that day! Contact Melissa Kirkpatrick at WSEC, (541-442-5778) for more information.


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

AUGUST

prize.bluerib20-24 Sherman County Fair

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Showmanship 8

23 Sherman County Fair Bull Riding 7:30

24 Sherman County DUII Prevention Walk 8 a.m. Moro

24 Sherman County Fair Kids’ Games 8:30

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-Around Showmanship 12:30, 4-H & FFA Awards, Livestock Auction Sale 3-4, Demolition Derby 7:30 and Dance with Countryfied 9:30.

26 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

26 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

26 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Bldg., Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

27 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

27 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

28 Representative Walden Town Hall 9 Bob’s Texas T-Bone, Rufus

29 Sherman County School Back to School Night 6:30

30-31 Meet and Greet Wasco-Sherman Extension Crops Agent Candidates

31 Deadline Sherman County Resident Incentive Application

31 Rummage Sale 10-3 Wasco School Events Center

31 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell, Oregon 

pencil.spiralSEPTEMBER

1 Rummage Sale 11-3 Wasco School Events Center

2 LABOR DAY

2 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

3 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

3 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

3 Sherman County School 1st Day

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Moro Presbyterian Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

7 Night on the North Bank, Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction

7 RiverFest: Our Rivers, Our Way of Life 10-4 Columbia Park, Kennewick

9 Sherman County School Board Meeting 7

9 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

10 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

10 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 a.m.

10 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11 Rufus City Council 7

13 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

14 A Night at the Museum – Sherman County Historical Society Benefit 541-565-3232

14 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Meeting 10:30 Discovery Center

16 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

17 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

17 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

17 Wasco City Council 7

18 Sherman County Court 9

20 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10

21 Sherman High School Multi-Class Reunion 501-258-7299

21 Quilts for Cops Workshop 9-4:30 Wasco School Events Center

23 Hans the Produce Guy 4:30-6 Rufus Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 8-9:30 Wasco Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 9:45-11:05 Sage Mountain Primitives, Moro

24 Hans the Produce Guy 11:30-12:20 Grass Valley Market

24 Hans the Produce Guy 1-2 Shaniko Wagon Barn

24 Sherman County School Dental Screening

25-26 Eastern Oregon Nonprofit Conference, Ontario

26 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 Boardman

26 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4 Hood River