Sherman County eNews #152

CONTENTS

  1. Storytime at Maryhill, June 6 & 20

  2. Father’s Day at Maryhill, June 16

  3. Building on Past Success

  4. Sherman County Court Notes, April 17

  5. Sherman County Court Notes, May 1

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“War is not the best engine for us to resort to; nature has given us one in our commerce, which if properly managed, will be a better instrument for obliging the interested nations of Europe to treat us with justice.” —Thomas Jefferson (1797)


1. Storytime at Maryhill, June 6 & 20

Thursday, June 6 & 20 | 10:30 a.m.
Program repeats July 11 & 18, August 1 & 8

Gather your little ones and enjoy stories in the galleries. Librarians carefully choose books to read next to the amazing works of art to which they connect! After having fun with books and art, your family will work together on an art project that is a perfect connection to your day.

This program is free to participants with a library card from either system. Bring a picnic and run through our sculpture garden enjoying the views of the Columbia River Gorge when you are finished and be sure to explore THE DISCOVER ROOM too!

Presented in partnership with The Dalles-Wasco County Public Library and the Fort Vancouver Regional Library System.


2, Father’s Day at Maryhill, June 16

StarYellowSunday, June 16 | all day

It’s Dad’s day at Maryhill…explore our exhibition of chess sets from around the globe, our Indigenous Peoples of North America Galleries or Sam Hill’s legacy in the Northwest — there’s sure to be something to tickle his fancy! All dads get free admission on Father’s Day and a free Freebridge beer or drink of choice with a lunch order at Loïe’s: The Museum Café.


3. Building on Past Success

The Pacific Institute resides at the exciting intersection where scientific research and practical application meet. We have been fortunate to have had strong relationships in the field of cognitive psychology, and delight when new research confirms that we are on the right path with our applications.

In the February 24th (2013) issue of the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, Joris Lammers, David Dubois, Derek D. Rucker and Adam D. Galinsky’s article, “Power Gets the Job Done: Priming Power Improves Interview Outcomes,” describes one experiment where two separate groups of individuals were asked to write a job-application letter. Before writing the letter, one group was asked to recall an occasion when they felt especially powerful, the other was asked to recall an occasion when they felt they lacked power.

In a second, similar experiment, three groups were primed – one as powerful, one as neutral and the third as powerless – before an admissions interview for business school. Results from both experiments reflected that merely “asking participants to remember a personal experience with power dramatically affected the impressions that interviewers had of them.”

The Pacific Institute has often taught this practice as “flick back / flick up.” When faced with a situation that would cause you to doubt yourself or cause you tension and anxiety, you flick back to a similar experience where you succeeded. Take that positive emotion of success, and drop it into the current situation – flick up. You are borrowing a positive emotion from the past, and painting the new situation with your own success.

If you are not certain that you have positive past experiences, take a few minutes and compile a list of the 10 things that have gone well in your life. If you have 5 or 20, write them down! Then, take each one and remember the circumstance, the challenge, and the way you succeeded and achieved. Live in that emotion of success once again. Then, the next time you face a challenge, flick back to one of these successes, and put the positive emotion of success into the new challenge.

Take the time to make that list and fully remember the successes of your past. They are powerful tools in creating the future that you want. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Sherman County Court Notes, April 17

ShermanCoLogoBy Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on April 17, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Motion to approve the 2019-2020 County Assessment Function Funding Assistance (CAFFA) Program Grant Application, Racial and Ethnic Impact Statement, and Resolution in the amount of $575,531.00, and authorize Judge Dabulskis to sign.
  • Motion to allow Larry Hoctor to live on the property until August 31, 2019 rent free, providing that he continues to provide insurance, utilities, and other items as previously agreed upon.
  • Motion to authorize Amy Asher to build an Oregon Youth Conservation Corps (OYCC) storage shed, and to work with Judge Dabulskis to find a location.
  • Motion to approve the letter to the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) notifying them to move the Prevention Education Grant from Center for Living to Sherman County, and authorize the County Court to sign.
  • Motion to appoint Gary Thompson to the North Central Public Health District Budget Committee as an Alternate.
  • Motion to approve the Regional Infrastructure Fund Grant Agreement for the Sherman Cities Broadband Initiative, between Sherman County and the State of Oregon, acting by and through Oregon Business Development Department, in the amount of $200,000, and authorize County Court and Debbie Hayden, Financial Officer, to sign.
  • Motion to approve Resolution No. 01-04-2019, In the Matter of the County Court Approving the Regional Infrastructure Fund Grant Agreement for the Sherman Cities Broadband Initiative to provide reliable, robust, and affordable broadband service as critical infrastructure for community and economic development as well as access to education, workforce training, health care, public safety, and other services in rural communities, and authorize County Court to sign.
  • Motion to approve the Sherman Cities Broadband Payments to GorgeNet in the amount of $41,714.40 for the City of Grass Valley, and $39,169.20 for the City of Wasco, for Fiber to the Home installation services.
  • Motion to declare the 2000 Ford E450 Bus as surplus as recommended by the County with a minimum bid of $2,000 and the 2008 Jeep Patriot as surplus as recommended by the Assessor’s Office with a minimum bid of $2,000.

5. Sherman County Court Notes, May 1

ShermanCoLogoBy Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest”.

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on May 1, 2019, and in conducting the business of the County,

  • Motion to hire Dan Meader to complete a Housing Analysis on the City of Wasco for no more than $7,500.
  • Motion to approve a minimum bid of $3,500 for the previously surplused Drivers Education 2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser, and a minimum bid of $10,000 for the previously surplused Sheriff’s Department 2014 Dodge Charger.
  • County Court had previously stated that a certified letter giving a 30 day notice to remove the ambulance from County property would be sent to the owner. Sheriff Lohrey informed the Court it would be easier, and more efficient, to have the Sheriff’s Office tag the ambulance and volunteered to take care of the issue on behalf of County Court.
  • Discussion held on RV Park Policies, long term versus short term stays, and written documentation.
  • Court previously reviewed the Finnegan Bridge replacement plans; seeing no issues, Mark Coles, Road Master was given the go ahead to proceed forward.

6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyGeorge H.W. Bush Library Birthday Anniversary, Forever Stamp Events

Military Times Home Page

Oregon lawmakers want to exempt farmers from new business tax

DOME DIGEST: Holocaust education, ranch tourism, olive oil production among bills passed this week

Malheur Enterprise: Public Money, Private Empire. Rep. Greg Smith Serves Many Public Masters for a Price

Bend Bulletin Editorial: Time to rethink ethics rules


 

Sherman County eNews #151

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Ambulance Board of Directors Meeting, June 11

  2. Try Tuesday Shopping with Sherman Community Transit

  3. Building Block: Awareness

  4. All County Prayer Meeting, June 5

  5. Sherman County 4-H News: Beef Club

  6. 2020 Census Jobs available in Sherman County $14.50 – $16.00 per hour – Paid Training

  7. Greg Walden reacts to NBC News report on migrant children

  8. Klindt’s Booksellers Hosts Dennis Dauble, Author of Bury Me with my Fly Rod, June 8


Thomas Paine noted in his 1776 pamphlet, Common Sense, “When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary.”


1. Notice. Sherman County Ambulance Board of Directors Meeting, June 11

Sherman County Ambulance Board of Directors

Board Meeting Agenda

June 11, 2019

1800hrs. 

  1. Open Meeting
  1. Approve March 12, 2019 Meeting Minutes
  2. Old Business:

3.1     EMT Course Update

3.2     EMR Course Update

3.3     FARMEDIC Course

3.4     Other Old Business

  1. New Business

4.1

4.2

  1. Next Meeting September 10, 2019 @ 1800hrs.
  2. Adjourn

2. Try Tuesday Shopping with Sherman Community Transit

ShermanCoLogoSHERMAN COMMUNITY TRANSIT

TUESDAY SHOPPING BUS ROUTE

PICK UP TIMES & LOCATIONS

9:15AM – GRASS VALLEY MARKET PARKING LOT

9:30AM – MORO SENIOR CENTER PARKING LOT

9:45AM – WASCO EVENT CENTER

10:00AM – RUFUS – BOB’S TEXAS T-BONE

RETURN ROUTE FROM THE DALLES

2:50PM – RUFUS

3:10PM – WASCO

3:25AM – MORO

3:45 – GRASS VALLEY

RESERVE A RIDE PHONE 541-565-3553


3. Building Block: Awareness

High self-esteem is a desirable quality. As a personal estimate of our own worth, it is a vital component in our sense of personal efficacy – our ability to cause things to happen for ourselves. Interestingly, we can’t have high self-esteem without self-acceptance.

Self-acceptance is an absolutely essential component of having high self-esteem, but what does self-acceptance mean? Some people think accepting yourself just as you are means that you condone or are proud of your faults – but that would be a mistaken idea. For definition, to “accept” means to experience the full reality, without denial or avoidance. We can accept the reality of things about ourselves that we don’t like or condone at all. It’s all about awareness first.

For example, suppose you are feeling envious of a friend who has a better job. If you accept yourself, you can allow yourself to acknowledge this envious feeling and take the time to examine and think about it. As we do this, we are not concerned with judging it as bad or weak, but we are concerned with being aware. It is our awareness that will show us that we have wanted something more than we realized, and that becomes fodder for more introspection and reflection to discover the “why” behind our feelings of envy.

You see, you can’t grow out of your unwanted feelings if you are not aware that you even have them. If you judge your feelings as bad or weak, you’ll be inclined to push them down into your subconscious where they’ll express themselves in ways you won’t be able to control.

So, the next time you find yourself thinking something you feel guilty about, try practicing awareness and self-acceptance. Refuse to be in an adversarial relationship with yourself, and dig in to discover where your feelings are coming from. These become one of the basic building blocks of self-esteem. ~The Pacific Institute


4. All County Prayer Meeting, June 5

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting will be Wednesday June 5th @ the Wasco Methodist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank you, Red Gibbs


5. Sherman County 4-H News: Beef Club

4-H clover1The Sherman County Beef Club met on May 29th 2019 at Doug and Sandi Martin’s house. The meeting was called to order at 6 pm by Courtney Coelsch. Everyone was at this meeting. The pledge of Allegiance was led by Natalie Martin and the 4-H pledge was led by Bailey Coelsch. Kole gave a treasurers report and told us that we have a total of $551 in our account, with this money we all agreed to by a blow dryer. At this meeting we talked about our presentation ideas and then said what ours was going to be on. We also talked about training steers, the supplies needed and then we went and looked at Natalie’s steers. We are looking into a fitting meeting and a hoof trimming meeting.  Our next meeting will be June 11th at the extension office starting at 6:30 pm. The meeting was adjourned at 6:32 pm.  Signed: Bailey Coelsch


6. 2020 Census Jobs available in Sherman County $14.50 – $16.00 per hour – Paid Training

Thousands of jobs are available nationwide, and many are near you. Help support your community by being a Census Taker.
*Great pay
*Flexible hours
*Weekly pay
*Paid Training
APPLY ONLINE TODAY: WWW.2020census.gov/jobs
Questions, call 1-855-562-2020
Federal Relay Services: 1-877-8339 TTY/ASCII
www.gsa.gov/fedrelay
The U.S. Census Bureau is an Equal Opportunity Employer.


7. Rep. Greg Walden reacts to NBC News report on migrant children

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Representative Greg Walden (R-Hood River) released the following statement following new reports that last year, 37 migrant children, ages 5 to 12, were left in vans overnight as they waited to be reunited with families at Port Isabel Detention Center, Texas.

“This latest report is completely unacceptable. Last year, I led a bipartisan delegation down to Texas to tour facilities where children detained at the Southwest border have been held, including Port Isabel. To now learn that children as young as 5 years old were left in vans for more than 24 hours is simply indefensible. I support enforcement of our nation’s borders, but I want to make something very clear — I strongly believe that children should not be separated from their parents. Period. And those separated should be cared for as if they were our own children until they are reunified with their families. This is not who we are as Americans. I expect a prompt explanation from the Departments of Homeland Security and Health and Human Services about this failure,” said Walden.

Background:
In July 2018, Walden led a bipartisan delegation of members down to McAllen, Texas to tour part of the Southwest border, a port of entry, a central processing facility operated by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detention facility, and an Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) shelter.

In June 2018, Walden, along with Republicans on the Energy and Commerce Committee, sent a letter to HHS stating that children should not be separated from their parents. The letter also sought information from HHS to ensure that children who are in ORR’s custody are properly cared for while in ORR’s care.


 8. Klindt’s Booksellers Hosts Dennis Dauble, Author of Bury Me with My Fly Rod, June 8

On Saturday, June 8th Klindt’s Booksellers will host Dennis Dauble for a book signing featuring his newest regional title, Bury Me with My Fly Rod.

What: Book Signing with Dennis Dauble

When: Saturday, June 8th at 4PM

Where: Klindt’s Booksellers and Stationers

Free and open to the public. We recommend you call ahead to reserve your books.

Bury Me With My Fly Rod, is Dennis Dauble’s latest collection of stories. With this new title, Dauble leads readers through a “spoke of the wheel” tour of northeastern Oregon trout streams. He battles the “Mike Tyson” of Couse Creek, hikes into Spirit Mountain, and soaks flies near his cabin in the Umatilla River canyon. Regale in tales about grasshoppers on a string, beaver scat, dogs that herd trout, and how not to teach your honey to cast. Swing a fly for steelhead on the Columbia and Deschutes rivers, and chase “Brownies” on the Isle of Skye. Learn what makes a perfect rod and the secret of huckleberry cream pie.