Sherman County eNews #140

CONTENT

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1Grass Valley First Baptist Church is having its Spring Fling on Saturday, June 8th at 6:30 p.m. It is featuring Joni Harms who will be there to encourage and perform. The dinner is a potluck. Please bring side dish or dessert. It is a family event and all are welcome. Babysitting will be provided. ~Joe Burgess, Pastor


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

applause1Appreciation can make a day – even change a life. Your willingness to put it into words is all that is necessary. ~Margaret Cousins

THANK YOU! On May 10, 2019, Sherman County Prevention sponsored a Mother’s/Grandmother’s Appreciation Dinner and Dance in honor of Mother’s Day.  The intent was to honor the moms in our county while creating bonding experiences for families.  The event was well attended and everyone had a good time.  I would like to thank Ali Roark, Rod Asher and Merva Haley for assisting with decorating and carrying out last minute duties as needed during the event. The Wasco Events Center was a great venue.  Dinner, catered by Country Side Catering, Brittney Havins, was delicious and the music by DJE added a lot of fun.  Thanks again to each of you.  This would not have been a success without each of you! ~Amy Asher, Sherman County Prevention Coordinator

THANK YOU, ODOT, for sweeping Wasco’s streets! They look so nice! ~Carol MacKenzie

I can live for two months on a good compliment. ~Mark Twain

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

COUNTRY BREAKFAST with SHERMAN COUNTY CHILD CARE FOUNDATION / ABC HUSKIES DAY CARE. Wasco Memorial Day Country Breakfast 7:30-10:30 Wasco Fire Hall May 26 & 27.

BINGO & MAKE-YOUR-OWN ICE CREAM SUNDAES for FOOD BANK. St. Mary Parish Hall, next door to the Wasco School Events Center, Monday, May 27, 1-3pm. Hosted by the Catholic Community of Sherman County to benefit the Sherman County Food Bank.

RAFFLE to SUPPORT WASCO MEMORIAL DAY CELEBRATION. Get your tickets at the historic Railroad Depot in Wasco May 26-27.

MEMORIAL DAY PASTRY AUCTION. Please help support the Wasco Memorial Day Celebration by bringing a baked item to the Pastry Auction on May 27th. I will be at the Train Depot to gather and label your tasty treats starting at 9am. The Auction is held after the parade. All proceeds go directly to the Memorial Day Fund to keep the parade entry free, to allow vendors to set up for free, to have free kid activities. I can also pick up baked items on Sunday if you want to donate but can’t make it Monday. Contact me at 541-340-0392.

All good fund raising plans have one thing in common: they show a diverse number of sources for their income. The board of directors plays a crucial role in the selection, implementation and evaluation of fundraising strategies. Board members may individually commit to raising and giving a certain amount of money. The basic premise of fundraising – You must ask; you must give. Everything after that involves creativity, imagination and a sense of fun.


VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

Participate in the process of your community and country.

One person can make a difference.

Take a stand.

Do something about it.

Look hard at your larger community

–it may need your specific participation. –Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey

JUST ASK! How can I help? Sherman County’s current activities require the equivalent of 290 volunteers –  part-time, one-time, once-yearly, once-monthly, as needed. Just ask! How can I help? The need is great. These come to mind… Your child’s activities. Your church. Sherman County Fair. Wasco Memorial Day Celebration. Sherman County Senior & Community Center. Sherman County Historical Museum. Sherman High School Booster Club. Wasco School Events Center. Grass Valley Pavilion. Cemetery clean-up days. Maryhill Museum. Food Banks. Respond to public notices of vacant local government positions, including EMT training. Lion’s Club. Or… if you can’t give of your time, give your support with your tax deductible dollars. ~The Editor. 

EMPLOYMENT:

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOARD SECRETARY. Job Description – May 15, 2019: Year-round paid position, pay DOE, hours vary based on season, some evenings and weekends required. Reports to: President, Sherman County Fair Board

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare and advertise agenda, following public meeting laws.
  • Prepare monthly financial reports to present to the Board at meetings.
  • Keep all minutes of the Fair Board and/or committees and disperse copies to necessary individuals and groups
  • Keep complete and accurate records of all proceedings and transactions in which the Board or Fair is concerned or involved in any way.
  • Issue notices, announcements or publications of or for the Fair and board.
  • Conduct correspondence, order supplies and maintain adequate records on file for all Fair dealings
  • Receive and keep complete records of all entries and awards made for premiums in all departments of the fair, except 4-H and FFA.
  • Off season events: arrange contracts, collect rent, etc. and note in monthly reports.
  • Prepare reports as may be required by Oregon Fair Association.
  • Prepare calendar of events for the year, indicating uses, revenue, dates, etc. of use of fairgrounds.
  • Year-round promotion of the fair
  • Manage fair office and hire office staff for Fair season
  • Administrative duties include answering phones, regular mailings and emails, updating and maintaining filing, provide bills to the County in a timely matter, record and report revenues and expenditures
  • Aid Fair Board in the development of the yearly budget for operations of the Fairgrounds and work with the finance director of the County.
  • Help solicit funds for the Fair.
  • Aid Board in grounds maintenance and trash removal
  • Prepare the premium book for publication

Experience & Skills: Experience with accounting, Microsoft Word, and Excel is essential. The position requires effectiveness in financial management, excellent verbal and written communications, and working well with the public.

To Apply: Qualified applicants should send resume and cover letter by May 31st, 2019 to: Sherman County Fair Board, PO Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065 OR submit electronically to: shermanctyfair@hotmail.com. 5/24

FT MECHANIC. Apex Auto & Truck Repair is hiring! In need of a Mechanic who:
* Has diesel experience
* Has a valid drivers license
* Has a CDL, but not required
* Is great with communication
* Has a positive attitude
* Has the ability to work with minimal supervision
* Has road service experience
ASE Certification is a plus, but not required.
Full-Time position. No Cap Depending On Experience. Hourly or Flat-rate options are available.
Call 541-565-3001 for more information.
Applications are also available on www.apextruckrepair.com6/7

FT GRAIN ACCOUNTANT. MCP is seeking applicants for a full time Grain Accountant at our main office in Moro OR. An ideal candidate will preferably have a background in Ag and poss. an entrepreneurial aptitude w/ the ability to operate a business profitably, in a fast paced environment. Proficiency in accounting debits and credits and a minimum of an Associate’s Degree in Accounting -or- 3 years of verifiable accounting experience is required. See full ad @ www.mcpcoop.com Contact HR for questions or to request an appointment 541-565-2277.  6/7

CUSTODIAN. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified 1.0 FTE custodial candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.

Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district) and resume if you are interested in the position to: Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039, (541) 565-3500 wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

SERVICES:

STRONG PEOPLE STRENGTH TRAINING. Join us at the Grass Valley Pavilion Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7:30 am to strengthen your bones and improve your balance and well-being. For questions call Fern Wilcox 541-980-5093 or email at sequencegulch@yahoo.com. 5/24

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 6/28

HOST A CBYX SCHOLARSHIP STUDENT FROM GERMANY. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now seeking American families to host high school students from Germany. All these exceptional students have received a scholarship through The Congress Bundestag Youth Exchange Program (CBYX), a U.S. State Department-sponsored program. The CBYX scholarship provides a unique opportunity for 250 young Americans to spend a year in Germany, while at the same time, giving 300 young Germans the change to live a year in the United States! All the students live as members of caring host families and enjoy a variety of program activities, in addition to learning life in a new country. By improving not only their language skills, but also increasing their intercultural awareness, these students form a bridge of understanding between Germany and the United States and continue to strengthen ties between their two countries. This historic US State Department program seeks to foster democracy and values inherent in a free market economy. Your support of these students and programs like this reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world. Become an ASSE host family for one of these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Germany. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, these scholarship students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills. If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at http://www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com. 5/24

 SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESS DIRECTORY https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

RURAL VENDORS OF SAGEBRUSH COUNTRY FACEBOOK GROUP   https://www.facebook.com/groups/990306287836327/

FOR SALE: 

WASCO MULTI-FAMILY YARD SALE. Multi-Family Yard Sale Saturday and Sunday, May 25th & 26th, 10am to 4pm, 912 Pemberton Street, Wasco, Oregon. We’re the house that sits back by itself by the storage facility and Pacific Power substation. Furniture, tons of young girls clothes, men’s and women’s clothes, shoes, kitchenware, toys, bikes, decor, etc. Too much to list! Come on over and take a look. 5/24

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION & PARK SALE. The annual Pavilion and Park Sale will be May 24th & 25th in Grass Valley, Oregon, from 9:30 – 4:00.  Participation fee: $10.00. Venders welcome: Crafters, yard sales, gardeners, photographers, food items. PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE to register with Terri Bibby 541-333-2374. 5/24

 VEHICLES. NOTICE: SHERMAN COUNTY SURPLUS SALE

2000 Ford E450 Bus

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 125,490 miles

As Is Condition

VIN #: 1FDXE4553YHB96056

 

2008 Jeep Patriot

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 87,058 miles

As Is Condition: Possible Drive Train Issue

VIN #: 108FF28W18D605526

 

2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 33,980

As Is Condition

VIN #: 3A8FY68878T155104

 

2014 Dodge Charger

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 99,856

As Is Condition

VIN #: 2C3CDXAT4EH158884

Sealed bids must be submitted to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 by 5:00 pm Tuesday June 4, 2019. Bids will be opened and read aloud during County Court on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. ALL ENVELOPES AND BIDS MUST BE LABELED WITH THE ITEM YOU ARE BIDDING ON. Minimum bid for Ford Van: $2,000; Minimum bid for Jeep Patriot: $2,000; Minimum bid for PT Cruiser: $3,500; Minimum bid for Dodge Charger: $10,000. To request a viewing appointment, contact the Office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416. 5/31

 SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE:

FREE SALVAGEABLE PVC GUTTERS. I have a bunch of old PVC Gutters that I took off my home. There are many parts that are usable if you have or want to put up some gutters. They are white. Contact me via email red.gibbs@gmail.com / Text 541-965-1227 or call. 6/7 

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR   https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

flower.iris1MAY

24 BURN BAN Begins for N. Sherman & Moro RFPDs, Rufus, Wasco & Moro

24 Sherman County Budget Hearing – Courthouse

24-25 Grass Valley Pavilion & Park Sale 9:30-4 Grass Valley

25-26 Catfish Extravaganza, Rufus/John Day River

26-27 Wasco Memorial Day Country Breakfast 7:30-10:30 Wasco Fire Hall

27 MEMORIAL DAY

27 Wasco Memorial Day Celebration U.S. Air Force Fly-over between 10 & 10:30; Tribute to Veterans; Parade at 11; Paradise Rose Chuck Wagon BBQ; Pastry Auction; Car Show; Dandy Valley Nursery Stock for Sale; Music by Tyson Huckins; Train Rides for Kids; Ice Cream & Bingo at the Parish Hall. 541-340-0392.

28 Sherman County/Cities Fiber Meeting 6

30 Sherman County School Senior Scholarship Program 7

31-June 2 Junior Livestock Show, Tygh Valley 

flower.lilac.lavenderJUNE

1 Sherman County School Graduation 11

1 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

1 Arlington Fishing Derby & Spring Walapalooza 8-12

1-2 Equine Mania LLC Wheatacres Trail & Cattle Challenge (541) 980-7394

3 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10

3 Grass Valley City Council 7

4 Sherman County School Junior High Academic Awards 2:30

5 Biggs Service District Budget Committee Meeting 8:30 Courthouse

5 Sherman County Court 9

5 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

6 D-DAY

7 Gorge Broadband Consortium 1 The Dalles

8 Veterans’ Benefit Fair & Support Services, Earl Snell Park, Arlington

9 Sherman Historical Society Museum Wine 4, Dinner & Program 5 Museum

11 Tri-County Mental Health 11-2 The Dalles

11 Pendleton Experiment Station Field Day

12 Moro Experiment Station Field Day

12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

12 Rufus City Council 7

12 Estate Planning Seminar 6 Sherman Senior & Community Center

14 FLAG DAY

14 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

15 Cascade Singers Compositori Femminili 7 Zion Lutheran Church

16 FATHERS’ DAY

16 Father’s Day at Maryhill Museum

16 Cascade Singers Compositori Femminili 3 Zion Lutheran Church

16-21 Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute for High School Students

17 Sherman County School District Board 7

18 Caregiver Job Fair 10-6 DHS, The Dalles

19 Sherman County Court 9

19-21 Sherman County 4-H Camp for 4th-6th graders, Wamic

24-28 Vacation Bible School – Moro Community Presbyterian Church

26-29 OSU 4-H Summer Conference for 7th-12th graders, Corvallis


 

Sherman County eNews #139

CONTENTS

  1. An Invitation: Sherman Station Field Day, June 12

  2. Time to Sign Up for Sherman County 4-H Camp!

  3. Sherman County Family Fair, June 6

  4. PleaseWearIt.com Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns.

  5. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Wyman John French (1922-1945)

  6. Self-Imposed Limits

  7. Oregon Farm Bureau seeks calendar photos


“The love we have in our youth is superficial compared to the love that an old man has for his old wife.” ~Will Durant


1. An Invitation: Sherman Station Field Day, June 12

wheat.four

Oregon State University Columbia Basin Research Center

and

U.S. Department of Agriculture Ag Research Service

invite you to the

Sherman Station Field Day

June 12, 2019 | 7:45 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, Oregon

Join us for latest research results for resilient dryland systems:

  • New varieties: wheat, & barley
  • New weed control options
  • Tillage & root disease dynamics
  • Water storage & usage: Chem fallow/trashy fallow & deep soil
  • Winter pea cover crop in a no-till system.

Sponsored Lunch.  Info: 541-278-4186   www.agsci.oregonstate.edu/cbarc


2. Time to Sign Up for Sherman County 4-H Camp!

Time to sign your kids or grandkids up for Sherman County 4-H Camp!  Camp will be June 19-21 at Camp Morrow on Pine Hollow Reservoir near Wamic.  Camp facilities consist of a lodge for meals and classes, cabins in the woods, recreational areas for games, and a lake for swimming and boating.

Camp is for youth who will be finishing grades 4th, 5th, and 6th, and is open to Sherman County kids, friends and relatives….you don’t have to be in 4-H to attend.  This will be a small camp of Sherman County connected kids, with a natural resources theme for classes and art projects.  Cost is $110, which covers all meals, lodging, insurance and craft supplies.  For scholarship assistance requests, contact the Sherman County Extension Office 541-565-3230.  The deadline for registration and scholarship requests is Monday, June 3, return forms to Extension Office.  The Sherman 4-H Association will be reviewing scholarship applications on Tuesday, June 4.

Some of our campers’ favorite things at 4-H Camp:

  • Being with their friends
  • Playing “ga-ga” ball
  • Capture the Flag
  • Swimming and boating
  • Songs, skits and games
  • Hanging out in the cabins

Some of the fun activities:

  • Outdoor cooking for meals and desserts
  • Spray paint shirts with lots of colors and shapes like leaves, pine cones and deer profiles
  • Construct dreamboats out of native materials and candles to float on the lake last night of camp
  • Cool natural resources classes offered by Soil & Water Conservation District staff
  • Everyone gets to do archery
  • Paintball on Friday morning.

3. Sherman County Family Fair, June 6

THIS IS A DRUG AND ALCOHOL FREE EVENT

June 06, 2019

4:00pm-6:00pm

Moro City Park

Free Hotdogs, chips and snow-cones

Live music by Karissa Gorham

  • Face painting
  • Bubbles
  • Pool Noddle Games
  • Body Bumpers
  • Corn Hole
  • Car Seat Safety
  • Fire Truck
  • Dental goodies
  • And more…

Questions, call Sherman County Prevention Office at 541-565-3655.


4. PleaseWearIt.com. Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns.

life-jacketHere are some more tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable time this summer/

Swimming in open water is different and more difficult than in a swimming pool. You can tire more quickly and get into trouble due to waves, current, lack of experience, exhaustion, or your abilities to swim as long as you used to have decreased. You could find yourself in a situation where you are fighting for your life. Even the best swimmers can misjudge their skills and abilities while swimming in a lake or river. Conditions can change quickly in open water, so before entering the water, please wear a life jacket. While wearing a life jacket you will not use as much energy, it will help you float, and most importantly it will be there when and if you ever really need it.

Every year several people lose their lives because they were encouraged to do something, such as swim across a lake, cove or pond, out to the nearest buoy, to retrieve a beach ball or something else that floated away or some other activity like jumping off a cliff or bridge. Your actions can have deadly consequences, so you should never encourage anyone to do these types of activities. Friends should do things like swim in designated areas and encourage each other to wear a life jacket.

While on or near the water watch out for each other at all times. It only takes 20 seconds for a child to drown and 60 seconds for an adult to drown. It is a misconception that if someone is drowning they will yell for help. Several people drown every year within 10 feet of safety because the people around them were not paying attention and did not recognize the signs of drowning. The signs of drowning can resemble someone just playing in the water. The signs include head back, mouth open gasping for air, no yelling or sound, and arms slapping the water like they are trying to climb out of the water. Properly rescuing someone should never include contact with them unless you are a trained lifeguard. Reach out to the victim with something to keep your distance or throw them something that floats to pull them to safety.

Avoid prolonged breath holding activities and games while swimming or in the water because it can lead to shallow water blackout. Shallow water blackout results from low oxygen to the brain.

A person basically “blacks out” or faints in the water. Shallow water blackout can affect anyone who is breath-holding, even physically fit swimmers. It is especially seen in competitive swimmers, snorkelers, or anyone that free-dives. It can also occur when kids or people of any age play games to see how long they can hold their breath underwater or someone that does not know how to breathe properly when swimming.

Increased water safety awareness can help ensure that you and your loved ones have fun this summer and return home safely. Always remember to wear a life jacket because it could save your life or the life of someone you love. Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns. Learn more at PleaseWearIt.com.


5. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Wyman John French (1922-1945)

flower.rose.star~ Quips from the column, These Things We Note, and Selected Editorials Published in the Sherman County Journal, 1931-1966 by Giles French, Binford & Mort, Publishers, Portland, Oregon 1966.

6-1-1945 Wyman John French (1922-1945)

”Dear Son,

”This is Memorial day. It has been three months and three days since you got that bit of shrapnel in your chest over there in Holland and died for your country.

”A lot of things have happened since then and I know with your interest in public affairs you would like to know of them, although they mean nothing to you now. The big push that started a day or two before you died was successful and Germany gave up early in May, but not until her armies and Berlin had been taken by Joe’s men.

”Had you gone on into Germany you would have seen some very shocking things, or so we are told. The Germans had treated those who disagreed with them very badly, starving them and overworking them.

”We are hearing much about it because it makes good copy – and exciting pictures – and because it fits well into the general picture that is painted for us. It strengthens the propaganda that we were fighting to end all such cruelties, or, at least, the regime that did it.

”I know that if you and Carl – who was killed ten days after you were – had felt that you were fighting to end all governments that practiced cruelty you would have had but momentary regret at the fatal results to you.

”But you didn’t feel that way. You had read too much history and knew that wars decide nothing except who shall live and who shall die. No ideology was ever destroyed by a war, but many have been strengthened thereby. You wouldn’t have fought to make the Germans or anyone else accept our ideal of democracy, for you were too liberal for that.

”I remember you saying that the young men you were going to fight against were probably about the same as you were, in that they hoped they would come out of it alive and be able to go on living at some peaceful pursuit, raising a family and making a place for them in the world. There was no hate in you. Maybe there was no hate in the fellow who shot you.

”Had you believed all the idealistic propaganda of the wartime, you would be surprised to learn the Russians are marching German prisoners back to the Ukraine to rebuild that destroyed country. For a man who has lost his life for justice and freedom and the pursuit of happiness, that would have come as a shock. We of the democratic nation are doing a fine job of not letting our left hand know what our right is doing.

”The man who sent you to war is dead, too. His end came about a month before Germany’s did. There is a conference being held in San Francisco to make up a plan for world order, but no one has a lot of confidence in it. Most people you meet think there will be another war in 20 to 25 years and that any kind of order, good or bad, would last until a new crop of people grow up – and no longer. You see, we are pretty pessimistic.

”The hills are green now, although the spring has been cold and backward; the cattle are fat and sleek and the grain is growing well since we had big rains the first of the month. There will be a good crop and big money again for the farmers. Everybody is doing well, with wages high and profits big because of the war.

”This is your first Memorial day as a memorialee instead of a memorialor. We had a program on the courthouse lawn and dedicated an honor roll with the names of all you boys on it. Those of you who have died have a place under a gold star. There will be many words said about you on future Memorial days. I do hope, and I know you would, that something will have come from your death. I know you did not expect it and neither do I. But you are never going to have to worry about it.

”Your grave over there in the low hills of Holland seems pretty far away, son, especially on this day, and your mother and I would like to be able to stand beside it a few moments and think about you.

”The high hopes we had that you had so far justified are there with you in foreign soil. The little men who yapped about the necessity of the war are quieter now as they contemplate the pictures of our overseas graveyards; the swaggering ones who glorify war will soon be in eclipse. What will persist forever and ever is the quietness, the silence of your brave young voices. What you could have done in the world will go undone and the world has lost that. It has had another lesson on might, on the value of power.

”The town is just the same. We and the neighbors go about our tasks as before. There is nothing else to do. We stay in our habits of work and play. Our pleasure that the European war is over comes from the relief that no more will be shot, not from the hope that there will be a new world to live in.

”The simple things are what interest us; life, death, food and shelter, hopes and fears. The wrangling of nations brings us misery more often than joy.

”We’ll be remembering you, son. And every day we can see you swing up the walk toward home in that long-legged stride you had. And your whistle sounds above the rattle of the job press when there is a moment of calm in the office.

”So-long, son

”Dad”


6. Self-Imposed Limits

Have you ever been faced with a challenge in life, one that really pushed you to your limits?

Most of us have. But let’s ponder a moment and ask, how did we feel when we came out on the other side? Most likely, the first thing we felt was relief. But then we probably felt stronger, tougher and more capable, as well.

If you want to develop yourself and expand your abilities, you must face and master challenges, move out of your comfort zone, and every now and then take on a little more than you are absolutely certain you can handle. Every advance made over the past millennia has happened in this exact way. Push beyond perceived limits, only to realize that those limits were self-imposed and not solid obstacles.

We can work up to this, by taking on little challenges every day. Set a goal to learn something, anything, new – every day. Part of the goal is making that something new also something completely outside of your “normal” knowledge base. Maybe the challenge is not just the knowledge itself, but the language used in the understanding of it. Nudge your mind to grow and you will find your comfort zones growing too.

It is not necessary to compete with other people in order to do this, although healthy competition can certainly help us sharpen certain skills. The really important competition goes on inside us, as we challenge our beliefs about where our limitations lie and how much we can be and do.

So, the next time life pushes you to your limits, why not look at it as an opportunity to grow? With this attitude, you’ll find it much easier to rise to the challenge and come out on top. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Oregon Farm Bureau seeks calendar photos

camera.handheldOregon Farm Bureau (OFB) invites all photography enthusiasts to enter their best images of Oregon agriculture in the annual OFB Calendar Contest.

Twelve selected photographers will have their work featured as month images in the 2020 Oregon’s Bounty Calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the production, the landscape, the enjoyment, anything that depicts the beauty, technology, culture, enjoyment, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

“Spring is a fantastic time to look for photo opportunities within Oregon agriculture,” said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. “Farmers markets are in full swing, fields are blooming, farmers are preparing for summer harvest, and young farm animals abound.”

Horizontal-format, high-resolution images — both close-ups and panoramic views — are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons.

Subject ideas include scenes from farmers markets, close-ups of ag products or crops in the field, planting and harvesting crops, panoramic scenes of farmland, people enjoying Oregon-grown ag products, portraits of farmers/ranchers/families, farm animals, state or county fairs, 4-H and FFA events, on-farm festivals, to name just a few.

Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon’s Bounty will receive a photo credit in the 2020 calendar, which is mailed to 67,000 Farm Bureau members, and copies of the calendar. Everyone who submits an image will receive a complimentary copy of the calendar ($20 value), provided they include their mailing address.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, 2019.

Photographers do not need to be Farm Bureau members to participate and there is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted. Photo specifications are at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

The state’s largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state’s family farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. The calendar is mailed to 67,000 members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year.

For more information and to see previous years of the Oregon’s Bounty Calendar, visit www.oregonfb.org/calendar.  Project contact is Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.


 

Sherman County eNews #138

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Budget Committee Meeting, May 23

  2. Sherman County 4-H News: Swine Club & Pans on Fire

  3. Express Yourself with Confidence

  4. Remember, Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns!

  5. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County World War I Casualties

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Life has its problems and the greatest enemy is he who would solve them for us. ~ Giles L. French, These Things We Note 7-23-1954


1. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Budget Committee Meeting, May 23

dollar.sign1A public meeting of the Frontier Telenet Budget Committee, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, will be held at the Gilliam County Courthouse, Circuit Court room, 221 S. Oregon St., Condon, Oregon. The meeting will take place on May 23, 2019 at 10:00 am.  The purpose of this meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive comment from the public on the budget. This is a public meeting where deliberation of the Budget Committee will take place. Any person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget Committee.

A copy of the budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after May 3, 2019 by calling (541) 793-2912 between the hours of 9:00 am and 4:00 pm for an appointment or by emailing records@frontier-telenet.org. The budget is also posted online at https://frontiertelenet.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/FY-2019-2020-Proposed-Budget-Document.pdf.


2. Sherman County 4-H News: Swine Club & Pans on Fire

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine club met on April 28th 2019. The meeting was called to order at 5:00 At this meeting everyone was there besides Allison.  The Pledge of Allegiance was led by Michael Blagg and the 4-H pledge was led by T’Sharra. At this meeting we went over presentation ideas, club sweatshirts, weigh in and we talked about the PED Virus. Cadence and Addie did advancement presentations. Our next meeting will be on May 20, 2019 at the Sherman County Extension Office. The meeting was adjourned at 5:40. Signed Bailey Coelsch

The Pans on Fire outdoor cooking club met on May 20, 2019 at 3:40pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Zach, Emma S, Emma R, Ivan, Dalton, Bailey, Haley, Savanna, Lexi, Annalise.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Dalton, 4-H pledge by Savanna.  What we did during the meeting:  We did the pledges.  The three parts of the fire triangle and “acted” like a fire.  We cooked on coals in Instant Grills.  We had groups of two for the fire.  We cut stuff for hamburgers.  Next meeting will be an outdoor cooking workshop Friday June 14 9am-noon at Deschutes Park.  Meeting adjourned at 5:00pm.  Signed Zach Banks, News Reporter


3. Express Yourself with Confidence

Have you ever heard it said that someone has “the gift of gab?” Do you believe that verbal ability is a gift – something some were born with? How easy is it for you to express yourself in words? Do you have any trouble doing it in front of a group? Do you believe that some people just have the gift of gab while others don’t – and that’s that?

The truth is, the ability to express yourself in language and the ability to speak in front of a group are learned skills, just like pretty much everything else in life. Think back for a moment. Were you encouraged to express yourself as a child? Or were you told that children should be seen and not heard? Did your teachers encourage you to talk or did they try to keep you quiet as much as possible? In other words, did you have a patient and sympathetic audience to help you learn?

Effective speaking to others or to a group is a skill that is learned, step by step. It is built on understanding the subject, experience, and on realizing that the anxiety you feel doesn’t mean you don’t have the ability, but rather that you don’t have the practice. You are at that level of Conscious Incompetence in Noel Burch’s Four Stages of Learning, moving toward Conscious Competence – putting practice to your skills.

If you’d like to improve your ability to express yourself, there is something that you can do. You can use goal-setting, mental and physical rehearsals, and positive affirmations to help. And you can begin building your confidence by taking small steps toward your goal.

Watch people who do it well and learn from them. Watching Ted Talks can provide a wealth of opportunities to learn how others approach their subject matter and their audiences. The most important thing, though, is to believe that you have enormous potential for growth in this area, if you will only act on that belief. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Remember, Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns!

life-jacketEvery year thousands of people in the United States mourn the loss of loved ones who could have survived if they had been wearing a life jacket.  The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with Safe Kids Columbia Gorge (SKCG), would like to encourage everyone to wear their life jacket this summer.

“If you don’t have a life jacket, you can borrow one from any of our life jacket loaner board locations.” says Amber Tilton, park ranger with the Corps.  Since 2012 the Corps and Safe Kids have partnered to install life jacket loaner boards along the Lower Columbia River at popular parks, boat ramps and swim beaches.  “It’s a community effort” says Tilton.  “Multiple agencies participate and the list of loaner board locations keeps growing. Drowning is preventable and by providing access to life jackets we can reduce the number of recreational fatalities, if you wear it!”

The Corps and Safe Kids Columbia Gorge would like to say thank you to all their partners in safety for hosting a loaner board at their site.  To learn more about how to keep yourself and others safe, visit www.pleasewearit.com and https://www.safekids.org/coalition/safe-kids-columbia-gorge.

Remember, Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns!

Lower Columbia River Life Jacket Loaner Board Locations

Bonneville Lock & Dam / Lake Bonneville

Bonneville Lock and Dam, Washington Shore

Managing Agency –

USACE

 

Hamilton Island

Boat Ramp

Located approximately 1 mile west of Bonneville Lock and Dam Highway 14.  Turn on to Dam Access Road, traveling west. Turn left at boat ramp signed intersection.  Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

Hood River Waterfront Park

Managing Agency –

Port of Hood River

City of Hood River

 

Swim Beach

Day Use Area by Marina

 

Located at Interstate 84, exit 63 (Hood River/City Center). Loaner board is located on Portway Avenue at the swim beach. The other loaner board is at the Port Marina Swim beach, exit 62.
Mayer State Park

Managing Agency –

Oregon State Parks

 

Boat Ramp Located at Interstate 84, exit 76. Turn North toward the river and then left to the boat ramp. Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

The Dalles Marina

Managing Agency –

Port of The Dalles

 

Boat Ramp Located at Interstate 84, exit 86 (City Center/The Dalles). Turn North toward the river. Marina is on the left. Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

The Dalles Riverfront Park

Managing Agency – North Wasco County Parks and Recreation

 

Swim Beach Located at Interstate 84, exit 86 (City Center/The Dalles). Turn North toward the river. Park is on the right. Loaner board is by the Kayak Shack.

 


The Dalles Lock & Dam/Lake Celilo

Columbia Hills State Park

Managing Agency –

Washington State Parks

Boat Ramp Located 1 mile east of the Highway 97 and Highway 14 intersection at mile marker 85. Enter park and follow main road to boat ramp. Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

Celilo Park

Managing Agency – USACE

Boat Ramp Located at Interstate 84, exit 97. Turn North toward the river. Turn left in to the park. Go to west end parking lot. Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

Heritage Landing

Managing Agency –

Oregon State Parks

 

Boat Ramp Accessible from Interstate 84, exit 97, turn south. At stop sign turn left on OR-206 E/​Celilo-Wasco Highway.  In approximately 3 miles turn right on Old Moody Road/Highway 143.  Loaner board is at the boat ramp.

 

Maryhill State Park

Managing Agency –

Washington State Parks

 

Swim Beach

Boat Ramp

Accessible from Interstate 84, exit 104. Cross Biggs Bridge at Highway 97. Just past bridge turn right at Maryhill Fruit Stand. Park is on right.  Drive to east end of the park. Loaner board is between the boat ramp and swim beach.

 

 

John Day Lock & Dam / Lake Umatilla

Giles French Park

Managing Agency –

USACE

Boat Ramp Located at Interstate 84, Exit 109.  Turn south then right. Going east toward the John Day Dam, the loaner board is located on the left, at the boat ramp.
LePage Park

Managing Agency –

USACE

Swim Beach

Boat Ramp

Located at Interstate 84, exit 114. Turn south then left just past entrance booth for the boat ramp, stay straight for the beach. Loaner boards are located next to the boat ramp and at swim beach.

 

 
Philippi Park

Managing Agency –

USACE

Swim Beach Located approximately 10 miles upstream from the mouth of the John Day River, Philippi is only accessible only by boat. Loaner board is located at the swim beach.
Plymouth Park

Managing Agency –

USACE

Boat Ramp

Swim Beach

Accessible from Interstate 84, exit 179 take Interstate 82 toward Hermiston. Take Exit 131 (Highway 14/Plymouth). Go west. Turn left on South Plymouth Road (turns to Christie Road). Turn left entering park (just past Olive Street). Loaner Boards are at the day use area swim beach and boat ramp.

 

 

Life jackets come in many styles, sizes, and colors. Choose the right one that fits you properly and make sure to wear it correctly. There is a life jacket for every kind of water activity including swimming.  One of the most comfortable life jackets for adult swimmers to wear is a manual, belt-type, inflatable life jacket. If you wear an inflatable life jacket of any kind make sure you know how it works, how to inflate it, inspect it before every use, how to rearm the CO2 cartridge, and repack it properly.


5. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County World War I Casualties 

flag.verticalWorld War I 1917-1918 – Official List: Sherman County Casualties

Names of officers and enlisted men from Oregon who lost their lives while serving in the armed forces during World War I are posted here:  http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/sherman-county-military/sherman-county-military-information-world-war-i/.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbReport: Oregon Will See More Deaths Than Births In Next Decade

Commentary: No Debate: Capitalism vs. Socialism

The Epoch Times: 7 Reasons Why the Uranium One Scandal Won’t Go Away

Brilliant Maps: The Year Women Got the Vote by Country

3 Reasons Why USDA Shouldn’t Give Special Aid to Farmers Hit by Tariffs

Reps. Scalise, Walden: The truth about ‘Medicare for all’ – Plan would make you pay for abortions

East Oregonian: Oregon Cap and trade takes significant step toward reality

Union Pacific will lay off nearly 200 in Hermiston


 

Sherman County eNews #137

CONTENTS

  1. Strong People Strength Training in Grass Valley

  2. Frontier Telenet Board of Directors Meeting, May 23

  3. Bingo & Make-Your-Own-Ice-Cream Sundae for Food Bank, May 27

  4. Grass Valley Baptist Church Spring Fling & Joni Harms Concert, June 8

  5. Sherman County Historical Society Wine Tasting & Dinner Program, June 9

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County World War I


“Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” — Marcel Proust


1. Strong People Strength Training in Grass Valley

Join us at the Grass Valley Pavilion Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 7:30 am to strengthen your bones and improve your balance and well-being. For questions call Fern Wilcox 541-980-5093 or email at sequencegulch@yahoo.com.


2. Notice. Frontier Telenet Board of Directors Meeting, May 23

Meeting Date/Time: Thursday, May 23, 2019 at 1:00 p.m. Pacific Time

Meeting Location: Gilliam County Courthouse, 221 S Oregon Street, Condon

Teleconference Dial-in: 669-900-6833 Meeting ID: 301-875-580  

REGULAR MEETING AGENDA

1.0 Call to Order; Establish Quorum; Introductions; Additions/Revisions to Agenda

2.0 Public Comment

3.0 Financial Matters

3.1 Review and Accept Monthly Financial Summaries for April 2019

3.2 Discuss Check Signing Policies

4.0 Old Business

4.1 Consider Approval of Legal Counsel Contract with Annala Carey

4.2 Discuss Request for Proposals for Telecom Counsel Services

4.3 Consider Approval of Inland Development Proposal for Independent System Audit

4.4 Weed Control Update

4.5 Cottonwood Tower Site Update

4.6 Consider Approval of FY 2018-2019 Contract Termination Notices

5.0 New Business

5.1 Discuss AOC Report Checklist & Next Steps

5.2 Discuss Request for Proposals for Management Services

5.3 Discuss Roosevelt Site Repairs & Generator

5.4 Consider Approval of Reciprocal Master Services Agreements with Inland Development

5.5 Consider Approval of Proposed Wholesale Data Transport Services with Inland Development for service to Wheeler County Schools for FY 2019-2020

5.6 Consider Approval of Proposed Wholesale Data Transport Services with Inland Development for service to Wheeler County Health Clinics for FY 2019-2020

5.7 Discuss T-Mobile Circuit

5.8 Gilliam County Fiber Project Update

6.0 Day Wireless Update

7.0 Public Comment

8.0 Adjournment

Additional Announcements:

  • With the exception of public hearings, the Frontier Board, in its sole discretion, may make changes to this agenda and/or address other matters it deems appropriate. In addition, the Frontier Board may at any time and without prior notice enter into an executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660(2).
  • The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made not less than 48 hours prior to the date/time the meeting is set to begin by contacting Judge N. Lynn Morley at 541-763-3460 or via email to info@frontier-telenet.org.

3. Bingo & Make-Your-Own-Ice-Cream Sundae for Food Bank, May 27

Come Join the Fun!

food.ice.cream

BINGO MAKE-YOUR-OWN-ICE-CREAM SUNDAE

Bingo:  $1 per card

Sundaes:  $1 (kids under 6), $3 (over 6 – adult)

Memorial Day, Monday, May 27

St. Mary Parish Hall (next door to the Wasco School Events Center)   1-3pm

Hosted by the Catholic Community of Sherman County

All proceeds to benefit the Sherman County Food Bank

Last year with your help, we were able to donate $330 to the SC Food Bank!


4. Grass Valley Baptist Church Spring Fling & Joni Harms Concert, June 8

Rescheduled Spring Fling
Joni Harms Concert
June 8 @ 6:30
It’s a family affair, babysitting provided if needed
Potluck: bring dessert and/or side dish
Invite your friends and family for a night of food, fellowship and inspiring music.
The Sherman County Cultural Coalition provided funds to help with this event.
If you have questions call 541-980-8678.


5. Sherman County Historical Society Wine Tasting & Dinner Program, June 9

Moro, OR – Please join us on Sunday, June 9th for the Sherman County Historical Society annual meeting and dinner. This event is open to the public and everyone is welcome to attend. Come tour the museum while enjoying a social hour at 4 p.m. with wine tasting and dinner registration. At 5 p.m. dinner will be served next door at the Senior Center with guest speaker Cal McDermid of the Fort Dalles Museum. Dinner is $15 per person at the door. Please call and RSVP at 541-565-3232.

The Museum is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through October. The Museum is operated by friendly volunteers with first-rate interpretive exhibits, hands-on activities, and a research genealogy library. The Sherman County’s Visitor Center is also located at the museum.

The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information, call 541-565-3232 or visit our Facebook page and website: www.shermanmuseum.org


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbNational Weather Service: Weather & Hazards Data Viewer

Will A New Energy Project Lure Eagles To Their Death?

Inland Development Corporation: Eastern Oregon Broadband

Rule change could pose financial threat to unions

SAT “Adversity Score” Isn’t What America Is About

Oregon minimum wage to increase 50 cents on July 1, 2019


7. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County World War I 

military.navySherman County Observer, Moro, Oregon, August 17, 1917:

“List of Names of Persons whose Registration Cards are in the Possession of the Local Exemption Board, in the order of Liability for Military Service, as Required by the War Registration Rules and Regulations.

[Serial Number-Name-Address-Order Number]

“258 Charles S. Forrester, Kent, 1

337 George H. Hansen, Kent, 2

275 Oscar Herman Adams, Kent, 3

126 Gilbert Tracy Davis, Grass Valley, 4

107 Andrew Dewie Ireland, Rufus, 5

373 Arthur Smith Munger, Grass Valley, 6

309 Arland Morris Coon, Grass Valley, 7

437 Charles Edgar Davis, Grass Valley, 8

43 Frank Herold Stone, Wasco, 9

420 Alexander W. McLeod, Kent, 10

433 Jim Reid, Moro, 11

10 Frank Schamel, Grass Valley, 12

140 Alex Hanley, Grass Valley, 13

432 Lewis John Sturza, Moro, 14

18 Eugene Vintin, Grass Valley, 15

182 Robert Burns Hoskinson, Moro, 16

46 Omer G. Sayrs, Moro, 17

223 Earl Leonard Mersinger, Wasco, 18

117 Aaron Sylvester Noyes, Monkland, 19

390 Amanuel T. Ramos, Wasco, 20

75 Stacy A. Wilson, Rufus, 21

280 Albert Edwin Benefiel, Klondike, 22

332 Lucius Roy Seely, Klondike 23

379 Leslie Taylor Barnett, Wasco, 24

194 John Grover Addington, Klondike, 25

298 Mearl Worley Ellis, Wasco, 26

343 Theodore Justesen, Kent, 27

15 Ralph Porter Brisbine, Moro, 28

355 William Craig Patterson, Grass Valley, 29

218 Roy Ermon Bozart, Wasco, 30

31 James Fox, Early, 31

183 Clyde Floyd Driscoll, Wasco, 32

56 James Frederick Perkins, Wasco, 33

5 James Thomas Smith, Wasco, 34

350 Marrion A. Duncan, Kent, 35

54 John Golden Barnett, Wasco, 36

440 Edgar Max Alley, Grass Valley, 37

269 John A. Schassen, Kent, 38

335 Murvil S. Stone, Moody, 39

341 James O. Minks, Grass Valley, 40

39- Arthur Dean Olds, Grass Valley, 41

353 Earl A. Barnet, Kent, 42

360 Ernest Eslinger, 43

72 Clarence A. Blagg, Grass Valley, 44

356 I. Lewis Armstrong, Grass Valley, 45

112 Thomas Wyan Ison, Wasco, 46

128 Hiram Leedy, Wasco, 47

11 Ernest Addison Manning, Wasco, 48

363 A. Conklin Buckley, Grass Valley, 49

6 Carl Adolph Happold, Klondike, 50

327 William L. Frymire, Grass Valley, 51

93 Elton Leon Alexander, Wasco, 52

345 Jasper Ray Alsup.”

More information is posted here:

http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/sherman-county-military/sherman-county-military-information-world-war-i/.


 

Sherman County eNews #136

CONTENTS

  1. 2019 National EMS Week, May 19-25

  2. Notice. Sherman County Fair Board Seeks Fair Board Secretary

  3. Notice: Sherman County Surplus Sale

  4. Notice. Biggs Service District Budget Committee Meeting, June 5

  5. Sherman County 4-H Club News: Chicken Tenders & Tiny Teaspoons

  6. Wasco County Historical Program Features French House, June 1

  7. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County Civil War Veterans


“Born in other countries, yet believing you could be happy in this, our laws acknowledge, as they should do, your right to join us in society, conforming, as I doubt not you will do, to our established rules.” —Thomas Jefferson (1801)


1. 2019 National EMS Week, May 19-25

May 19-25, 2019 is the 45th annual National EMS Week.   In 1974, President Gerald Ford authorized EMS Week to celebrate EMS practitioners and the important work they do in our nation’s communities.  Sherman County EMS is celebrating EMS Week at our May 21st meeting.

Sherman County EMS is proud to acknowledge and thank all of those who serve in our community.  We also would like to acknowledge the family members who support our EMS personnel.  Personnel miss dinners, family functions and other activities in order to answer the call of duty.   Personnel respond all time of the day and night and in all types of extreme weather conditions.

Please take the time to thank your Sherman County EMS personnel and let them know how much they are truly appreciated.


2. Notice. Sherman County Fair Board Seeks Fair Board Secretary

ShermanCoLogoJob Description – May 15, 2019

Year-round paid position, pay DOE, hours vary based on season, some evenings and weekends required.   Reports to: President, Sherman County Fair Board

Responsibilities:

  • Prepare and advertise agenda, following public meeting laws.
  • Prepare monthly financial reports to present to the Board at meetings.
  • Keep all minutes of the Fair Board and/or committees and disperse copies to necessary individuals and groups
  • Keep complete and accurate records of all proceedings and transactions in which the Board or Fair is concerned or involved in any way.
  • Issue notices, announcements or publications of or for the Fair and board.
  • Conduct correspondence, order supplies and maintain adequate records on file for all Fair dealings
  • Receive and keep complete records of all entries and awards made for premiums in all departments of the fair, except 4-H and FFA.
  • Off season events: arrange contracts, collect rent, etc. and note in monthly reports.
  • Prepare reports as may be required by Oregon Fair Association.
  • Prepare calendar of events for the year, indicating uses, revenue, dates, etc. of use of fairgrounds.
  • Year-round promotion of the fair
  • Manage fair office and hire office staff for Fair season
  • Administrative duties include answering phones, regular mailings and emails, updating and maintaining filing, provide bills to the County in a timely matter, record and report revenues and expenditures
  • Aid Fair Board in the development of the yearly budget for operations of the Fairgrounds and work with the finance director of the County.
  • Help solicit funds for the Fair.
  • Aid Board in grounds maintenance and trash removal
  • Prepare the premium book for publication

Experience & Skills:

Experience with accounting, Microsoft Word, and Excel is essential. The position requires effectiveness in financial management, excellent verbal and written communications, and working well with the public.

To Apply:

Qualified applicants should send resume and cover letter by May 31st, 2019 to:

Sherman County Fair Board

PO Box 45

Wasco, OR 97065

OR submit electronically to: shermanctyfair@hotmail.com


3. Notice. Sherman County Surplus Sale

ShermanCoLogo

Surplus for sale by Sherman County:

2000 Ford E450 Bus

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 125,490 miles

As Is Condition

VIN #: 1FDXE4553YHB96056

 

2008 Jeep Patriot

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 87,058 miles

As Is Condition: Possible Drive Train Issue

VIN #: 108FF28W18D605526

 

2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 33,980

As Is Condition

VIN #: 3A8FY68878T155104

 

2014 Dodge Charger

Auto Transmission

Mileage: ~ 99,856

As Is Condition

VIN #: 2C3CDXAT4EH158884

Sealed bids must be submitted to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039 by 5:00 pm Tuesday June 4, 2019. Bids will be opened and read aloud during County Court on Wednesday, June 5, 2019. ALL ENVELOPES AND BIDS MUST BE LABLED WITH THE ITEM YOU ARE BIDDING ON. Minimum bid for Ford Van: $2,000; Minimum bid for Jeep Patriot: $2,000; Minimum bid for PT Cruiser: $3,500; Minimum bid for Dodge Charger: $10,000. To request a viewing appointment, contact the Office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416.


4. Notice. Biggs Service District Budget Committee Meeting, June 5

A public meeting of the Budget Committee of the Biggs Service District, Sherman County, State of Oregon, to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July1, 2019 to June 30, 2020, will be held at Sherman County Court House, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon. The meeting will take place on the 5th day of June 2019 at 8:30 a.m.

The purpose of the meeting is to receive the budget message and to receive Comment from the public on the budget. A copy of the budget document may be Inspected or obtained on or after June 3, 2019, at Sherman Courthouse between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Any questions contact, Merrie von Borstel at 541-565-5052.


5. Sherman County 4-H Club News: Chicken Tenders & Tiny Teaspoons

4-H clover1The Chicken Tenders 4-H poultry club met on May 14 at 5:17pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Renan, Claire, Damian and Cohen.  Excused were Dillian and Emersyn.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Cohen, 4-H Pledge by Renan.  What we did during the meeting:  discussed Condon field trip, refurbishing cages, painting, presentations by Claire and Damian, eggs and egg life.  Next meeting will be June 6.  Meeting adjourned at 6:10pm. Signed Cali Johnson, News Reporter

The Tiny Teaspoons 4-H Club met on May 17, 2019 at 3:30 at the Cranston’s. Attending were Claire, Maddie, Addie and Savanah. Excused absence was Savanna D. Pledge of Allegiance was led by Addie and the 4-H Pledge was led by Savanah. Today was Pie Day! We made Ruffled Milk Pie, which was made out of phyllo dough. We learned how to quickly fold and wrap the phyllo dough before it dried out because it was so thin. We also learned how to mix a custard for that pie. Then we each made two Perfect Pie crusts and one pie crust we blind baked using beans. The pie crust we blind baked was for Strawberry Pie. The other pie shell we baked into was Quiche Lorraine. Our next meeting will be the end of June. Meeting was adjourned at 5:30. Signed Claire Cranston news reporter.


 6. Wasco County Historical Program Features French House, June 1

The Wasco County Historical Society presents the first of six programs in their summer series. The program will be at the historic French House at 515 Liberty Street in The Dalles on June 1, 2019 at 11a.m. The building now houses the Sweetheart Bake Shop.

The building has a long history beginning circa1865 and is named for the French Family who had the French & Company Bank for many years. History of the building will be presented by Cal McDermid and the present owner Jason Blevins.

Please RSVP to 541-478-3429 by May 28th as seating is limited. Refreshments will be available for purchase.


7. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County Civil War Veterans

flag.verticalInformation for Civil War veterans who lived in Sherman County is derived from cemetery records in Sherman County, Kent, Grass Valley, Moro, Rose, Sunrise, Wasco Methodist and Emigrant Springs, and Chris Sanders’ transcribed obituaries from the microfilmed copies of the Wasco News, Wasco News Enterprise, People’s Republic, Grass Valley Journal, Moro Bulletin, Moro Leader, Moro Observer, Sherman County Observer, and Sherman County Journal.

Other sources include the 1900 Sherman County Voters’ Register transcribed by Chris Sanders, the 1890 11th Census of Surviving Soldiers, Marines and Widows in Sherman County, and the Oregon Death Index. Monkland, Rutledge, Erskine, Klondike, Nish, McDonald, Michigan and Rosebush were small hamlets or districts in Sherman County.

The list of Civil War veterans is posted here: http://shermancountyoregon.com/sherman-county/sherman-county-military/sherman-county-civil-war/.


 

Sherman County eNews #135

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. Ready, Set, Wear It! National Safe Boating Week, May 18-24

  3. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County Military Stories & Records

  4. Stop the Negativity

  5. Original Wasco County Courthouse Program, June 1

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Like the song says: Live your life with arms wide open. Today is where your book begins. The rest is still unwritten.


1. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open SCHOOL Hours
8am-4pm Monday, Wednesday and Friday
8am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday
10am-4pm Saturday.

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

YA Art Club – Every Wednesday after school.
Grades 6-12.
When it’s over, catch the 5:00 activity bus

Family Workshop – WIND
May 31 at 6pm
Come investigate the properties of wind and air as you explore its effects on other objects.

June Book Club: A Town Called Alice by Nevil Shute – Thursday, June 27 at 6pm.


2. Ready, Set, Wear It! National Safe Boating Week, May 18-24

life-jacketLife jackets save lives! If a boater is wearing one, their chance of survival from capsizing or falling over-board will dramatically increase.

U.S. Coast Guard statistics show that drowning was the reported cause of death in four out of every five recreational boating fatalities in 2017, and that 84.5 percent of those who drowned were not wearing life jackets.

Boaters or those swimming near boats should be aware that carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible, and silent killer that clarifies another reason why wearing a life jacket is so important. Carbon monoxide can accumulate anywhere in or around your boat regardless of what type of boat you have. It is heavier than air and lighter than water, so it floats on the water’s surface. Early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include eye irritation, headache, nausea, weakness, and dizziness. One breath of carbon monoxide at the water’s surface can cause you to pass out and drown. Avoid areas where exhaust fumes may be present. Do not let anyone swim under or around the boarding platform because this silent killer could be waiting for them.


3. History Tidbits for Memorial Day: Sherman County Military Stories & Records

USAbannerMemorial Day was originally known as Decoration Day and meant to honor the Union and the Confederate soldiers who died during the American Civil War. By the 1900s it had become a day to celebrate all American soldiers who died while serving in the military. In 1967 it was legally named Memorial Day.

Sherman County honors its military service members in an exhibit, Pride, Patriotism and Anguish, in the Sherman County Historical Museum, and in stories and records published in the twice-yearly Sherman County: For The Record. The Museum is open 10-5 daily May through October and these publications are offered for sale in The Museum Store.

Sherman County: For The Record, Volume & Number

#1-2, 1983

WW I Cochran Diary

Autobiography of Giles French by Giles L. French [several parts]

#7-1, 1989

Camp Rufus, WWII by Sherry Kaseberg

#9-2, 1991

Camp Rufus, Army Legend

#10-1, 1992

Letter: Loy Cochran on the Rhine, WWI

#11-1, Spring 1993

WW II Military Experiences by Paul A. Fraser

#11-2 Fall 1993

Tsubota Family, Japan & Oregon by Isami Tsubota

World War II Memories by Lloyd Henrichs

#12-1, 1994

WWII Military Experiences by Malcolm McDermid

#12-2, 1994

WWII Air Force Experiences by Bob Boynton

#13-1, 1995

WWII Army Experiences by Glenn Virtue

WWII Seabees Experiences by Stuart Macnab

WWII Navy Experiences by Byron O. “Swede” Stark

WWII Navy Experiences by Clarence A. Young

#13-2, 1995

WWII Pacific Experiences by Tom Macnab & Helen Kelly Macnab

WW II Home Front Memories by Nell Coats Melzer

WWII Home Front Memories by Dorothy Brown Benson

WWII Letters: Don & Jacque von Borstel

WWII Navy Nurse Corps by Owietus Neal McDermid

#14-1, 1996

WWII Navy Adventures by Dan Kaseberg

WWII Navy Life of Marcus & Eilene Eslinger

WWII Leyte and Back by Chet Coats

WWII Letters Frank Sayrs by Mary von Borstel Sayrs

#14-2, 1996

Thomas Fraser, USAF by Thomas H. Fraser

WWII Air Force by Howard Conlee

#15-1, 1997

WW II, Africa & Europe by Phil O’Meara

#15-2, 1997

WWII William G. Macnab’s B-17 Collision Over the North Sea by Teresa K. Flatley

#18-1, 2000

Charlie Wilson, French Legion of Honor by Mark Fields

WWII Gordon O. Fraser by Richard Fraser

#19-1, 2001

Civil War Veterans in Sherman County by Sherry Kaseberg

History of Frank E. Brown Post No. 91, American Legion

WWI Draft Registration List, 1917

#22-1, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part One by Chris Sanders

#22-2, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part Two by Chris Sanders

#25-2 2007

WW II Stories: Conlee, Boynton, O’Meara, Fraser, Morrow, McCoy, von Borstel, Kaseberg, McClure, Macnab

WW II B-17 Collision by Teresa Flatley

#29-1 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part One by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

WWII Navy Experiences by Charles F. Decker

#29-2 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part Two by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

#30-1 2012

Navy Experiences, Memories of Easter 1966 by Doug Rhinehart

Rev. Roy Harvey and Captain Joe Harvey by Joe Harvey

#30-2 2012

WWII Merchant Marine Experiences of Ted Carlson by Susan R. Smith

#31-1 2013

Lt. Commander Gordon D. Helyer, U. S. Navy by Pat (Goodwin) Helyer

#31-2 2013

World War II Veterans Historic Highway by Dick Tobiason

#33-2 2015

Fort Lewis, New Guinea, Philippines & Japan by Robert Ziegler.


4. Stop the Negativity!

What would the world be like if there were no negativity? Do you have difficulty imagining such a place? These days, that wouldn’t be much of a surprise.

Can you imagine a world in which there was no negativity? Now, we are not talking about a world without legitimate sadness or anger. But we are talking about a world in which there were no put-downs, no belittling of ourselves or others, no withering remarks, no name calling, no free-floating hostility, no power-tripping, no insults, no bigotry or intolerance.

That’s a pretty tall order, isn’t it – even to imagine such a place? So, let’s back it up a little and try another question. Can you imagine your own life without any negativity? Maybe that’s a pretty tall order, too. So how about this: What would it be like to go through one entire day and night without any negativity?

Yes, we are talking about a 24-hour period during which you stop yourself from doing any negative thinking or behaving whatsoever. No put-downs, no sarcasm, no teasing or belittling of others or yourself. Some of you have probably done this – or tried this – before. But, it bears repeating every so often! With the onslaught of negative news on TV, radio, newspapers, blogs, social media sites, it can be pretty easy to slip into a “negativity sinkhole.”

We all can fall into the trap of negative thinking, especially if we are not watching for it. When we do look, the results are usually pretty powerful. First of all, we become aware of the amount of negative thinking we routinely do. Then, we realize that negative thinking really is something that can be brought under control, with a little practice. And finally, we experience again how good it feels when the negativity stops.

Why not try it yourself? No negative thinking for 24 hours. Why not start right now? There is no time like the present . . . and we all could probably use the break. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Original Wasco County Courthouse Program, June 1

“The Elusive Dr. Brooks, Early Physician in The Dalles” is the program taking place at the Original Wasco County Courthouse Saturday, June 1.  Sandy Bisset will present her research as part of the annual membership meeting of the Courthouse beginning at 1:30 p.m.  There is no admission charge and attendees do not have to be members.  The 1859 Courthouse is located at 410 West 2nd Place, behind the Chamber of Commerce.

The business meeting will be brief, and the program traces the life of an early local resident who was virtually forgotten until recent research recovered his story.  Dr. Charles B. Brooks arrived in The Dalles around 1860.  He practiced medicine on First Street in conjunction with druggists Polhemus Craig and the Waldron brothers.  He made calls throughout western Wasco County and at times was the contract physician for the county owned hospital.

Dr. Brooks came across the plains from Kentucky in 1853 and first settled in Jacksonville during the gold strikes and the Rogue Indian uprisings.  He left behind a collection of medical books when he came to The Dalles.  This led to a query from the Southern Oregon Historical Society for any information about the doctor and why he left his books behind.

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society took up the request, and their research is the basis for Bisset’s program.  She comments, “It turns out this very private man we had never heard of had quite an interesting life.”  Refreshments will be served, Original Courthouse membership applications will be available, and donations are appreciated.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Fact Retriever: 100 Facts About World War II 

Memorial Day: Sherman County Military Records 

Sherman County, Oregon Civil War Veterans

Historical Atlases and Maps of U.S. and States

Prager U. Discipline = Freedom


 

Sherman County eNews #134

CONTENTS

  1. National Prevention Week: PREVENTING SUICIDE

  2. May is National Heritage Preservation Month: Sherman County Sites

  3. Historical Program to Entertain at Sweetheart Bake Shop, June 1

  4. Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon’s Bounty

  5. Focused Attention

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The oldest, shortest words – Yes and No – are those which require the most thought. ~Pythagoras


1. National Prevention Week: PREVENTING SUICIDE

MYTH: Talking about suicide will lead to and encourage suicide.

TRUTH: There is a widespread stigma associated with suicide and as a result, many people are afraid to speak about it. Talking about suicide not only reduces the stigma, but also allows individuals to seek help, rethink their opinions and share their story with others. We all need to talk more about suicide. 

*NAMI.org

Myth: It’s dangerous to ask a depressed person whether they’re considering suicide.

TRUTH: You may be afraid of raising the subject of suicide with a vulnerable person, for fear that even mentioning it could inspire them to harm themselves. But the reality is that those struggling with depression may be relieved to have the opportunity to share their disturbing thoughts, including the ones about suicide, with someone else. 

*By Alice Gomstyn, 7 Suicide Myths Debunked


2. May is National Heritage Preservation Month: Sherman County Sites

sherman.map.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the Nation’s historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Park Service’s National Register of Historic Places is part of a national program to coordinate and support public and private efforts to identify, evaluate, and protect America’s historic and archaeological resources.

Sherman County sites on the National Register of Historic Places are the Columbia Southern Railroad Passenger Station and Freight Warehouse, DeMoss Springs Park, Mack Canyon Archaeological Site (federal), John and Helen Moore House (private) and Sherman County Courthouse. See the official list here: https://nationalregisterofhistoricplaces.com/or/sherman/state.html.

The Oregon Encyclopedia includes stories about three of these sites. See the Sherman County Courthouse here: https://oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/sherman_county_courthouse/#.XOAk3shKg2w.


3. Historical Program to Entertain at Sweetheart Bake Shop, June 1

Wasco County Historical Society invites the public to the Sweetheart Bake Shop, 515 Liberty St., The Dalles on Saturday, June 1st, for a 11:00 talk on the history of the building.  Formerly the Edward French House, originally dating from circa 1865, acquired by the French Family in 1892, it was renovated by the family in the Italianate style in circa 1900. The presentation will be by current owner, Jason Blevens, and former owner, historian Cal McDermid.  Please RSVP to 541-478-3429 by May 28th as seating space is limited. Refreshments will be available for purchase.


4. Find farm stands & u-picks with Oregon’s Bounty

food.peasUse a smartphone to easily find farm stands, u-pick fields, on-farm events with Oregon’s Bounty at http://www.OregonFB.org.

Strawberries, asparagus, rhubarb, mushrooms, salad greens — along with bedding plants, flowering baskets, and fresh-cut flowers — are just a few favorites of Oregon’s agricultural bounty in spring.

But outside of the local farmers market, where can you buy these things directly from a farm or ranch?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is. But what about roadside farm stands, u-pick fields, and on-farm events out in rural areas? That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at http://www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Oregon’s Bounty allows visitors to do keyword searches for specific agriculture products — such as blueberries, cucumbers, honey, or eggs — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state. Visitors can also do a keyword search for “u-pick” or “events” to find farms that offer those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of agriculture in this great state, we can buy an enormous variety of seasonal fruits, vegetables, flowers, foliage, meat, and nuts directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members who are proud to share what they’ve raised with the public,” said Moss. “Spring is a great time to take a trip into the beautiful countryside and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”


5. Focused Attention

Do you think happy people are blind to reality? Or, do you think they see things that the rest of us miss?

It is possible that the answer may include a little of both, but it is also possible, in the final analysis, that people are happy because they make up their minds to be. This comment needs a bit of explanation.

Most happy people aren’t blind to the pain in the world, but because they have chosen to be happy, they don’t focus their attention on the pain. They don’t let the cruelty and injustices that are undeniably present in the world rob them of the pleasures and beauty that are also undeniably here.

And, it’s entirely possible that happy people can see things that others don’t, because their power of paying attention is enormous. Your attention, when you really focus it, is a lot like a searchlight. When you focus on beauty, you’re simply going to see more beauty than other people do.

The same thing happens when you focus on a problem: you see it everywhere you look, even though people around you may need to have it pointed out to them. The challenge is using that laser-like focus to find solutions. Once we do focus our attention on finding solutions, we find possibilities everywhere.

Where is your attention focused these days? Do you see mostly problems or solutions? Are you surrounded by people you enjoy and appreciate or are you surrounded by people who give you nothing but trouble? Does life send you an unending cavalcade of pleasures or a litany of pain? And finally, how could changing what you focus your attention on change the results you are getting? ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkSpilyay Tymoo, Warm Springs News, May 8, 2019

The Oregon Encyclopedia: Sherman County Courthouse

Commentary: MAGA vs. the U.S. Chamber of Commerce

Order Your Free Travel Oregon Visitor Guide

7 Wonders of Oregon: Painted Hills

Oregon OKs largest expansion of federal free lunch program

Oregon bill to shut down unlicensed food operators headed to governor

Editorial: Don’t hamstring Oregon’s enterprise zones

Seed experts from around world gather in Oregon

Trump’s Plan To Reform Legal Immigration Is Long Overdue

College Board To Juke SAT Test Scores To Reflect Student ‘Privilege’