Sherman County eNews #118

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Sherman County Community Transit Begins Weekly Just Shopping Trip, May 8

  2. Notice. Sherman County Education Foundation Board Meeting, May 15

  3. Sherman County Middle School Track & Field Schedule Update, May 10

  4. The Responsibility Coin

  5. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

  6. Salmon & Steelhead Passage Through Mainstem Hydrosystem of Columbia River Basin

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Conservation, as I use the term, does not mean non-use or non-development. It does not mean tying up the natural resources of the states. It means the utilization of these resources under such regulation and control as will prevent waste, extravagance, and monopoly; but at the same time, not merely promoting, but encouraging such use and development as will serve the interests of the people generally.”  ~ Theodore Roosevelt, 1910


1. Notice. Sherman County Community Transit Begins Weekly Just Shopping Trip, May 8

ShermanCoLogoSherman County’s Community Transit begins new weekly Just Shopping trip with a stop for lunch starting Tuesday, May 8th.

Every Tuesday the bus will leave the Senior Center in Moro at 9:30 a.m. and return at 2:30 p.m.  This will be a casual and comfortable ride. To reserve your seat call 541-565-3553. Space is limited.


2. Notice. Sherman County Education Foundation Board Meeting, May 15

The Sherman County Education Foundation will be holding their monthly board meeting on May 15th in the Sherman County Library Program Room at 6pm. Everyone is welcome to attend.


3. Sherman County Middle School Track & Field Schedule Update, May 10

The MS track meet on Friday May 10 has been pushed back to 12:30 due to outdoor school. The field events will begin at 12:30 and the track events at 2:30.


4. The Responsibility Coin

Just about everyone agrees that it’s a good thing to be responsible, but not everyone agrees about what “responsibility” means. Are you a responsible person? What does it mean to you to be responsible? Does it mean doing what is expected of you? Keeping your promises? Being a good provider?

All of these things are important, but being responsible means more than that. In fact, when it comes right down to it, we are responsible for absolutely everything in our lives – all of the successes, and all of the failures, too.

If you don’t accept responsibility for your life, you are likely to just shrug off your failures thinking you have nothing to learn from them. If you don’t take full responsibility for your life, you will never be happy, because no one can make you happy but you.

You might wonder, then, if you’re responsible for illness and adversity, too. Well, you are certainly not responsible for earthquakes or the drunk driver who sideswipes your car. But you are, without a doubt, responsible for how you respond to these things – and whether or not you choose to use them to learn from and to grow.

Taking responsibility for your life gives you the freedom to take risks and make mistakes, and that’s a great feeling. Of course, it also means you need to be prepared to take the consequences of your risks and mistakes. There are two sides to the responsibility coin, and the other side is accountability.

It is difficult to grow very much at all if you are not willing to do these things. But if you are willing, there really is no limit to how far you can go. ~The Pacific Institute


5. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Thursday, May 2nd @ the Kent Baptist Church.  Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting; come and join in when you can get there. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


6. Salmon & Steelhead Passage Through Mainstem Hydrosystem of Columbia River Basin

The Fish Passage Center provides technical assistance and information to fish and wildlife agencies and tribes, in particular, and the public in general, on matters related to juvenile and adult salmon and steelhead passage through the mainstem hydrosystem in the Columbia River Basin.

The Fish Passage Center (FPC) coordinates the Smolt Monitoring Program (SMP), and data from this program is intended to provide the information basis for federal, state and tribal recommendations for anadromous fish passage in the Federal Columbia River Hydro-electric System (FCRPS). The FPC web site provides data on salmon, steelhead, bull trout, and lamprey throughout the FCRPS. In addition to SMP data, The FPC web site provides data and analysis for the Gas Bubble Trauma (GBT) program, the Comparative Survival Study (CSS), adult migration, environmental conditions, hydrosystem operations, hatchery releases, and spawning and emergence for certain groups of anadromous fish.

Select from the menu on the left http://www.fpc.org/.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbMalheur Enterprise: Oregon House backs new business tax, school spending on partisan vote

East Oregonian: Our view | Student success committee flunks big test

OPB: Effort To End ‘Prison Gerrymandering’ Would Alter Oregon’s Political Map

Space Weather, Asteroids, Fireballs & Radiation

Fact Check. What the Mueller Report Says About Obstruction

Do Americans Know How Much Trouble They’re In?

U.S. Exports for Most Major Meat Commodities Grew in 2018

USDA Economic Research Service

The Beauty of Pollination

Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission