Sherman County eNews #117

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

  2. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, May 8

  3. Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive, May 11

  4. Emotional Listening

  5. And Then It Is Winter

  6. Sherman County History Tidbits: Columbia Southern Railway


Practice the pause.

Pause before judging.

Pause before assuming.

Pause before accusing.

Pause whenever you’re about to react harshly and

you’ll avoid doing and saying things you’ll later regret. ~ Loi Deschene.


1. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

The All County Prayer Meeting is Thursday, May 2nd @ the Kent Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting; come and join in when you can get there. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


2. Notice. Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, Feb. 8

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on May 8th, 2019. The public is welcome to attend! 6 p.m. at the WSEC (903 Barnett St.).


3. Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive, May 11

On Saturday May 11, letter carriers will be doing more than just dropping off the mail; they’ll also be collecting food for the annual Stamp Out Hunger Food Drive. Hosted by the National Association of Letter Carriers, Stamp Out Hunger takes place around the country and is the largest single-day food drive.

You can take part by collecting nonperishable food items and leaving them in a bag near the mailbox early on May 11. A letter carrier or volunteer will pick up the donation and ensure it gets to Oregon Food Bank. Last year, one million pounds of food was collected in Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Our goal this year is to bring in another one million pounds. All donated food stays in the community where it was collected.

“Six days a week, our letter carriers are out in the community, traveling door to door. They see the subtle changes in income and know which house is struggling to put food on the table,” says CEO Susannah Morgan. “We’re proud to work together again this year to nourish and care for every neighbor.”

A list of most wanted foods is available at oregonfoodbank.org/mostwanted. Donations not picked up by letter carriers can be dropped off at any post office by Wednesday, May 15. Financial donations can be made online at oregonfoodbank.org/NALC

The Stamp Out Hunger food drive was created in 1993 by the National Association of Letter Carriers to encourage communities to come together in an effort to stock the shelves of food banks nationwide. Along with the National Rural Letter Carriers Association, the National Association of Letter Carriers has collected more than one billion pounds of food nationally since the drive’s inception.

“I’ve always strived to help everyone else in need through my life,” says Abe RedCloud, Letter Carrier and Oregon Coordinator, Stamp Out Hunger. “There are a lot of people that need help in the world, and this event helps millions of people in need of an essential item to live, food. Every time I see a house with a bag of food for me to pick up, I get super excited and say thank you to them the next time I see them. I’m super proud to be helping in this event every year.”

The food drive is made possible by Delta Fire and your local letter carriers, the U.S. Postal Service, Fred Meyer, AWS Elemental, UFCW Local 555 along with many dedicated volunteers and community organizations.  https://vimeo.com/331847039

About Oregon Food Bank
Oregon Food Bank works to eliminate hunger and its root causes… because no one should be hungry. Oregon Food Bank believes that hunger starves the human spirit, that communities thrive when people are nourished, and that everyone deserves healthy and fresh food. Oregon Food Bank helps feed the human spirit of 260,000 people every month through a food distribution network of 21 regional food banks serving Oregon and Clark County, Washington. Oregon Food Bank also leads statewide efforts to increase resources for hungry families and to eliminate the root causes of hunger through public policy, local food systems work, nutrition and garden education, health care screening and innovative programming. Find out how to feed the human spirit at oregonfoodbank.org.


4. Emotional Listening

Do you have trouble understanding why your kids do what they do? Or why your mate refuses to listen to you? Are there days when you feel like you are talking to a brick wall? Here is a suggestion to ponder, that just might help.

If you’d like to see your relationships change for the better, there is something you can do that is almost guaranteed to help. It doesn’t matter whether it’s a teenager who doesn’t talk to you anymore, a spouse who just won’t listen, a co-worker who never asks you to lunch, or someone at the complete opposite end of the political spectrum from you.

This technique will improve any relationship, and it’s not hard to do, once you get the hang of it. It is listening – but not ordinary listening. We’re talking about listening while you are really trying to understand where the other person is coming from. It is a bit of an art, but one that we all have the talent for.

This means that we want to refrain from judging what they have to say, reacting to it, or figuring out what you’re going to say when it’s your turn. You’re not hearing just the parts that interest you, and you’re not just listening with your ears and mind – you are listening with your heart. You’re trying to see the world as they see it, to understand what it is they’re feeling and to put yourself in their shoes.

It is a powerful experience to be heard in this way. It creates a bond between people – a bond of genuine human connection. Try it for a day or two. Ask the people in your life to talk to you, but don’t jump in and try to fix their problems, don’t give advice, and don’t make judgments. Just ask questions and pay 100 percent attention until you think you really understand. Then check it out to see if you do. It’s a good bet that you will be surprised at just how much this kind of emotional listening can do for your relationships. ~The Pacific Institute


5. And Then It Is Winter

You know time has a way of moving quickly and catching you unaware of the passing years.  It seems like yesterday that I was young, just married, and embarking on my new life with my mate. Yet in a way, it seems like eons ago, and I wonder where all those years went.

I know that I lived them all.  I have glimpses of how it was back then and of all my hopes and dreams.  But, here it is… the winter of my life, and it catches me by surprise… How did I get here so fast? Where did the years go and where did my youth go? I remember well seeing older people through the years and thinking that those “older people” were years away from me and that winter was so far off that I could not fathom it or imagine fully what it would be like.

But, here it is…my friends are retired and getting grey… they move slower and I see an older person in myself now  Some are in better and some worse shape than me… but, I see the great change… Not like the ones that I remember who were young and vibrant…but, like me, their age is beginning to show and we are now those older folks that we used to see and never thought we’d be.

Each day now, I find that just getting a shower is a real target for the day!  And taking a nap is not a treat anymore… it’s mandatory! Because if I don’t on my own free will… I just fall asleep where I sit!

And so… now I enter this new season of my life unprepared for all the aches and pains and the loss of strength and ability to go and do things that I wish I had done but never did!!  But, at least I know, that though the winter has come, and I’m not sure how long it will last.. this I know, that when it’s over on this earth… it’s over. A new adventure will begin!

Yes, I have regrets.  There are things I wish I hadn’t done… things I should have done, but indeed, there are also many things I’m happy to have done.  It’s all in a lifetime.

If you’re not in your winter yet.. let me remind you, that it will be here faster than you think.  So, whatever you would like to accomplish in your life, please do it quickly!  Don’t put things off too long!!  Life goes by quickly.  So, do what you can TODAY, as you can never be sure whether this is your winter or not!

You have no promise that you will see all the seasons of your life. so, LIVE FOR TODAY and say all the things that you want your loved ones to remember.. and hope that they appreciate and love you for all the things that you have done for them in all the years past!!

Life is a GIFT to you.  The way you live your life is your gift to those who come after.  Make it a fantastic one.  ~Unattributed


6. Sherman County History Tidbits: Columbia Southern Railway

Incorporated in 1894, the Columbia Southern Railway began surveys up Spanish Hollow from Biggs for the purpose of building a rail line Biggs to Prineville. The grade, in what was called Biggs Canyon, was the steepest ten miles in the Union Pacific system. The track reached Wasco in October 1897, Moro in December 1898, Grass Valley in 1900, Kent in May 1901 and Shaniko in 1901. Kent was relocated to a site next to the railroad in 1900, and by then there were 31 wheat warehouses along the Columbia Southern track in Sherman County. The line was sold to E.H. Harriman, owner of the Oregon Rail and Navigation Company in 1902, but locals called it the Shaniko Line or Shaniko Branch. Rail service Kent to Shaniko was discontinued in 1943. A flood during Christmas week in 1964 scoured out Spanish Hollow taking rails and ties with it. The rail damage was so great it was not economical to rebuild the line. ~Giles French, The Golden Land; Sherman County Atlas 1934; Illustrated History of Central Oregon, 1905; Due and Rush, Roads and Rails South from the Columbia; Due and French, Rails to the Mid-Columbia Wheatlands; The Railway Age Gazette, 1908, 1910, 1912.


 

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