Sherman County eNews #101

CONTENTS

  1. History Tidbits: Baby Cyclone Reported by the Condon Globe & Times, April 15, 1925

  2. P.S. Friday Classifieds

  3. Oregon Retired Educators to Convene in Hood River, May 7

  4. Letter to the Editor: Sherman County Victim Assistance Program

  5. Taking a Look at NO

  6. Sherman County History Tidbits: Camp Sherman

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. History Tidbits: Baby Cyclone Reported by the Condon Globe & Times, April 15, 1925

On this day, April 15, 1925, in Condon, Oregon, what was tabbed as a baby cyclone by the Condon Globe and Times, swept through Condon, wrecking the county machinery warehouse, tearing down the Washington Lumber Company Warehouse, and taking the tops off of autos. Altogether, the tornado did 10,000 dollars in damage during its 6 mile path. ~U S National Weather Service, Pendleton, Oregon 4/15/2019


2. P.S. Friday Classifieds

CLERK/RECORDER. The City of Wasco is accepting applications for the position of Clerk/Recorder. Applicants must be able to deal courteously with the public, and have experience in office management. 24-34 hours per week/$18 per hour DOQ, plus benefits. Complete job description and application packets will be available at Wasco City Hall between the hours of 9:00am and noon M-TH. Deadline to submit a completed application is noon on 4/23/2019. For further information, contact Wasco City Hall at 541-442-5515.


3. Oregon Retired Educators to Convene in Hood River, May 7

Unit 20, Oregon Retired Educators, will be hosting the OREA State Convention May 6th, 7th in Hood River.  Featuring the Gorge will be presenters Darryl Lloyd, photographer-journalist and Kevin Gorman, Executive Director of the Friends of the Gorge. Business will include welcomes, election of officers, scholarship recipients, awards, entertainment, remembrances, door prizes and local tours. The 1912 Criterion School, which had been moved in the 1970s from South Wasco County to the Oregon State Fairgrounds, will also be recognized. Inquiries may be directed to 541-331-3282 or 541-354-1002.


4. Letter to the Editor: Sherman County Victim Assistance Program

Each generation looks to young people to create a brighter future that encourages safe and engaging communities. This hope begins with healthy children being supported by their families, caregivers, teachers, and community. Unfortunately, according to a 2015 National Institutes of Health publication, more than 2/3 of children 17 or younger were either victims or witnesses of violence in the last year. There are multiple ways that children may become victims of crime, ranging from bullying and harassment at school to dating violence and sexual assault to child abuse and exposure to domestic violence. Also, while it isn’t addressed as frequently, children suffer from the effects of the ongoing opioid crisis, too. This type of trauma, if left unaddressed, can have serious consequences on a child’s health, ability to succeed in school, and capability to positively contribute to the community.

In a different National Institutes of Health study on violence in the United States, researchers found about 30 percent of children reported that they have been bullied in school or in their communities, and 14 percent suffered from mistreatment by a parent or caregiver at home. Roughly 11 percent of children reported exposure to more than five types of violence, and while all kinds of trauma may affect a child long-term, children who experience poly-victimization are more likely to suffer from serious, lasting effects of violence. These are only a few ways children experience victimization in their own homes and communities. However, there is hope. Children are resilient, and with the proper support from the adults in their communities, children can avoid lasting damage from the violence they have experienced or witnessed.

Visit the Linking Systems of Care website or reach out to Sherman County Victim Assistance Program to learn how to change social norms, support child victims, and positively contribute to your community.

Katie Woodruff

Sherman County Victim Assistance Program

Moro, Oregon


5. Taking a Look at NO

How good are you at handling rejection? If your answer is, “Not good at all,” or “Not very,” you will want to pay special attention to the following.

One of the most powerful words in any language is the word that means, “No.” It is typically used to stop something, whether it is an action (a small child about to touch a hot burner on the stove) or a conversation. Often, it’s one of the first words children learn to speak. Research has shown that our negative vocabulary is significantly larger than our positive vocabulary.

Many adults can’t handle hearing it, and as a result of their fear of “No,” they limit themselves in just about every way possible. How many times have you wanted to talk to someone, but decided not to do it because they might respond negatively? How many jobs have you not tried for because you were afraid they wouldn’t hire you? How many times have you kept yourself from growing because you believed you might fail?

All of these self-created limits are the result of fear of rejection – fear of that little word, “No.”

But there are no real successes without rejection. Ask anyone, who has ever succeeded in life, how many times they failed, how many times someone said, “No way” to them, and how many times they kept right on going. You see, the more rejection you encounter, the stronger you will become – if you’re on the road to success. You look at setbacks as temporary and you bounce back every time you take a negative hit.

So, the next time you run into that great big roadblock known as, “No,” ask yourself: “What can I learn from this?” You will move further forward if you can refrain from telling yourself that you can’t learn anything, and it’s time to quit. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Sherman County History Tidbits: Camp Sherman

Two national events felt locally appear to have motivated a group of Sherman County citizens to be among the nation’s first summer home owners in the national forests. Mass production of automobiles and the good roads movement, along with dramatic increases in wheat prices 1914-1917, gave Sherman countians the affluence to build second homes in the forest. They built the first cabins at Camp Sherman on the Metolius River in 1916. Camp Sherman was mentioned in The Observer in 1917. ~Sherman County: For The Record #6-1, 1988.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3 Northwest Cherry Festival, The Dalles, April 26-28

Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife News Releases

Most of the $33 Billion in Remittances to Mexico Flow Via U.S. Govt. Banking Program

U.S. Department of State Freedom of Information Act Reading Room

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

USA Watchdog

Oregon Watchdog | Oregon Taxpayers Association

That Oregon Life. 4 Underwater Lost Cities

1914 Maps of Oregon Counties