Sherman County eNews #115

CONTENTS

  1. Rep.AnnaWilliams@Oregonlegislature.gov Reports

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

  3. Cleaning Hurt Out of the Mental Attic

  4. Volunteers Drive Organizations Serving Sherman County 

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  6. Sherman County History Tidbits: DeMoss Springs Post Office

  7. Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery Opens May 1


The Holocaust illustrates the consequences of prejudice, racism and stereotyping on a society. It forces us to examine the responsibilities of citizenship and confronts the powerful ramifications of indifference and inaction. ~ Tim Holden


1. Rep.AnnaWilliams@Oregonlegislature.gov Reports

You may be wondering how many bills have passed this session and what the vote count looks like, so here is a breakdown as of mid-April:
Total bills passed: 171
Bills that have passed with only Democratic votes: 3
Bipartisan Votes (at least 5 Republican votes): 165
Unanimous Votes: 109
Bills introduced by a Committee: 82
Bills w/ only Democratic Sponsors: 36
Bills w/ at least one Republican Chief Sponsor: 39.


2. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

The All County Prayer Meeting is Thursday, May 2nd @ the Kent Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting; come and join in when you can get there. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


3. Cleaning Hurt Out of the Mental Attic

Let’s do a little follow-up, regarding this week’s “Mental Housekeeping” message. A valid question has been asked: “How do you clean out all the hurts and still go about this mental housekeeping?” It’s a fair question that deserves an answer.

Hurts are the most difficult things to get over, because of the emotional imprint we add to the experience, and then store that memory in our subconscious. Each time we remember the incident or situation, we also recall the pain and hurt, which just solidifies the memory. Neural research now shows that we slightly change our memories when we revisit them, providing the opportunity to intensify those hurts. Some people spend their entire lives purposely remembering old hurts, and now we know that they add another layer before putting the memory “away” until the next re-visit.

It takes a fair amount of work to put those emotional memories into a different perspective, and a lot of that work is self-reflection. Asking yourself the questions, “What else might have been going on, that I might have missed?” and “What was it inside of me that caused me to react in the way I did?”  Sometimes, those self-answers are more revealing than we expect.

The good news is that, while we are taking the time to answer these questions (and any others that come to mind during these times of self-reflection), we are cleaning out old mental cobwebs, dusting off even older memories that we may have buried away, under other memories, and illuminating our mental attics.

Self-reflection is like uncovering windows and throwing them open, to let sunlight and fresh air into closed spaces. The light allows us to “see” each memory in full without any shadows, and the fresh “breezes” give us a chance to “blow away the dust” and change our perspective.

What we decide to keep or throw away is up to each of us. Sometimes, an altered perspective allows us to toss the hurt or the pain, and create a new memory of a new lesson learned. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Volunteers Drive Organizations Serving Sherman County  

Volunteer SmileThe number of organizations, boards and committees, and the participation involved, desired or required, according to statute, funding source, and local culture, first tracked about 2002 at 144 and currently about 123, reflects a shrinking population and volunteer pool.

According to the 2010 census, Sherman County lost 8 percent of its population (about 150 people). Others posted losses – Baker, Malheur, Harney, Wallowa, Gilliam, Grant and Wheeler. The census bureau does not forecast a growing population for Sherman County.

Volunteers are essential for the operation of our churches, cities, county, special districts, regional/state/federal governments and schools.

Volunteers are the engines for our youth programs: 4-H, Little League, Scouts, CASA, day care, pre-school, Junior Hoops, and school programs, athletics and Booster Club.

Volunteers are important representatives for the agricultural community: Columbia Basin Experiment Station in Moro, Oregon Wheat Growers League, Oregon Wheat Commission, Oregon Cattlemen’s Association, North Central Livestock Association, Mid Columbia Producers (a cooperative), Farm Bureau and local representation for federal and state agricultural programs.

Volunteers are vital for cultural and charitable groups: Scholarship Association, Sherman County Cultural Coalition, Sherman County Athletic Foundation, Grass Valley Pavilion, cemeteries, Sherman County Historical Society/Museum, Sherman County Fair, Sherman Development League and Sherman County Education Foundation.

Volunteer! Just ask how you can help!


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talk$2 billion school funding, reform bill goes to Oregon House floor vote

The Best Educational Toys to Have in Your Kids’ Playroom

Claremont Institute | Recovering the American Idea

Classic Works of Children’s Books Published More Than 100 Years Ago Now Online at the Library of Congress

Vaccination-strengthening bill makes it to House floor for full vote

Project 21 – Black Leadership Network

Prager U – Who are the racists?

Commentary: The Carbon Tax Fantasy


6. Sherman County History Tidbits: DeMoss Springs Post Offic

pencil.spiralA farm post office on the route of the Grant-Wasco-Moro stage line, mail was delivered daily to DeMoss Post Office, three miles N of Moro. Postal patrons in 1898 included Allison, Belchee, Cochran, Corson, DeMoss, Davis, Dougherty, Foss, Herrin, Hilderbrand, Hockman, Laughter, McDermid, Mathias, Miller, Mitchell, Newman, Nixon, Pickard, Seiders, Stockings, Strachan, Webb, Whitelock, Wikoff and Woods. Occupations of the residents included teacher, farmer, meat market, teamster, hotel, blacksmith, wagon maker, carpenter and music teacher. ~Wasco and Sherman County Directory 1898, Portland Directory Company, Portland, Oregon.


7. Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery Opens May 1

fishing.rod.reel

Portland, Ore. – Help save salmon and steelhead and make money, too.

Wednesday, May 1, marks the opening of this year’s Northern Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery in the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The program pays registered anglers $5 to $8 for each pikeminnow that is at least nine inches long. The more fish an angler catches, the more each pikeminnow is worth. And some fish have an even bigger payout. State fish and wildlife biologists have released up to 1,000 specially tagged northern pikeminnow into the Columbia and Snake rivers, each worth $500. Last year the top fisherman in the program earned more than $71,000 in just five months of fishing.

Northern pikeminnow are voracious eaters, consuming millions of young salmon and steelhead each year. Since 1990, anglers paid through the program have removed nearly 5 million pikeminnow from the Columbia and Snake rivers. The program has reduced predation from pikeminnow on young salmon and steelhead by approximately 40% since it began.

The 2019 Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery begins Wednesday and is scheduled to run through Sept. 30.

Northern pikeminnow experts say The Dalles is one of the best places to fish early in the season. Last season that station registered 22,464 pikeminnow, one of the highest registration rates among the 19 stations on the rivers.

The fishery website, www.pikeminnow.org, has details on how to register for the program and applicable state fishing regulations. Anglers will also find resources on the site to help boost their fishing game, including maps, how-to videos and free fishing clinics.

The program is funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and administered by the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission in cooperation with the Washington and Oregon departments of fish and wildlife. For more information about the 2019 Pikeminnow Sport Reward Fishery visit www.pikeminnow.org, or call 800-858-9015.


 

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Sherman County eNews #114

CONTENTS

  1. Wanted: Outdoor Survival Class Instructor for 4-H Camp, June 20

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

  3. Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting, May 4

  4. Notice. Sherman County Request for Proposals

  5. Caregiver Job Fair, June 18

  6. Sherman County 4-H News Meeting Notes: Swine Club & The Goatees

  7. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

  8. Sherman County History Tidbits: The Observer Notes 1911-1912


You will teach them to fly, but they will not fly your flight.

You will teach them to dream, but they will not dream your dream.

You will teach them to live, but they will not live your life.

Nevertheless, in every flight, in every life, in every dream,

the print of the way you taught will always remain.

~Mother Teresa of Calcutta


1. Wanted: Outdoor Survival Class Instructor for 4-H Camp, June 20

Outdoor survival class instructor wanted for our teen staff at Sherman County 4-H camp Thursday June 20. Do you have a special skill or interest you’d like to share with our counselors? We need YOU for a 90 minute class in the morning then a 90 minute class in the afternoon. Share your life skills with our young adults. Contact Cindy at the Sherman Extension Office 541-565-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu


2. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Thursday, May 2nd @ the Kent Baptist Church.  Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting; come and join in when you can get there. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


3. Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting, May 4

The Annual Meeting of the Wasco County Pioneer Association
Saturday May 4, 2019
The Fort Dalles Readiness Center
402 East Scenic The Dalles, Oregon 97058
On the Columbia Gorge Community College Campus (East of Sorosis Park)

Doors open and Registration begins at 9:30
Come early to view the Historic Picture Boards
Lunch is at 11:30am
Annual Meeting and Program to follow lunch at 1:00pm

Annual Dues: $12.50
Lunch is $15.00
The Public is welcome at this meeting.

The Oregon Territorial Legislature created Old Wasco County on January 11, 1854. The Dalles was designated the county seat with the creation of the county, and has been its only location.  At the time of its creation old Wasco County was the largest county in the United States, consisting of 130,000 square miles that stretched from the Cascades to the Rocky Mountains.

When Dakota Territory (including present-day Wyoming) was created in 1861, Idaho Territory in 1863, and Montana Territory in 1864, the parts of Old Wasco County east of the present Oregon boundaries were ceded to those territories.  Other counties were formed – Baker in 1862, Umatilla in 1862, Grant in 1864, Lake in 1874, Crook in 1882, Morrow in 1884, Gilliam in 1885, Sherman in 1889, Hood River in 1908 and Jefferson in 1914.

The Wasco County Pioneer Association Celebrates Old Wasco County every year on the first Saturday of May!


4. Notice. Sherman County Request for Proposals

SHERMAN COUNTY, OREGON

INVITATION TO SUBMIT BID PROPOSALS

Outside Plant Fiber Construction

ShermanCoLogo 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Sherman County, through its County Court, will open sealed bids for the Sherman County Outside Plant Fiber Construction project. Sealed bids will be received until June 3rd, 2019 at 3:00 p.m. according to the official clock located in the Sherman County Administrative Office. Each bid must be enclosed in a sealed envelope and delivered on or before the deadline to the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  Final award will be announced during County Court at 9:00 a.m. on June 5th, 2019.

A Mandatory Pre-Bid Meeting will be held on May 13th, 2019 at 10:00 a.m. at the Rufus City Hall, located at 304 W. 2nd Street, Rufus, Oregon 97050. A map and directions to the site are included in the Bidder’s Proposed packet.

Complete bidding documents may be obtained from the Sherman County Administrative Office, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon 97039. Phone: 541-565-3416, or email requests to: countycourt@shermancounty.net.

Kayla von Borstel, Sherman County Administrative Assistant, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, 541-565-3416, countycourt@shermancounty.net is designated as the person to whom all inquiries regarding the project, this Invitation, and/or the Bidder’s Proposal must be directed.

Sherman County reserves the right to accept the bid and award the contract to the lowest responsible bidder which is in the best interests of the County, to postpone the acceptance of bids received and the award of the contract for a period not to exceed thirty (30) days, or to reject any and all bids received and further advertise for bids.

No bids shall be received or considered by the County unless the bidder is registered with the Construction Contractor’s Board and/or licensed by the State Landscape Contractor’s Board as required by ORS 671.530. The bidder must identify whether it is a resident bidder under ORS 279C.365(h).

This is a public work contract subject to ORS 279C.800 to 279C.870 or if applicable, the federal prevailing rate of wage required under the Davis-Bacon Act (40 USC 276(a)).


5. Caregiver Job Fair, June 18

bench.guysCaregiver Job Fair

Tuesday June 18th 10:00AM to 6:00PM

“Be A Rising Star”
Start your own business as an Adult Foster Home Licensee,
An AFH Caregiver or a Homecare Worker.
Applications Available, Venders, Information,
Guidance and Support. Refreshments Provided.

3641 Klindt Drive, The Dalles
DHS/Aging and People with Disabilities
Call Yulanda 541-506-3536.


6. Sherman County 4-H News Meeting Notes: Swine Club & The Goatees

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine Club met on April 1, 2019. The meeting was called to order at 6:00pm.  At this meeting Austin, Coral, Dillan, T’Sharra, Addie, Bailey, Cadence, Savannah, Michael, Allison, Ellery and Quinton were all attending. We started the meeting with Allison leading the 4-H Pledge and Savannah leading the Pledge of Allegiance. At this time we have $1042.20.  We talked about presentations, county medals, advancements and 4-H camp on June 19th– 21st. We also talked about when weigh in is and what the rules. At this meeting Brennah said, “If any of you guys can get your pig to sit down in the sale ring with a command you will get a prize!” The meeting was adjourned at 6:40pm.  Reporter Bailey Coelsch.

The Goatees 4-H Club met on April 28, 2019 at 4pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were:  Elijah, Antone, Michael, Calvin, Clay, Emersyn, Austin, Logan, Alexis, Coral, Taylor, Kiara, Kaelex, T’Sharra, Bailee, Wyatt, Mercedez.  Correction to last meeting:  Kiara Peters was present.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Michael, 4-H Pledge by Coral.  We talked about what type of goat to look for and what it needs to have on it.  Basically, it’s how it’s shaped, how they walk, etc.  Two people are doing a report on what their goat needs to have.  Next meeting will be May 14 at 4:30pm  Meeting adjourned at 4:35pm.  Signed T’Sharra Lanthorn, News Reporter


7. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of last week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories.

1008: Senate Bill that would no longer automatically refer juveniles accused of committing Measure 11 crimes to adult court, according to The Oregonian. The House Judiciary Committee took testimony on the bill this week.

8: Oregon conservation groups that sent a letter to Gov. Kate Brown this week criticizing her appointments to the state’s Fish and Wildlife Commission, including a big-game hunter with a prolific Instagram feed, according to Willamette Week.

40: Percent of Oregon that was experiencing “moderate drought” conditions on April 2, according to KOIN.

0: Percent of Oregon experiencing “moderate drought” one week later, after heavy rain. About 17 percent of the state is considered abnormally dry as of Thursday, though.

718: Patients admitted to the Oregon State Hospital last year under court orders to get treatment so they could assist in their own criminal defense, according to The Oregonian.

$1,324: Amount such “aid and assist” treatment costs taxpayers per patient per day, The Oregonian reports.

42-18: Vote count, for and against, a statewide ban on plastic bags in the House of Representatives this week, according to the AP.

$250,000: Amount a Portland comedian, Mohanad Elshieky, is seeking through an administrative complaint filed against U.S. Customs and Border Protection, according to the AP. During a January incident in Spokane, Elshieky alleges that although he presented Border Patrol officers with documentation that he was in the country legally, he was racially profiled and detained by border patrol.

59-0: Unanimous vote in the House to repeal a 2015 state tax break for internet service providers, according to The Oregonian.

300: State troopers the Oregon State Police want to hire by 2030, according to the Statesman-Journal.


8. Sherman County History Tidbits: The Observer Notes 1911-1912

newsletter2The Observer, Moro, Oregon: Notes, not quotes.

1911

  • November: Monkland – H.M. Shull to move to his farm in this neighborhood. Bands of sheep, 2,000 & 3,000, crossing the John Day River at McDonald. Born to Deputy Sheriff & Mrs. McKean a son, November 21, has sister Georgia.
  • December: John F. Foss has a contract to make galvanized pipe culverts for the County, an experimental order.

1912

  • January: The Celilo bridge opened. Sherman County had 30 schools including Bigelow (sic) & Fredberg.
  • February: The Farmers’ Banquet at the Rudolph Opera House in Moro served only Sherman County grown farm products, tables set for 350. City of Moro bought 250 shade trees for the tract in the flat to be set aside for a city park – black locust, Carolina poplar & American elm.
  • March: New fence around Moro city park. E.W. Knapp was in Moro from Monkland with coyote & badger skins; he plans to experiment with growing peanuts this season. The Moro Concert Band to play in the Opera House on March 30.
  • April: The Junior Baseball Nine at Moro: Carroll Sayrs, Ben Tomlin, Neil Freeman, George Tomlin, Jacob Douma, Collis Moore, G. Douma, Chester Anderson with John Mowry as umpire.
  • May: Monkland Presbyterian church.
  • June: Notice to accept bids for building new school houses in District 21 – Biggs, and #37 – Deschutes.
  • July: Shad fishing on the Columbia especially profitable this season. The Miller Sands Co. smoked quite a quantity of shad & blueback. E.E. Kaseberg & brother-in-law Herbert Root got a Case steam engine from Chas. Golliher & operate one of the largest threshing outfits, 35 men. Fatal harvest accident, Mr. Bullard here to help with harvest, was run over & crushed by a team of 7 horses he was leading.
  • August: W.H. Moore & R.J. Ginn were overhauling the Moro flouring mill to use as a warehouse. O.M. Scott of former Scott, McCoy & Co. visited in Moro.
  • September: J.A. Smith overturned his Reo auto in Gordon Ridge territory. Off to Oregon Agriculture College: Perry & Theodore Johnston, Leo Strong, Ernest McClure. To school in Albany: Bessie Watkins, Helen & Ina Hansen, Clara Thompson.
  • October: Ewan McLennan of Shaniko grazed his flocks in the Cascade forests during the summer; shipped 10,000 fat sheep from Bend in 32 double-deck cars on Oregon Trunk Railway to Chicago on a 72 hour schedule. Orville Davis, agent at Wasco for Oregon Washington Rail & Navigation Co., was a boyhood friend of Phil Yates in Iowa. The BCP Company’s sheep now located in Canyon #16 on the Deschutes River. Children’s Industrial Fair.
  • November: Golden wedding of Rev. & Mrs. James M. Morrison in Portland, formerly of Sherman County, he a former pastor of the Moro Presbyterian church.
  • December: R.W. Pinkerton visited his parents’ home in Iowa for the holidays. Grandma Powell was wintering with her son Roy and family in Crook County. Louis J. Gates, long time manager of Kent Commercial Co., purchased the business from Balfour, Guthrie & Co.

 


Sherman County eNews #113

CONTENTS

  1. Scam Alert

  2. Letter to the Editor: Write in Jeremy Lanthorn for School Board position 1

  3. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

  4. FREE Hazardous Waste (+ E-WASTE) Event for Households, Businesses & Ag Producers, May 3

  5. On the Topic of Taking Risks

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center May Meal Menu


My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane. ~Unattributed


1. Scam Alert

Scam alert. Crooks use clever schemes to defraud millions of people every year. Read more: http://www.consumer.ftc.gov/scam-alerts. Learn how to report fraud and assist others: http://www.justice.gov/fraudtaskforce/report-fraud/chart.


2. Letter to the Editor: Write in Jeremy Lanthorn for School Board position 1

pencil.sharpVote Tuesday May 21st, 2019 and write in Jeremy Lanthorn for School Board position 1.
I’m am asking for your votes for the school board position 1. I have been an active member of the community since my wife, Kara Lanthorn, and I moved to Sherman County in 2011. I have helped the yearbook class with photography information, provided photos to the school, boosters, and local paper to help promote the students and athletes at Sherman county schools. This year I began serving as a 4H leader for the photography club. I helped coach youth flag football in the fall, and I am in my 4th year of helping with SKORE (an after-school program for kids in Sherman County). I have two children who attend Sherman County School, one in 3rd and one in 4th grade, and another who will begin preschool this coming fall. I have served on several different non-profit boards including serving as the president of a board serving Eastern Washington, Northeast Oregon, and Northern Idaho.

We live in a great community that supports our kids at all levels. We have a fantastic school with great teachers, administration, support staff, and students. I hope to help Sherman county schools continue to strive for excellence at all levels, to push ourselves to be better than we were before and never settle for good enough. I thank you for your support and I look forward to serving our community, school, and students.

I would also encourage you to write in Paul Bish for School Board position 5.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact me:
Jlanthorn@gmail.com
(541) 333-2013
(541) 993-2446

Jeremy Lanthorn

Grass Valley


3. All County Prayer Meeting, May 2

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Thursday, May 2nd @ the Kent Baptist Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting; come and join in when you can get there. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


4. FREE Hazardous Waste (+ E-WASTE) Event for Households, Businesses & Ag Producers, May 3

recycle.blwhWHAT: Get rid of unwanted hazardous waste, electronics and medicine too

WHEN: Friday, May 3, 10am-2pm

WHERE: Sherman County Road Department, 501 4th Street, Moro, OR

HAZARDOUS WASTE Accepted Items:

AG Chemicals & Pesticides

Paints and stains of all types

Yard, garden, pool and spa chemicals

Cleaners, disinfectants, solvents and glues

Automotive fluids (antifreeze, brake fluids, motor oil, etc…)

Art and hobby chemicals

Fluorescent lamps, CFL bulbs and ballasts

Propane bottles and tanks

Old gasoline

Fire extinguishers

Batteries (all types)

ELECTRONICS Only these Items Accepted:

Computers, Monitors, Laptops/Tablets, TV’s, Keyboards, Printers, Mice, and Cell Phones

MEDICINE

Unwanted prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and pet medicines. NO sharps (Free sharps disposal at: Hood River Transfer Station, The Dalles Disposal, Moro Medical Clinic)

Items NOT Accepted

Explosives, ammunition, asbestos (call us to find out how to dispose of)

 Although FREE, pre-registration is required for businesses and farmers. This helps our contractor bring the proper supplies. To Register, please contact: Stericycle Environmental Service at (360) 772-2838, John.Pitman@STERICYCLE.com

Sponsored by: Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program. Call 541-506-2632 or visit www.tricountyrecycle.com.


5. On the Topic of Taking Risks

What is it that enables some folks to take big-time risks without becoming a nervous wreck? Taking risks in life isn’t easy, because there is always the possibility of loss involved. However, it doesn’t have to be a white-knuckle experience, either. So how can you take the anxiety out of risk-taking?

Well, first of all, you don’t take foolish risks. Take risks only when you believe that what you are going for will be better than what you already have. You won’t want to risk anything you can’t afford to lose, so a careful analysis – with eyes wide open – is only common sense.

Second, remind yourself that risk-taking is involved in everything worthwhile in life. Without taking risks, you can’t find true love, develop personal power, gain the respect of others or raise healthy, happy kids, for that matter.

Third, refrain from worrying excessively about the outcome. Instead, spend time imagining exactly how it will look and feel if things go just as you want them to. In other words, stay focused on what you have to gain, not what you have to lose.

Our experience in life is largely determined by where we choose to focus our attention. If you think loss, talk loss, see loss day after day, it is far more likely that you will end up with loss. On the other hand, if your purpose is worthy, your commitment strong, and your thoughts focused on a positive end-result, you will behave like a winner.

And whether or not any given risk pays off in the long run, if you behave like a winner you will be a winner in the only game that counts – the game of being the best you that you can be. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center May Meal Menu

We serve lunch at 12:00 noon sharp.  First come, first served.If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at 541-565-3191 the day before to ensure that we make enough food!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. $7.00 ~~ 60 Yrs. & Up $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
  1            2 3
Meatloaf Chicken a la King Pulled Pork on a roll
Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Biscuits Baked Beans
Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
6 7 8 9 10
Reuben Sandwich Beef & Broccoli Oven Fried Chicken Tuna Casserole Beef Chili
Potato Wedges Fried Rice Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Salad Bar Cornbread
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert
13 14 15 16 17
Cheeseburgers Hot Turkey on a roll Spaghetti w. Meat Sauce Chicken Enchiladas Pork Chops
Tater Tots Mashed Potatoes w/ gravy Garlic Bread Rice Red Potatoes
Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert
20 21 22 23 24
Chicken/Sausage Alfredo Mac & Cheese w/ Ham Salisbury Steak Stromboli loaded w. Meat Beef Tacos
w/ Penne Salad Bar Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Salad Bar Refried Beans
Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert
27 28 29 30 31
CLOSED Chicken Strips Hamburger Gravy White Bean Chicken Chili Sloppy Joes w. Bun
FOR MEMORIAL Potato Wedges Over Mashed Potatoes Muffins Tater Tots
DAY Veggies & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies. Salad & Dessert

Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


 

Sherman County eNews #112

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Sherman County STF & STIF Public Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting, April 29

  2. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Chicken Tenders

  3. P.S. eNews Friday Classifieds

  4. Local Teacher Receives Scholarship to Attend Summer Ag Institute

  5. Klindt’s Booksellers Hosts Local Author Sam Woolsey, April 27

  6. An A for Aging with Attitude

  7. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  9. Oregon Health Authority Medical Countermeasures Exercise, Operation OX, May 1


“It is proper you should understand what I deem the essential principles of our government… Equal and exact justice to all men, of whatever persuasion, religious or political.” —Thomas Jefferson (1801)


1. Notice. Sherman County STF & STIF Public Transportation Advisory Committee Meeting, April 29

ShermanCoLogo

Marnene Benson-Wood, Transit Coordinator

541-565-3553

marnenebw@co.sherman.or.us

Agenda for

SHERMAN COUNTY STF AND STIF PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE

MEETING APRIL 29, 2019

1:00 P.M.

at

The Sherman County Senior Center

  • REVIEW MINUTES FROM LAST MEETING, APRIL 9, 2019
  • REVIEW INFORMATION FOR THE STIF GRANT APPLICATION 2019-2021
  1. Projects
  2. Project Priority
  3. Any Changes to current information
  4. Additions to current information
  • PUBLIC COMMENTS
  • New Business:
  1. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR STIF GRANT APPLICATION FOR COUNTY COURT MAY 1, 2019

These meetings are open to the public.  The Sherman County Public Transportation Advisory Committee welcomes and thanks citizens for suggestions.  The participation allows the Transportation to better serve our community.  Members of the public wishing to comment can indicate such by raising a hand.  The chairman of the committee will then call upon anyone wishing to make suggestions or comments.


2. Sherman County 4-H News Reports: The Chicken Tenders

4-H clover1The Chicken Tenders 4-H Club met on April 25, 2019 at 6:08pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Dillian, Emersyn, Renan, Cohen, Damian and Claire.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Emersyn, 4-H Pledge by Damian.  We talked about a field trip to go to Gilliam Count to show their 4-H members how to show.  We talked about healthy or unhealthy poultry.  Our next meeting will be May 14.  Meeting adjourned at 7:02pm.  Signed Emersyn Stanfield, News Reporter


3. P.S. eNews Friday Classifieds

THANK YOU! Thank you so much to everyone who donated baked goods for the Easter Bake Sale at the Sherman County Senior Center! And thank you also to everyone who purchased baked goods in support of the fundraiser. We had numerous generous donations and many happy patrons. The senior center made $342 toward our fundraising foal for the year, so we wanted to send out a special thank you to everyone who helped! THANK YOU!! – Kari Silcox – The Sherman County Senior Center.


4. Klindt’s Booksellers Hosts Local Author Sam Woolsey, April 27

Join us Saturday, April 27th at 4 p.m. for a book signing featuring Sam Woolsey and his travel memoir, The Condor of Chavín: A Journey in the Peruvian Andes. Free and open to the public. We recommend you call ahead to reserve your books.


5. Local Teacher Receives Scholarship to Attend Summer Ag Institute

Carol Ritchie, a special education 6th-8th grade teacher at The Dalles Middle School, has been selected as the winner of a $600 scholarship to attend Oregon State University’s Summer Agricultural Institute (SAI).  She will be sponsored by the Columbia Gorge chapter of Oregon Women for Agriculture and the Wasco County Soil & Water Conservation District.

SAI is a week-long summer graduate level course offered for K-12 educators with little or no agricultural background, and helps educators use agriculture as a theme for teaching science, math, social studies, English, etc.  Educators receive hands-on instruction and materials on how to incorporate agriculture into their classroom curriculum.  These teachers will benefit from tours of agricultural processing plants, farms, vineyards, golf courses, nurseries and agribusiness operations.  Two sessions are available: Corvallis June 23-28 and LaGrande/Union July 14-19.

In her application for the scholarship, Ms. Ritchie stated that she is often surprised by the lack of agricultural knowledge among students—such as where does milk come from—or that students have never seen a cow milked.  In her experience, few students actually know what the major crops are in Wasco County, even with many having parents employed in the industry.  She wrote that “I want to learn some curriculum and lesson ideas…that teaches agriculture.  My students would benefit from high interest curriculum at their level of access.”


6. An A for Aging with Attitude

If you’re interested in living to a ripe old age, here is some information about aging and attitude that may surprise you.

Several studies that have been performed regarding people who are older, who have lived far beyond the norm in the United States, indicate that attitude seems to play an important role. There probably isn’t anything like a “longevity personality.” Living to the ripe old age of 100 seems to happen to selfish, cantankerous people as often as it does to those who are quiet and kind. But there does seem to be a common thread, and it is a sense of self-sufficiency.

The oldest of our senior citizens all seem to have a strong attachment to freedom and independence. They tend to dislike and avoid constraints and they value their autonomy highly. What’s more, most of these old-timers are also people who enjoy life. They have a high degree of realistic optimism, a definite sense of humor, and they respond to simple pleasures, seeing beauty where others only see ugliness. They are also extremely adaptable and resilient. Some of them had been hit hard by the Great Depression, but they recovered to build new futures. And while many of them cherished childhood memories, all of them preferred living in the present with its many changes.

In a nutshell, these studies found that attitude seemed to outweigh physical characteristics and what these folks thought and felt was more important than what they ate or how long their parents had lived. Ultimately, what they found was that these efficacious older folks got an A when it came with aging with a positive attitude.

So, if you want to live a long, happy life, consider keeping track of your attitude as well as counting your calories and monitoring your cholesterol. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

These firsts were alleged, claimed, reported or stated:

MILITARY. 1st young men went off to Camp Lewis, WWI, 1916; 1st WWII draft registration, 1940; 1st per capita of all U.S. counties in E Bond purchases, 1942 & 1943, a record never beaten; christening of the ship William T. Sherman, by Mrs. Patrick O’Meara & Mrs. Alex Macnab, each with four sons in the service; christening of the ship Fon du Lac by Mesdames Pinckney, Dixon and French, 1944.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbOregon Public Records Advocate: List of Proposed 2019 Public Records-Related Bills

Ag Census shows declining farmland in Oregon

Pacific Lamprey: Primitive Eel-like Fish

Western Concepts Have Drastically Shaped the History of Chinese Art… the Artworks Have Their Own Stories to Tell


9. Oregon Health Authority Medical Countermeasures Exercise, Operation OX, May 1

North Central Public Health District (NCPHD) is participating in Oregon Health Authority’s Statewide Medical Countermeasures (MCM) exercise, Operation OX 2019.

As part of our participation, we will be exercising an open Point of Dispensing (POD) on May 1, 2019, at Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, and we invite you to join us between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. for a drive-through POD simulation.

Exercising our ability to dispense medical countermeasures, through this exercise, will help NCPHD improve our plan to provide medications or vaccinations, when needed.

Medical Countermeasures are the medications (including vaccines, antiviral drugs, or antibiotics) needed to treat, protect or prophylax an identified population in accordance with public health guidelines and/or recommendations.

PODs are locations organized by the local public health department, where medication/vaccination will be given to people to prevent disease in response to a public health threat. For example, you may remember being invited to a POD for H1N1 vaccine in 2009, or Pertussis vaccine in 2015.

No medication/vaccination will be given at the exercise; instead the first 75 participants will receive a FREE mini first-aid kit!

Date/Time: Wednesday, May 1, 2019, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Location: Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue (MCF&R) 1400 W 8th Street

Directions: Coming from Cherry Heights Road, turn onto W 8th Street, heading West toward MCF&R. Participants will be directed by onsite officials through the drive-through POD exercise. The first 75 participants will receive a mini free first-aid kit!

We encourage everyone to participate in an effort to help community members understand and prepare for public health emergencies.

(For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at http://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.)


 

Sherman County eNews #111

CONTENT

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Be present in all things and thankful for all things. ~Maya Angelou


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

eNEWS POLICIES: 

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome. Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers. 

NEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. No posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words. 

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES: 

THANK YOU! Wasco School Events Center would like to thank everyone who came out Monday April 22nd, to support us for French dip sandwiches and Bingo. And a special thanks to all our wonderful volunteers.

CONGRATULATIONS, Wasco County and Sherman County Soil & Water Districts for your exceptional work in 2018 to help NRCS implement Farm Bill financial assistance programs across the state and perform conservation education and outreach, and Chase Schultz of the Wheeler SWCD for the District Employee Partnership Award! ~The Editor

CONGRATULATIONS, Oregon State University Sherman County Extension and Sherman School’s Sherman Kids On the Road to Excellence (SKORE), recipients of the “Excellence in Afterschool Programming Award.” ~The Editor

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

Volunteer SmileYOUR TIME. One of the greatest gifts that you can give is your time. “I believe that every human mind feels pleasure in doing good to another.” – Thomas Jefferson In small communities like ours, we rely on the kind hearts of volunteers in many capacities. We all work together to make our community the best it can be. One of the greatest gifts you can give to anyone is your time. Volunteers are not paid – not because they are worthless, but because they are priceless.  So before you complain, have you volunteered yet? By volunteering you are voting about the kind of community you wish to live in. We would like to take a moment to extend a special thank you to all of our volunteers in Sherman County who continue to generously donate their time to make our county the special place that it is.   Volunesia – that moment when you forget you’re volunteering to change lives because it’s changing yours. -Sherman County Community & Senior Center 

JUST ASK! Sherman County’s current activities require the equivalent of 290 volunteers –  part-time, one-time, once-yearly, once-monthly, as needed. Just ask! How can I help? The need is great. These come to mind… Your child’s activities. Your church. Sherman County Fair. Wasco Memorial Day Celebration. Sherman County Senior & Community Center. Sherman County Historical Museum. Sherman High School Booster Club. Wasco School Events Center. Grass Valley Pavilion. Cemetery clean-up days. Maryhill Museum. Food Banks. Respond to public notices of vacant local government positions, including EMT training. Lion’s Club. Or… if you can’t give of your time, give your support with your tax deductible dollars. ~The Editor. 

EMPLOYMENT:

COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS SPECIALIST / CSW COORDINATOR.

Job Title:               Community Corrections Specialist / CSW Coordinator

Reports To:           Community Corrections Program Director

Starting Salary:      $19.52 per hour

Work Hours:          16-20 hours per week, can be flexible

SUMMARY: The successful applicant will perform clerical duties of mixed complexity according to standard procedures for which typing; filing and telephone skills are required. Applicant must understand the importance of maintaining confidentiality regarding offender files and other criminal justice information.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS:

  • Must be at least 21 years of age and a U.S. citizen
  • Must possess a valid Oregon Driver’s License or immediate ability to obtain one
  • Must have a driving record free of any convictions that may indicate an inability to operate a public vehicle safely
  • Must have no criminal record and be able to pass a background investigation
  • A minimal requirement of a high school diploma, preferably supplemented by college or business school training and two years responsible office experience, or any satisfactory equivalent combination of experience and training.
  • Must be skilled in use of current computer and software technology, telephone, copy and fax machine, computers and other general office machines. Must be familiar with Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.
  • Must be willing to travel as required to attend state trainings and meetings
  • Must acquire and maintain LEDS (Law Enforcement Data System) certification
  • Must acquire and maintain an Oregon Notary Public certification

TO APPLY: An application and a list of duties and responsibilities may be acquired by contacting Tina Potter at 541-565-0520 x1, by email at tina.i.potter@cc.doc.state.or.us or at the Tri-County Community Corrections office located at 302 Scott Street in Moro OR. 5/3 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR, AG & CROPS. OSU Extension in Wasco and Sherman counties is looking for a Full-time Assistant Professor for Ag/Crops. Master’s degree required in Agriculture, Agricultural Education, Natural Resources, Soils, Crops or closely related field. Person will be based in Moro and serve both counties. Please see the following posting for more details! This position closes 05/15/2019.   http://jobs.oregonstate.edu/postings/75253   5/12

COOK, GRASS VALLEY COUNTRY MARKET. We are willing to train kitchen staff, but you must be organized, reliable, and able to move quickly in a fast paced kitchen setting. Experience interacting with customers is a plus.  Please feel free to stop by or call with your contact information to setup an interview appointment (541) 993-8135.   5/3

HELP GILLIAM AND SHERMAN COUNTY STUDENTS SUCCEED. Do you know someone with time to spare, who loves to drive, and help others? Refer them to Mid Columbia Bus Company! Once the person you refer becomes certified and drives a full route for at least 30 days, we will donate $1000.00 to a school organization of your choice. What we offer: $13.30 an hour, Paid training, Flexible schedule, Dental, Vision, Medical Plan, 401 K … And more! Qualifications: Pass a criminal history check, Have a good driving record, Have a valid Oregon driver’s license, Ability to obtain Class B CDL with training. Contact Mid Columbia Bus Company and tell us where to make a donation today: ~Amberlena Shaffer, RecruiterOFFICE: (541) 567-0551CELL: (541) 303-5093Email: amberlena@MidCoBus.com www.MidCoBus.com   4/26

SERVICES:

LOCAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR, HANDYMAN & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Ready for spring projects, large and small, indoors or out. Please call Kevin at 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 5/17 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

RURAL VENDORS OF SAGEBRUSH COUNTRY FACEBOOK GROUP   https://www.facebook.com/groups/990306287836327/

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

FOR SALE:

HANDCRAFTED INDOOR & OUTDOOR FURNITURE. Considerately handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders accepted. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com | Facebook | 5/17

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS, FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND: 

WANTED:

SEEKING INTERIOR COURTHOUSE PHOTOGRAPHS 1899-1930. In search of pictures taken inside of the original Sherman County Courthouse, during and shortly after construction, dating between 1899-1930. Any help locating pictures would be sincerely appreciated. Please contact Ross Turney at 541-565-3505 or at turneyr@shermancounty.net with any information. – Lee Langston, Community Member

HOST FAMILY. Host a Foreign Exchange Student. ASSE Student Exchange Programs is now looking for American families to host high school students from Asia. These personable and academically select exchange students speak English, are bright, curious, and eager to learn about this country through living as part of a family for an academic year and attending high school. Your support of these students reinforces the United States’ commitment to education and opportunity throughout the world.  ASSE is currently seeking host families for these well-qualified, bright, motivated and well-screened students coming from Japan, China, Thailand, Taiwan, Mongolia, and South Korea. By living with local host families and attending local high schools, the students acquire an understanding of American values and build on leadership skills.  The exchange students arrive from their home country shortly before school begins and return at the end of the school year. Each ASSE student is fully insured, brings his or her own personal spending money and expects to bear his or her share of household responsibilities, as well as being included in normal family activities and lifestyles. At the same time the student will be teaching their newly adopted host family about their own culture and language.   If you are interested in opening your home and sharing your family life with a young person from abroad, please contact us today for more information, call (800) 733-2773, go online at www.ASSEhosts.com or email asseusawest@asse.com  4/26


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT EVENTS CALENDAR

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

American-Flag-StarAPRIL

26 N. Central Livestock Assoc. Bull Tour to Gilliam County starts 9 Wasco School

26-28 Northwest Cherry Festival, The Dalles

https://thedalleschamber.com/northwest-cherry-festival/  

  • 26 Cherry Festival Open Air Market, Carnival, Lifestyle Show
  • 27 Cherry Festival Royalty, Run/Walk, Car Show, Teddy Bear Run, Parade 10,
  • Ag Job Fair, Safety Fair, Market, Carnival, Pie Eating Contest
  • 28 Ag Job Fair, Softball, Open Air Market, Sen. Cliff Bentz, Lifestyle Show, Entertainment

27 4-H Community Service Day 9 Cottonwood Canyon State Park

27 Learn to Crochet 2 Sherman County Public/School Library

27-28 Oregon Ag Fest, Salem

28 Open House Preview Party 1-4 Sherman County Historical Museum

flag.starsMAY

1 Sherman County Court 9

1 Gilliam County Museum Complex Opens for the Season

1 Sherman County Historical Museum Opens for the Season 10-5 Daily

1 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Exec. Board 4 The Dalles

2 North Central Education Service District Board 5 Condon

2 North Central Education Service District Budget Committee 6 Condon

2 NATIONAL DAY OF PRAYER

2 HOLOCAUST REMEMBRANCE DAY

2 Sherman County Fair Board 7

2 All County Prayer Meeting Kent Baptist Church, social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 FREE Hazardous Waste (+ E-WASTE) Event for Households, Businesses & Ag Producers 10-2 Sherman County Road Department, Moro

3 The Woolery Spring Fest 4-7 Arlington

3-5 Gorge Artists Open Studios Tour

4 County-wide Clean-up Day

4 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

4 Wasco County Pioneer Association Annual Meeting – Fort Dalles Readiness Center

4 Prineville Reservoir Star Party Activities, Stargazing 9 a.m.- 10 p.m.

4-5 72nd Annual Arlington Jackpot Rodeo 12:30 Arlington, Oregon

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

6-10 Sixth Grade Outdoor School

7-8-9 Spring Museum Week at Maryhill Museum of Art

8 Rufus City Council 7

8 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Board 12:30

9 North Central Public Health District Budget Committee 1:30-4:30 Burnet Building

10 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

10-12 Equine Mania LLC Cows & More Clinic w/Mary Jane Brown (541) 980-7394

11 The Woolery Open 9 China Creek Golf Course, Arlington

11 Spring Plant Fair 9 The Dalles City Park

12 MOTHERS’ DAY

12 Mother’s Day at Maryhill Museum

13 Sherman County Planning Commission Public Hearing 5:30 Burnet Bldg.

13 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 7

14 Sherman County Watershed Council 8 TBA

14 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 TBA

14 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

14 Sherman County Public/School Library Board Meeting 6 Library

15 Sherman County Court Public Hearing 10 Courthouse

15-17 National Association of Counties, Western Interstate Region, Spokane

16 Sherman County Health District Budget Committee 5:30 Moro

17 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting TBA

18 ARMED FORCES DAY

18 Maryhill Museum Members’ Appreciation Day

18 Drive the Historic Maryhill Loops Road 10-12

21 Sherman County SPECIAL DISTRICT ELECTION DAY

21 Wasco City Council 7

23 Frontier TeleNet Budget Committee Meeting 10 Condon

23 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 1 Condon

24 Sherman County Budget Hearing – Courthouse

27 MEMORIAL DAY

30 Sherman County School Senior Scholarship Program 7

31-June 2 Junior Livestock Show, Tygh Valley

American flag1JUNE

1 Sherman County School Graduation 11

1 Farmers Market 10-4 Moro

1-2 Equine Mania LLC Wheatacres Ranch Trail & Cattle Challenge (541) 980-7394

3 Grass Valley City Council 7

4 Sherman County School Junior High Academic Awards 2:30

4 Wasco City Council 7

5 All County Prayer Meeting Wasco Methodist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

6 D-DAY

8 Veterans’ Benefit Fair & Support Services, Earl Snell Park, Arlington

8-9 ’62 (gold) Days in Canyon City, Oregon

11 Pendleton Experiment Station Field Day

12 Moro Experiment Station Field Day

12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Board 12:30

12 Rufus City Council 7

14 FLAG DAY

14 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

16 FATHERS’ DAY

16 Father’s Day at Maryhill Museum

16-21 Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute for High School Students

17 Sherman County School District Board 7

18 Caregiver Job Fair 10-6 DHS, The Dalles

19-21 Sherman County 4-H Camp for 4th-6th graders, Wamic

26-29 OSU 4-H Summer Conference for 7th-12th graders, Corvallis


 

Sherman County eNews #110

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Extension and SKORE Afterschool Program Win State Award

  2. FREE Hazardous Waste (+ E-WASTE) Event for Households, Businesses & Ag Producers, May 3

  3. Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute for High School Students, June 16-21

  4. Mental Housecleaning

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. Cycle Oregon’s 2nd Annual GRAVEL Event, May 17-19


1. Sherman Extension and SKORE Afterschool Program Win State Award

Oregon State University Sherman County Extension and Sherman School’s Sherman Kids On the Road to Excellence (SKORE) was recently awarded the “Excellence in Afterschool Programming Award.”  This award was presented at the Oregon 4-H Conference in Bend by the OSU Extension Association of 4-H Agents, and accepted on behalf of the program by Sherman 4-H and Healthy Living Educator Cindy Brown.

Sherman Extension has partnered with the SKORE program and Director Deanna Christiansen since the fall of 2012 to offer afterschool cooking activities for the youth in the afterschool program.   Research shows that providing healthy eating and cooking educational programs for youth is a great way to expand their life skills, interest them in a variety of nourishing foods, and to build a foundation for healthy living.

Sherman Extension’s goals in teaching kids how to cook include:  Increase self-confidence and self-sufficiency in the kitchen; expose students to a variety of healthy eating options including more fruits and vegetables; teach safe food handling, kitchen and equipment safety; and provide a beneficial afterschool activity to students.

The content of the SKORE afterschool cooking class focuses on developing kids’ “survival cooking skills,” incorporating the use of a variety of OSU Food Hero recipes, giving the youth the opportunity to rotate through a variety of breakfast/lunch/dinner items, as well as giving introduction to basic activities including cooking eggs and learning how to use electric and stove top skillets and kettles, electric woks, blenders, and hand mixers.

From Extension’s 4-H perspective, one of the biggest outcomes of the SKORE afterschool program is the increased interest in 4-H cooking programs and a corresponding increase in enrollment and number of cooking clubs.  This has also increased the number of cooking and food preservation displays at the small Sherman County Fair.  This is significant, considering that Sherman County 4-H is fairly small, with average enrollments of 60-70 youth.


2. FREE Hazardous Waste (+ E-WASTE) Event for Households, Businesses & Ag Producers, May 3

WHAT: Get rid of unwanted hazardous waste, electronics and medicine too

WHEN: Friday, May 3, 10am-2pm

WHERE: Sherman County Road Department, 501 4th Street, Moro, OR

HAZARDOUS WASTE Accepted Items:

AG Chemicals & Pesticides

Paints and stains of all types

Yard, garden, pool and spa chemicals

Cleaners, disinfectants, solvents and glues

Automotive fluids (antifreeze, brake fluids, motor oil, etc…)

Art and hobby chemicals

Fluorescent lamps, CFL bulbs and ballasts

Propane bottles and tanks

Old gasoline

Fire extinguishers

Batteries (all types)

ELECTRONICS Only these Items Accepted:

Computers, Monitors, Laptops/Tablets, TV’s, Keyboards, Printers, Mice, and Cell Phones

MEDICINE

Unwanted prescriptions, over-the-counter medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and pet medicines. NO sharps (Free sharps disposal at: Hood River Transfer Station, The Dalles Disposal, Moro Medical Clinic)

Items NOT Accepted

Explosives, ammunition, asbestos (call us to find out how to dispose of)

 Although FREE, pre-registration is required for businesses and farmers. This helps our contractor bring the proper supplies. To Register, please contact: Stericycle Environmental Service at (360) 772-2838, John.Pitman@STERICYCLE.com

Sponsored by: Tri-County Hazardous Waste & Recycling Program

Call 541-506-2632 or visit www.tricountyrecycle.com


3. Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute for High School Students, June 16-21

Cottonwood Crossing Summer Institute (CCSI), a week-long residential field studies program for high school students, is now accepting applications for their June 16-21, 2019 program. CCSI takes place along the John Day River at Cottonwood Canyon State Park and is one of a growing number of programs being offered to regional students by Eastern Oregon University.

Since 2015, CCSI has offered students an opportunity to work with regional professionals to conduct research and complete projects on various topics related to the natural and cultural resources of eastern Oregon. Twenty-five students from around the region will spend a week together working on one of five different projects. These include: field research techniques applied to wildlife and macroinvertebrates; designing and building solar solutions to modern problems; researching how the human body responds to the environment; and, practicing the fine art of writing non-fiction about nature.

High school students work with students and faculty from Eastern Oregon University to complete a high quality project and earn early college credit. Some of these projects become permanent displays for Oregon State Parks.

Last September, Oregon State Parks and the Oregon State Parks Foundation completed construction of an Experience Center at Cottonwood Canyon State Park dedicated to educational pursuits such as CCSI. Included in the complex are restroom facilities and four new cabins. Students and leaders attending CCSI will spend the week enjoying these amenities while immersed in one of Oregon’s beautiful landscapes.

For more information or to apply as a student at CCSI, please visit the EOU website at https://www.eou.edu/cottonwood-crossing/

Student quotes:

  • CCSI “has ignited in me new interests in writing and environmental science.”
  • “This experience has made me feel more outgoing.”
  • “I have learned that I don’t need television, computers, and the internet. I am more productive and I have a better time without them.”

4. Mental Housecleaning

How much unnecessary junk is accumulating in your attic? No, we’re not talking about the one you may have in your house. We’re talking about your mental attic.

Since we are in the middle of what many of us, in the northern hemisphere, call “spring cleaning” time, we have started to sort out and discard possessions we no longer use and give them to charity or sell them at a garage sale. But have you ever thought about how valuable it could be if you took the time to perform the same kind of housecleaning for your mind?

Removing the superfluous, the unnecessary, the destructive, or the outlived from our mental attics is a vital part of making room for new possibilities. Every day we are learning more about the world around us, and that cannot help but teach us more about ourselves – if we listen.

We can’t possibly stay the same if we are living creatures. Each surprise, each unpredictable turn, each new venture, produces the potential for new insights, new responses, and new resilience. A willingness to change is a prerequisite for openness to life. And without that willingness, we become stuck in our need for stability and certainty. Eventually, if we stay stuck long enough, we stagnate. We exist, but we don’t really live – individually, as a group, or an organization.

Is there any junk in your mental attic that you would be better off without – a grudge, a hurt, maybe an outgrown assumption? Perhaps it’s an old job, or an outworn “must” or “should,” or maybe even an old anger that has outlived its welcome. Why not clean it out? There is no time like the present. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

alphabet blackboardThese firsts were alleged, claimed, reported or stated:

SCHOOLS. 1st schools – in farm homes, 1867-1873; 1st school house built in Mud Hollow, 1874; 1st school district formed, China Hollow, 1881; 1st religious school, Middle Oregon Baptist Academy, Grass Valley, 1895; 1st county-wide school field meet, 1906; 1st four-year high school graduations, Wasco & Moro, 1914; 1st scrip used to pay teachers, 1933; 1st consolidation of high schools, Grass Valley & Moro, 1941; 1st Union High School District, 1955; 1st class to graduate from Sherman Union High School, 1957; 1st FFA state president elected from Sherman High School, Michael S. Macnab, 1972; 1st Sherman County School Hall of Honor awards 2016.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeOpinion. New High-School Textbook Describes Trump as Mentally Ill, Supporters as Racist

The High Plains Ranch Practicum

Commentary. Yes, There is a Crisis at the Border

NPR: Kim Jong Un Willing To Denuclearize If Given Security Guarantees, Putin Says

Restaurant review: Oregon State University – Cascades Beaver Dam


7. Cycle Oregon’s 2nd Annual GRAVEL Event, May 17-19

Oregon has thousands of miles of backroads, logging roads, forest roads and various other unpaved paths just waiting to be explored. We’re heading to Dufur, Oregon May 17-19 to do just that. Join us for our second annual GRAVEL event featuring all the Cycle Oregon standards – great food, awesome people and fully supported routes through some truly breathtaking country.

Live music from Tevis Hodge Jr, Jager Bumz, Tracy Klas, Al and Nolan from Brewer’s Grade, Ben Bonham Trio, greaterkind, and more will be rocking the main stage.

Oh, and one more thing, FREE BEER and CIDER from our friends at Double Mountain Brewery and Freebridge Brewing will be flowing!  Spaces are still available, so register today! The last day to register for GRAVEL is May 7. To REGISTER and to get all the details, go to cycleoregon.com.


 

Sherman County eNews #109

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County 4-H News Report: Pans on Fire Outdoor Cooking Club

  2. Tri-County Community Corrections Position

  3. Beating Unexpected Roadblocks

  4. Caregiver Job Fair, June 18

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

  7. 20th Annual Star Party Event at Prineville Reservoir, May 4


1. Sherman County 4-H News Report: Pans on Fire Outdoor Cooking Club

4-H clover1The Pans on Fire outdoor cooking 4-H club met on April 22 at 3:30pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Zach, Emma S, Annaliese, Codie Lee, Hayley and Emma R.  Excused absences were Avila boys, Cohen and Savanna.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Annaliese, 4-H Pledge led by Codie Lee.  What we did during the meeting:  talked about why in the club, experience with outdoor cooking, why it can be challenging, and learned how to make fires (editor’s note).  Emma R. (junior leader) said that if you need something (let her know) because things might not work.  When in the outdoors, you should always have a fishing pole, so if a bear, bees or something else (gets your food) you can fish for food.  You can use dry leaves to help start a fire.  Note:  group started fires and a fire in rocket stove, then cooked old fashioned popcorn then grilled apples and bananas over coals.  Meeting adjourned at 5:00pm.  Signed, Hayley Blagg, News Reporter.


2. Tri-County Community Corrections Position

TRI-COUNTY COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS

302 Scott Street, PO Box 404, Moro OR 97039

PH: 541-565-0520 – FAX: 541-565-0525

Job Description

Job Title:               Community Corrections Specialist / CSW Coordinator

Reports To:           Community Corrections Program Director

Starting Salary:      $19.52 per hour

Work Hours:          16-20 hours per week, can be flexible

SUMMARY: The successful applicant will perform clerical duties of mixed complexity according to standard procedures for which typing; filing and telephone skills are required. Applicant must understand the importance of maintaining confidentiality regarding offender files and other criminal justice information.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS:

  • Must be at least 21 years of age and a U.S. citizen
  • Must possess a valid Oregon Driver’s License or immediate ability to obtain one
  • Must have a driving record free of any convictions that may indicate an inability to operate a public vehicle safely
  • Must have no criminal record and be able to pass a background investigation
  • A minimal requirement of a high school diploma, preferably supplemented by college or business school training and two years responsible office experience, or any satisfactory equivalent combination of experience and training.
  • Must be skilled in use of current computer and software technology, telephone, copy and fax machine, computers and other general office machines. Must be familiar with Microsoft Word, Excel, etc.
  • Must be willing to travel as required to attend state trainings and meeting
  • Must acquire and maintain LEDS (Law Enforcement Data System) certification
  • Must acquire and maintain an Oregon Notary Public certification

TO APPLY: An application and a list of duties and responsibilities may be acquired by contacting Tina Potter at 541-565-0520 x1, by email at tina.i.potter@cc.doc.state.or.us or at the Tri-County Community Corrections office located at 302 Scott Street in Moro OR.


3. Beating Unexpected Roadblocks

If you encountered roadblocks on your way home tonight, would you pull over to the side of the road, put a “For Sale” sign on your car, give up and walk away?

Why is it that if you encountered unexpected roadblocks on your way home tonight, it would never occur to you to simply give up trying to get there? It might take you longer, but you’d find some other way to make it home, wouldn’t you?

For the most part, this is because you have a crystal-clear picture of your goal in mind and you also have unshakable confidence in your ability to achieve it. Confidence alone without the picture won’t get you there, and neither will the picture without the belief in yourself. But together, they are an unbeatable combination.

Think about this for a minute. When you discover this hypothetical obstacle, a way around it might not be immediately clear to you. You could be in an unfamiliar area or completely unaware of alternate routes, but that wouldn’t stop you, would it? You would figure out the “how-to” as you went along. You would ask for help, borrow a map, check your GPS or smartphone app, and, one way or another, you would reach your goal of getting home.

The same is true of any goal you set in life, at work, in your career – anywhere. You don’t have to know exactly how you are going to achieve it at the time you set the goal. In fact, if you expand your goals beyond what you know how to make happen, and if you hold a picture of the end-result you want vividly in your mind – refusing to give up until you achieve it – you set a powerful process in motion that will help you with the “how.”

Take your unbeatable combination of confidence and picture, your persistence and resiliency, add them all together and create the life, the achievements, you want. By the way, organizational goal-setting works this very same way. It’s just that the picture tends to be a bit bigger, but you have the effect of mass confidence, picture, persistence and resiliency.

This is effective goal-setting. Perhaps your first goal will be to become an effective goal-setter. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Caregiver Job Fair, June 18

Tuesday, June 18th

10:00 AM to 6:00 PM

“Be a rising star”
Start your own business as an
Adult Foster Home Licensee,
an AFH Caregiver or a Homecare Worker.
Applications available, Venders, Information,
Guidance and Support. Refreshments provided.

3641 Klindt Drive, The Dalles

DHS/Aging and People with Disabilities
Call Yulanda 541-506-3536


5. Sherman County History Tidbits: Sherman County Firsts

raindropThese firsts were alleged, claimed, reported or stated:

WEATHER. 1st recorded terrible winters, 1861-1862, 1880-1881, December 1884; 1st recorded poor crops and the depression of 1893; town of Grant swept away in the Columbia River flood, 1894; 1st recorded crop freeze-out, 1906; 1st rain-making project, The Rainmaker, on Gordon Ridge, 1907; 1st recorded fatal cloudburst, 30 June 1916, four fatalities in Hay Canyon. ~Northwest Living, Oregon Journal, 20 January 1975; Giles L. French; Bertha Belshe; Sherman County newspapers.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyDrovers: BLM Now Hopes Hammond’s Cattle Can Reduce Fire Risk

Drovers: Learning From The Hammond’s Federal Lands Saga

Only in the U.S. is it controversial for the census to ask about citizenship.

U.S. Launches Latest Agent Orange Clean-Up at a Vietnamese Air Base

Brilliant Maps


7. 20th Annual Star Party Event at Prineville Reservoir, May 4

StarYellowPRINEVILLE, Ore. – The annual Star Party event at Prineville Reservoir State Park turns 20 this year and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is celebrating with a full day of space-related events on May 4. The event is free and will feature kayak tours, astronomy exhibits, scientist-led presentations, model rocket building and launching, and stargazing with provided telescopes.

“It’s an important milestone and we’re excited to celebrate the stars with the community again this year,” said Paul Patton, OPRD resource specialist. “Prineville Reservoir is one of the best spots in Oregon for stargazing and the event is a great start-of-summer activity for everyone to enjoy.”

List of activities:

  • 9 – 11:30 a.m. Kayak tours of the reservoir, led by park staff. Space is limited; reserve your seats online at the state parks event page.
  • 1 p.m. “Solar System Stroll” presentation. Learn about each planet in our cosmic neighborhood from Oregon Observatory volunteers.
  • 1 – 4 p.m. Visit each star party exhibit: safe solar viewing station; meteorite display; virtual reality experience station; telescope displays; space photos and artwork from renowned artist John Foster; various children’s activities focused on astronomical science; information on stars and planets; and more.
  • 2 and 3 p.m. Join Oregon Observatory speakers to learn about the proposed first human missions to Mars and how astronauts will survive on the Red Planet.
  • 4 p.m. Young rocket scientists can design, build and safely launch their own rockets.
  • 7 p.m. Bob Grossfeld, Oregon Observatory director and NASA representative, will present an update on current space exploration missions.
  • 9:30 p.m. Join other stargazers at the permanent observatory housing to peer through various telescopes generously provided by professional and amateur astronomers. The largest telescope, nicknamed “Big Doug,” is 16-inches in diameter.

OPRD partners with the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver for the event.

Prineville Reservoir State Park is 16 miles southeast of Prineville, off Highway 26. More information about the park, including overnight stay details, is on oregonstateparks.org.