Sherman County eNews #61

CONTENTS

  1. Weather: March Outlook & February Climate Summary for Moro

  2. Notice. Solid Waste Advisory Committee Meeting, March 5

  3. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board of Directors Meeting, March 14

  4. Maryhill Museum of Art Opens its 79th Season, New Exhibitions, Programs, March 15

  5. The Willingness to Be Wrong

  6. Bipartisan Effort Launched to Provide Information, Data and “Sensible Solutions” to Oregon’s $26.6 Billion Public Employees Retirement System Problem

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Weather: March Outlook & February Climate Summary for Moro

snowflakeYou can find the March outlook and the February monthly climate summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

~ Marilyn Lohmann, National Weather Service, Pendleton  541-276-7832


2. Notice. Solid Waste Advisory Committee Meeting, March 5

The Wasco County Solid Waste Advisory Committee (a regional agency) will meet Tuesday, March 5th at 2:00 p.m.in North Central Public Health District’s meeting room located at 419 East Seventh Street in The Dalles. The public is encouraged to attend.


3. Notice. Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Board of Directors Meeting, March 14

                                                      March 14, 2019 1:00 p.m.

                                 Gilliam County Courthouse – Courtroom

1 –     Approve January 15, 2019 Minutes

2 –     Future Items – Attorney, Consultant, Relocation – Gary Bettencourt

3 –     Frontier TeleNet Update – Lynn Morley

4 –     By-Laws/IGA Update – Gary Bettencourt

5 –     System Maintenance Costs – Gary Bettencourt

  • If necessary, Executive Session may be held in accordance with ORS 192.660 (1)

(e) Property

(h) Legal Rights

(i) Personnel

  • As this is a regular meeting of the Frontier Regional 911 Board, other matters may be addressed as deemed appropriate by the Board.

Frontier Regional Board Members:

Sheriff Gary Bettencourt – sheriff@co.gilliam.or.us

Judge Elizabeth Farrar – elizabeth.farrar@co.gilliam.or.us

Sheriff Jim Adkins – jim.adkins@co.jefferson.or.us

Commissioner Mae Huston – mae.huston@co.jefferson.or.us

Sheriff Brad Lohrey – bradlohrey@yahoo.com

Judge Joe Dabulskis – jdabulskis@co.sherman.or.us

Sheriff Mike Smith – mike.smith@co.wheeler.or.us

Judge Lynn Morley – lmorley@co.wheeler.or.us


4. Maryhill Museum of Art Opens its 79th Season, New Exhibitions, Programs, March 15

Maryhill Museum re-opens for its 79th season on March 15th with exhibitions highlighting work from its permanent collections. These include Mélange: Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection and Maryhill Favorites: Still Life.

Others include Théodore Rivière: Sculpture and Washington Art Education Association exhibition: Teachers as Artists – Exploring Identity. Rotating on view in the Théâtre de la Mode are “La Grotto Enchantée” (The Enchanted Grotto), “Palais Royale” and “Le Jardin Marveilleux” (The Marvelous Garden). Work new to the collection is on view in the exhibitions Indigenous Peoples of North America, George E. Muehleck Jr Gallery of International Chess Sets and Recent Acquisitions.

Premiering – The Discover Room. This room, just off the Queen Marie Gallery, is a jumping off point for families to experience Maryhill in all of its glory. Each year, the room will have a different focus. This year it is still life. Using nearby Maryhill Favorites as inspiration, families can learn about still life and then create one of their own. The Discover Room expands on Maryhill’s Discover program begun in 2018 to provide opportunities to engage with the museum’s works of art. The program is sponsored by a generous gift from Judith A. Lackstrom and Robert E. Morrow.


5. The Willingness to Be Wrong

Do you know anyone who has a hard time admitting they were wrong? If so, they may be struggling with uncertain self-esteem.

No one enjoys being wrong or making a mistake, but in spite of what some folks would like you to believe, we all do it. In fact, the more venturesome you are and the less afraid of taking risks, the more likely you are to be wrong from time to time. But then what? How can you salvage your self-esteem when your pride has been shaken by a wrong decision?

Well, it’s not as hard as you might think. Try just simply admitting it. Say something like, “I made a mistake. Thank you for correcting me.” Or, “I was wrong about that. Next time, I’ll do better.” Even, “Oops – my bad” is better than trying to maintain the air of infallibility.

You see, by proudly proclaiming yourself to be a normal, imperfect, fallible human being, you give others permission to do the same. Believe it or not, you also make yourself more loveable. After all, while we may respect each other for our strengths, it is often our human weaknesses that are most endearing. When you are able to openly confess a weakness without making a big deal about it, you are honored by your humility and your dignity is nourished by your honesty.

It is only those people whose self-esteem is shaky, underneath an exterior pose of perfection, who have trouble admitting that they were wrong.So keep in mind that doing the right thing is always more important than being right, and when you’ve made a mistake, the right thing to do is admit it. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Bipartisan Effort Launched to Provide Information, Data and “Sensible Solutions” to Oregon’s $26.6 Billion Public Employees Retirement System Problem

Oregon.Flat.poleThursday February 28, 2019—(PORTLAND)—A new effort to stem the growing drain on schools, essential services, higher education and public safety from the rising costs of the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS) was unveiled today with the launch of a new informational website, PERSsolutions.org.

A bipartisan group of public service advocates who have come together under the banner of PERS Solutions for Public Services is proposing cost-sharing and debt-reducing reforms to the state’s pension system that will ensure competitive retirement benefits and working conditions for public workers while preserving and enhancing vital public services.

The website includes background on Oregon’s Public Employee Retirement System (PERS) and outlines seven sensible reforms to address the urgent challenge of addressing the pension system’s $26.6 billion debt.

“The rising cost of the PERS retirement program means that all Oregonians, young and old alike, will pay a heavy price in terms of the quality of our individual lives and the ability of our government to provide essential services for all of our citizens.  There must be a bipartisan effort to find solutions to the PERS problem that are fair for taxpayers and public employees alike,” explained former Oregon Governor Ted Kulongoski, a key supporter of the effort.

PERS payroll rates paid by public agencies (and their taxpayers) have grown from 12 percent of payroll in 2013-15 to what will become 25 percent of payroll in July and is likely to surpass 30 percent of payroll in 2021-23. PERS increases over that period will amount to $4 billion. 

“Young people who have successfully navigated challenges to become graduates of our fine public universities deserve to start their futures without crushing student debt, and to live as citizens of communities that are vibrant and provide the very best public services we can afford to offer,” said Cec Koontz, Monmouth Mayor and Board Member of Western Oregon University. “We have a PERS problem. We need solutions that are fair and responsible – and we can’t wait.”

Kelly Bissinger, vice-chair of the InterMountain ESD School Board said, “As a veteran school board chairman, I’ve personally witnessed the strain on school budgets due to escalating PERS costs. We need to find a way to honor previous commitments to our hard-working employees yet find a way to make sound financial changes moving forward.” ~https://oregoncatalyst.com/43719-bipartisan-effort-launched-to-provide-information-data-and-sensible-solutions-to-oregons-26-6-billion-pers-problem.html

Visit PERSsolutions.org to learn more about Oregon’s Public Employee Retirement System and the proposals for PERS Solutions for Public Services. View our letter to state legislators here.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbBipartisan Effort Launched to Provide Information, Data and “Sensible Solutions” to Oregon’s $26.6 Billion PERS Problem
Weather: March Outlook & February Climate Summary for Moro

Health Insurance, Rural Economic Development and Agriculture

Linking Health Insurance and Farm Viability

OEA website with maximum annual rent increase information

SB 608: Full Text. State Sets Maximum Rent Increase for 2019 

Work progresses on celiac-safe wheat

Brilliant Maps. Blood Borders: A Proposal To Redraw A “New Middle East”

Commentary: America’s Second Civil War Has Already Begun

How To Explain That Seizing Money From The Rich Ruins The Economy For Everyone


 

Advertisements