Sherman County eNews #51

CONTENTS

  1. Boys Basketball State Playoff Game – Friday @ Sherman 6:00 pm

  2. Sherman County SWCD & Watershed Council Annual Meeting, March 27

  3. You Are What You Think

  4. A Week in the Life of an Oregon Senator By Senator Bill Hansell

  5. Maryhill Museum of Art Set to Open for the Season on March 15

  6. AARP Opens Applications for 2019 Community Challenge Grant Program

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Ask anyway. At the appropriate time and place. Others hearing the answers – or want of response – will learn a lot. Questions change and open minds.                     ~Q.E. McGillicuddy


1. Boys Basketball State Playoff Game – Friday @ Sherman 6:00 pm

sport-basketballOur Sherman boys’ basketball team was victorious at their 1st round playoff game Tuesday night against North Clackamas Christian.

Sherman’s next game on the road to the state tournament will be this Friday, February 22 at 6:00 pm here at Sherman County School against Siletz Valley.  Tickets are $8 for adults and $5 for students.  The only passes accepted for an OSAA playoff game are the OSAA media pass and OACA Gold Card. Everyone else will need to pay. Please encourage our community to come and support our Huskies!  ~Sherman County School District


2. Sherman County SWCD & Watershed Council Annual Meeting, March 27

March 27th, 2019

Social Hour @ 5:30pm   Dinner @ 6pm catered by Paradise Rose Chuckwagon

Wasco School Events Center

Our guest speaker will be Bob Zybach, discussing wildfire history in Oregon. He is an independent historian and has conducted forest science and public education research as president of his family business, NW Maps Co for the past 25 years. Bob has a PhD from OSU in Environmental Sciences, with a research focus on forest and wildfire history. He has written and lectured extensively on reforestation planning, wildfire history and economics, Oregon history, and the state’s cultural and resources management. Bob has been widely interviewed by the public media on a diversity of topics related to cultural and natural resources.

Cost is $20/ea. Please RSVP by calling the Sherman SWCD office at 541-565-3216 or email amanda.whitman@or.nacdnet.net


3. You Are What You Think

What do hopelessness, helplessness and stress have to do with rats, astronauts and you?

Did you know that right after splashdown, one of the most difficult phases of spaceflight, NASA doctors found significant changes in the Apollo astronauts’ immune systems? The Apollo, Gemini and Mercury capsules (even the lunar excursion modules) were pretty cramped environments. Not much room to move, and “escape” required a significant amount of time, care and planning, especially for a spacewalk.

Researchers have also found that rats, given electric shocks from which they cannot escape, give up and become helpless. Later, when placed in a box where they can escape the shocks just by moving to the other side, these rats don’t even try. They also develop stomach ulcers and abnormal brain chemistry. And, it’s not because of the shocks. Another group of rats received the same amount of electricity, but they could turn the current off by pressing a bar. They remained healthy.

There is no longer any question about it. Many, many studies have verified that the health of our immune systems is linked to our stress levels and our attitudes about life in general. Now a certain amount of stress is good for us and can give us more energy and greater concentration. But too much stress causes it to break down. We see the results of this stress in changes in productivity of the workforce, and the increase of sick days at all levels of our organizations.

Today, doctors recommend to their patients fighting cancer to put lot of time and energy into building up their immune systems. Monitoring their thoughts as carefully as controlling the diet has a great impact. If you’re concerned about living a long and healthy life, or if you’re fighting a serious illness, developing a sense of control about your life can be as important as anything else you do. Some say you are what you eat. But it looks more and more like you are also what you think and feel. ~The Pacific Institute


4. A Week in the Life of an Oregon Senator By Senator Bill Hansell

Oregon.Flat.poleFrom time to time, I am asked “just what does a Senator do in Salem, anyway?”  While there are some constants, such as my committee meeting schedule, most of the time the schedule has a wide range of activity.  Much of it is scheduled in advance, but some of it just happens.  No two days are the same, and usually I enjoy the variety my schedule produces.  I asked my staff to keep track of a week.  So, for those of you who have ever wondered, here is what my schedule included the week of February 11th-15th.

Monday February 11th:

  • Mondays begin with an office meeting with my staff, Ann Rava my office manager, and Evan Bryan my legislative director. We go over the week’s schedule and figure out where I need to be when.
  • The rest of the morning was filled with 7 appointments in my office on topics ranging from Cap and Trade to Death with Dignity.
  • I then grabbed a 5-minute lunch (can’t forget lunch!)
  • Met with Senator Kathleen Taylor in her office on my legislation for sex trafficking of minors. I have submitted 6 bills, and my colleague from Portland is chief sponsoring them with me, making them bipartisan.  Senator Taylor and I have worked together on a number of bills.
  • Each afternoon, Monday through Thursday have two Ways and Means subcommittees, on which I serve. They begin at 1:00 and conclude at 4:30 with a half hour break in between.
  • I testified on two bills of which I am a chief sponsor at a hearing in The Senate Education Committee. Both deal with tuition or scholarships for Native American students.  It went well, and I believe they will be sent to the Senate floor with a do pass recommendation.
  • The evening had a reception sponsored by the Association of Oregon Counties, where I had a chance to visit with several Commissioners from District 29.

Tuesday February 12th:

  • 7:00am video conference with Wallowa County in the Capitol media room.
  • 8:00 am Workforce Committee Meeting till 10:00am which ran late because….
  • I testified on two more bills I chief sponsored, which were constituent bills SB298 a death certificate bill, and 294 a frontier cemetery bill.
  • I then rushed over to another hearing room to testify before the Senate Judiciary Committee in support of SB 380, a bill supported by banks in the district.
  • Met with correction officers from EOCI.
  • 10:30am Republican Caucus Meeting
  • 11:00am Senate Floor Session. Gave my first floor speech of the Session in opposition to State-wide rent control.  It passed on a partisan vote with one Democrat voting with the Republicans in opposition.
  • Another quick lunch. Thank goodness for the Senate Lounge.
  • The afternoon subcommittees on Transportation and Economic Development and General Government.
  • A couple of office appointments including Kathy Stree, a librarian from Heppner.

Wednesday, February 13th:

  • 7:00am Fire Caucus Meeting
  • Testified in support of SB 308, a bill that Pendleton disabled veteran JP Bailey brought forward to me dealing with reservations for disabled veterans at State Parks.
  • Five office meetings on topics ranging from health care to PERS.
  • Met with Senator Michael Dembrow on wild fire legislation I had written concerning wildfires on crop land.
  • Testified in support of SB 704 which allows bond funding to help fund seismic retrofitting of the State Capitol Building.
  • Lunch in the Senate Lounge
  • 1:30pm testified on one of my major bills SB740 to help cover the proton cancer treatment for Oregonians.
  • Met with Representative Brad Whitt, about leadership of the Oregon Legislature’s Sportsman’s Caucus. This bipartisan caucus needs a Republican Senator to be part of the leadership team, and I said I would do it.
  • Testified in support of SB304 which deals with changing Oregon’s death tax. My bill would allow farms and businesses to be passed down to children or grandchildren, without charging an estate tax or what many of us call a death tax.
  • Finished the day meeting with Dr. Alan Sams, Dean of OSU’s College of Ag Sciences.

Thursday, February 14th:

  • 8:00 am A mandatory Respectful Workplace Training for all Senators. This training had been rescheduled from January due to the federal government shutdown.
  • Lunch in my office
  • Meeting with the Oregon Association of Nurseries
  • Testified in favor of SB 536. I submitted this bill at the request of the Oregon Dairy Association.  There are 12 dairies in my district including the largest in Oregon.
  • Met with Senator Michael Kabua of Kwajalein Atoll in the Marshall Islands. He is visiting to voice his support of SB 263, which would give students from the Marshall Islands instate tuition at Oregon Universities.  I am a chief sponsor of the bill. Eastern Oregon University has a long history of working with students and communities in Micronesia.
  • Afternoon meetings to discuss rural broadband, cap and trade, and PGE’s power generation in Morrow County.

Friday, February 15th:

  • 9:00 Full Ways and Means Committee. I spoke in favor of a plan to keep the Oregon Health Plan funded.  Around 30% of the people in the seven counties I represent are on the Oregon Health Plan.
  • Worked on a Proton Therapy Bill, one of my priority bills.
  • Lunch: I had some good conversations with my Senate Colleagues on different legislation. If things need changing in a bill, these conversations can, and often do, get the job done.
  • Afternoon spent catching up on phone messages, correspondence, and attacking the stack on my desk.
  • Late afternoon I went down to Eugene for a bit of R&R, attending the UofO Lady Ducks basketball game versus OSU.

So, there you have it.  To summarize I testified on 9 bills; attended 5 committee meetings with over 8 hours of listening to testimony; attended a mandatory 4-hour training; 20+ individual appointments with constituents, lobbyists, and others; wrote and presented two speeches; numerous meetings that just happened; and a Lady Duck basketball game on Friday night.  Go Ducks!

Bill Hansell represents District 29 in the State Senate.  He and his wife have moved to Salem for the 2019 Session, living in the basement of Rep. Greg Barreto’s ranch house north of Kaiser.  He is affectionately known as ‘Basement Bill’ by some.


5. Maryhill Museum of Art Set to Open for the Season on March 15

Special Exhibitions to Highlight the Museum’s Diverse Collections

(GOLDENDALE, Wash., February 20, 2019) –Maryhill Museum of Art, one of the Pacific Northwest’s most remote and beguiling museums, will open its doors for the season on Friday, March 15, with special exhibitions highlighting works on paper, still life paintings and sculpture from its own collections. The museum is open daily 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., from March 15 – November 15.   Set among 5,300 acres on a bluff overlooking the Columbia River Gorge, Maryhill also features permanent exhibitions of European and American painting, a full gallery of works by French sculptor Auguste Rodin, international chess sets, and Native American arts and artifacts. Outside of the museum visitors can enjoy several expansive lawns, shade trees and picnic areas, and the William and Catherine Dickson Outdoor Sculpture Park with works by many noted Northwest artists. The museum’s terrace offers stunning views of the Columbia River and Mount Hood.

The museum will present the following special exhibitions in 2019. Many of the exhibitions will be complemented by educational programs and special events. Please click here for the full program calendar.

SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS IN 2019

Mélange: Works on Paper from the Permanent Collection – March 15 – July 7, 2019

Mélange includes an array of more than 40 prints, drawings and watercolors drawn from Maryhill’s collection. Included are works by noted Northwest artists such as Rick Bartow, Betty LaDuke, Richard Thompson and Henk Pander. Also featured are a lithograph by Thomas Hart Benton and several prints by the French artist Marcel Augis, who trod World War I battlefields to depict the everyday lives of Allied troops. The subject matter of the works on view ranges from landscapes and nature studies to interiors, portraits, still life and abstract works.  

West Coast Woodcut: Contemporary Relief Prints by Regional Artists – July 13 – November 15, 2019

Explore the natural and urban beauty, and the social worlds of the West Coast through woodcuts, linocuts and wood engravings by artists from Washington, Oregon and California. Among those featured are Oregon artists Berk Chappell, Dennis Cunningham, Erik Sandgren, Jonnel Covault, Manuel Izquierdo and Paul Gentry; Washington artist Yoshiko Yamamoto; and California artists Andrea Rich, Art Hazelwood, Daniel Gonzalez, Gordon Mortenson, Leonard Nuñez, Rik Olson and Tom Killion. The prints showcase not only the natural splendor of West Coast, but also address homelessness, migrant labor, emigration, Native fisheries, logging and environmental issues. All of the 60 works are drawn from the museum’s permanent collection. 

Maryhill Favorites: Still Life – March 15 – November 15, 2019

Still life prints and paintings from Maryhill’s permanent collection, including work by Robert Douglas Hunter, Richard Lack, Henk Bos, Jakob Bogdani, Katja Oxman, and Oregon artists John Van Dreal and Robert Bibler. The exhibition includes a sumptuous painting of poppies and fruit by British artist Annie Feray Mutrie, considered one of the foremost flower painters of the Victorian era.

Théodore Rivière: Sculpture – March 15 – November 15, 2019

The 19th-century French artist Théodore Rivière (1857–1912) is best known for his small-scale sculptures with Orientalist themes. His works also frequently show Art Nouveau influences. On view are more than a dozen figurative sculptures in bronze, marble and terra cotta.  

Théâtre de la Mode – March 15 – November 15, 2019

Created as a means to re-build France’s fashion industry after the devastation of World War II, this exhibition shows one-third human size mannequins wearing fashions created by the country’s finest designers. When it debuted at Louvre’s Museum of Decorative Arts in 1945, the opening drew 100,000 visitors.  After touring Europe and the US in 1946, the exhibition languished in the basement of San Francisco’s City of Paris department store; the sets were destroyed, but the mannequins were saved by Alma de Bretteville Spreckels who championed their acquisition by Maryhill Museum of Art. Maryhill is now home to nine re-built sets and restored mannequins.

During 2019, three Théâtre de la Mode sets will leave storage and rotate onto view: André Beaurepaire’s “La Grotto Enchantée” (The Enchanted Grotto); Jean-Denis Malclès’ “Le Jardin Marveilleux” (The Marvelous Garden); and André Dignimont’s “Palais Royale.”   The sets feature garments and accessories by such celebrated designers as Worth, Jean Patou, Balenciaga, Nina Ricci, Mad Carpentier, Lanvin, Schiaparelli, Hermès, Pierre Balmain and Grès, among others.

EXHIBITIONS in the M.J. MURDOCK CHARITABLE TRUST EDUCATION CENTER

Exhibitions presented in the museum’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center further the museum’s educational mission and feature collaborative exhibitions with regional arts educators, academies and art groups. The following exhibitions will be presented in the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center in 2019:

Washington Art Education Association Exhibition

Teachers as Artists – Exploring Identity

March 15 – May 26, 2019

Teachers as Artists is an annual juried exhibition in the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center showcasing the talents of WAEA members who are current or retired arts educators. This year we invited art teachers to submit works in any genre that explore identity. Presented in partnership with Washington Art Education Association.  Juror: Karen Giles, Lifelong Museum Educator and retired Manager of Adult and Community Programs at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles.

2019 Plein Air Painting in the Columbia River Gorge – August 4 – 24, 2019

An annual showcase of works created by artists during the Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event. Forty artists from the northwest and across the country spend four days plein air painting in the Columbia River Gorge, capturing the incredible light and landscape, from snowcapped Mount Hood and surrounding orchards, to wineries, high plateaus and waterfalls. Paintings are on view and available for purchase in the museum’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center. As work is sold and removed, other work created during the paint-out will replace it. A portion of the proceeds support Maryhill Museum of Art. 

Works on Paper: Drawing Reality – June 1 – July 17, 2019

Presented in collaboration with Aristides Atelier at Seattle’s Gage Academy, this exhibition examines importance of developing drawing skills, as well as understanding drawing as a finished art form.

Exquisite Gorge – September 3 – 25, 2019

View a unique 60-foot print created with a steam roller on the grounds of Maryhill. Ten artists were selected to create a woodblock carving inspired by and in collaboration with communities along the Columbia River from the Snake to the Willamette. Similar to the Surrealist practice of “exquisite corpse,” each artist’s unique print block was joined with the others to form a continuous image, with the Columbia River running through it.


6. AARP Opens Applications for 2019 Community Challenge Grant Program

Clackamas, OR —AARP has opened applications for the 2019 AARP Community Challenge grant program to fund “quick-action” projects that spark change across the country. Now in its third year, the program is part of AARP’s nationwide work on Livable Communities. Grants can range from several hundred dollars for small, short-term activities to several thousand dollars for larger projects.

“We’ve seen these mini grants spark change and new solutions in communities across Oregon from Port Orford to Hood River,” said AARP Oregon State Director Ruby Haughton-Pitts. “We’re excited to see the creative proposals from commuity groups this year,” she said.

The Community Challenge is open to 501(c)(3), 501(c)(4) and 501(c)(6) nonprofits and government entities. Other types of organizations will be considered on a case-by-case basis. AARP will prioritize projects with permanent or temporary solutions that aim to achieve one or more of the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate the tangible value of “Smart Cities.” New in 2019, this category will encourage applicants to develop and implement innovative programs that engage residents in accessing, understanding and using data to increase quality of life for all, as well as engage in decision-making about housing, transportation, economic development, placemaking, infrastructure or other community aspects.
  • Deliver a range of transportation and mobility options that increase connectivity, walkability, bikeability, wayfinding, access to transportation options and roadway improvements.
  • Create vibrant public places that improve open spaces, parks and access to other amenities.
  • Support the availability of a range of housing that increases accessible and affordable housing options.
  • Other community improvements. In addition to the four areas of focus, AARP wants to hear about local needs and new, innovative ideas for addressing them.

Since 2017, AARP has awarded 217 grants through the AARP Community Challenge to nonprofit organizations and government entities representing 50 states and U.S. territories.

The 2019 application deadline is 11:59 p.m. ET, April 17, 2019, and all projects must be completed by November 4, 2019. To submit an application or learn more, visit AARP.org/CommunityChallenge.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbOpinion: HB 2020 will devastate Oregon families

U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Service, Amber Waves

Islands of Portland

SCOTUS Ruling Prohibits Mandatory Union Dues For Public Employees

Hands Off Venezuela: Historic Stance at the United Nations against US Imperialism

The Progressive Movement & the Transformation America Politics


 

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