Sherman County eNews #49

CONTENTS

  1. Dorothy E. Heater 1926-2019

  2. Optimism is a Choice We Make

  3. College embarks upon skill center, housing projects

  4. Sherman County History Tidbits: The Formation of Sherman County

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Dorothy E. Heater 1926-2019 

flower.rose.starDorothy E. Heater, 92 yrs. of Moro passed away February 11, 2019. She was born June 21, 1926 in Oak Grove, Oregon, to Fred E. Feldman and Hattie S. (Hoke) Feldman.

Dorothy graduated from Milwaukie High School in 1944.She was employed at Pacific Northwest Bell in the accounting department until November 1947. She married Joe L. Heater and moved to Moro, Oregon. They farmed for other people for 40 years. The longest time period was for Dutton & McKean, two of the Powell sisters. In 1988 Joe was diagnosed with the first signs of Alzheimer’s. They retired in the Ragsdale house which they restored in Moro. Dorothy lived in The Dalles for a number of years; but chose to return to Moro in 2007. She loved volunteering at MCMC, Sherman County Historical Museum, and the Veteran’s home.

She was a member of the Moro Presbyterian church and later in life, Wasco United Methodist. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Joe, brother Fred D., and sister Fran M. Parker. She is survived by her daughter Kathy (Joe) Novak, daughter Cindy (Jeff) Heater-Judah, granddaughter, Hattie C. Justesen, grandsons Michael, & Joe Novak, and Colby R. Judah. Two great-granddaughters, and one great grandson and one nephew and five nieces. At her request, no funeral or graveside service will take place. Memorials may be sent to Sherman County Historical Society or Mid-Columbia Medical Foundation.


2. Optimism is a Choice We Make

Are optimists people who just don’t see the pain and suffering in the world, or is something else going on? Let’s talk about optimism in a less than perfect world.

Do you know anyone who is a pessimist because they claim that it’s just being “realistic”? They seem to feel that because the world contains murderers and molesters, and because war, famine and injustice are common, it is simpleminded to take an optimistic view.

Now, it may very well be simpleminded to try to live as if the world contained no pain, suffering or injustice. Current events around the world prove that. But remember, the practical optimists of the world rarely lead lives untouched by suffering.

Saint Paul, for example, wrote his remarkable letter about joy to the Philippians while he was in a Roman jail, awaiting, as far as he knew at the time, execution.

Dr. Viktor Frankl, who lived through three years in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, related that the survivors were often not the ones who were physically strongest, but rather those who found reasons to live with integrity in the midst of horror and death.

To live and breathe pessimism is to deny the possibility of change. Goals are not set, and the vision of solutions disappears. Creativity is tamped down, if not blotted out completely. The fixed mindset becomes just that – fixed, and on the negative. Eventually, the downward spiral toward depression is the only landing pad.

Optimism is a choice we make with our eyes wide open. It is a choice that enables us to live with purpose and hope, no matter what the circumstances. When you make that choice, day after day, year after year, you will be standing with St. Paul, Dr. Frankl and so many others on the side of transformation and hope – which is a truly great place to be! ~The Pacific Institute


3. College embarks upon skill center, housing projects

Thanks to the support of community partners and its board of directors, Columbia Gorge Community College this spring will embark upon the college’s most significant physical expansion since establishing the Hood River – Indian Creek Campus and redeveloping The Dalles Campus more than a decade ago.

The “Treaty Oak Regional Skills Center” will enable CGCC to offer career-tech training in family-wage skills currently seeing high demand locally and across the Pacific Northwest. Yet the new building will also be flexible enough to accommodate long-term training demands, which are ever-changing as the Columbia Gorge economy continues to diversify.

Along with the skills center, the college will also construct student housing on The Dalles Campus. This meets a longstanding need emphasized through a student survey last year, which found many students living in their vehicles or in temporary shelters, or commuting long distances each day, all because of the shortage of affordable local housing.

In January the college completed an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the City of The Dalles and Wasco County allocating $3.5 million in “enterprise zone” funds toward the new career-tech skills training center. These funds, together with the college’s own “full faith and credit” bond obligation and a $7.3 million allocation from the Oregon Legislature, will result in a total of $14.7 million investment.

In allocating the funds, Oregon lawmakers mandated that the project focus on the grades 11-14 transition from high school to college, providing the opportunity for innovative elements in educational programming as well as physical infrastructure. North Wasco County School District is cited by the Legislature as a full partner in this “prototype facility.”

“This project only became possible through the support of the Oregon Legislature, The Dalles City Council and Wasco County Board of Commissioners,” stated Dr. Marta Yera Cronin, president of CGCC. “Their encouragement, and the support of our college board of directors, North Wasco County School District, Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue District, Port of The Dalles, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District and many other partners, truly make this a community project – something that will benefit everyone by allowing the college to train people with the skills needed for family-wage employment.”

The college’s bond — which is not a local tax measure but rather an investor-financed debt secured by the college’s own credit – is $7.475 million. The city and county contribution of $3.5 million will essentially reimburse the college for nearly half this amount upon project completion. Together with the state’s contribution of $7.3 million, this means the college ultimately will be responsible for approximately $3.9 million of the $14.7 million project, all without adding to local property taxes.

Next steps include a conditional use permit from the City of The Dalles, hiring a project manager, and selecting an architect and engineering firm. The college anticipates ground-breaking in 2020 and project completion in 2022.

Thanks to the support of community partners and its board of directors, Columbia Gorge Community College this spring will embark upon the college’s most significant physical expansion since establishing the Hood River – Indian Creek Campus and redeveloping The Dalles Campus more than a decade ago.

The “Treaty Oak Regional Skills Center” will enable CGCC to offer career-tech training in family-wage skills currently seeing high demand locally and across the Pacific Northwest. Yet the new building will also be flexible enough to accommodate long-term training demands, which are ever-changing as the Columbia Gorge economy continues to diversify.

Along with the skills center, the college will also construct student housing on The Dalles Campus. This meets a longstanding need emphasized through a student survey last year, which found many students living in their vehicles or in temporary shelters, or commuting long distances each day, all because of the shortage of affordable local housing.

In January the college completed an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the City of The Dalles and Wasco County allocating $3.5 million in “enterprise zone” funds toward the new career-tech skills training center. These funds, together with the college’s own “full faith and credit” bond obligation and a $7.3 million allocation from the Oregon Legislature, will result in a total of $14.7 million investment.

In allocating the funds, Oregon lawmakers mandated that the project focus on the grades 11-14 transition from high school to college, providing the opportunity for innovative elements in educational programming as well as physical infrastructure. North Wasco County School District is cited by the Legislature as a full partner in this “prototype facility.”

“This project only became possible through the support of the Oregon Legislature, The Dalles City Council and Wasco County Board of Commissioners,” stated Dr. Marta Yera Cronin, president of CGCC. “Their encouragement, and the support of our college board of directors, North Wasco County School District, Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue District, Port of The Dalles, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District and many other partners, truly make this a community project – something that will benefit everyone by allowing the college to train people with the skills needed for family-wage employment.”

The college’s bond — which is not a local tax measure but rather an investor-financed debt secured by the college’s own credit – is $7.475 million. The city and county contribution of $3.5 million will essentially reimburse the college for nearly half this amount upon project completion. Together with the state’s contribution of $7.3 million, this means the college ultimately will be responsible for approximately $3.9 million of the $14.7 million project, all without adding to local property taxes.

Next steps include a conditional use permit from the City of The Dalles, hiring a project manager, and selecting an architect and engineering firm. The college anticipates ground-breaking in 2020 and project completion in 2022.


4. Sherman County History Tidbits: The Formation of Sherman County

Happy Birthday, Sherman County!  February 25, 1989 

The Golden Land by Giles L. French, pages 107-115, excerpted:

“Independence. … Candidates for office from ‘east Wasco county’ had not often been successful in getting elected, although W.H. Biggs had been state representative, Walter Moore had been a candidate for sheriff and J.B. Scott for clerk. E.O. McCoy, a Republican, had been just elected state representative… After the election of 1888 a petition was circulated asking for the annexation of the land between the Deschutes and John Day to Gilliam County which had been established in 1885. Few signed this petition. Another one appeared asking for a new county. A large number of settlers signed it, even though some felt the movement was premature and that the county would be too small…

“… Sentiment for the new county came quickly, whipped up by the newly established Wasco Observer… [and] did not receive spontaneous support from the Grass Valley country… Nevertheless, residents of the area had signed the petition for a new county. E.O. (Dutch) McCoy, warehouseman, store-keeper, grain-buyer, farm equipment dealer, big and aggressive in a genial Irish manner, was the new representative with a desire to please. He introduced a bill to create Fulton County with the southern boundary at the Crook County line. Antelope sent a delegation to Salem to oppose that and gained the support of E.L. Smith, Wasco County’s other representative, who was also speaker of the house. McCoy had to amend his bill. The opposition from the south was so strong that the line was placed between townships two and three south of the base line, a short mile south of Grass Valley.

“The new county was to honor Colonel James Fulton, an early and leading citizen, a Democrat of southern parentage, member of the 1870 legislature, one-time bridge builder, stockman and farmer. When the bill came before the house a member from Tillamook County, William Maxwell, who had served long at Salem and acquired much prestige, argued that back in 1870 when Colonel Fulton had been a member there had been a resolution asking General William Tecumseh Sherman, then on a trip through Oregon, to speak to the assembled legislators. In that year the legislature was Democratic and Sherman’s name was highly unpopular. Fulton opposed the resolution ‘in a bitter speech denunciatory of General Sherman. It was a regular secession speech from the word go, and the outcome was that General Sherman did not visit the state house,’ according to the report on Maxwell’s remarks in the Weekly Oregonian, February 22, 1889.

“Maxwell, therefore, moved that the name Fulton be stricken from McCoy’s bill wherever it appeared and the name Sherman substituted therefore. Delay and opposition and the expected end of the session had weakened the ardor for the new county and McCoy accepted the amendment. Charles Hilton saw the bill through the senate and three days after it had passed the house, Governor Sylvester Pennoyer signed the bill making Sherman County a political entity as of February 25, 1889. … …

“Appointed to office were James Fulton, judge; V.C. Brock, clerk; E.M. Leslie, sheriff; Levi Armsworthy, treasurer; C.J. Bright, school superintendent; John Medler and Dayton Elliot, commissioners; John A. Smith, surveyor; C.C. Myers, assessor; J.B. Hoss, coroner. On March 4, Fulton refused his commission and Owen M. Scott was named to serve. These men held office until July 1, 1890 when those who were elected in June took over. Some changes were made… men from farther south succeeding appointees. C.F. McCarthy became school superintendent; William Henrichs, assessor; J.R. Belshee, surveyor; John Moore, commissioner; [and] R.J. Ginn was appointed commissioner when John Graham would not serve, and J.W. Blackburne served out Scott’s term as judge. … …

“The election of June 2, 1890, had a more interesting matter than the selection of officers; the county voted on the location of a permanent county seat. Moore Bros. had gone to Wasco and bought the Observer and installed a young lawyer, J.B. Hosford, as editor. He was not a man inclined toward intense partisanship, but he did speak for Moro as the county seat. The issue was further complicated by the entrance of Kenneth into the race. Kenneth was the name of a nebulous townsite located a mile east of DeMoss in Grass Valley Canyon. … With three locations to be voted on no one of them attained a majority. … …

“Wasco remained the seat of government until another election could be held. The legislature of 1891 added another eighteen miles to the county on the south, putting it between townships five and six south of the base line. This brought in more citizens. … It also added to the voters who favored Moro. The election of 1892 was between Wasco and Moro, Kenneth having been eliminated by running third. The question was decided by a vote of 404 to 301. Precincts voted as follows:

Bigelow: Moro 11, Wasco 32

Grant: Moro 38, Wasco 39

Wasco: Moro 23, Wasco 183

Monkland: Moro 61, Wasco 30

Moro: Moro 117, Wasco 2

Grass Valley: Moro 74, Wasco 5

Rutledge: Moro 51, Wasco 5

Kent: Moro 29, Wasco 5.

“The census of 1890 gave the population of the county as 1,892. … … The record shows that Wasco accepted defeat gracefully and Moro her victory with little more than the expected elation. Wasco generally supported the movement for a court house for which the county contracted in July, 1892 with H.C. Jackson, who built a vault and a building on the main street of Moro. A block of land on the hill was bought for a court house which was built in 1897.

“Also in 1892 John Fulton was elected county judge over R.J. Ginn; D.H. Leach and J.D. Wilcox were elected commissioner; S.S. Hayes, clerk over V.C. Brock; E.M. Leslie remained as sheriff defeating Emmitt Olds; H.A. Thompson became treasurer, beating Josiah Marsh; William Henrichs was re-elected assessor over Louis Schadewitz; Hiram Tyree was made school superintendent defeating W.J. Peddicord; W.H. Moore became coroner and J.R. Belshee, surveyor. Thus the politicians who had worked so hard for a new county were eliminated within a few years and the county settled back to the business of farming, building bigger houses, buying more machinery.  … …

“The citizens of Sherman County had gotten themselves a new county without settling their problems. It still cost toll to go to The Dalles and the freight rates were still considered too high. The Free Bridge road was often impassable because of rock slides. … … There was need for a road to let residents north of Gordon ridge down to the Free Bridge and this was provided in the winter of 1895-96 when Charley Barzee and some others, who lived in the neighborhood concerned, agitated for a road up Rattlesnake canyon the site of the original survey when the Free Bridge was first contemplated and for which John Fulton had made the survey. Barzee built the grade in the winter, using frozen sod for the grade which was not as rocky as expected. It joined the Harris grade a little above the Free Bridge and made that structure available to more farmers. … … The Free Bridge was destroyed in 1912, after much of its usefulness had ceased. Whether by flood as officially stated, or by dynamite, as partisans aver, it is gone, leaving nothing but a few stalwart pillars standing in the swift water as mute evidence that Hoffman and Bates did their work well. … …”


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

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