Sherman County eNews #48

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Closed, Feb. 16

  2. Sherman County Health Board Meeting Rescheduled, Feb. 20

  3. House Bill 2931: Restricting Journalists’ Access to Executive Sessions

  4. Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance

  5. Learning to Face Our Fears

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Public/School Library Closed, Feb. 16

Sherman County Public/School Library will be CLOSED today, February 16th, due to road conditions near the school. ~Abbey Phelps, Sherman County Public/School Library


2. Sherman County Health Board Meeting Rescheduled, Feb. 20

Due to the inclement weather, the Sherman County Health District had to cancel the regular board meeting on February 14th. This meeting has been rescheduled for Wednesday, February 20th, at 5:30 in the administration office.


3. House Bill 2931: Restricting Journalists’ Access to Executive Sessions

Oregonians would be shocked how often reporters attend closed-door executive sessions to find officials having discussions that by law must instead take place in public. A new bill would make it harder for reporters to let the public know what’s happening:


4. Oregon Farm Bureau statement on Hammonds grazing permit reissuance

SALEM, OREGON, February 15, 2019 – “On Feb. 14, 2014, the Bureau of Land Management revoked the grazing permit of Hammond Ranches. Almost five years to the day later, on Feb. 13, 2019, BLM signed documents that reissued the permit, allowing the Hammond family to get back to the business of raising cattle in eastern Oregon.

“This reissued grazing permit signals that justice has finally been achieved for this rural family. While nobody can restore what the Hammonds have lost to years of prosecutorial overreach and bureaucratic vendetta, we are grateful that this awful chapter is closed.

“Oregon Farm Bureau was proud to play a role in advocating on the Hammonds’ behalf, including gathering over 25,000 online signatures and working directly with officials, so the family can return to doing what they love and keep a proud heritage of ranching alive.”


5. Learning to Face Our Fears

Everyone feels frightened from time to time, especially young children. Let’s face it. There are some pretty frightening images on television and in newspapers and magazines, not to mention online. So, let’s talk about how to handle the fears of the children in our lives, whether they are our children, grandchildren, godchildren, nieces, nephews – whatever.

What should you do if your child becomes terrified of the water, or of going to the doctor, or shows fearful or aggressive behavior that you hadn’t noticed before? First, don’t panic. Fears surface normally during several stages of child development.

Reassure your children patiently and affectionately about themselves as well as the feared object or person. Let them know you understand how they feel, and that it’s OK to feel that way. Hold the line on reasonable discipline and clear limits, reminding them of the reasons for these limits and help them understand that learning to control our behavior in acceptable ways is a process that takes plenty of time.

Tell them about how you or others in the family deal with fearful or aggressive feelings, and help them begin to express themselves and understand why they feel the way they do. Make sure each knows that in case of real danger, you will do your best to keep them safe. In doing so, you will be establishing valuable patterns for sharing the inevitable turmoil of later periods, including adolescence and young adulthood.

Fears are part of the normal periods of adjustment that kids go through as they grow and develop, and your attitude can make a tremendous difference in how soon they disappear. For good or ill, children look to their parents and the important adults in their lives as models. Knowing how you face your fears will go a long way in helping your children find their own ways to face and conquer their fears. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbEditorial: HB 2931 would incorrectly restrict journalists’ access to executive sessions

Society of Professional Journalists, Oregon Territory Chapter

Oregon Legislature: House Bill 2931 Relating to attendance at public meetings held in executive session 

Emerging Journalists: Report for America Application February 22

Road Conditions & Accident Reports for The Columbia River Gorge Area: Facebook Closed Group

Legislature: Health Insurance Tax Passes Ways and Means

Dead pines drive new herbicide rules in Oregon

League of Oregon Cities Training Opportunities

Shall We Defend Our Common History?

Cattle losses from Eastern Washington blizzard top $2 million

21-Year Old WWII Soldier’s Sketchbooks Reveal a Visual Diary of His Experiences