Sherman County eNews #38

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. Sherman County School District Activities Cancelled, Feb. 9 & 10

  2. Notice. Sherman County Public/School Library Closed, Feb. 9

  3. Community Renewable Energy Association News

  4. Building Strong Relationships

  5. Sherman County History Tidbits


1. Notice. Sherman County School District Activities Cancelled, Feb. 9 & 10

LogoShermanCoSchoolSherman County School District Parents, Guardians, Students, Staff and Constituents,

All District activities have been cancelled for Saturday, February 9 and Sunday, February 10.  This includes the games at Mitchell today (February 9).  The games have been rescheduled for Monday, February 11 (Girls Varsity at 4:30 p.m., Boys Varsity at 6:00 p.m.).  Weather and road conditions will be closely monitored throughout the weekend.  If delays or closures occur on Monday, the information will be reported through the School Messenger system.

We apologize for the inconvenience.

Thank you,

Wes Owens
Superintendent
Sherman County School District
Working Together To Put Student Success First!


2. Notice. Sherman County Public/School Library Closed, Feb. 9

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017Due to current and forecast weather conditions, Sherman County Public/School Library will be closed today, Saturday, February 9th.

 

 


3. Community Renewable Energy Association News

By Frontier Advocates

The executive committee of the Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) met on February 8, 2019, at Columbia Gorge Community College. Vice Chair Don Coats presided as Morrow County Commissioner Don Russell, Chair was unavailable. Other county representatives present included Sherman County Judge Joe Dabulskis, Gilliam County Judge Elizabeth Farrar, Hood River County Commissioner Les Perkins and Morrow County Commissioner Jim Doherty (by phone). CREA is an intergovernmental entity funded by allocations from the Strategic Investment Programs in Gilliam, Morrow and Sherman Counties:  https://www.community-renewables.org/

This budget year the revenue has come from: Gilliam, $93,000; Morrow, $71,500; Sherman, $19,500. The expenses are primarily for staffing (executive director, board secretary and financial services), legal services and advocacy.

Topics for discussion included a legislative update from Doris Penwell, a consultant for Association of Oregon Counties, an executive director’s report from Brian Skeehan including a review of the financials (the budget is following projections) and discussion of issues with the Oregon Public Utilities Commission and several bills before the legislature.

Executive Director Skeehan spoke of the proposed pump storage projects in Klamath County and at the John Day dam site. Having worked with Klickitat County PUD for many years, Skeehan said he felt the John Day project looked promising for getting a federal permit. The significance of the project is that it would store intermittent renewable energy from wind, solar and other sources at low rates and deliver on demand power higher rates.

Concern was expressed about recent Department of Revenue rulings denying natural resource estate tax credits to farms with wind generation projects.

Frontier Advocates is a partnership dedicated to navigating and shaping public policy on behalf of rural Oregon. Partners are three retired county judges with over 75 years of collective experience: Steve Grasty (Harney), Mike McArthur (Sherman) and Laura Pryor (Gilliam). All three judges have also served in statewide leadership roles. Contact FrontierAdvocate@gmail.com


4. Building Strong Relationships

What makes a good relationship work? What makes a good relationship turn bad and fall apart? Let’s talk about what it takes to build solid relationships.

Most people would never consider jumping off a cliff into the sea without some expertise in swimming, but almost all of us jump into relationships without a clue about how to make them work.

We’ve never given much thought to what a really good relationship needs, or about what skills the people in the relationship should have, if they really want to get the most out of it. Nevertheless, we seem to expect some version of happily-ever-after to follow, and when it doesn’t, we’re often surprised and disillusioned.

But if we want strong, loving relationships, we need the foundation of strong and open communication skills, demonstrations of affection that are genuine and understood, and a great deal of patience – for ourselves and the other involved in the relationship. We need the pillars of honesty, acceptance and dependability. And let us remember compassion, forgiveness and freedom, and the ability to successfully negotiate conflicts, as well. Without these, the structure of our relationship will not stand against the challenge of an ill wind.

Both building and maintaining a relationship requires a great deal of skill and lots of energy. It is an investment that requires our attention, if it is to succeed. However, a lot of people assume that, once started, their relationships will just take care of themselves. Relationships are more like flowers planted in a garden. Once planted, they need water and fertilizer, and occasional pruning, in order to flourish and bloom.

Now, if a business owner assumed that once started, the business needed no further attention, no one would be surprised when that business went bankrupt. It is easy to see business as an investment and completely logical to take care to make sure that our investment doesn’t fail. Our relationships deserve at least the same level of care we would put into our business, don’t they? ~The Pacific Institute


5. Sherman County History Tidbits

“A.E. Hammond, prominent civil engineer, died in San Francisco last Saturday aged 70 years. Mr. Hammond had charge of construction of the Columbia Southern Railway when the line was built from Biggs to Shaniko. Later the road was purchased by the OWRR&N company. Mr. Hammond came to Oregon in 188_ from North Dakota, moving to California about five years ago.” [Oregon Washington Railroad & Navigation Company] ~~Source: Sherman County Observer, 13 March 1925.