Sherman County eNews #34

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court & OSU Ag Extension Meeting, Feb. 6

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court & Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, Feb. 21

  4. Notice. Sherman County Court & CCO Meeting, Feb. 7

  5. Notice. School Exclusion Day is Wednesday, February 20, 2019

  6. Oregon Legislature’s Joint Revenue Committee & Gov. Brown’s School Funding Proposal

  7. Growing Character

  8. West Wing Reads: State of the Union Address

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update

sports-basket2ballThe following changes are reflected in the schedules:

HIGH SCHOOL:

The Saturday, February 9th high school games vs. Mitchell/Spray will take place in Mitchell (not Spray).

JUNIOR HIGH:

The A-Boys will not be playing tonight against Horizon Christian. Only the A-Girls at 3:30 and the B-Boys at 4:30.

~Jeanie Pehlke, Confidential Secretary
Sherman County School District
541.565.3500  |  541.565.3319 (Fax)


2. Notice. Sherman County Court & OSU Ag Extension Meeting, Feb. 6

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the OSU Ag extension position discussion meeting to be held on Wednesday February 6, 2019 at 4pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR. 97029.


3. Notice. Sherman County Court & Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, Feb. 21

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) to be held on Thursday, February 21, 2019, at 11am in the Sherman County Courthouse Addition – 500 Court street, Moro, OR. 97029.


4. Notice. Sherman County Court & CCO Meeting, Feb. 7

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the CCO Boundary Change meeting to be held on Thursday, February 7, 2019, at 3pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR. 97029.


5. Notice. School Exclusion Day is Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Oregon law requires that all children attending public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities, have up-to-date immunization documentation (or have an exemption) to remain in school.

The goal is to make sure children are fully protected against vaccine-preventable diseases and can go to school in a safe and healthy environment. Immunization is a safe way to help protect your family, your school and your community, against disease. 

The date for exclusion this year is Wednesday, February 20, 2019.

Each year North Central Public Health District sends a letter to the parents of children that need additional immunizations, indicating what additional immunizations a child needs. Letters are in the mail this week.

Please be aware that North Central Public Health District typically receives a large number of walk-in clients needing to be immunized the week of school exclusion. Our walk-in clinic hours that week will be Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Clients are seen on a first-come-first-served basis.

Parents seeking immunization for their child should contact their primary care provider, their pharmacist (if the child is over 11 years of age), or North Central Public Health District during our walk-in clinic hours.

You can also call 211 for information about where to go for immunizations in your area. 

In recent years there have been a few changes, please keep in mind:

 Hepatitis A vaccine requirement: The hepatitis A vaccine, which protects against a communicable viral infection, is a two-dose series now required for children18 months through tenth grade.

 Nonmedical exemption process: Parents wanting a new nonmedical exemption for their child must provide documentation that they have received education about the benefits and risks of immunization on a Vaccine Education Certificate. Parents can get education from a health care practitioner or from watching an online vaccine education module. More information about the new process is available at www.healthoregon.org/vaccineexemption.

On Wednesday, February 20, 2019, children will not be able to attend school or child care if their records on file show missing immunizations. No child will be turned away from North Central Public Health District due to a parents’ inability to pay for required vaccines. Please note that our walk-in clinic hours that week will be Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Additional information on school immunizations can be found at the Oregon Immunization Program website at www.healthoregon.org/imm.  For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


6. Oregon Legislature’s Joint Revenue Committee & Gov. Brown’s School Funding Proposal

By Frontier Advocates

Oregon Legislature: These materials were presented to the Joint Revenue committee, the selected house and senate revenue committee members meeting jointly. Their task is to find the $1 Billion a year for schools that Governor Brown has made a priority for this session. The initial target appears to be some type of business tax. The committee is reviewing different approaches and their impacts.

Frontier Advocates is a partnership dedicated to navigating and shaping public policy on behalf of rural Oregon. Partners are three retired county judges with over 75 years of collective experience: Steve Grasty (Harney), Mike McArthur (Sherman), and Laura Pryor (Gilliam). All three former judges also served in statewide leadership roles. Contact FrontierAdvocate@gmail.com.


7. Growing Character

Today, let’s look at what parents can do to help their children develop good character.

How do people develop character? Well, first and most important, by what they are taught and what they see as they grow up. Very simply, placing examples of virtue in front of young people as early as possible, and as often as possible, forms character.

It is those positive pictures that they see, absorb, and understand are of great personal value that they will be drawn toward. Remember: human beings are picture-oriented; it’s hardwired in our brains.

You see, you don’t build character in your children by trying to control them or telling them what to do. You build it by consistently doing the right thing yourself and not making a big fuss about it. You build it by telling and reading your children stories that reinforce goodness from the time they are very young. Remember, you are your child’s best example, the one they see before all others.

So, what is the right thing? Well, honesty, accountability, fairness, tolerance, civility and kindness, for starters. Without these, trust will be difficult to earn. You might want to think about adding in compassion and empathy as they grow and learn.

Talk to them about hypocrisy, self-deception, cruelty and selfishness when you see it around you, in language they will understand. Avoid delivering a lecture that they can turn off. Just make it clear that there are better ways of living, and that you expect them to live up to your picture of them as people of fine character.

Providing the pictures of what to do right, first, goes a long way to ensuring your children adopt the examples as a part of their own fine character. ~The Pacific Institute.


8. West Wing Reads: State of the Union Address

American flag2With Pitch for Unity, President Trump Urges Republicans and Democrats to ‘Choose Greatness’ – West Wing Reads: https://www.whitehouse.gov/westwingreads/

“President Trump in his State of the Union address Tuesday night issued a call for unity and an end to the political divisiveness that has ensnared Washington,” Melissa Quinn reports for the Washington Examiner.

During the speech—with its theme of “choosing greatness”—President Trump laid out five priorities that should unite both parties in Washington: “American jobs and fair trade, rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure, reducing the price of healthcare and prescription drugs, creating a safe and lawful immigration system, and pursuing a foreign policy agenda that ‘puts America’s interests first.’”

In The Hill, Tal Axelrod reports that roughly three-quarters of American voters approved of President Trump’s State of the Union address, according to CNN and CBS News polls. “Seventy-six percent approved of the speech in the CBS poll, with 24 percent saying they disapproved,” Axelrod writes. But the telling stat: CBS found that “about 82 percent of independents in that survey who watched the speech liked what they heard.”

“The speech was big, not just in length — about 80 minutes — but also in concept. It had a structure. It had a message. It had passages to appeal to all Americans. It had passages to appeal to Trump’s conservative base. And it had passages to appeal to opposition Democrats,” Byron York writes in the Washington Examiner. “He delivered a big, broad, far-ranging statement of his approach to the presidency and to the country.”

“The president also took time to highlight a few of the many incredible achievements under his administration” in last night’s State of the Union, Kimberly Guilfoyle writes in The Daily Caller. “Record-low unemployment rates for African Americans, Hispanics, and women. Rising wages and tax cuts for working-class families. A historic bipartisan criminal justice reform bill to give non-violent offenders a second chance.”

“Members of Congress broke out into a spirited singing of ‘Happy Birthday’ for a guest of President Trump’s State of the Union who survived both the Holocaust and the anti-Semitic mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue,” Tamar Lapin reports in the New York Post. President Trump also honored three veterans who served in World War II: Private First Class Joseph Reilly, Staff Sergeant Irving Locker, and Sergeant Herman Zeitchik.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.bookEnergy Northwest

A Forgotten Botanist’s Stunning 19th-Century Manuscript Is Now Online

Forgotten Oregon Facebook Group

Health Insurance Consumer Complaints Up in 2018

Oregon Bill Seeks Suicide Prevention Plans in Schools

Oregon Legislature:

 Oregon’s Sen. Wyden Skewers State Department Silence Over Saudi students’ disappearance

West Wing Reads on the State of the Union Address

CNN on the State of the Union Address

Patriot Post Review of the State of the Union Address

Looking Back at the Fifties & Sixties


 

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