Sherman County eNews #34

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court & OSU Ag Extension Meeting, Feb. 6

  3. Notice. Sherman County Court & Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, Feb. 21

  4. Notice. Sherman County Court & CCO Meeting, Feb. 7

  5. Notice. School Exclusion Day is Wednesday, February 20, 2019

  6. Oregon Legislature’s Joint Revenue Committee & Gov. Brown’s School Funding Proposal

  7. Growing Character

  8. West Wing Reads: State of the Union Address

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County School Basketball Schedule Update

sports-basket2ballThe following changes are reflected in the schedules:

HIGH SCHOOL:

The Saturday, February 9th high school games vs. Mitchell/Spray will take place in Mitchell (not Spray).

JUNIOR HIGH:

The A-Boys will not be playing tonight against Horizon Christian. Only the A-Girls at 3:30 and the B-Boys at 4:30.

~Jeanie Pehlke, Confidential Secretary
Sherman County School District
541.565.3500  |  541.565.3319 (Fax)


2. Notice. Sherman County Court & OSU Ag Extension Meeting, Feb. 6

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the OSU Ag extension position discussion meeting to be held on Wednesday February 6, 2019 at 4pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR. 97029.


3. Notice. Sherman County Court & Local Public Safety Coordinating Council, Feb. 21

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) to be held on Thursday, February 21, 2019, at 11am in the Sherman County Courthouse Addition – 500 Court street, Moro, OR. 97029.


4. Notice. Sherman County Court & CCO Meeting, Feb. 7

A quorum of the Sherman County Court will be present at the CCO Boundary Change meeting to be held on Thursday, February 7, 2019, at 3pm in the Burnet Building – 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR. 97029.


5. Notice. School Exclusion Day is Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Oregon law requires that all children attending public and private schools, preschools, Head Start and certified child care facilities, have up-to-date immunization documentation (or have an exemption) to remain in school.

The goal is to make sure children are fully protected against vaccine-preventable diseases and can go to school in a safe and healthy environment. Immunization is a safe way to help protect your family, your school and your community, against disease. 

The date for exclusion this year is Wednesday, February 20, 2019.

Each year North Central Public Health District sends a letter to the parents of children that need additional immunizations, indicating what additional immunizations a child needs. Letters are in the mail this week.

Please be aware that North Central Public Health District typically receives a large number of walk-in clients needing to be immunized the week of school exclusion. Our walk-in clinic hours that week will be Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Clients are seen on a first-come-first-served basis.

Parents seeking immunization for their child should contact their primary care provider, their pharmacist (if the child is over 11 years of age), or North Central Public Health District during our walk-in clinic hours.

You can also call 211 for information about where to go for immunizations in your area. 

In recent years there have been a few changes, please keep in mind:

 Hepatitis A vaccine requirement: The hepatitis A vaccine, which protects against a communicable viral infection, is a two-dose series now required for children18 months through tenth grade.

 Nonmedical exemption process: Parents wanting a new nonmedical exemption for their child must provide documentation that they have received education about the benefits and risks of immunization on a Vaccine Education Certificate. Parents can get education from a health care practitioner or from watching an online vaccine education module. More information about the new process is available at www.healthoregon.org/vaccineexemption.

On Wednesday, February 20, 2019, children will not be able to attend school or child care if their records on file show missing immunizations. No child will be turned away from North Central Public Health District due to a parents’ inability to pay for required vaccines. Please note that our walk-in clinic hours that week will be Tuesday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to Noon and 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Additional information on school immunizations can be found at the Oregon Immunization Program website at www.healthoregon.org/imm.  For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


6. Oregon Legislature’s Joint Revenue Committee & Gov. Brown’s School Funding Proposal

By Frontier Advocates

Oregon Legislature: These materials were presented to the Joint Revenue committee, the selected house and senate revenue committee members meeting jointly. Their task is to find the $1 Billion a year for schools that Governor Brown has made a priority for this session. The initial target appears to be some type of business tax. The committee is reviewing different approaches and their impacts.

Frontier Advocates is a partnership dedicated to navigating and shaping public policy on behalf of rural Oregon. Partners are three retired county judges with over 75 years of collective experience: Steve Grasty (Harney), Mike McArthur (Sherman), and Laura Pryor (Gilliam). All three former judges also served in statewide leadership roles. Contact FrontierAdvocate@gmail.com.


7. Growing Character

Today, let’s look at what parents can do to help their children develop good character.

How do people develop character? Well, first and most important, by what they are taught and what they see as they grow up. Very simply, placing examples of virtue in front of young people as early as possible, and as often as possible, forms character.

It is those positive pictures that they see, absorb, and understand are of great personal value that they will be drawn toward. Remember: human beings are picture-oriented; it’s hardwired in our brains.

You see, you don’t build character in your children by trying to control them or telling them what to do. You build it by consistently doing the right thing yourself and not making a big fuss about it. You build it by telling and reading your children stories that reinforce goodness from the time they are very young. Remember, you are your child’s best example, the one they see before all others.

So, what is the right thing? Well, honesty, accountability, fairness, tolerance, civility and kindness, for starters. Without these, trust will be difficult to earn. You might want to think about adding in compassion and empathy as they grow and learn.

Talk to them about hypocrisy, self-deception, cruelty and selfishness when you see it around you, in language they will understand. Avoid delivering a lecture that they can turn off. Just make it clear that there are better ways of living, and that you expect them to live up to your picture of them as people of fine character.

Providing the pictures of what to do right, first, goes a long way to ensuring your children adopt the examples as a part of their own fine character. ~The Pacific Institute.


8. West Wing Reads: State of the Union Address

American flag2With Pitch for Unity, President Trump Urges Republicans and Democrats to ‘Choose Greatness’ – West Wing Reads: https://www.whitehouse.gov/westwingreads/

“President Trump in his State of the Union address Tuesday night issued a call for unity and an end to the political divisiveness that has ensnared Washington,” Melissa Quinn reports for the Washington Examiner.

During the speech—with its theme of “choosing greatness”—President Trump laid out five priorities that should unite both parties in Washington: “American jobs and fair trade, rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure, reducing the price of healthcare and prescription drugs, creating a safe and lawful immigration system, and pursuing a foreign policy agenda that ‘puts America’s interests first.’”

In The Hill, Tal Axelrod reports that roughly three-quarters of American voters approved of President Trump’s State of the Union address, according to CNN and CBS News polls. “Seventy-six percent approved of the speech in the CBS poll, with 24 percent saying they disapproved,” Axelrod writes. But the telling stat: CBS found that “about 82 percent of independents in that survey who watched the speech liked what they heard.”

“The speech was big, not just in length — about 80 minutes — but also in concept. It had a structure. It had a message. It had passages to appeal to all Americans. It had passages to appeal to Trump’s conservative base. And it had passages to appeal to opposition Democrats,” Byron York writes in the Washington Examiner. “He delivered a big, broad, far-ranging statement of his approach to the presidency and to the country.”

“The president also took time to highlight a few of the many incredible achievements under his administration” in last night’s State of the Union, Kimberly Guilfoyle writes in The Daily Caller. “Record-low unemployment rates for African Americans, Hispanics, and women. Rising wages and tax cuts for working-class families. A historic bipartisan criminal justice reform bill to give non-violent offenders a second chance.”

“Members of Congress broke out into a spirited singing of ‘Happy Birthday’ for a guest of President Trump’s State of the Union who survived both the Holocaust and the anti-Semitic mass shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue,” Tamar Lapin reports in the New York Post. President Trump also honored three veterans who served in World War II: Private First Class Joseph Reilly, Staff Sergeant Irving Locker, and Sergeant Herman Zeitchik.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.bookEnergy Northwest

A Forgotten Botanist’s Stunning 19th-Century Manuscript Is Now Online

Forgotten Oregon Facebook Group

Health Insurance Consumer Complaints Up in 2018

Oregon Bill Seeks Suicide Prevention Plans in Schools

Oregon Legislature:

 Oregon’s Sen. Wyden Skewers State Department Silence Over Saudi students’ disappearance

West Wing Reads on the State of the Union Address

CNN on the State of the Union Address

Patriot Post Review of the State of the Union Address

Looking Back at the Fifties & Sixties


 

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Sherman County eNews #33

CONTENTS

  1. Spring Seminars for Opportunity Zones

  2. Oregon Legislature: Rent Control Bill

  3. Walking in Your Own Shoes

  4. All County Prayer Meeting, Feb. 6

  5. Sherman County Court Notes, Jan. 2

  6. NEW Family Caregiver Webinar Series from Oregon Care Partners

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“He shall from time to time give to the Congress Information of the State of the Union, and recommend to their Consideration such Measures as he shall judge necessary and expedient.”—Article II, Section 3 of the Constitution


1. Spring Seminars. Sherman County is an Opportunity Zone 

Opportunity Zones are shaking up Oregon’s investment and development world.  Our first two conferences generated millions of dollars in new investment. Today we invite you to two local seminars and the spring state-wide convening.

Thursday, February 14

Willamette Valley Country Club

click here 

for details and to register

No sponsorship opportunities are remaining.

This two-hour seminar will focus on understanding OZ investing for business owners.

Friday, March 15 or 22 (TBD)

Bend

A partnership with Economic Development of Central Oregon (EDCO)

click here for details and to register

Sponsorship opportunities are now available.

Friday, April 14

Sunrise Center in Gresham

This capstone conference brings together national speakers, accountants, lawyers, government leaders, investors, mortgage brokers, developers, investment advisors, non-profits, academia, and foundations.  This is the place where deals will get done and projects will be announced.  Please click here for details and to register.

Sponsorship opportunities are now available.


2. Oregon Legislature: Rent Control Bill

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM – A bill that would stabilize out-of-control rent hikes for residential properties across the state is advancing to the Oregon Senate for a vote.

Senate Bill 608 – which passed out of the Senate Committee on Housing today with a “do pass” recommendation – would eliminate the potential for many “no cause” evictions on residential tenancies. It also would cap annual rental increases.

The bill would provide certainty for Oregon’s renters by ensuring they won’t face enormous and unforeseen rent increases or be kicked out of their homes. Safe and stable housing is a central requirement for healthy families to thrive and for children to excel in school. Sen. Shemia Fagan, D-Portland, chairs the Senate Housing Committee and is a leader on the issue of housing.

The bill prohibits landlords from terminating month-to-month tenancies without cause after one year of occupancy. Tenants would be entitled to advanced written notice, ranging from 30 to 90 days, if they are going to be evicted. The bill also would cap annual rent increases to 7 percent – plus the consumer price index – over the existing year’s rents. Landlords who fail to comply with those provisions would pay three months’ rent, plus actual damages, to the tenants affected by the eviction or rent increase.


 3. Walking in Your Own Shoes

A good rule to remember when it comes to relationships is, “What you see is what you get” – at least most of the time.

If we want to form lasting relationships with others, we must start by being happy with who the other person is. It is courting disaster when you bring thoughtless, abusive, or angry people into your life assuming that under your influence they will change. Now, this change is possible, but it won’t come from you. For the other person, it must come from a position of wanting to change, not having to change.

You see, what’s likely to happen is, you will change your behavior to accommodate them, rather than the other way around. Again, the point is that change is not something we can force on other people. Change comes from within. And, when people are pushed by outside forces, they push back.

If, in major ways, the people in our lives are not what we think they should be, nagging them or manipulating them to change is not the way to go. Change will never happen if we are certain we are always right, or if we believe that the fault lies always with the other person.

Perhaps if we were to allow them the dignity of being who they are without our criticism, we might find change happening naturally of its own accord. One thing is certain. When we give up blaming and criticizing our spouses and others we love, our relationships with them improve enormously.

At the same time, their self-esteem and feelings of competence increase as well. You see, we can help others to change, and support their own change efforts. We can be their own personal cheer squad to encourage them in their goals for change. It’s just not helpful to try to choose their direction for them. We need to let others walk in their own shoes, not force them to walk in ours. ~The Pacific Institute


 4. All County Prayer Meeting, Feb. 6

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, February 6th @ the Rufus Baptist Church, Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM.  Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank you. ~Red Gibbs


5. Sherman County Court Notes, Jan. 2

ShermanCoLogoBy Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

NOTE:

– This is a very brief outline ONLY of topics considered “public interest.”

– These are NOT OFFICIAL MINUTES. For official minutes and full details, please see the approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the next Court session. Thank you.

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on January 2, 2019, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • Motion to appoint Jeremy Lanthorn to the Sherman County Ambulance Service Board, and Dana Haner to the Sherman County Ambulance Service Board pending a background check, for a term of 2 years to expire December 2020.
  • Motion to appoint Bryan Cranston to the Sherman County Ambulance Service Area Plan Committee, and Kathleen Ahearn and Renee Heidy to the Sherman County Ambulance Service Area Plan Committee pending background checks, for a term of 4 years to expire December 2022.
  • Motion to appoint Bryce Coelsch and Tom Rolfe to the Sherman County Fair Board, and Shandie Johnson to the Sherman County Fair Board pending a background check, for a term of 3 years to expire December 2021.
  • Motion to appoint Debbie Hayden as Budget Officer to the Budget Committee for a 1 year term expiring December 2019.
  • Motion to appoint Amber DeGrange, Teri Thalhofer, Alyssa Winslow, Barbara Seater, Shawn Payne, Joe Dabulskis, Wes Owens, Wade McLeod, Katie Woodruff, Tara Koch, Angie Tennison, Tina Potter, Amy Asher, Brad Lohrey, and Les Kipper to the Sherman County Local Public Safety Coordinating Council (LPSCC) for a term of 1 year to expire December 2019.
  • Motion to appoint Daryl G. Ingebo as Sherman County Surveyor with a term to expire June 2019.
  • Motion to remove Henry Brown, Jeanee Kuettel, and Linda Cornie from the Public Transportation Committee.
  • Motion to approve the Oregon Military Department Office of Emergency Management Performance Grant No. 18-528, between Sherman County and the State of Oregon, in the amount of $60,628.00, and authorize Commissioner Dabulskis to sign.
  • Motion to approve the operating loan and promissory note documents between Frontier TeleNet and Sherman County in the amount of $100,000 at 0% interest with repayment at the end of June 2019 with the funds coming out of the SIP Additional fees.
  • Motion to appoint Commissioner Dabulskis as the Sherman County Representative to the Frontier TeleNet Board.

6. NEW Family Caregiver Webinar Series from Oregon Care Partners

Oregon Care Partners is excited to announce a new Family Caregiver Webinar Series starting on February 12 with Dementia – What is it? The live webinars will be held on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month from 7:00 pm to 8:30 pm.

It’s important that you know you aren’t alone, and help is available. We’ve made it easier to learn useful, hands-on skills through the Family Caregiver Webinar Series, giving you the same benefits of an in-person class from the comfort of home.

In this series, an expert instructor will present easy-to-understand information on common caregiving topics and help answer questions important to you. The skills you’ll gain can help reduce caregiver-related stress and help you improve the quality of life and care of your loved one. Please take a moment to read about upcoming topics and register by selecting webinars from the schedule below.

This Family Caregiver Webinar Series is made possible thanks to funding from the state and is available to anyone who lives or works in Oregon. Please help by sharing this information with anyone who can benefit.

Save The Dates!
Join us on the 2nd and 4th Tuesday of each month from 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

Join from an internet-connected computer, tablet or smartphone. Registration is required. For assistance, please email info@oregoncarepartners.com or call 1-800-930-6851.

Feb 12Dementia – What is it?

Feb 26How to Identify the Different Stages of Dementia

Mar 12Minimizing Medication Risks and Maximizing Quality of Life

Mar 26Talking with Your Doctor and Pharmacist About Safe Medication Use

Apr 09 How to Address Personal Safety Issues for People Living with Dementia

Apr 23How to Create Meaningful Activities for Different Stages of Dementia

May 14Minimizing Medication Risks and Maximizing Quality of Life

May 28Talking with Your Doctor and Pharmacist About Safe Medication Use

Jun 11Understanding and Responding to Dementia-Related Behaviors

Jun 25Ask Anything About Dementia!

Oregon Care Partners helps caregivers improve the lives and care for aging Oregonians by providing access to free, high-quality caregiver trainings across Oregon. Professional and family caregivers, administrators, and members of the public are encouraged to sign up for free classes and learn more at OregonCarePartners.com.

Please pass this information along to those who can benefit by sharing information about Oregon Care Partner’s new Family Caregiver Webinar Series with family caregivers in your network.

Morgan Cairns Communications Specialist

Oregon Care Partners, LLC, 11740 SW 68th Parkway, Ste. 250, Portland, OR  97223

mcairns@oregoncarepartners.com │Direct: 503.726.5238

Help someone caring for an older adult find the help and resources they need by spreading the word about Oregon Care Partners high quality, no-cost trainings. Click here to register for free caregiver trainings today!


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyOregon State Legislature Information

Winter Storm & Cabins at Cottonwood Canyon State Park

What is a national emergency?

How To Improve The State Of Our Viciously Polarized Union