Sherman County eNews #333

CONTENTS

  1. New Year’s Eve at First Baptist Church, Grass Valley, Dec. 31

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Jan. 2

  3. History and Essential Public Purpose Services Provided by Frontier TeleNet, TRICOM, Frontier Regional 9-1-1 and Frontier Digital Network

  4. E-rate: Universal Service Program for Schools and Libraries

  5. E-Rate: Universal Service Administrative Company (USAC), FCC

  6. Broadband: Types of High Speed Transmission Technologies

  7. Goldendale Library Schedule of Events

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Somehow not only for Christmas
But all the long year through,
The joy that you give to others
Is the joy that comes back to you.
And the more you spend in blessing
The poor and lonely and sad,
The more of your heart’s possessing Returns to make you glad.
~ John Greenleaf Whittier


1. New Year’s Eve at First Baptist Church, Grass Valley, Dec. 31

There will be a New Year’s Eve party at First Baptist Grass Valley beginning at 7:00 p.m.. Come enjoy a movie, board games, etc. and soups and snacks. Bring a favorite game/soup/snack to share.


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Jan. 2

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, January 2nd @ the First Baptist Church in Grass Valley. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You. Red Gibbs


3. History and Essential Public Purpose Services Provided by Frontier TeleNet, TRICOM, Frontier Regional 9-1-1 and Frontier Digital Network

By Rob Myers who presented it to the Gilliam County Court, April 5, 2017 

“PREFACE

“From my nearly 20 years testifying in front of legislative committees, I acknowledge and fully agree that an informal, extemporaneous presentation of information is far better than simply reading it – that’s why I have never done so in Salem. However, reading it is the only practical way to avoid being inadvertently misunderstood, misinterpreted and/or misquoted, so that’s the format I’ll employ today.

“In 2001, a group of dedicated public servants and elected officials representing three counties and an education service district, in order to create a more advanced communications environment for the citizens they served, formed an entity called Frontier TeleNet. Their original primary goals – goals that have endured the test of time and a succession of capable, honest, dedicated public servants and elected officials – were to expand and enhance telecommunications services for law enforcement, emergency services, schools and public health institutions in Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties. Those essential public purposes have been demonstrably served.

“Frontier TeleNet has provided high-speed internet services for the six school districts and local government in three counties at no direct cost to the schools for over fifteen years. For a good portion of that time, such services were simply unavailable or prohibitively expensive.

“Over time, the Frontier TeleNet wide area network has been expanded, enhanced, upgraded and amplified with Federal and State Homeland Security Program and Law Enforcement Terrorism Prevention Program grant award funds amounting to approximately $4.5 million dollars. Currently, the Frontier TeleNet network operation area encompasses seven Oregon counties and Klickitat County in Washington.

“The next entity the counties formed was TRICOM, which provided 9-1-1 and dispatch services by local employees from a call center developed and sited in Condon.  TRICOM was the only three-county Public Safety Answering Point (PSAP) in Oregon. TRICOM transitioned into Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Communications Agency with the addition of Jefferson County, becoming the only four county PSAP in Oregon. Like TRICOM before it, Frontier Regional 9-1-1 operates entirely on its own 9-1-1 excise tax revenues with no outside support from local government or other sources, the only PSAP in Oregon that does so.

“The TRICOM/Frontier Regional PSAP was built and developed with approximately $600,000 in federal and state competitive grant award funds, providing the substantial, sustainable and very real economic benefit of 13 local family wage jobs.

“The third entity formed was Frontier Digital Network, which owns and operates one of the five digital switches in Oregon and the first digital switch in the state to functionally utilize the P25 TDMA Phase II operating standard; necessary both to preserve a public safety standard-compliant system, and to avoid the expense of upgrading an outdated VHF system that even after updating would have still been a substandard public safety operating platform. 

“The digital switch supports a 700 MHz digital communications platform serving law enforcement and emergency services agencies in three counties; in addition to serving as an essential mission-critical regional communications hub in the event of wide area emergency incidents such as a predicted mass inflow of evacuees from a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. The digital switch is located in a secure electronically monitored, target hardened facility specifically designed and built to survive everything from earthquakes to nuclear winds.

“Today, Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties, through Frontier TeleNet and its partner entities – Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Communications Agency and Frontier Digital Network – represent the highest public communications standard achievable with the combination of federal, state and local funds secured for that specific purpose and goal. Further, these same entities form a nucleus of experienced, highly qualified service providers long and widely acknowledged as exceptional, not only for their past and potential future contributions in the region and to the state, but also because three counties have been willing to subordinate their individual interests to the higher purpose of doing the right thing the right way for everyone.

“Frontier TeleNet provides dedicated internet access and data transport services to Asher Clinics in Fossil, Spray and Mitchell; internet services to Greater Oregon Behavioral Health, Inc. (GHOBI) in Condon and Fossil; in partnership with Lightspeed Networks video arraignment services to the Oregon Judicial department in John Day, Fossil, Condon and Moro; in partnership with Windwave Communications data transport for Bank of Eastern Oregon in Prairie City, John Day, Fossil, Condon and Moro; and singularly backhaul cell phone services for US Cellular in Spray and Fossil, where US Cellular towers and shelters reside on Frontier TeleNet sites. These long-term services have been delivered efficiently, effectively, reliably and affordably over an extended period of time. All Asher Clinic services were made possible by system upgrades paid with $1.5 million in competitive grant awards.

“As a matter of interest – and to eliminate any confusion or speculation about any additional compensation I may or may not have received – I wrote all the successful grant applications referred to herein – I wrote them as a function of my normal contractual duties to Frontier TeleNet at no additional cost to the organizations and by extension no reduction in benefit to the citizens served or to the expanded essential public services provided thereby.

“For fifteen years Frontier TeleNet, plus its original and subsequent partners, TRICOM, Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Communications Agency and Frontier Digital Network, have together been the heart of public purpose communications in our three counties.

“I would respectfully suggest that in the interests of moving forward in a positive manner, differences could be set aside long enough to at least initiate a constructive dialogue for the purpose of determining how we might work together to identify and ultimately craft solutions that will best serve all the residents of Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler counties – exactly the solid and historically proven purpose of the original and subsequently combined Frontier organizations since 2001.”


4. E-rate: Universal Service Program for Schools and Libraries

The FCC’s E-rate program makes telecommunications and information services more affordable for schools and libraries. With funding from the Universal Service Fund, E-rate provides discounts for telecommunications, Internet access and internal connections to eligible schools and libraries.

The ongoing proliferation of innovative digital learning technologies and the need to connect students, teachers and consumers to jobs, life-long learning and information have led to a steady rise in demand for bandwidth in schools and libraries. In recent years, the FCC refocused E-rate from legacy telecommunications services to broadband, with a goal to significantly expand Wi-Fi access. These steps to modernize the program are helping E-rate keep pace with the need for increased Internet access. (Learn more about modernization of the E-rate program.)

What benefits are available under the E-rate program?

Eligible schools and libraries may receive discounts on telecommunications, telecommunications services and Internet access, as well as internal connections, managed internal broadband services and basic maintenance of internal connections.

Discounts range from 20 to 90 percent, with higher discounts for higher poverty and rural schools and libraries. Recipients must pay some portion of the service costs.

See the list of eligible services.

How does the E-rate program work?

An eligible school or library identifies services it needs and submits a request for competitive bids to the Universal Service Administrative Company. USAC posts these requests on its website for vendors’ consideration. After reviewing its offers, the school or library selects its preferred vendor(s) and applies to USAC for approval for the desired purchases.

Next, USAC issues funding commitments to eligible applicants. When a vendor provides the selected services, either the vendor or the applicant submits requests to USAC for reimbursement of the approved discounts.

The bid request and competitive bidding processes must comply with FCC rules and state and local procurement requirements.

For more information about eligibility, see USAC’s definitions.

How are schools and libraries in my area benefiting?

To find which schools and libraries in your area benefit from E-rate, use USAC’s commitments tool.

How are requests prioritized?

Funding is allocated first to the highest poverty schools and libraries, then the next-highest poverty applicants, and so on.

How much funding is available?

In 2014, the FCC approved the Second E-rate Modernization Order, increasing the cap for the program to $3.9 billion in funding year 2015, indexed to inflation going forward.

Does the E-rate program duplicate state and local efforts?

The FCC’s plan complements the efforts of states and localities to bring advanced telecommunications and information services to schools and libraries. When the E-rate program was established in 1996, only 14 percent of the nation’s K-12 classrooms had access to the Internet.

~ https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/universal-service-program-schools-and-libraries-e-rate


5. E-rate for Schools & Libraries: Universal Service Administrative Company

The Universal Service Administrative Company is dedicated to achieving universal service. This important principle suggests that everyone in the U.S. deserves accessible, affordable, and pervasive high-speed connectivity.

Despite pervasive connectivity in most urban areas in the United States, millions of people across the country have no access to broadband services needed to work, learn, heal, and communicate. The funds we administer exist to fill these gaps in access. As an independent not-for-profit designated by the FCC, USAC administers the Universal Service Fund, almost $10 billion available annually to the companies and institutions that make universal service possible.

Universal Service Programs

With the guidance of policy created by the FCC, we collect and deliver funding through four programs focused on places where broadband and connectivity needs are critical. These programs serve people in rural, underserved, and difficult-to-reach areas.

Schools and Libraries

Rural Health Care

  • The Rural Health Care Program supports health care facilities in bringing world class medical care to rural areas through increased broadband capabilities.

Lifeline

  • The Lifeline Program helps households obtain the voice and broadband connectivity services they need to participate and function in today’s digital world.

High Cost

  • The High Cost Program provides funding to companies working to expand connectivity infrastructure in unserved or underserved areas.

6. Broadband: Types of High Speed Transmission Technologies

The term broadband commonly refers to high-speed Internet access that is always on and faster than the traditional dial-up access. Broadband includes several high-speed transmission technologies such as:

The broadband technology you choose will depend on a number of factors. These may include whether you are located in an urban or rural area, how broadband Internet access is packaged with other services (such as voice telephone and home entertainment), price, and availability.

Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)

DSL is a wireline transmission technology that transmits data faster over traditional copper telephone lines already installed to homes and businesses. DSL-based broadband provides transmission speeds ranging from several hundred Kbps to millions of bits per second (Mbps). The availability and speed of your DSL service may depend on the distance from your home or business to the closest telephone company facility.

The following are types of DSL transmission technologies:

  • Asymmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL)– Used primarily by residential customers, such as Internet surfers, who receive a lot of data but do not send much. ADSL typically provides faster speed in the downstream direction than the upstream direction. ADSL allows faster downstream data transmission over the same line used to provide voice service, without disrupting regular telephone calls on that line.
  • Symmetrical Digital Subscriber Line (SDSL)– Used typically by businesses for services such as video conferencing, which need significant bandwidth both upstream and downstream.

Faster forms of DSL typically available to businesses include:

  • High data rate Digital Subscriber Line (HDSL); and
  • Very High data rate Digital Subscriber Line (VDSL). 

Cable Modem

Cable modem service enables cable operators to provide broadband using the same coaxial cables that deliver pictures and sound to your TV set.

Most cable modems are external devices that have two connections: one to the cable wall outlet, the other to a computer. They provide transmission speeds of 1.5 Mbps or more.

Subscribers can access their cable modem service by simply turning on their computers, without dialing-up an ISP. You can still watch cable TV while using it. Transmission speeds vary depending on the type of cable modem, cable network, and traffic load. Speeds are comparable to DSL.

Fiber

  • Fiber optic technology converts electrical signals carrying data to light and sends the light through transparent glass fibers about the diameter of a human hair. Fiber transmits data at speeds far exceeding current DSL or cable modem speeds, typically by tens or even hundreds of Mbps.
  • The actual speed you experience will vary depending on a variety of factors, such as how close to your computer the service provider brings the fiber and how the service provider configures the service, including the amount of bandwidth used. The same fiber providing your broadband can also simultaneously deliver voice (VoIP) and video services, including video-on-demand.
  • Telecommunications providers sometimes offer fiber broadband in limited areas and have announced plans to expand their fiber networks and offer bundled voice, Internet access, and video services.
  • Variations of the technology run the fiber all the way to the customer’s home or business, to the curb outside, or to a location somewhere between the provider’s facilities and the customer.

 Wireless

  • Wireless broadband connects a home or business to the Internet using a radio link between the customer’s location and the service provider’s facility. Wireless broadband can be mobile or fixed.
  • Wireless technologies using longer-range directional equipment provide broadband service in remote or sparsely populated areas where DSL or cable modem service would be costly to provide. Speeds are generally comparable to DSL and cable modem. An external antenna is usually required.
  • Wireless broadband Internet access services offered over fixed networks allow consumers to access the Internet from a fixed point while stationary and often require a direct line-of-sight between the wireless transmitter and receiver. These services have been offered using both licensed spectrum and unlicensed devices. For example, thousands of small Wireless Internet Services Providers (WISPs) provide such wireless broadband at speeds of around one Mbps using unlicensed devices, often in rural areas not served by cable or wireline broadband networks.
  • Wireless Local Area Networks (WLANs) provide wireless broadband access over shorter distances and are often used to extend the reach of a “last-mile” wireline or fixed wireless broadband connection within a home, building, or campus environment. Wi-Fi networks use unlicensed devices and can be designed for private access within a home or business, or be used for public Internet access at “hot spots” such as restaurants, coffee shops, hotels, airports, convention centers, and city parks.
  • Mobile wireless broadband services are also becoming available from mobile telephone service providers and others. These services are generally appropriate for highly-mobile customers and require a special PC card with a built in antenna that plugs into a user’s laptop computer. Generally, they provide lower speeds, in the range of several hundred Kbps.

 Satellite

Just as satellites orbiting the earth provide necessary links for telephone and television service, they can also provide links for broadband. Satellite broadband is another form of wireless broadband, and is also useful for serving remote or sparsely populated areas.

Downstream and upstream speeds for satellite broadband depend on several factors, including the provider and service package purchased, the consumer’s line of sight to the orbiting satellite, and the weather. Typically, a consumer can expect to receive (download) at a speed of about 500 Kbps and send (upload) at a speed of about 80 Kbps. These speeds may be slower than DSL and cable modem, but they are about 10 times faster than the download speed with dial-up Internet access. Service can be disrupted in extreme weather conditions.

Broadband over Powerline (BPL)

BPL is the delivery of broadband over the existing low- and medium-voltage electric power distribution network. BPL speeds are comparable to DSL and cable modem speeds. BPL can be provided to homes using existing electrical connections and outlets. BPL is an emerging technology that is available in very limited areas. It has significant potential because power lines are installed virtually everywhere, alleviating the need to build new broadband facilities for every customer.

Updated: 

Monday, June 23, 2014

~ https://www.fcc.gov/general/types-broadband-connections


7. Goldendale Library Schedule of Events

The Simcoe Mountains Speaker Series continues with a talk on Eclipses on Wednesday, January 9 at 6:00 pm. Troy Carpenter of the Goldendale Observatory will give a presentation on the science of eclipses and answer your questions about the Observatory upgrade project.

Learn & Play continues on January 9th from 2:15 to 3:15 pm at the Goldendale Primary School cafeteria. Children ages 0-5 build vocabulary with songs, books, and movement.

Calling all fiber artists! January 11th is the deadline to submit your fiber art for the Fiber Arts & Crafts Exhibit that will be on display in the Camplan Room from January 22 to March 15. An artist reception and demonstration of fiber art techniques will be held from 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm on Thursday, January 31.

The library’s Book Groups meet January 14th, the morning group at 11:00 am, and the evening group at 6:00 pm. The new year is a good time to start a good habit. So, why not consider joining a book group? You can borrow copies of the books for free, and there is no pressure to finish every book. It is a great way to meet and socialize with people, a great way to learn about new authors, stories, and genres, and a great way to rediscover the joy of reading. If you are still reading, maybe a book group IS for you! In January there are two great books being discussed, the Pulitzer prize winning novel Less, and the knock-your-socks-off memoir Educated. Even if you haven’t read them, you can come and sit in on the discussion and see if being in a book group is something you’d like to do. While you are there, you can pick up a list of the books we’ve chosen to read in 2019.

Movie Night! Enjoy a movie and popcorn after hours at the library. Each month we feature movies based on titles our book group has read or plans to read together. You don’t have to be part of a book group to attend. A group discussion will follow for anyone who wishes to stay. Open to adults 18 and older. On January 28th, we are watching The Girl on the Train, based on the novel by Paula Hawkins. Show starts at 6:00 pm.

Let’s Play Chess is on break and will resume on Mondays from 3:00 pm to 5:00 pm on January 28th. All ages and abilities welcome to come and play chess.

For a full list of events at the Goldendale Library, visit fvrl.org, click on Events Calendar, and select Goldendale Community Library.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkOregon Broadband Advisory Council

Broadband in Oregon, Oregon Broadband Advisory Council Report

Brilliant Maps: Map of World War 2 Shipwrecks

WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE! A name, a place, a toponym

Oregon State Capitol Jigsaw Puzzle Gallery

Invasive Insect Enters Oregon On Christmas Trees, Officials Warn

A Trip on the Most Beautiful Train Ride in America Starts at Just $97


 

 

 

Sherman County eNews #332

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Jan. 2

  2. Gilliam County Court hears of Frontier Telenet financial issues

  3. As the ecosystem of news changes, will journalists adapt fast enough?

  4. Oregon State Capitol Jigsaw Puzzle Gallery

  5. Hillsdale College Free Course: Principles of Free-Market Economics

  6. Anchor Points


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Jan. 2

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday, January 2nd @ the First Baptist Church in Grass Valley. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You. ~Red Gibbs


2. Gilliam County Court hears of Frontier Telenet financial issues

~ With permission of The Times-Journal, Dec. 27, 2018, an excerpt from the article:

“Gilliam County Court hears of Frontier Telenet financial issues.

“The Gilliam County Court met at the North Gilliam R.F.P.D. Building in Arlington Wednesday last week and among other agenda items, heard Judge Steve Shaffer explain that Frontier Telenet, the three-county ORS 190 entity that has made infrastructure available for the 911 emergency dispatch system for the past 16 years, will be short of funds to pay its bills at the end of December.

“Shaffer’s assessment indicated that revenue is not covering the expenses of the entity and that federal reimbursements for making internet available to area schools is being withheld while Frontier Telenet’s request for the funds is being reviewed by Universal Services Administrative Company, the service responsible for refunding ‘e-rate funds’ back to entities which provide broadband connectivity to schools, libraries and other sectors at low cost.

“Frontier Telenet’s costs have out-paced the entity’s revenue and it needs an immediate influx of cash to pay its December bills. Judge Shaffer asked the court for $100,000, but commissioners Leslie Wetherell and Mike Weimar, struggling to understand the information being presented to them, suggested they needed more time and more information, and further discussion whether funding that may come from the county should be a loan or a grant, and what terms should be included in an agreement.

“At one point in the discussion, Judge Shaffer indicated that federal ‘e-rate’ funds that can be reimbursed to an entity that provides low-cost broadband services to schools, libraries and other public service entities, and which had been reimbursed to Frontier Telenet, had been used “illegally” to subsidize Frontier Telenet’s infrastructure and the emergency 911 service.

“County Attorney Ruben Cleaveland quickly clarified, “Not necessarily.” Cleaveland indicated that Frontier has the infrastructure for the emergency 911 service that has been providing 911 emergency dispatch services first for three counties and now for four counties, for 16 years. “You have to have the system for the 911 service,” Cleaveland explained. “Through the system, internet is provided to the schools. It wasn’t designed to subsidize 911.”

“Commissioners Leslie Wetherell and Mike Weimar, with many questions about the information that was being presented to them by Judge Shaffer, agreed that Frontier Telenet needs money soon, but no decision was made on the $100,000 request, pending more information on the situation, on Sherman County Court’s decisions on the matter, on whether the money should be approved in the form of a loan or grant, and on the development of proper money transaction agreements.

“The Frontier Telenet board met [on] Friday, Dec. 21, to further discuss the situation… …”

[Editorial note: The Sherman County Court discussed Frontier TeleNet’s financial straits at a recent meeting and agreed to consider a $100,000 loan.]


3. As the ecosystem of news changes, will journalists adapt fast enough?

newsletter2The Expanding News Desert, a report from the Center for Innovation and Sustainability in Local Media at the University of North Carolina’s School of Media and Journalism this year, found that the 11 Western states, plus Alaska and Hawaii, lost 48 dailies and 157 weeklies between 2004 and 2018. Forty-six counties in the region now lack a local newspaper. In some cases, the report notes, only “ghost papers” remain, mere shadows of their former selves. If this trend continues, observers ask, how will local journalism survive?

Continue here: https://www.hcn.org/issues/50.22/media-as-the-ecosystem-of-news-changes-will-journalists-adapt-fast-enough?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email


4. Oregon State Capitol Jigsaw Puzzle Gallery

Choose an online Oregon State Capitol jigsaw puzzle that fits your skill level. Each puzzle describes the subject, difficulty and the number of puzzle pieces. If you get stuck, you can use the “ghost” option or play with other puzzle settings to help. Challenge your friends to beat your completion time! Puzzles via Jigsaw Planet.

Here they are… https://sos.oregon.gov/blue-book/Pages/fun-games-jigsaw-capitol.aspx


5. Hillsdale College Free Course: Principles of Free-Market Economics

dollar.sign1Be an informed citizen and sharpen your understanding of the free market.

Have you ever wondered why America is the most prosperous nation in history? Do you understand the connection between freedom and free enterprise? And do you think you could explain that connection to your friends? Maybe you can, but you also probably agree that the economic principles of free enterprise aren’t well understood by all. That’s why we created this important online course on free-market economics. In it, you will learn the fundamentals of economics, the role of profit and the free market, and, importantly, how to restore economic liberty in America.

Take this free online course to deepen your understanding of the principles of free-market economics. By activating this special course you will get informed and help our country work towards markets that are more free and more prosperous. It’s absolutely free to you, and you can take the course at your own pace, in the comfort of your own home or office.

–Hillsdale Principles of Free-Market Economics https://lp.hillsdale.edu/economics-101/?fn=U2hlcnJ5&ln=S2FzZWJlcmc%3D&em=c2hlcnJ5a0Bnb3JnZS5uZXQ%3D&ci=V2FzY28%3D&st=T1I%3D&ad=NjkzODQgV2hlYXRhY3JlcyBSb2Fk&ti&c_id&zi=OTcwNjU%3D&appeal_code=MK418EM9&utm_source=housefile&utm_medium=email&utm_content=automated_course_offer&utm_campaign=econ101&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8x9XxbDsFo1IafYP4JeVLlDL7zLAH_ARRtGL3OVTBcU7xRg6PGPTiGuT-nK1bLsbB6a-5gXiHXy0akal8e6F_xd0QQaQ&_hsmi=67324699

–Hillsdale College Online Course Catalog: https://online.hillsdale.edu/dashboard/courses

–Hillsdale College: https://www.hillsdale.edu/

–Subscribe to Hillsdale’s Imprimis, no charge: https://imprimis.hillsdale.edu/ 


 6. Anchor Points

When you’re feeling all at sea, or tossed about by life’s occasional stormy weather, do you maintain some safe anchor points? When everything seems to be changing around you and you’re feeling a bit out of control, is there a rock of stability you can hang on to until you get your bearings again?

We all need some stress and tension to give our lives zing and motivation, but too much at once can be a real problem. If your marriage is shaky, your son has just dropped out of school, and someone has just run into your car at the supermarket, you certainly don’t need any more changes for a while.

Keep at least some things stationary by returning to and maintaining customary activities or familiar habits. Touch base with old friends who know you well and with whom you feel completely comfortable. Find an island of calm and create some respite for yourself, so that you can return to the mainland of temporary chaos feeling rested, restored, and clearer about who you are and what you really want.

Whether it is a small summer cottage, a special fishing cove, a campground by a river or a trip to a day spa, take some time to indulge yourself during times of rapid change. It is a “guided” way to release tension, with you purposefully moving the tension out of your way – if only for a little while. It’s the break that is necessary.

It doesn’t hurt to return to your personal anchor of peace and quiet for a while, every so often. It’s a practical tactic and a good strategy for coping with change that threatens to overwhelm. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #331

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

New Year’s Prayer by Charlotte Anselmo

Thank you Lord for giving me
The brand new year ahead
Help me live the way I should
As each new day I tread.

Give me gentle wisdom
That I might help a friend
Give me strength and courage
So a shoulder I might lend.

The year ahead is empty
Help me fill it with good things
Each new day filled with joy
And the happiness it brings.

Please give the leaders of our world
A courage born of peace
That they might lead us gently
And all the fighting cease.

Please give to all upon this earth
A heart that’s filled with love
A gentle happy way to live
With Your blessings from above.


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU, eNEWS SUBSCRIBERS! Your news, ads, organization and local government notices, agendas and minutes are key to this collaborative effort. We believe that informed citizens act in the best interest of our county community and your participation is very important!  ~The Editor 

APPRECIATION & RESPECT. We respect and appreciate our fellow citizens who run for public office or volunteer to fill unpaid positions for our school  and youth programs, churches, city councils, county government, non-profit organizations and farm and electric cooperatives… and who step up to help produce special events…. and those who donate to our nonprofits, school and churches. We estimate that about 291 volunteers are required! Thank you, Volunteers and Donors! Congratulations to citizens who will be sworn-in for public service! ~The Editor.

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

LOST OR FOUND:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

SUPPORT FOR BRENNAH MILLER

Brennah Miller is a young wife and mother, an electrician and a cancer patient.

EMPLOYMENT: 

FOR SALE:

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/

SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE TIMES-JOURNAL! The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com  $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond the region. 

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & GIFTS. Considerately Handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available. Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 12/28

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

SERVICES:

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

SUBSCRIPTIONS TO THE TIMES-JOURNAL! The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com  $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond the region.

FRIDAY KIDS’ GYM. Beginning this Friday, and continuing most every Friday through March, Wasco School Events Center (WSEC) will be hosting “Kids Gym.”   This will be an opportunity for parents and their pre-school children to play inside for a couple of hours when the weather is too cold to be outside.   Kid Gym will go from 10 a.m. to noon, and parents who attend with their pre-schooler(s) will need to sign a release form to participate. Cost is $5/week, or free if you are a member of the WSEC Fitness Center. This is not a babysitting service; children must be accompanied by an adult.   Feel free to bring toys, trikes, etc. for your child(ren) to play with. 12/28

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 12/28 

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

Sherman County School District Calendar

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html


DECEMBER

27-31 Whale Watching Week on the Oregon Coast

31 Official End of WWII 1946

time.hourglass1JANUARY

1 NEW YEAR’S DAY

1 First Day Hikes in Oregon State Parks

2 Sherman County Court 9 Courthouse

2 Sherman County Swearing-in & Public Reception 1 Courthouse in Moro

2 Gilliam County Swearing-in & Public Reception 10 Courthouse in Condon

2 Wheeler County Court 10 Fossil

2 All County Prayer Meeting First Baptist Church in Grass Valley social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

3 North Central Education Service District Board Meeting 6 Condon

3 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Grass Valley City Council 7

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board 11-2

8 North Central Public Health Board 3

8 Moro City Council 7

9 Gilliam County Court 10 Condon

9 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Program 10:30 Discovery Center

15 Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Board Meeting 1

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

18 Frontier TeleNet Board 10

19 Annual Eagle Watch 9-3 The Dalles Dam Visitor Center

19 Sherman Athletic Foundation Crab Feed

19 North Central Livestock Assoc. Annual Meeting 5 Jefferson County Fairgrounds

21 MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY

23 Tri-County Courts 10 Fossil

26 22nd Annual Robert Burns Supper 2 Condon

pencil.spiralFEBRUARY

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 Moro City Council 7

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 All County Prayer Meeting Rufus Baptist Church social 6:30, prayer 7:00-8:30

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12 LINCOLN’S BIRTHDAY

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

13 Rufus City Council 7

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

18 PRESIDENTS’ DAY

19 Wasco City Council 7

21 Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals 9

22 WASHINGTON’S BIRTHDAY

25 SHERMAN COUNTY’S BIRTHDAY 1889-2019


 

Sherman County eNews #330

CONTENTS

  1. Gilliam County Swearing-in Ceremony and Reception, Jan. 2

  2. Notice. Gilliam County Court Schedule Update, Jan. 9

  3. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Program, Jan. 12

  4. What you lose when you lose local news

  5. Responding to Criticism

  6. National ‘Do Not Call’ Registry

  7. Zone of Proximity

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Whenever possible, please shop at home! These businesses add to the character of their community. They offer personalized attention, add diversity to our shopping options, and bring life to historic buildings. They pay their employees and local taxes with the income they receive. Each time you choose to spend your dollars in your own home town, you are voting for the continued strength and vitality of your community.” ~K’Lynn Lane, Executive Director, Chamber of Commerce, Condon, Oregon, in The Times-Journal, December 27, 2018.


1. Gilliam County Swearing-in Ceremony and Reception, Jan. 2

January 2, 2019

10:00am Swearing-In Ceremony (Gilliam County Courthouse Courtroom)
The swearing-in of newly elected or re-elected officials.

10:30-11:30am Public Reception (Downstairs Conference Room)
Elected officials, staff, and the public are all invited to enjoy refreshments at a meet-and-greet reception.

Questions? Contact Sandy McKay, Court Administrator, Gilliam County Court 541-384-3303.


2. Notice. Gilliam County Court Schedule Update, Jan. 9

The Gilliam County Court has cancelled the planned January 2nd Court meeting and re-scheduled it for Wednesday, January 9th at 10:00am. On January 9th the Court will address agenda topics that include but are not limited to the Consent Agenda including designation of the Newspapers of Record, The Times-Journal and East Oregonian; “Frontier TeleNet Emergency Funding, Turnaround Proposal and Letter to the Board;” Employee Handbook Revision Committee; Road Advisory Committee; Strategic Planning Process; County Court Meeting Efficiency; Scheduling Tour of SWCD Building; Scheduling Annual Road Tour; and Court Member Reports.

~ Sandy McKay, Court Administrator

Gilliam County Court, 221 S. Oregon St., PO Box 427, Condon, OR 97823

Court Office: 541-384-3303


3. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Program, Jan. 12

Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society

January 12, 2019

Columbia Gorge Discovery Center

10:30am

Downstairs classroom

Carolyn Purcell from the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center will give a lecture on preserving old photographs and documents. This free lecture will cover subjects of identifying different types of photo processes used throughout history and best practices for handling and storing them, as well as historical documents. A $1.00 donation to cover room rental fees is appreciated. Public Welcome!


4. What you lose when you lose local news

newspaper-arrowPeople are less likely to vote, and politics become more polarized.

In November 2016, as election results began rolling in, the maps showing state-by-state Senate and presidential wins started to look like they were plotting the same race. By the time the final votes were counted, it was clear: Every state that held a U.S. Senate election favored the same political party in both contests. No state that went for Hillary Clinton elected a Republican senator; no state that went for Donald Trump elected a Democrat.

It was a stark display of the nation’s growing polarization, marking the highest percentage of states with a straight-ticket senator-and-president outcome in a century.

Now, new research suggests America’s increasing partisanship may be related to a monumental shift in the nation’s media landscape over the past three decades. As local newspapers shrink and close, people interested in the news are left more reliant on national outlets. As a result, they become more disconnected from their own communities and elected officials, less interested in voting — and more politically polarized. Without a revival of support for local journalism, experts say, that trend may be difficult to turn around.

For a decade or so, researchers have found that when the public lacks access to information about local issues, democracy itself suffers. When local print news coverage drops, residents are less likely to participate in civic activities, like contacting public officials or joining a community association; less knowledgeable about the candidates for their U.S. House district; less able to hold municipal officials accountable, leading to economic inefficiencies; and, ultimately, less likely to vote.

“When that coverage goes away, people don’t turn out to participate,” said Sarah Cavanah, a professor of mass media at Southeast Missouri State University. In November, a new study published in the Journal of Communication revealed an even further-reaching effect: After a newspaper in their community shuts down, those who do vote are more likely to cast a straight-ticket ballot, just as they did in 2016.

Local news lets people know the individual priorities and goals of local candidates — what they stand for specifically, not just how closely they hew to the party line. In other words, it keeps voters from relying exclusively on partisan cues when they’re marking their ballots, said Joshua Darr, a professor of political communication at Louisiana State University. Darr, who led the Journal of Communication study, focused on straight-ticket voting because it’s a good gauge of political polarization. Other scholars have cited factors as varied as economic inequality and top-down pressure on politicians from party leaders, for example, to explain America’s growing partisanship. Darr and his colleagues wondered if the loss of local news could have something to do with it, too.

To find out, the researchers analyzed how often voters in 66 counties across the country that had recently lost a newspaper split their votes for senator and president in the 2012 election. They found nearly 2 percent more straight-ticket voting in such counties compared to similar ones that hadn’t lost newspapers. That may seem like a small effect; after all, other factors also affect voting behavior, like education, political party affiliation and church attendance. But even small shifts can swing elections. This year, for example, a difference of just a quarter of a percentage point, or about 700 votes, brought Democrat Ben McAdams victory over Republican Mia Love in a race to represent Utah in Congress.

“(Local news sources) just need to keep existing,” Darr said. “If they can do that, they’ll help stem the tide of this polarization that seems to have really taken over politics in recent years.”

That bulwark has weakened as protections for local news itself have eroded. Rules like lower mail rates for periodicals and the Newspaper Preservation Act of 1970, which allowed competing newspapers to share some resources, helped ensure that communities had access to diverse sources of local news. But those policies aren’t as powerful in an era dominated by digital media, and updates like net neutrality, which would help safeguard access to independent media, are far from universally supported.

“So it’s not necessarily accidental that there’s a crisis in the functioning of state and local politics now,” said Lee Shaker, a professor at Portland State University who studies media and politics. “We simply stopped, as a nation, working to make sure that those processes function.”

At the same time, we stopped subscribing to local newspapers, shoving the industry off an economic cliff. “Fundamentally, the public needs to value and seek this information,” Shaker said. Without support from readers, bolstered by policies recognizing the importance of local information, local news media will be hard-pressed to help keep in check the bitter partisan animosity splitting the country today. “I don’t see a good future for us if we end up having nationalized politics,” Cavanah said. “And we might end up with that, if we don’t have a quality local news ecosystem.”

Emily Benson is an assistant editor at High Country News, covering Alaska, the Pacific Northwest and the Northern Rockies. Email her at emilyb@hcn.org or submit a letter to the editor.  See https://www.hcn.org/issues/50.22/communities-what-you-lose-when-you-lose-local-news?utm_source=wcn1&utm_medium=email


5. Responding to Criticism

key.goldGet more information.

  1. Active listening. Non-verbal attention, a posture of curiosity. Paraphrasing – Listening to the message, reflecting it back, discovering the speaker’s intent.
  2. Ask for details and clarifying information.
  3. When a speaker can’t think of a specific, you come up with one.

Agreement – Seek out agreement wherever it exists.

  1. Agree with facts. Be explicit in your agreement.
  2. Agree with a critic’s perception. Acknowledge critic’s perception is reasonable.

~Glaser & Associates, Eugene, Oregon, 1998.


6. National ‘Do Not Call’ Registry

boy.telephonetalkTo register your phone number to the Do Not Call Registry go to https://www.donotcall.gov/register/reg.aspx. ~Courtesy of The Times-Journal.

 


7. Zone of Proximity

Have you ever heard of the Zone of Proximity? It’s an interesting idea, and one that just might help during this season of “too much to do,” and “not enough time,” to get everything done we hope to accomplish.

The main idea behind the Zone of Proximity is that we don’t need to worry or be concerned until the moment we need to act. The late-Muhammed Ali, one of the best heavyweight boxers of all time, used this philosophy all the time, during his boxing matches. He was totally at ease in the corner. When the bell for the round rang, he’d come out with his arms at his sides, conserving energy until he was close enough to his opponent to get hit. When he did get close enough, then the energy he needed kicked in, his arms were up, gloves ready to protect or punch. This conservation meant he didn’t tire as quickly as some of his opponents.

So how does this idea translate to us “regular folks” as we meet each day? Let’s think of it in terms of the energy we use up when we consider the future. There really isn’t much use worrying about what will happen in the future, because it is too far away, right now. When we worry about how our children are – especially if they are adults – it is wasted energy if there is nothing we can do about a particular situation. Worrying about whether a loved one will like a holiday gift is an energy sapper, because we cannot control someone else’s reactions.

We can prepare for as many contingencies as we can imagine, and for humans we are gifted with forethought in order to do this. But once that is done, there is very little else to do until situations play out. Obsessing about possibilities only causes stress inside ourselves that inevitably spreads to those around us. With all this energy and creativity draining away on the “what ifs” of life, there isn’t enough left to deal with the realities that actually do show up.

Mastering our own Zones of Proximity allows us to meet each day with our energy meters fully charged, and our attitudes lined up for achievement.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

arrow-rightWhat you lose when you lose local news

Oregon opens broadband office to connect rural resident

Oregonians Born in Oregon Are Disappearing

Lions Club International Founder Dr. William Perry Woods

2019 Women Farm to Food Business Competition

Wind Power Finance & Investment Summit, Feb. 5-7

Prager U. Visits the March for Open Borders

Socialist Workers newspaper

The 15 Biggest Art Historical Discoveries of 2018

Mike Rowe Works Foundation


 

Sherman County eNews #329

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Junior Hoops Signups

  2. Calling All K-5 Student Artists

  3. Smiling Through the Holiday Rush

  4. 19th Annual Eagle Watch at The Dalles Dam Visitor Center in January

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


I heard the bells on Christmas Day
Their old, familiar carols play,
And wild and sweet
The words repeat
Of peace on earth,
good-will to men!
~ Henry Wadsworth Longfellow


1. Sherman Junior Hoops Signups

sports.basketball.netSignups are underway for another year of Sherman Junior Hoops youth basketball for children grades K-4. Junior Hoops takes place on Saturdays at 9 am at the elementary gym beginning January 5, 2019, and running through February 16. Signup forms are available at the Sherman Elementary School front desk and should be returned as soon as possible. Please contact Ron McDermid at 541-980-2156 with questions.


2. Calling All K-5 Student Artists 

paint.brushesSUBJECT: ELEMENTARY STUDENT ART SHOW

WHEN: JAN 22 – FEB 2, CLOSING RECEPTION ON FEB 2 FROM 3-4PM

CALLING ALL K-5 STUDENT ARTISTS in Wasco/sherman County!

You are invited to participate in our annual Elementary Student Art Show at The Dalles Art Center January 22 – February 2nd. All mediums are welcome, submission sheets are available in the gallery or online at www.TheDallesArtCenter.org

Each student may submit 1 piece of artwork each. All mediums are welcome. 2D & 3D artworks are welcome. There will be CASH PRIZES awarded during our Closing Reception on February 2 from 3-4pm. Entries will be accepted Tuesday Jan 15 – Saturday Jan 18, 2019.


3. Smiling Through the Holiday Rush

Articles and posts abound on the Internet (and Facebook) suggesting that the holiday season poses a challenge to us humans. In a season of joy, folks claim that it is difficult to be happy in overcrowded airports; that it is impossible to stay civil when it comes to spending time with relatives who try our patience. It would seem that there are lots of things to dread.

Others claim that “think positive” advice, and “peppy affirmations” to change one’s mood and visualizations of success can often achieve the opposite of their desired effect. There may be some merit in these claims, but there just might be a piece missing here.

It is a well-researched fact that we move toward what we are thinking about, because human beings think in pictures. If someone tells us NOT to think about a purple elephant, because the words “purple elephant” draw a pretty specific picture, we are going to have a challenge thinking of something else. If we think about how uncomfortable we are going to be in a crowded airport, we don’t stand much of a chance of enjoying the experience.

This is the point where these claims miss a vital point: We have the ability to decide how we are going to react to situations. Typically, we can’t change the situation, but we can change how we react to it. We can choose to be miserable and irritated, and our minds will go right to work at helping us see everything that makes the situation worse. It’s called the Self-Fulfilling Prophecy, aided and abetted by our Reticular Activating System.

However, the self-fulfilling prophecy can be pointed in a different direction. We all know that something as simple as a smile can diffuse tension – in yourself and in the receiver of the heartfelt smile you give. It is also contagious! Just try not smiling back when you are on the receiving end of an honest, heartfelt smile. It’s darn near impossible!

A smile is easy, quick and costs little. And a smile uses fewer muscles and less energy than a frown. So, for today, give the world around you a smile, and see how it transforms the world inside you. ~The Pacific Institute


4. 19th Annual Eagle Watch at The Dalles Dam Visitor Center in January

bird.eaglePORTLAND, Ore. – Corps park rangers invite the public to The Dalles Dam visitor center to view bald eagles roosting in their natural habitat along the Columbia River. The visitor center will be open Saturdays and Sundays in January from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Park rangers will be available to answer questions, help people use spotting scopes (provided by the Corps) and teach basic bird identification tips. Visitors are encouraged to bring their own scopes, binoculars and cameras. These weekend events are family-friendly, free and accessible to all people.

Saturday, Jan. 19, is the ninth annual Eagle Watch event, when visitors can also see live raptor shows in addition to eagle-watching. Eagle Watch is co-hosted with partners from the U.S. Forest Service, Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Rowena Wildlife Clinic.

The Dalles Dam is a prime winter location for migrating bald eagles. It’s typical to see more than 30 eagles from the visitor center parking lot and adjacent Seufert Park, which are both open to the public every day from dusk until dawn.

The Dalles Dam Visitor Center is located off exit 87 of I-84, traveling east on Bret Clodfelter Way. Inclement weather may cause the event to be rescheduled. For more information contact The Dalles Lock & Dam Ranger Office at 541-506-7857 or visit www.nwp.usace.army.mil/Locations/Columbia-River/The-Dalles/.

To stay up to date on all Portland District events, follow us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/PortlandCorps/.

Get more information about raptor viewing opportunities in the Columbia Gorge at www.gorgediscovery.org or www.rowenawildlifeclinic.org/.


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeHow the Reformation Shaped Your World

Number of fatal car accidents in Oregon has been trending upward

Ranchers upset by wild horse release

Farm groups express relief as Trump signs farm bill

Sen. Jeff Merkley announces rural broadband bill

Federal program pays $1.4 million to pikeminnow anglers

Military Times (news)

Defense News

A Bridge for Santa Claus – Coca Cola


 

Sherman County eNews #328

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

church.family1

Comfort for Those Grieving

O son of Man!  Thou art My dominion and My dominion perish not; wherefore fearest thou thy perishing?

Thou art My light and My light shall never be extinguished; why dost thou dread extinction?

Thou art My glory and My glory fadeth not; thou art My robe and My robe shall never be outworn.

Abide then in thy love for Me, that thou mayest find Me in the realm of glory.

(Baha’u’llah: The Arabic Hidden Words #14)

For more information visit www.bahai.org or 1-800-22-UNITE

Erling Jacobsen  541-980-3055

church.family1

Sent to be Wrapped

“In those days a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be registered. This was the first registration when Quirinius was governor of Syria. And all went to be registered, each to his own town. And Joseph also went up from Galilee, from the town of Nazareth, to Judea, to the city of David, which is called Bethlehem, because he was of the house and lineage of David, to be registered with Mary, his betrothed, who was with child. And while they were there, the time came for her to give birth. And she gave birth to her firstborn son and wrapped him in swaddling cloths and laid him in a manger, because there was no place for them in the inn.

And in the same region there were shepherds out in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. (And the angel said to them, “Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.”

And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, “Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!” (Luke 2:1–14, ESV)

The next time we have a record of Jesus’ being wrapped in cloths is at His burial after His crucifixion which was followed on the third day by His resurrection for the purpose of our salvation.

Joe Burgess
Pastor, Kent Baptist Church


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected) 

eNEWS POLICIES:

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. No posters or flyers.

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

WELL DONE, SHERMAN COUNTY! I recently attended a meeting in Moro at the Sherman County Courthouse and while there was able to have a tour given by Sherman County Judge Gary Thompson and Justice of the Peace Ron McDermid.  I was impressed by the care of keeping the historical integrity in the original building and the thoughtful consideration of space and function of the addition.  Realizing that it was a decade-long process and considerable resources were used for the project, I think that Sherman County staff and residents should be proud of the end result.  After the meeting and tour, I went to the Sherman County School as I had made some arrangements to pick up a Christmas tree that they were selling the previous weekend.  From the school front office to dealing with the teacher selling the trees, I was impressed by the friendliness and professionalism of the school staff. Well done, Sherman County. ~Kathryn Greiner, Mayville, OR 97830 

JOYFUL NEWS!

Merry Christmas, Everyone! 

Christmas.Santa.mail

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

LOST OR FOUND:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” — Unknown

SUPPORT FOR BRENNAH MILLER

Brennah Miller is a young wife and mother, an electrician and a cancer patient.

EMPLOYMENT:

 

Christmas.Holly2 FOR SALE:

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

GIVE THE TIMES-JOURNAL FOR CHRISTMAS & YEAR-ROUND! The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com  $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond the region.

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & GIFTS. Considerately Handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available. Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 12/21 

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE: 

 

Christmas.Holly2SERVICES: 

SHOP LOCALLY! SHERMAN COUNTY BUSINESSES https://www.co.sherman.or.us/businesses/ 

GIVE THE TIMES-JOURNAL FOR CHRISTMAS & YEAR-ROUND! The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com  $37.50/year; $47.50 for beyond the region.

FRIDAY KIDS’ GYM. Beginning this Friday, and continuing most every Friday through March, Wasco School Events Center (WSEC) will be hosting “Kids Gym.”   This will be an opportunity for parents and their pre-school children to play inside for a couple of hours when the weather is too cold to be outside.   Kid Gym will go from 10 a.m. to noon, and parents who attend with their pre-schooler(s) will need to sign a release form to participate. Cost is $5/week, or free if you are a member of the WSEC Fitness Center. This is not a babysitting service; children must be accompanied by an adult.   Feel free to bring toys, trikes, etc. for your child(ren) to play with. 12/28

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 12/28 

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

Sherman County School District Calendar

https://shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com/scsd-event-calendar.html

Christmas.Carolers2DECEMBER

21 Frontier TeleNet 10 Steve Burnet/Extension Building, Moro

21 Winter Begins

23 Wasco Methodist Church Christmas Service 11 Wasco

23 First Baptist Church Christmas Service 6 Grass Valley

24 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Candlelight Service 6 Moro

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

27-31 Whale Watching Week on the Oregon Coast

31 Official End of WWII 1946

church bellJANUARY

1 NEW YEAR’S DAY

1 First Day Hikes in Oregon State Parks

2 Sherman County Court & Oaths of Office 9 Courthouse

3 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Grass Valley City Council 7

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board 11-2

8 North Central Public Health Board 3

8 Moro City Council 7

9 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory 12:30

9 Rufus City Council 7

11 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

15 Frontier Regional 9-1-1 Board Meeting 1

15 Wasco City Council 7

16 Sherman County Court 9

18 Frontier TeleNet Board 10

19 Sherman Athletic Foundation Crab Feed

19 North Central Livestock Assoc. Annual Meeting 5 Jefferson County Fairgrounds

21 MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY

23 Tri-County Courts 10 Fossil

26 22nd Annual Robert Burns Supper 2 Condon

Valentine.heartFEBRUARY

4 Grass Valley City Council 7

5 Moro City Council 7

6 Sherman County Court 9

7 Sherman County Fair Board 7

8 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

13 Rufus City Council 7

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

18 PRESIDENTS’ DAY

19 Wasco City Council 7

21 Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals 9


 

Sherman County eNews #327

CONTENTS

  1. St. John the Baptist and St. Mary Catholic Church Services, Dec. 24-Jan. 26

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court, Jan. 2

  3. Rustic Cabins Open & Ready to Rent at Cottonwood Canyon State Park

  4. First Day Hike at Cottonwood Canyon State Park, Jan. 1

  5. Black History 101 Mobile Museum to Visit The Dalles, Jan. 8

  6. To Be Alone


“[Members of Congress] are the Servants of the People, sent together to do the People’s Business…” —Benjamin Franklin (1785)


Christmas.Baby

Away in a manger, no crib for his bed,
the little Lord Jesus laid down his sweet head.
The stars in the bright sky looked down where he lay,
The little Lord Jesus asleep on the hay.

The cattle are lowing, the baby awakes,
but little Lord Jesus no crying he makes.
I love thee, Lord Jesus! Look down from the sky,
And stay by my side until morning is nigh.

~Lyrics unattributed; music by William J. Kirkpatrick in 1895


1. St. John the Baptist and St. Mary Catholic Church Services, Dec. 24-Jan. 26

church.family1Christmas Eve Mass, Monday, December 24, 5pm St. John the Baptist, Grass Valley (No Mass in Wasco) Everyone is welcome to join us as we celebrate the birth of Our Savior!

December 29 – January 26 Mass Schedule

St. Mary, Wasco, Saturdays at 5pm (No Grass Valley Masses) Father Ron Maag will be celebrating Mass with us while Father Fabian is on vacation.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court, Jan. 2

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, January 2, 2019, at 9:00 a.m.  will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


3. Rustic Cabins Open & Ready to Rent at Cottonwood Canyon State Park

Just in time for the cold winter weather, the cabins at Cottonwood Canyon are open for business! These rustic cabins are the perfect way to experience the open wilderness of Cottonwood Canyon and the surrounding area while sleeping in comfort.

Our 4 rustic cabins sleep up to 8 people and are outfitted with two twin sized bunk beds, a full sized bed, and a futon that pulls out into an additional full sized bed. Each cabin also includes a dining table with 4 chairs, a mini fridge, porch seating, picnic table and fire ring.

For those cold winter nights, or hot summer days; air conditioning and heat is supplied.

Located nearby is our newly constructed restroom/shower house; free hot showers are provided with rentals of any cabin or campsite. Potable water is available outside the cabins year round.

Visitors will still need to bring bedding, eating utensils, food and any other camping items they’ve come to rely on.

Cabin rentals are currently $48/night for visitors without pets, or $58/night for one of our two pet-friendly cabins. (Plus an additional $8 reservation fee). For additional information, give us a call here at Cottonwood Canyon at (541) 394-0002.

Reservations can be made on-line 24/7 through Reserve America; or by calling reservations at 1-800-452-5687Monday-Friday 8-5pm (excluding holidays). See https://cottonwoodcanyon.wordpress.com/2018/12/20/cottonwood-cabins-open-and-ready-to-rent/.


4. First Day Hike at Cottonwood Canyon State Park, Jan. 1

This year, the hike will start at our brand new Experience Center building. From there we will be hiking the pinnacles trail which follows the John Day river canyon through stunning geologic formations in a natural desert landscape. Look closely for Mule Deer, Red Tailed Hawk, and our resident herd of California Bighorn Sheep.

Some things to keep in mind: Dogs are permitted on a 6-foot leash. Due to some narrow and sloping trail sections, strollers are not recommended. Bring plenty of water, and snacks if desired. Hiking boots highly recommended, as well as hats, gloves and winter coats.

The hike is expected to be around 2.5 miles round trip. We will be meeting at 10am starting from the Experience Center, located just past the red barn. Resister now at Oregonstateparks.org!

Looking for something different? Nearby Deschutes State Recreation Area will be hosting its first annual First Day Hike. The hike will begin at 9am, meeting at the Oregon Trail Kiosk (located in the campground area). Take a ranger-led hike on the historic Railbed Trail along the edge of the Deschutes River. The hike will continue on the Ferry Springs Trail to climb to the highest point in the park and magnificent views of the Deschutes River Scenic Waterway. The final leg of the trek will be on the Blackberry Trail. Note that this hike will be approximately 5miles, with minor water crossings. Hiking boots, water, and weather appropriate clothing are necessary. Register for this hike here: https://store.oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_item&itemId=162&eventId=105.


5. Black History 101 Mobile Museum to Visit The Dalles, Jan. 8

A mobile museum featuring a collection of over 7,000 artifacts related to Black history and culture will visit The Dalles-Wasco County Public Library on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, from 11 am to 3 pm. The Black History 101 Mobile Museum’s founder, Khalid el-Hakim, will give a talk from 12 to 1pm. Admission is free.

As a Social Studies teacher at Detroit’s Lions Academy, a public middle school, el-Hakim realized that the available textbooks often glossed over or inadequately explained Black history and culture. In response, he began scouring second-hand shops, junk yards, and other sources for original artifacts that he could use to illustrate concepts like the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Jim Crow, slavery, and institutionalized racism to his students. el-Hakim calls himself “the Black version of the show American Pickers.”

Starting in the early 1990s, el-Hakim continued growing his collection for use as a classroom aide, amassing around 500 pieces. In 1995, after attending the Million Man March in Washington, D.C., el-Hakim was inspired to do something that would support awareness and social change in the community. He also decided he needed a larger and more permanent way to make the collection accessible beyond just his own students.

The result is the Black History 101 Mobile Museum, a 39-foot trailer that houses el-Hakim’s collection, representing a cross-section of what el-Hakim calls “the Black experience in America.” The museum showcases artifacts–both historical and contemporary–that illustrate the history and progression of Black culture. Pieces range from those connected to slavery, Jim Crow, and civil rights, to the emergence and flourishing of Black culture in movements from the Harlem Renaissance to modern-day hip-hop. The museum is laid out in table-top displays, with objects grouped together to illustrate a common theme.  Unlike books or commentary about a historical subject, a collection such as the one el-Hakim has curated allows visitors to have a visceral experience of history and culture. Grouping objects thematically allows the artifacts to be contextualized. As el-Hakim said “I took it to a different level [to show] what Booker T. Washington or W.E.B. Dubois or other individuals were doing during the Jim Crow era. It just made more of a powerful impact for me to see Aunt Jemima imagery next to somebody like [poet and playwright] Paul Laurence Dunbar, and what he was doing at the time.”

Current themes include women, hip-hop, Jim Crow, civil rights and Black Power, music, leadership, sports, and science and technology. Since 2018 is the 50th anniversary of his assassination, materials are included that relate to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., and to the 1968 Olympics, where athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos each raised a fist in a silent salute to civil rights.

el-Hakim stopped teaching social studies in 2011 to devote himself to the museum full time. He is also creating a documentary film about the museum itself, called ArtifaXual, as part of his dissertation research as a Ph.D. student at the University of Illinois.

Light refreshments will be served, and the event, which is sponsored by Columbia Gorge Community College, will be held in the Library’s Community Room.

Khalid el-Hakim and the Black History Mobile Museum can be found on social media at the following locations:

Twitter @BH101MM
Instagram: @bhistory101
Facebook: Black History 101 Mobile Museum
Black History Mobile Museum website: https://www.blackhistorymobilemuseum.com/


6. To Be Alone

Loneliness is something most of us dread. It can seem even worse during the holiday season, especially if we are dealing with loss and the need to create a new future for ourselves. However, even loneliness has its positive aspects.

Loneliness can be painful, but, as with other things, it is our attitude toward loneliness that counts. We can take a negative attitude, in which case we may either run from being alone, filling life with “busy-ness” or we can choose to wallow in it, immersed in self-pity.

We can also take a positive attitude, recognize it as an essential experience of every human being and use it creatively as a resource for knowing the self, and discovering our center and focus in life. Loneliness then becomes “alone time,” which is very different from loneliness.

It is only when we can stand alone, when we can admit our separate-ness, that we can make full use of our individual resources to set about finding our meaningful connections with others. We can take the time to set aside the desperation that fear of being alone can cause.

When the love and understanding with which we reach out to others is based upon a true sense of the self, a sense that we have discovered in confrontation with our loneliness, then it is based on reality instead of on false expectations. It is much easier to deal with, or handle, the truth than it is to deal with the disappointment of false expectations.

We alone can change ourselves. We alone can make the decision for growth. Each of us, alone, is the central point of reference in our lives. And this alone-ness actually gives us courage and resiliency to face what comes.

Knowing these things can be a lonely experience, but out of it can come a greater strength and confidence in your ability to meet life – and provide inner security that fear cannot manipulate or destroy. ~The Pacific Institute