Sherman County eNews #305

CONTENTS

  1. Photography Club Meeting, Nov. 26

  2. Space Weather: Mars Landing, Nov. 26

  3. Oregon State Agencies A-Z

  4. Oregon Law: Newspaper in Which Public Notice May Be Published

  5. Finding the Middle Ground

  6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem, by the Numbers

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Photography Club Meeting, Nov. 26

The Sherman County Photography Club meets Monday, November 26 at 6 pm at the Steve Burnet/OSU Extension Building in Moro.  Giving a presentation on photo editing will be Lowell Smith. This month’s photo challenge is portrait photographs. Members will share their portrait shots. Plans for upcoming field trips will be discussed. Everyone is invited to attend.


2. Space Weather: Mars Landing, Nov. 26

http://spaceweather.com
https://www.facebook.com/spaceweatherdotcom

On Monday, Nov. 26th, NASA will attempt to land a new robot on the planet Mars. Named “InSight,” the lander will tear through the Red Planet’s atmosphere, shedding more than 12,000 mph of velocity is just under 7 minutes. For the first time, a pair of interplanetary cubesats nicknamed “WALL-E” and “Eva” will relay signals from the landing in near-real time. Find out how to watch on today’s edition of Spaceweather.com.


3. Oregon State Agencies A-Z

Over the years, our politicians have created an enormous pork barrel of agencies that employ personnel to provide services… salaries, health insurance and public pensions. https://www.oregon.gov/pages/a_to_z_listing.aspx


4. Oregon Law: Newspaper in Which Public Notice May Be Published

~https://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/193.010

2017 ORS 193.020¹ [Also see ORS 193.010 to 193.030]

ORS 193.010: Newspaper – Definition:

“Newspaper” means a newspaper of general circulation, published in the English language for the dissemination of local or transmitted news or for the dissemination of legal news, made up of at least four pages of at least five columns each, with type matter of a depth of at least 14 inches, or, if smaller pages, then comprising an equivalent amount of type matter, which has bona fide subscribers representing more than half of the total distribution of copies circulated, or distribution verified by an independent circulation auditing firm, and which has been established and regularly and uninterruptedly published at least once a week during a period of at least 12 consecutive months immediately preceding the first publication of the public notice. Interrupted publication because of labor-management disputes, fire, flood or the elements for a period not to exceed 120 days, either before or after a newspaper is qualified for publication of public notices, shall not affect such qualification. [Amended by 1979 c.760 §1; subsection (1) renumbered 174.104 (“Public notice” defined) in 1999]

Newspaper in which public notice may be published:

(1)Any public notice of any description, the publication of which is now or hereafter required by law, shall be published in any newspaper, as defined in ORS 193.010 (Definitions for ORS 193.010 and 193.020), which is published within the county, city of which any part lies within that county, city, district or other jurisdiction where the action, suit or other proceeding is pending, or is to be commenced or had, or in which the legal publication is required to be given.

(2)If publication in only one newspaper is required by law, and if more than one newspaper fulfills the requirements of subsection (1) of this section, the public notice shall be published in that newspaper which the moving party considers best suited to give actual notice. However, nothing in this subsection prohibits the publication in more than one newspaper if desired by the moving party.

(3)If no newspaper is published within the county, city, district or jurisdiction where the action, suit or other proceeding is pending, or is to be commenced or had, or in which the legal publication is required to be given, public notice shall be published in:

(a)The newspaper published nearest to such county, city, district or jurisdiction; or

(b)Any publication that is published in such county, city, district or jurisdiction and that satisfies all the requirements for being a newspaper except that it is published less than once a week but not less than once a month.

(4)If more than one newspaper or publication fulfills the requirements of subsection (3) of this section, the public notice shall be published in that newspaper or publication which the moving party considers most effective for providing actual notice. [Amended by 1963 c.432 §1; 1979 c.760 §2; 1983 c.831 §1]


5. Finding the Middle Ground

Have you heard of “either/or thinking?” It’s a dangerous but fairly common mistake that many of us have been conditioned to make. Perhaps it’s time to find the middle ground.

Either/or thinking, or black-and-white thinking as it’s sometimes called, is a dangerous thing. It’s basically just what it sounds like. Either/or thinkers don’t see shades of gray. They want easy answers to difficult questions, so they see life in terms of winners and losers, good guys and bad guys, success or failure, right and wrong.

What they fail to realize is that right and wrong often depend on time, place, culture and purpose, among other things. They fail to understand that no one is all good or all bad, or that “success” and “failure” depend on how you define them – just like “winning” and “losing” do. These people don’t see the degrees of difference that stretch between most opposites, because if they did, it would require more time and energy being devoted to complex thinking skills and a willingness to deal with subtle differences.

Now, it’s true that they don’t see these things. Because of these dearly-held beliefs, their brains build blind spots, or “scotomas,” to any information that is contrary, because it threatens their either/or belief system. So even if a nuance is true, it can’t get through.

Here is a homework assignment, for the rest of this year. During this coming holiday season, while you are at special dinners, parties or get-togethers, just sit and listen to the conversations around you. What are you hearing? How many people are engaging in this “either/or” thinking? How does it affect the rest of the people in the conversation?

In an increasingly global society, flexibility of thinking is a must. Catch yourself doing either/or thinking. Most of us do it, from time to time, and it drastically limits our options. Deliberate self-awareness is essential – and a strong desire to keep your mind open to the full range of possibilities will keep you from getting trapped in an “either/or” world. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem, by the Numbers

Here are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories.

4: Percent decline in the price of whole, frozen turkeys this year, according to the Oregon Office of Economic Analysis.

10: Percent of retail sales that are now done online, according to OEA.

3 to 16: Inches of snow that could accumulate over Cascade mountain passes over Thanksgiving, according to OPB.

$37 million: Total spending in this year’s contest for governor, according to The Oregonian/OregonLive.

516: Pages of a novel about vampires and witches set in the 19th century and published in 2006 by Rep. Paul Evans, D-Monmouth. “The Guardians Last Crusade: Springtime in Babylon” got parlayed into an attack ad against Evans in this year’s election, according to The Salem Reporter. Evans won.

10: Public employees suing two unions and public agencies in Oregon over practices involving mandatory dues in the wake of the Janus vs. AFSCME case. The plaintiffs are seeking class action status.

$5 million: Amount Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has given to a Portland nonprofit, JOIN, that serves homeless families, according to OPB.

54,200: Population growth in Oregon from 2017 to 2018, according to Willamette Week, citing figures from PSU.

88: Percent of that growth corresponding to people moving to Oregon from other places.

143: Pounds of pot a Springfield, Ore., man tried to mail across state lines by hiding the drug in fake rocks, according to the Washington Examiner. Curran Millican Manzer, 37, pleaded guilty to mailing a package of concealed pot to Oklahoma in federal court this week. They were labeled as taxidermy.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Oregon State Agencies A-Z

TedEd: Why is meningitis so dangerous?

Smithsonian: The Ironic History of Mar-a-Lago

Oregon abortion laws attract out-of-state residents 


 

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