Sherman County eNews #298

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Student Selected to Play in the NAFME All Northwest Wind Ensemble

  2. Sherman County Education Foundation Logo Contest

  3. Marilyn (Powell) Clark 1940-2018

  4. Turkey Bingo at the Goldendale American Legion Post, Nov. 17

  5. Collateral Stress

  6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

  7. Oregon Fire Marshal Strike Teams Work on Camp Fire Incident in California


1. Sherman Student Selected to Play in the NAFME All Northwest Wind Ensemble

Logo.Sherman High SchoolOutstanding music students from Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and Wyoming have received top honors by being selected to participate in one of our 2019 National Association for Music Educators (NAFME) All-Northwest performing groups.  A Sherman High School student will join over one thousand other outstanding high school student musicians in this gala event. NAFME All-Northwest high school bands, orchestras and choirs will meet in Portland, Oregon, February 14-17. They will rehearse and perform in concert under the direction of world-renowned conductors. These All-Northwest musicians were selected from over 4370 students who auditioned to participate in this outstanding event, which is managed by the Washington Music Educators Association. Many professional musicians credit their All-Northwest experience as crucial in their decision to choose music as a career. Thousands of others whose career paths took them in different directions have great memories of participating in this inspiring and motivating musical experience and claim that it was a life changing experience for them. Well-known Northwesterners who have participated in past years’ All-Northwest groups include: trumpeters Doc Severinson and Allen Vizzutti, Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist and columnist David Horsey, 2008 National Teacher of the Year Andrea Peterson, and jazz saxophonist Kenny G.

Emma Witherspoon was selected to play in the NAFME Wind Ensemble next February. Emma is a junior at Sherman County School. ~Sherman County School District


2. Sherman County Education Foundation Logo Contest

art.toolsThe new Sherman County Education Foundation is sponsoring a logo contest. Our mission is to enhance the excellence of education of all the Sherman County community and students’ experiences and provide balanced curriculum. Our vision is to assist the Sherman County School District to designate funds to provide more creative programs and innovative experiences.

Design must include our tagline: Our kids. Our Future.
Please also provide your name and phone number. Contest is open to all ages.
Entries are due on November 29th and can be submitted by email:shermancoeducationfoundation@gmail.com
mail:PO Box 68, Moro, OR 97039
Drop off at the Sherman County Public Library or at any of the school offices.
Winner will be announced at the Annual Holiday Bazaar in Moro, Country Christmas Bazaar in Grass Valley, Sherman County Historical Museum and right here on the eNews. $50 cash prize.
Questions: email us at shermancoeducationfoundation@gmail.com


3. Marilyn (Powell) Clark 1940-2018

flower.rose.starMarilyn Clark, a retired homemaker, passed away at the age of 77 on November 5, 2018. Marilyn’s life began on November 18, 1940 when she was born to Marion “Bud” and Rosemary Powell, joining big sister Judy. She was raised in Moro, The Dalles and Hood River, Oregon, graduating from Hood River High School in 1958. Shortly after graduation, she married Don Clark with whom she had two children, Mark and Melanie. Don and Marilyn were married for 21 years.

Marilyn’s fascination from an early age was genealogy. We found letters from extended family dating from the early 1960s, answering her questions about her ancestors. She loved traveling to far-off cemeteries when she learned of an ancestor’s final resting place, and one of her favorites was a visit to Boston to visit the grave of Charles Bulfinch, her 3rd Great Grandfather who, she liked to brag, was the architect of the US Capitol building in Washington DC.

Marilyn volunteered her time and resources to the Providence Hood River Hospital, as well as to Parkhurst Place. She could always be counted on to provide special love and care to elderly and special-needs friends. She was also a strong supporter of Alzheimer’s Research.

Marilyn was a proud member of the Hood River chapter of the Beta Sigma Phi sorority, as well as of the local Sewing Club where we are sure she never raised a needle.

She leaves behind her old cat, Callie; sister Judy and brother-in-law Lyle; son Mark; daughter Melanie and son-in-law Dave; granddaughter Stephanie and husband Josh, and the light of her life, great-grandson Langston; niece Theresa and husband Scott; and many dear local friends and extended family.

Services were held Sunday, November 11, 2018 at Anderson’s Tribute Center 1401 Belmont Avenue, Hood River, Oregon 97031.  Memorial contributions would be most appreciated by one of Marilyn’s two charitable passions: the Sherman County Historical Museum or the Alzheimer’s Association.


4. Turkey Bingo at the Goldendale American Legion Post, Nov. 17

TURKEY BINGO

Brought to you by Goldendale American Legion

Louis Leidl Post 116

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 17TH

TIME: Noon until???

25 cents per card per game

All winners get a FREE TURKEY!


5. Collateral Stress

Compulsive behaviors and the negative costs we charge ourselves, in the way of extra tension and stress, can add up over time and cause physical as well as emotional distress. “Compulsive punctuals” are good examples, with their overwhelming need to be on time disrupting traffic with erratic driving and the ultimate distress – road rage. Today, let’s flip that around a bit because there are negative costs to going too far in the opposite direction.

Compulsively punctual people generally cause the extra stress and tension on themselves first, but there can also be a cost to those around them as they basically force others to adhere to their obsessive schedule. While some of us think that constantly being early is not a bad thing, nobody wants to be constantly forced into it, and the effect on work teams can be destructive. It’s not much fun, and when we feel pushed, we tend to push back.

So, what happens when a team member is constantly late? Interestingly enough, that same stress and tension plays out within the group, and the effect is equally destructive. Someone (or more than one) winds up having to cover for the missing member, take up extra duties, and typically find themselves behind on their own work. If it happens often enough, the rest of the group begins to question the late arriver’s commitment to the job and the rest of the team.

If you are a constant “late arriver,” there is a balance to be found, and it begins with a little research. What gets in the way to a smooth on-time arrival? Do you find yourself pulled in too many directions as you get ready for work? If so, a little re-organization of priorities can make all the difference. If on-time arrival is a part of the job description, then assigning priorities to your morning becomes a little easier.

If arriving late is a lifelong pattern, then ask yourself why? Where does it come from? Identifying the source of the behavior puts you halfway toward changing it. And if you truly want to change the behavior, then start creating new pictures of yourself arriving on time -or maybe a little early. Paint the picture of the benefits, focus on those pictures, and watch the behaviors – and those of your work team – change for the better. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories.

  • 81,600:New addresses the state of Oregon has found in the run-up to the 2020 census, according to The Salem Reporter.
  • $408 million:Amount of additional federal money the state could receive if those addresses are verified by the federal government.
  • 97:Ballots turned in late in Multnomah County by an unnamed political group, an incident that the Secretary of State’s Office is investigating because it could violate state law, according to Willamette Week. Defend Oregon, a liberal campaign committee, said that campaign staff had turned in late ballots and issued an apology Thursday.
  • $1 billion:Approximate additional revenue the state will collect in the current budget, exceeding state economists’ mid-2017 projections.
  • $724 million:Estimated “kicker” amount.
  • $174:Amount of tax money the median taxpayer will get back if predictions hold.
  • 3:Oregon wilderness areas that the U.S. Forest Service wants to limit access to with a permit system starting in 2020: Mt. Jefferson, Three Sisters and Mt. Washington, according to the Statesman-Journal.
  • 46,999:Visitors the areas received in 2011.
  • 132,118:In 2016.
  • 146:Hate crimes reported in Oregon last year, according to The Oregonian/OregonLive.

~ http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/oci/1908-313081-insider-index-this-week-in-salem-by-the-numbers?utm_source=Oregon+Capital+Insider&utm_campaign=20254a5ac8-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_04_25_COPY_01&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_362d804414-20254a5ac8-233864753


7. Oregon Fire Marshal Strike Teams Work on Camp Fire Incident in California

emergencyFireThe Oregon State Fire Marshal (OSFM) strike teams (ST) continue critical work on the Camp Fire Incident burning in Butte County, California.  The OSFM currently has 75 engines and approximately 300 personnel from throughout the Oregon Fire Service currently assigned to the incident. The Camp Fire is the nation’s deadliest wildfire in a century and although cooler weather is helping firefighters to gain ground, we know that the search for people will continue. As the number of fatalities increase, we continue to monitor the effects this has on our first responders and to provide the necessary peer support. The safety and well-being of our firefighters is, and will remain, our number one priority.

Thirteen OSFM ST are working 24 hour shifts on the fire constructing direct lines and holding control lines to mitigate the threat of fire escaping.  They are also engaged in mop up and patrol. Two OSFM ST are assigned to the Rescue Division, working 12 hour shifts. Their assignments involve securing water lines, gas lines, and LPG storage and lines, as well as working to clear structures and assisting search and rescue recovery efforts.

Chief Deputy Ruiz-Temple states, “Oregonians can take great pride in the sacrifice of our firefighters during this time of year. We also keep their families in our thoughts who will certainly miss them during the upcoming holiday. When giving your thanks next week, please keep everyone affected by the fires in your thoughts as they face the grim task of rebuilding their property and lives”.

The Oregon strike teams are expected to remain on the fire through Friday, November 23rd; however, as conditions improve their return home may change.


 

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