Sherman County eNews #294

CONTENTS

  1. Veterans Day: 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918

  2. Oregon Air National Guard Veterans Day Flyovers in Oregon

  3. Veterans Day & 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day at Maryhill Museum & Stonehenge, Nov. 10-12

  4. Our Veterans’ Stories: Sherman County: For The Record

  5. Oregon State Capitol Christmas Tree

  6. Hansell’s Sex Trafficking Prevention Bill Implemented in Oregon

  7. In Order to Succeed, First Try

  8. Sherman County History Tidbits: 1949 4-H Song Book

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


We feel strongly about supporting your local economy. It keeps the community unique, builds relationships between neighbors, encourages and supports a healthier and more sustainable food system and supports local families. ~Staci Fisher, Fisher Ridge Farm


1. Veterans Day: 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918

We set aside Veterans Day to honor the high price of sacrifice paid by generations of Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Marines and Coastguardsmen. They have carried forward the banner of Liberty since the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord. Millions of American Patriots have, for generations, honored their oaths “to support and defend” the Liberty that was “endowed by our Creator,” and enshrined in our Constitution.

Our national Veterans Day observance originated as Armistice Day, marking the end of World War I at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. The Armistice commemoration was to honor Veterans of World War 1. ~The Patriot Post https://patriotpost.us/pages/318?mailing_id=3852&utm_medium=email&utm_source=pp.email.3852&utm_campaign=digest&utm_content=body  

Remembering the Lessons of the Great War: https://patriotpost.us/articles/59383-remembering-the-lessons-of-the-great-war?mailing_id=3852&utm_medium=email&utm_source=pp.email.3852&utm_campaign=digest&utm_content=body


2. Oregon Air National Guard Veterans Day Flyovers in Oregon 

The Oregon Air National Guard is scheduled to conduct Veterans Day flyovers at various locations throughout Oregon.

F-15 Eagle fighter jets from both the 173rd Fighter Wing in Klamath Falls, Oregon, and the 142nd Fighter Wing in Portland, Oregon, are scheduled to conduct flyovers at the following community locations at or near the designated times:

The 142nd Fighter Wing is scheduled to conduct the following flyovers on Saturday, Nov. 10:

11:45 a.m., Albany Veterans Day Parade, Albany, Oregon.

12:00 p.m., Willamette Lutheran Homes, Keizer, Oregon.

12:50 p.m., Linfield College Honors Veterans, McMinnville, Oregon.

 

The 173rd Fighter Wing is scheduled to conduct the following flyovers on Monday, Nov. 12:

11:00 a.m., Veterans Day Parade, Klamath Falls, Oregon.

11:45 a.m., Veterans Day Parade, The Dalles, Oregon.

All passes will be approximately 1,000 feet above ground level and about 400 mph airspeed. Flights could be canceled or times changed due to inclement weather or operational contingencies.

The Oregon Air National Guard has been an integral part of the nation’s air defense since 1941. The 142nd Fighter Wing guards the Pacific Northwest skies from northern California to the Canadian border, on 24-hour alert as part of the North American Air Defense system. The 173rd Fighter Wing is home to the premier F-15 pilot training facility for the U.S. Air Force.


3. Veterans Day & 100th Anniversary of Armistice Day at Maryhill Museum & Stonehenge, Nov. 10-12

 (Goldendale, Wash., October 8, 2018) — As Maryhill Museum of Art prepares to close out its 2018 season, a weekend of events will mark Veterans Day and the 100th anniversary of the armistice of November 11, 1918, when the Allies of WWI and Germany ceased hostilities on the Western Front.

On Saturday, November 10 and Sunday, November 11 the museum will offer free admission to veterans, active military and firefighters. Visitors who donate two non-perishable food items will also receive free admission.

On Sunday, November 11 from 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. there will be a special, commemorative event at Stonehenge Memorial, marking the anniversary of Armistice Day. This event will be followed by a reception at Maryhill, where there will be a small exhibition in the museum’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center of WWI posters from the Maryhill Museum of Art Collections, and WWI artifacts from the Columbia Gorge Veterans Museum. Families whose loved ones are honored at Stonehenge Memorial are invited to share scrapbooks or photos; a table will be set up in the museum on Sunday for this purpose. For more information, contact Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at 509 773-3733 ext. 25 or email education@maryhillmuseum.org.

At 11 a.m. on Sunday, there will be a performance of Honor Bells and honorific music by the handbell choir of Hood River Valley Christian Church, at the museum.

At 6 p.m. on November 11, Washington State park ranger Mark Harris will give a final performance of his living history presentation of a WWI soldier. This program will take place at Stonehenge Memorial.

There are also Veterans Day activities such as parades, breakfasts, presentations and more in the communities of GoldendaleThe DallesWhite Salmon and Hood River; local chamber websites are linked.

FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS – NOVEMBER 10 & 11

Closing Weekend: Maryhill Museum of Art
Saturday, November 10 & Sunday, November 11, 2018

Celebrate the conclusion of the 2018 season at Maryhill and LEND A HELPING HAND to food banks in Klickitat County. For every two non-perishable food items contributed at Maryhill on this final weekend, you will receive one free museum admission. Veterans and active military and their families are free all weekend, as are regional firefighters.  Cookies and drinks will be free for veterans.  Members will also enjoy a double discount (20%) in the Museum Store throughout the month of November. Our way of saying THANKS!

Armistice Day 100th Anniversary Celebration at Stonehenge Memorial
Sunday, November 11, 2018 | 9:30- 11:30 a.m.

Join us at Stonehenge Memorial as we commemorate the 100th anniversary of Armistice Day. The event will begin with World War I era music and poetry, followed by a brief history of the Stonehenge and the 14 service members memorialized there.  There will be speeches, a wreath laying, National Salute, taps, and planting of red poppies.  A reception at Maryhill Museum of Art will follow the ceremonies.  Veterans are encouraged to wear their medals and decorations to the ceremony; the museum will offer free admission to all who attend the event at Stonehenge on November 11. Measures will be in place in the event of cold or wet weather.

Families whose loved ones are honored at Stonehenge Memorial are invited to share scrapbooks or photos; a table will be set up at Maryhill for this purpose. For more information, contact Louise Palermo, Curator of Education at 509 773-3733 ext. 25 or email education@maryhillmuseum.org.

Participating groups include Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier; Washington State Parks; Maryhill Museum of Art; City of Goldendale; Goldendale Chamber of Commerce; Columbia Gorge Veterans Museum; Kiwanis, Goldendale; American Legion Evan Childs Post 87, White Salmon; American Legion Louis Leidl Post 116, Goldendale; Washington State Police; The Dalles Civic Auditorium; Boy Scout Troop 282, Hood River; Point Man International Ministries, The Dalles; and, Daughters of the American Revolution, Karneetsa Chapter, Moses Lake.

A special thank you to our sponsors: American Legion Evan Childs Post 87, White Salmon; American Legion Louis Leidl Post 116, Goldendale; The Association of Washington Generals; Edward and Kathleen La Motte; Bruce and Mary Stevenson Foundation; the Goldendale Sentinel; Great Skot Productions and Smith Creative Group.

Veterans Day Bells
Sunday, November 11, 2018 | 11 a.m. 

We will pay tribute to all veterans at 11 a.m., when the handbell choir of Hood River Valley Christian Church, directed by Mary Anne Parrett, will play Honor Bells in the museum’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center. This will be followed by other honorific songs.

WWI Living History Presentation at Stonehenge Memorial
Sunday, November 11 | 6 p.m.

A reenactment of a soldier’s experience during World War I from state park ranger Mark Harris. Learn about new technologies used during The Great War, how uniforms differed between participating countries, the role of women in the war effort, and the causes of one of the deadliest conflicts in human history.


4. Our Veterans’ Stories: Sherman County: For The Record

Sherman County: For The Record

Sherman County Historical Society

Sherman County Veterans’ Stories and Records

[Note: Some military stories are found in family stories, not shown here.]

Volume & Number:

#1-2, 1983

WW I Cochran Diary, Excerpts by Frank von Borstel

Autobiography of Giles French by Giles L. French [several parts]

#7-1, 1989

Camp Rufus, WWII by Sherry Kaseberg

#9-2, 1991

Camp Rufus, Army Legend

#10-1, 1992

Letter: Loy Cochran on the Rhine, WWI

#11-1, Spring 1993

WW II Military Experiences by Paul A. Fraser

#11-2 Fall 1993

Tsubota Family, Japan & Oregon by Isami Tsubota

World War II Memories by Lloyd Henrichs

#12-1, 1994

WWII Military Experiences by Malcolm McDermid

#12-2, 1994

WWII Air Force Experiences by Bob Boynton

#13-1, 1995

WWII Army Experiences by Glenn Virtue

WWII Seabees Experiences by Stuart Macnab

WWII Navy Experiences by Byron O. “Swede” Stark

WWII Navy Experiences by Clarence A. Young

#13-2, 1995

WWII Pacific Experiences by Tom Macnab & Helen Kelly Macnab

WW II Home Front Memories by Nell Coats Melzer

WWII Home Front Memories by Dorothy Brown Benson

WWII Letters: Don & Jacque von Borstel

WWII Navy Nurse Corps by Owietus Neal McDermid

#14-1, 1996

WWII Navy Adventures by Dan Kaseberg

WWII Navy Life of Marcus & Eilene Eslinger

WWII Leyte and Back by Chet Coats

WWII Letters: Frank Sayrs by Mary von Borstel Sayrs

#14-2, 1996

Thomas Fraser, USAF by Thomas H. Fraser

WWII Air Force by Howard Conlee

#15-1, 1997

WW II, Africa & Europe by Phil O’Meara

#15-2, 1997

WWII William G. Macnab’s B-17 Collision Over the North Sea by Teresa K. Flatley

#18-1, 2000

Charlie Wilson, French Legion of Honor by Mark Fields

WWII Gordon O. Fraser by Richard Fraser

#19-1, 2001

Civil War Veterans in Sherman County by Sherry Kaseberg

History of Frank E. Brown Post No. 91, American Legion

WWI Draft Registration List, 1917

#22-1, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part One by Chris Sanders

#22-2, 2004

Red Cross Auxiliaries, Part Two by Chris Sanders

#25-2 2007

WW II Stories: Conlee, Boynton, O’Meara, Fraser, Morrow, McCoy, von Borstel, Kaseberg, McClure, Macnab

WW II B-17 Collision by Teresa Flatley

#29-1 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part One by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

WWII Navy Experiences by Charles F. Decker

#29-2 2011

Dewey Thomas’ WWII Military Reflections – Part Two by Dewey Thomas with Reine Thomas

#30-1 2012

Navy Experiences, Memories of Easter 1966 by Doug Rhinehart

Rev. Roy Harvey and Captain Joe Harvey by Joe Harvey

#30-2 2012

WWII Merchant Marine Experiences of Ted Carlson by Susan R. Smith

#31-1 2013

Lt. Commander Gordon D. Helyer, U. S. Navy by Pat (Goodwin) Helyer

#31-2 2013

World War II Veterans Historic Highway by Dick Tobiason

#33-2 2015

Fort Lewis, New Guinea, Philippines & Japan by Robert Ziegler


5. Oregon State Capitol Christmas Tree

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon State Capitol’s Christmas tree will be arriving from the Tillamook State Forest on Thursday, Nov. 15, donated by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

The 30-foot Noble fir tree will be cut and delivered by ODF staff. The tree arrives Thursday morning, with unloading and setup scheduled to start at 8:30 a.m. and continue until approximately 10 a.m.

“The Oregon Department of Forestry is very excited to contribute to Holidays at the Capitol,” South Fork Forest Camp Manager Dave Luttrell said. “Our employees take a lot of pride in being part of this Oregon tradition.”

The tree lighting event is set for Tuesday, Nov. 27, with a choral performance by South Salem High School at 5 p.m., and the lighting program beginning at 5:30 p.m.

Holidays at the Capitol is made possible through generous donations by organizations, businesses and individuals throughout the state and the Capitol’s volunteers. More than 10,000 people visit the Capitol every year during the holiday season. To learn more, visit www.oregoncapitol.com.


6. Hansell’s Sex Trafficking Prevention Bill Implemented in Oregon

Salem, OR Today, as a way of combating trafficking in the state of Oregon, Senate Bill 375 has been implemented across the state.

Senate Bill 375, legislation sponsored by Senator Bill Hansell (R-Athena) called for posters to be installed in rest area bathrooms across the state to combat sex and human trafficking.  The bill was signed into law in 2017 and officially effective this year.

Working with State Agencies (Oregon Department of Transportation, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and the Oregon Travel Experience) as well as Nita Belles, Executive Director for In Our Backyard, an anti-human trafficking organization headquartered in Redmond, Oregon, the concept was put forward in the 2017 Session and passed unanimously in both legislative chambers.

“I am so glad these posters have been installed in the rest areas,” Sen. Hansell said.  “Sex Trafficking and Human Trafficking is an epidemic that must be stopped.  It is a terrible practice and a horror that is in every city and community nationwide.  Most sex trafficking occurs at rest stops along the Interstates and the Human Trafficking hotline received 300 calls from Oregon alone in 2016.  Anything we can do to combat this heinous, insidious practice should be done.”

The posters are being installed along I-5 this week and will be in every rest area under the supervision of the Oregon Travel Experience by the end of next week.

The posters are being affixed to the back of the stall doors and include not only a national telephone number but also a text option.

“Even if just one individual is saved from these posters, SB 375 would have been well worth it,” Sen. Hansell said.

The National Human Trafficking Hotline is 1-888-373-7888 or you can text “Help” or “Info” to 233733.  Anyone needing help or knows of someone in need of help should call.  The Hotline is managed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and is staffed with employees to speak to you in more than 200


7. In Order to Succeed, First Try

Do you feel that half the things you do turn out all wrong? If so, take heart, because today we will discover how to fail successfully.

After over 45 years in business, we consider ourselves pretty successful. The company started by Lou and Diane Tice in their basement is in over 60 countries, and the education that Lou once gave to small groups of teachers and coaches in the early 1970’s now reaches millions of people around the world. Many of these recipients are world leaders and corporate executives.

But one of the reasons we are successful is the same reason that Ty Cobb, one of the greatest baseball sluggers of all time, was as good as he was. If you look in the record books, you will find that Ty Cobb’s lifetime batting average was only .367. That means he got a hit once out of every three times at bat. It’s the same story for baseball greats Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, and for virtually every other successful person in the world.

We need not be afraid to try nor should we be afraid to fail. In fact, the only real failure is in not trying at all. It turns out that people really don’t remember the times Hank Aaron swung and missed, only the times the ball sailed out of the ballpark.

For the most part, we learn more from failure than we do from immediate success. It is in learning what not to do “the next time” that provides for greater success when we do try, the next time. And, “the next time…” is critical, because it is a direct connection to our persistence and resilience, and our personal or organizational efficacy.

The fact is that successful people try more things more often than average folks do. Whether it’s playing baseball, building an international business, selling a new product, or solving safety issues at the job site, if you try enough things, you’re going to succeed – a lot. And if you don’t try anything, your “batting average” will end up at .000.

Yes, there is always going to be some risk involved. But there is risk involved in nearly everything that we do, and we can plan for some, if not most of those risks.

So, what do you really have to lose?  ~The Pacific Institute


8. Sherman County History Tidbits: 1949 4-H Song Book

A 4-H song book was issued at 4-H Summer School and 4-H livestock show banquets.

“Ploughing Song

A growing day, and a waking field,

And a furrow straight and long,

A golden sun and a lifting breeze,

And we follow with a song.

Sons of the soil are we,

Lads of the field and flock

Turning our sods, making no odds,

Where is life so free?

Sons of the soil are we,

Men of the coming years,

Facing the dawn, brain ruling brawn,

Lords of our lands we’ll be.

A guiding thought, and a skillful hand,

And a plant’s young leaf unfurled,

A summer’s sun and a summer’s rain,

And we harvest for the world.”

“Make the Best Better”

“I pledge

my HEAD to clearer thinking,

my HEART to greater loyalty,

my HANDS to larger service, and

my HEALTH to better living

for my Club, my Community and my Country.”


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbRemembering the Lessons of the Great War

Video: Top 10 Countries by GDP, Visualized Like a Horse Race

Sherry’s Sherman County History Collection

Cows are getting a bad rap and it’s time to set the record straight: Giving up meat won’t save the planet.

If European Borders Were Drawn By DNA Instead Of Ethnicity


 

Advertisements