Sherman County eNews #258

CONTENTS

  1. All County Prayer Meeting, Oct. 3

  2. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

  3. Editorial. Inviting Sherman County Judge Candidates’ Vision for Long-Range Planning & Governance

  4. Robert William Odell 1937-2018

  5. Gordon Elner Helyer  -2018

  6. Universal Terms: Fact, Opinion or Generalization?

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. All County Prayer Meeting, Oct. 3

The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday October 3 @ the Wasco Christian Church. Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting, come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can. Thank You. ~Red Gibbs


2. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open School Hours – 8am-4pm Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 8am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm Saturday

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

YA Art Club
THURSDAY after school in the library.
Grades 6-12.
When it’s over, catch the 5:00 activity bus.

Madero Winds Concert – Tuesday, October 2 at 6:30pm
Enjoy an evening of classical music played on wind instruments presented by Gail Gillespie, Brad Hochhalter, and Dave Bergmann of Madero Winds.

Music and Movement – Saturday, October 6 at 10:00am and the first Saturday of every month. Join the fun of creative play, rhyme and rhythm while fine tuning motor skills and coordination. Ages 0-6

Hogwarts Party – Saturday, the 6th of October at 6:00 in the evening.
Your presence is requested in the library for an evening of magical adventure. Get sorted into your house and start earning points. Make your own wand! Enjoy snacks from Honeydukes. A prize will be awarded for the best costume. ALL ages welcome, yes, ALL ages!


3. Editorial. Inviting Sherman County Judge Candidates’ Vision for Long-Range Planning & Governance

pencil.sharpSherman County eNews offers an opportunity for Joe Dabulskis and Mike Smith, Sherman County’s two candidates for the position of county judge, to submit to eNews in 350 words or less their thoughts in response to a question about the use of regularly scheduled long-range planning sessions as a tool for governance. Responses received by October 5th at 5 p.m. will be posted to eNews together the week of October 8th.

The question: What are your thoughts about the use of regularly scheduled long-range planning sessions as a tool for governance to avoid bouncing from one reactionary decision to another?


4. Robert William Odell 1937-2018

flower.rose.starRobert William Odell, 81, peacefully passed away from natural causes on September 23, 2018 at The Claremont Care Center in Pomona, Calif. He was the husband of his second wife, Mary Jean Odell for 36 years.

Born in Willmar, Minn., on April 29, 1937, he was the oldest son of Robert & Mary Odell. He attended the College of St. Thomas where he earned his B.A. in Mathematics and a minor in Theology. He furthered his education at OSU with a major in counseling. His greatest love was teaching math at Sherman County High School and being a guidance director at The Dalles High School. In his later years his passion for theology was fulfilled by working as a youth minister and pastoral assistant for St. Joseph Catholic Church in Vancouver, Wash. He will always be remembered for his great love of his Catholic faith and God.

He is survived by his first wife, Phyllis Rayburn, and their five children, Thomas Odell, Christopher Odell, Mary Kelly Keyser, Amy Robertson, and Anthony Odell. He is also survived by his second wife, Mary Jean Odell and her three children, Robert Brady, Steven Brady and Bridget Ronnie and all spouses collectively. Combined he had many grandchildren and great-grandchildren whom he loved dearly.

Funeral services will be held on Wednesday, October 3, 2018 at 11 a.m. at St. Peter & St. Paul Catholic Church in Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. Regards may be sent to Mary Jean Odell at 6638 Amethyst Ave. C305, Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91737.


5. Gordon Elner Helyer  -2018

flower.rose.starOn September 17, 2018, Gordon Elner Helyer, 84, passed away at a hospice house in Albany, Oregon, with his family by his side. Gordon was born on the family farm near Kent, Oregon, to Elner and Olive (Adams) Helyer.

Gordon grew up raising horses and, at 10 years old, in support of the WWII effort, he broke a horse named Blue Sky that served in the Cavalry. Gordon penned a letter to President Roosevelt to inquire about Blue Sky’s fate. In response he received a letter from the war department, explaining that his horse died in 1944 due to a broken leg.

Gordon was the youngest brother of four sisters, Virginia, Myrtle, Bertha, and Norma Jean. He attended Vale High School and graduated from The Dalles High School, meeting the love of his life, Verda “Dawnie” Dickson, while he was working at a downtown filling station. Gordon married Dawnie on June 12, 1954, in The Dalles, joining the Army near the end of the Korean War. Gordon served for two years in Ulm, Germany, where he and Dawnie traveled throughout Europe, including Holland, Ireland, Luxembourg, Germany, Italy and France they collected charms for their nieces along the way.

Upon his return from Europe, Gordon worked at Payless along with helping his brother-in-law, Art Fletcher, in his orchard near Odell. Later, Gordon was employed by H.S. Smith Co. as a route salesman and eventually became assistant manager. Gordon and Dawnie had rental properties and later each started their own businesses; Helyer Insulation and Mode O’Day. They loved boating, snowmobiling and spending time with their family and traveling to Thailand with friends. Gordon had a booming voice, an infectious laugh, and a million dollar smile.

Gordon was preceded in death by his wife Dawnie of 46 years in 2000 and son Todd in 1992. Gordon continued his travels, going to Alaska, Arizona and points in between. While in Yuma, Arizona in 2001, Gordon befriended Elizabeth Kay Piva and as widowers they found a blossoming relationship that continued to grow in love until his death. They enjoyed spending winters in Yuma, and summers traveling to see friends and family in Oregon and Idaho, creating many fond memories.

Gordon is survived by his oldest son and wife, Mark and Kim Helyer, and youngest son and wife, Lynn and Kella Helyer; grandchildren, David, Amanda, K-Lei, Katherine, Grace and Sarah; and great-grandchildren, Lilly, Harper, Francisco and Gabriel. Graveside services were held on September 29, 2018, at the Odd Fellows Cemetery, The Dalles, Oregon. Donations in Gordon’s name may be made to Samaritan Evergreen Hospice House 4600 Evergreen Place S.E. Albany, Ore. 97322.


6. Universal Terms: Fact, Opinion or Generalization?

“The next time you hear a universal term, ask yourself, “Is this a fact or an opinion or a generalization?” Watch and listen closely to those running for office, especially when they talk about their opponents or the state of affairs. Are they stating facts or a cleverly worded opinion? The same goes for news outlets or anyone attempting to grab the spotlight. It is vital that all of us sharpen our critical listening skills.

Listen for the words “all,” “every,” “always,” “never,” and “none,” and let them serve as red flags for you. Ask yourself, “Is this strictly true? Are there exceptions?” If you avoid these universals except when they are really true, you will dramatically improve your communications, as well as create a better sense of trust in you by those who listen to you. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeHigher Columbia River Water Levels Possible This Fall

Branding Can Limit Word Use

Hallelujah, 2 Copies of National Geographic and the Chinese People’s Libertarian Army: Congressional Hits and Misses

Prager U.: Left or Liberal?


 

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Sherman County eNews #257

CONTENTS

  1. The Other Oregon – A Voice for Rural Oregon, a New Quarterly Magazine

  2. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Emergency Executive Session, Oct. 1

  3. Is your nonprofit considering an end-of-year fundraising campaign?

  4. Capital Chatter: First Gubernatorial Debate Set for Tuesday, Oct. 2

  5. Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

  6. Fear of Success – Really?

  7. Poetry on the Road! Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford Announces Fall Schedule


“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” —Thomas Jefferson (1808)


1. The Other Oregon – A Voice for Rural Oregon, a New Quarterly Magazine

Print editions of The Other Oregon – TOO – are being delivered this week to 5,000 key decision makers in Oregon. If you would like to receive our next edition or sign up for our monthly e-newsletter, please contact Publisher Kathryn Brown  kbbrown@eomediagroup.com. In the meantime, enjoy a digital copy on our website: https://theotheroregon.com/current-issue/.

The Other Oregon: “We believe there is really just one Oregon. We are interconnected and we’re all in this together. We wish there wasn’t an urban-rural divide.  We want to help create a more robust urban-rural interface — where urban Oregonians have connections to rural Oregonians, and vice versa. This magazine is an important step in that direction.”


2. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Emergency Executive Session, Oct. 1

Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda and Notice

Non-regular other meeting pursuant to Frontier TeleNet Bylaws for issues requiring immediate attention

2:30 p.m. – Monday, October 1, 2018

Sherman County OSU Extension office conference room 66365 Lone Rock Rd, Moro, Oregon

Agenda

  1. Call Meeting to Order
  2. Executive Session to be held pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(f) and/or ORS 192.660(2)(h) in connection with: (i) the failure of the Universal Service Administration Company (USAC) to disburse 2017 Funding Year E-rate program monies owed to Frontier; and, (ii) USAC’s delay in processing a 2018 Funding Year E-rate program funding request award to Frontier.
  3. Adjourn Meeting.

The meeting location is accessible for persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities may be made by contacting: Mike Smith at 541-306-1202 or mikesmith@connectionsllc.us


3. Is your nonprofit considering an end-of-year fundraising campaign?

Are You Considering an End-of-Year Campaign?

With the end of the year approaching, many nonprofit organizations may be considering launching an End-of-Year Campaign to capture donations as the calendar year closes out. Here are some articles to provide some food for thought on how you plan the campaign and some tips to carry it out.

–End Your Fiscal Year Strong: 3 Campaign Ideas <https://www.networkforgood.com/nonprofitblog/end-fiscal-year-strong-3-campaign-ideas/> – www.networkingforgood.com

–Year End Giving: The Step-by-Step Guide for Nonprofits <https://www.mobilecause.com/year-end-giving/> – www.mobilecause.com

–A Nonprofit’s Guide to #GivingTuesday and End of Year Fundraising <https://npengage.com/nonprofit-fundraising/guide-giving-tuesday-eoy/> – www.npengage.com


4. Capital Chatter: First Gubernatorial Debate Set for Tuesday, Oct. 2

The first gubernatorial debate is Tuesday and young people will ask the questions.

Children First for Oregon, Pamplin Media Group and KOIN-TV are presenting the 7 p.m. debate at Roosevelt High School.

The “Debate for Oregon’s Future” will feature the three major-party candidates for governor: Democrat Brown, Republican Buehler and Independent Patrick Starnes.

Children First for Oregon, the founding sponsor, solicited applications from children and youth who were interested in participating.

Portlanders asking the questions will be Jeremy Clark, 14; Shimon Dasgupta, 16; Genesis Gomez, 12; Rose Lawrence, 15; Deja Presseur, 16; Viktoria Rosqvist, 19; Ja Neciya Ross, 15; Adi Solomon, 15; and Tosha Kitungano, 17.

Other participants will be Olivia Cooper, 17, Prineville; Brian Josephson, 18, Medford; McKeely Miller, 17, John Day; Sal Najjar, 16, Tigard; Kai Schrosk, 15, Colton; Justin Thach, 17, Salem; and Dazon Sigo, 17, Pendleton.

Jeff Gianola of KOIN and John Schrag of Pamplin Media Group conducted a training session with them last weekend.

This may be the only debate that includes people east of the Cascades. Brown dismissed Buehler’s suggestion of having two debates in each of Oregon’s five congressional districts. She agreed to only two other debates, Oct. 4 in Medford and Oct. 9 in Portland.

Voters: Independent-minded voters will determine the outcome. As of last month, 2,706,777 Oregonians were registered to vote, a 3 percent increase from July. They included 958,884 Democrats, 700,368 Republicans, 120,989 Independent Party members and, most important, 863,118 who did not choose a party affiliation. The remaining voters were registered with minor parties.

The number of voters ranges from 522,409 in Multnomah County to 997 in Wheeler County.

To see more voter statistics and state information about the Nov. 6 General Election, go to oregonvotes.org.

Dick Hughes, who writes the weekly Capital Chatter column, has been covering the Oregon political scene since 1976. Contact him at TheHughesisms@Gmail.com, Facebook.com/Hughesisms, YouTube.com/DickHughes or Twitter.com/DickHughes.  


5. Capital Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

  • 0:Times that former Trailblazers center and 2010 Republican gubernatorial nominee Chris Dudley says he saw Brett Kavanaugh, U.S. Supreme Court nominee, get black-out drunk in college at Yale, according to Buzzfeed News.
  • 2:Percentage of Oregonians who were uninsured in 2017, according to The Oregonian.
  • $640,000:Funding opponents of a state ballot measure to restrict government funding for abortions have raised, according to OPB.
  • $30,000:Funding supporters have raised.
  • 80 million:Approximate views that a Nike ad featuring former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick — who was rebuked for kneeling during the National Anthem to protest racism and police brutality — got on Facebook, Twitter and Youtube, as part of a “groundbreaking new advertising campaign” by the Beaverton apparel empire, according to The New York Times.
  • 769:Vineyards in Oregon, according to The Associated Press. Oregon winegrowers are raising concerns that out-of-state vintners using terms associated with Oregon on their labels, could tarnish Oregon’s reputation as a source of world-class wines
  • 22:Oregon beers that won prizes at the Great American Beer Festival, “the largest and most prestigious beer event in the nation,” in Denver, Colo., last weekend, according to The Oregonian.
  • $400,000:Amount an Oregon computer technician is seeking in damages in a lawsuit against Google, alleging sexual harassment at its data center in The Dalles, according to Willamette Week.
  • 1845:Year Republican U.S. Rep. Greg Walden‘s paternal ancestors came to what is now Oregon, according to the Associated Press. He accused his Democratic opponent, Jamie McLeod-Skinner, of over-selling her wife’s family ties to the state, according to the AP
  • 40,000:Approximate number of miles McLeod-Skinner had logged traversing the state’s massive 2nd congressional district in a Jeep and teardrop trailer as of mid-September, according to her Twitter account.

6. Fear of Success – Really?

A lot of people are afraid of failure, but do you know anyone who is afraid of success? You probably do. So today, let’s talk about this surprisingly common problem.

Abraham Maslow, one of the 20th Century’s great psychologists, called it a “Jonah Complex,” because Jonah chose to turn his back on the great things God had planned for him. Of course, the Bible tells us that Jonah eventually found himself inside the belly of a great fish, but most people who fear success eventually find themselves consumed with regrets for things that might have been.

American journalist, Sydney J. Harris once wrote, “Regret for the things we did can be tempered by time; it is regret for the things we did not do that is inconsolable.” We turn away from the challenges that will bring us success for many reasons. Fear of the unknown, certainly is one reason. Mainly, we just don’t believe we have what it takes to pull it off. Our self-efficacy is low, which means we have a low estimation of what we can cause or make happen for ourselves or others.

However, self-efficacy can be improved. We aren’t born with a certain level of efficacy. It’s a learned appraisal of our abilities. And if we can learn one estimate, we can certainly learn another, higher level. We can do it by remembering successes we’ve had in the past and imagining ourselves repeating similar successes in new situations.

Make a list of all the qualities you possess that you consider to be strengths. Think back on what you have done, so far, in your life. You will find that you have done a lot, and successfully, too. Surround yourself with people who believe in you and what you can do. There is always greater strength in numbers, as well as the self-confidence you can draw from that support.

You see, you can take on challenges that are bigger than you are right now and then grow into them. And you can control your self-talk and your negative thinking so that you don’t stop yourself before you start. Regret for things not done is not a necessity. Live your life in the present so that your regrets won’t weigh you down in the future. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Poetry on the Road! Oregon Poet Laureate Kim Stafford Announces Fall Schedule

Salem, Ore. – Kim Stafford, Oregon’s new Poet Laureate, is making good on his promise to connect with as many Oregonians as possible, with more than two dozen statewide appearances scheduled before the end of the year.

Stafford just returned from John Day, where he gave a reading, and from Harney County, where he presented at “Art in Burns” and participated in an “In a Landscape” performance with pianist Hunter Noack in the Alvord Desert; he will visit close to 20 more communities before Dec. 31.

“Kim has jumped into the Oregon Poet Laureate position with the gusto, creativity and energy we anticipated,” said Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, who administers the Poet Laureate program on behalf of the Cultural Trust. “He’s been all over the place already, and each place has been just the right place.”

Appointed Oregon’s ninth Poet Laureate in May by Governor Kate Brown, Stafford is the founding director of The Northwest Writing Institute at Lewis & Clark College. Constantly writing, Stafford has already been so inspired by his travels that he plans to release a book of poetry inspired by Oregon’s natural beauty and vibrant communities.

“Like groundwater blossoming at many mountain springs,” Stafford said, “the stuff of poetry can appear wherever you take a close look. I want to be the poet laureate by constantly responding to Oregon’s myriad inspirations, and to do the work of the poet laureate by engaging writers all over the map.”

Here are some of the doings of your Poet Laureate through December:

2018 POET LAUREATE SCHEDULE:

Sept. 29, 9 a.m.: Valley River Inn, Eugene

Keynote address for the Oregon State Poetry Association Conference titled “The Flavor of Unity.”

Sept. 29, 2 p.m.: Eugene Public Library

Free writing workshop open to the public: “Settling Your Accounts through Poetry.”

Oct. 1-8, Oregon Days of Culture Celebration

Stafford will write an original poem about the winning image in the Oregon Cultural Trust’s annual “Days of Culture” social media contest. Oregonians are invited to post photos of cultural experiences with #ORCulture.

Oct. 13, 10 a.m. -2 p.m. and 7 p.m.: Curry County Library, Gold Beach

Free exploratory writing workshop followed by evening poetry reading.

Oct. 18, 1 p.m.: Tillamook County Pioneer Museum

Stafford will read poems and talk about the practice of writing.

Oct. 20, 2 p.m.: Hood River Library

Free poetry reading.

Oct. 21, 2 p.m.: Cannon Beach Library

Poetry reading followed by a conversation about poetry and place with local writers.

Oct. 25, 12:15 p.m.: Oregon City High School

Poetry reading for students.

Oct. 27, 4 p.m.: Salem Public Library

An afternoon public reading and conversation.

Nov. 3, 10 a.m.: Sitka Art Invitational

Stafford will open the event with a brief poetry reading.

Nov. 4, 1 p.m.: Multnomah County Library

A free public reading in the Collins Gallery “with reference to poetry’s contribution to individual and community well-being.”

Nov. 6, 7 a.m.: Pearl Rotary Club, Portland

Poetry reading and talk.

Nov. 6, 1:30 p.m.: Maimonides Jewish School

Poetry reading and talk.

Nov. 7, 6:30 p.m.: Tigard Public Library

Free public reading and talk.

Nov. 14, 7 p.m.: Columbia Gorge Community College, The Dalles

Class visits followed by poetry reading.

Nov. 15, 1 p.m.: Blue Mountain Community College

Reading and talk as part of the “Sense of Place” Arts and Culture Series.

Nov. 15 & 16, 7 p.m. and 9-11:30 a.m.: Pendleton Center for the Arts

Poetry reading Friday followed by a Saturday writing workshop, “Poems for a Better Nation.”

Nov. 17, 1-4 p.m.: Two Rivers Correctional Institution, Umatilla

An appearance as part of the Open Hearts, Open Minds program.

Nov. 29, 7 p.m.: Stayton Public Library

A poetry reading for families and community: “How poetry, art, and culture lift the soul.”

Dec. 4, 12 p.m.: Chehalem Cultural Center, Newberg

A reading and conversation at Newberg City Club: “Poetry for the good of the city.”

Dec. 31: Trinity Episcopal Cathedral

A short poetry reading as part of the New Year’s concert.

Kim Stafford was born and grew up in Oregon. He is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose, and edited half a dozen others. His book, “Having Everything Right: Essays of Place,” won a citation for excellence from the Western States Book Awards in 1986. He holds a Ph.D. in medieval literature from the University of Oregon, and has worked as a printer, photographer, oral historian, editor and visiting writer at a host of colleges and schools, and also offered writing workshops in Italy, Scotland and Bhutan. He lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife and children.

The Oregon Poet Laureate fosters the art of poetry, encourages literacy and learning, addresses central issues relating to humanities and heritage, and reflects on public life in Oregon. Stafford will provide up to 20 public readings per year in settings across the state to inform community, business and state leaders about the value and importance of poetry and creative expression. The program is funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

To learn more about the Oregon Poet Laureate program, or to schedule an event with Kim Stafford, visit the Poet Laureate website.


 

Sherman County eNews #256

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

2-22-1933  Old Uncle Zeke has joined the church after a lifetime of atheism. He says that after watching the world in general and humans in particular for fifty years he has come to believe that the world was actually thrown together in six days after all, maybe less. ~ Giles L. French, These Things We Note, Sherman County Journal


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected) 

sherrycaricatureCLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News (anniversaries, achievements, awards, births, birthdays, graduations, weddings, etc.) here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life.

Your willingness to put it into words

is all that is necessary.

~ Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY SENIOR & COMMUNITY CENTER BENEFIT. We are selling another round of Sherman County photobooks through the end of November. This time it is a fundraiser for the Senior Center in Moro. Books will be between $65-$79, depending how many copies we sell. The book is 70 pages in full color, and showcases the work of more than a dozen local photographers. To view a copy in person please stop by the senior center. To sign up for a copy please contact: Kari Silcox, 541-565-3193, kari@shermancounty.net. Thanks!! 10/12

LOST OR FOUND:

FOUND:  Verizon iPhone in gray case, screen pic is photo of a red/black Union snowboard binding. Found Tuesday morning on shoulder of the road in upper Hay Canyon. Please text or call your number to claim.

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

4-H THEATRE ARTS CLUB LEADER. Want to help lead a new 4-H “Theatre Arts” club? No acting or performing experience needed! We’ve got lots of kids with interest in drama, there’s easy-to-use 4-H curriculum, and we just received a $2000 grant to put on a kids’ drama musical with hired instructors. 4-H clubs need to meet at least 6 times a year, usually once a month, plus you’d need to attend the monthly Sherman 4-H Assn meetings. Let the Sherman Extension Office know if you’re interested, love to have you! 541-565-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu. 10/12

“Volunteering is the ultimate exercise in democracy. You vote in elections once a year, but when you volunteer, you vote every day about the kind of community you want to live in.” — Unknown

EMPLOYMENT:

AREA REPRESENTATIVE. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking individuals to serve as Area Representatives in your local community.  ASSE provides academic year and semester exchange programs in the United States for high school students from around the world.  Students are 15 to 18 years of age, have passed a series of academic and character requirements and are awaiting an opportunity to embark on their American Adventure. — Area Representatives recruit and screen prospective host families, interview students to study abroad and supervise the exchange students in their community.  Area representatives are compensated based on the number of students they are supervising. There is also a great bonus opportunity. — ASSE’s primary goal is to contribute to International understanding by enabling students to learn about other languages and cultures through active participation in family, school and community life. ASSE’s Area Representatives are the cornerstone of the organization, making all of this possible! For more information about ASSE or becoming an Area Representative, please call our Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or email us at asseusawest@asse.com. Please check out our website at host.asse.com.  We look forward to welcoming you to the ranks of Area Representatives nationwide – striving towards a world of understanding, one child at a time! 11/30

TECHNICIAN. NOTICE OF PERMANENT VACANCY. Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency Program Technician. The Gilliam-Wheeler County Farm Service Agency (FSA) is accepting applications for a permanent Program Technician in Condon, Oregon. Applications will be accepted beginning September 19, 2018 and closing October 3, 2018. Salary range of $26,587 – $53,773 per year based on qualifications and experience. A copy of the vacancy announcement and application may be obtained on line by visiting: https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/511240400 . For more information please contact the FSA Office at 541-384-4251 ext 2.  The Federal Service offers a comprehensive benefits package.  Explore the benefits offered to most Federal employees at:  https://www.usa.gov/benefits-for-federal-employees9/28

FOR SALE:

PIANO. Baldwin Spinet Piano – Maple colored – $300 OBO negotiable, would like it to find a home where it will be used. Thanks Very Good shape, I just want space for exercise equipment. Call or text Jeanne Kuettel @ 541-714-5740.  11/30

5020 JOHN DEERE TRACTOR. It can be viewed at the fairgrounds. Engine ran when parked. Transmission locked in reverse. Please submit sealed bids to the Sherman County Fair board at shermanctyfair@hotmail.com 10/12 

SHERMAN COUNTY PHOTO BOOK. We are selling another round of Sherman County photobooks through the end of November. This time it is a benefit for the Senior Center in Moro. Books will be between $65-$79, depending how many copies we sell. The book is 70 pages in full color, and showcases the work of more than a dozen local photographers. To view a copy in person please stop by the senior center. To sign up for a copy please contact: Kari Silcox, 541-565-3193, kari@shermancounty.net. Thanks!! 10/12

COME SEE US AT THE HOOD RIVER HARVEST BAZAAR OCTOBER 12-14:  One of a kind handcrafted furniture and gifts: Considerately Handcrafted one-of-a-kind indoor and outdoor furniture and gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, old barn wood and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 10/12

MORO PROPERTY. NEW PRICE OF $44,900.00 A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. RMLS# 17410095. Contact tiffany@drysideproperty.com 9/28

FOR RENT OR LEASE:  

FREE:

SERVICES:

GETTING READY FOR COOLER WEATHER?  LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 11/23 

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

WANTED:

4-H THEATRE ARTS CLUB LEADER. Want to help lead a new 4-H “Theatre Arts” club? No acting or performing experience needed! We’ve got lots of kids with interest in drama, there’s easy-to-use 4-H curriculum, and we just received a $2000 grant to put on a kids’ drama musical with hired instructors. 4-H clubs need to meet at least 6 times a year, usually once a month, plus you’d need to attend the monthly Sherman 4-H Assn meetings. Let the Sherman Extension Office know if you’re interested, love to have you! 541-565-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu. 10/12

AREA REPRESENTATIVE. Non-Profit Organization Looking for Community Area Representatives to Join our International Team. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs is seeking individuals to serve as Area Representatives in your local community.  ASSE provides academic year and semester exchange programs in the United States for high school students from around the world.  Students are 15 to 18 years of age, have passed a series of academic and character requirements and are awaiting an opportunity to embark on their American Adventure. — Area Representatives recruit and screen prospective host families, interview students to study abroad and supervise the exchange students in their community.  Area representatives are compensated based on the number of students they are supervising. There is also a great bonus opportunity. — ASSE’s primary goal is to contribute to International understanding by enabling students to learn about other languages and cultures through active participation in family, school and community life. ASSE’s Area Representatives are the cornerstone of the organization, making all of this possible! For more information about ASSE or becoming an Area Representative, please call our Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or email us at asseusawest@asse.com. Please check out our website at host.asse.com.  We look forward to welcoming you to the ranks of Area Representatives nationwide – striving towards a world of understanding, one child at a time! 11/30


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

food.freshSEPTEMBER

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families / Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum Exhibit: Photographs John Day Dam, 50 Years Ago

28 Sherman Football vs. Enterprise 7 at Sherman CANCELED

28 Sherman County School Hall of Honor Induction Reception & Awards 5:30

28 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 – Wasco County

28-30 Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree

29 Sherman Invitational JV Volleyball Tournament 9 at Sherman

29 Living History Presentation at Stonehenge WWI Memorial 6

29 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

camera.35mm.blueOCTOBER

1 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10 Rufus

1 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10:30 NORCOR, The Dalles

1 Grass Valley City Council 7 City Hall

1-31 Oregon Archaeology Month

1-31 National Archives Month

1-31 Historic Cemeteries Month

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Lowell Smith Photography 10-5

2 Moro City Council 7 City Hall

2 Madero Winds Concert 6:30 Sherman County Public/School Library

3 Biggs Service District Board Meeting 8:30 Courthouse CANCELED

3 Sherman County Court 9

3 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Christian Church – Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time 7:00 to 8:30.

4 Sherman Volleyball vs. Ione 5 at Sherman

4 Sherman County Fair Board 7

5 Sherman Football vs. Ione 7 at Ione

6 Sherman Volleyball JV Tournament at Fossil TBD

6-7 Car is King Weekend at Maryhill Museum

7 Afghanistan War Began 2001

7 P.E.O. Chapter EJ “Mission: Possible,” Scholarship Benefit bike/walk clue-finding tour 12-1 The Dalles

8 Columbus Day (observed)

9 Oregon School Boards Association Regional Fall Meeting, Condon

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

9 Sherman Volleyball vs. Echo 5 at Echo

10 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

10 Rufus City Council 7

11 Sherman Volleyball vs. South Wasco County 5 at Maupin

12 Sherman Football vs. Imbler 2 at Imbler

12 Columbus Day

12-14 Hood River Harvest Bazaar

13 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Antique Gliders & Bikes

13 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

13 Sherman Volleyball vs. Condon/Wheeler 1 at Sherman

15 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Condon

16 Sherman Volleyball vs. Dufur 5 at Sherman

16 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 1 Condon

16 Wasco City Council 7

17 Sherman County Court 9

18 Sherman County Book Club 6 Sherman Public/School Library

19 Sherman Football 7 at Dufur – Dufur Homecoming

19-21 White Salmon Fall Art Walk

20 Sherman Volleyball Playoffs at Echo TBD

20 Free Family History Workshop 8:30 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints Hood River

20 Bingo for Breannah 6 Grass Valley Pavilion

24 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Condon

26 Sherman Football District 3 Championship at E. Oregon University TBD

27 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

31 Sherman County Historical Museum closes for the season. Open by appointment November-April

31 Halloween 

clock.793NOVEMBER

1 Sherman County Fair Board 7

1 North Central Education Service District Board Meeting, Condon

1-31 Military Family Appreciation Month

1-May 1 Sherman Museum Open by Appointment

4 Day Light Saving Time Ends (set clock back one hour)

6 Election Day

7 Sherman Historical Museum Volunteer & Hosts Appreciation Party

7 All County Prayer Meeting, Kent Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

9 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

10 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Military Vehicles

10 Year-End Family Day at Maryhill Museum 1:30-5

11 Veterans Day Bells at Maryhill Museum 11

11 Veterans Day

12 Veterans Day (observed)

14-17 Tri-State Grain Growers Convention, Portland, Oregon

22 Thanksgiving Day


 

Sherman County eNews #255

CONTENTS

  1. Wasco School Events Center Coffee Hour & Bingo

  2. North Central Education Service District News, New Website

  3. Notice. Biggs Service District Meeting Cancelled

  4. Nixyaawii senior preparing questions for governor’s debate

  5. Frustration as Opportunity

  6. Days of Yore in The Times-Journal

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Wasco School Events Center Coffee Hour & Bingo

Wasco School Events Center
10 – 11 am coffee hour next three Mondays starting October 1st.
No cost but donations appreciated.
Also… Join us for Bingo and Dinner on October 22nd.  Stay tuned for details!


2. North Central Education Service District News, New Website

The North Central ESD Board of Directors met in regular session on September 6, 2018, with Jeff Schott, Jim Doherty, Amy Derby, Sarah Rucker, Superintendent Penny Grotting & Business Manager Kim Domenighini present and Kristen Neuberger and Greg Greenwood absent. Visitors were Stacy Shown and Rinda Montgomery.

According to the meeting minutes, Superintendent Penny Grotting reported that Stacy and Kalie did a great job with the new structured learning center in Sherman School District, Angela Tyler will work in the business office 18 hours a week, graphic designer Ellie Bray started work in July, and Carrie Somnis, OPK Director, was hired in September. She noted that a successful in-service was held in August and that staff is working on job descriptions. She met with Fossil School Superintendent Jim Smith, Mitchell School District Superintendent Vince Swagerty, and Spray School District Superintendent Phil Starkey, and Wheeler County SPED teacher Kim Williams met with all three Wheeler County superintendents.

New business included the announcement of the Oregon School Boards Association’s fall regional meeting in Condon on October 9th and an update on OPK in-service, parent involvement and funding allocation.

The next meeting of the NCESD will be November 1, 2018.

See the new website: https://www.ncesd.k12.or.us/.


3. Notice. Biggs Service District Meeting Cancelled

The Biggs Service District meeting to be held at 8:30 a.m. on October 3, 2018 in the Commissioners Meeting Room located in the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon 97039, has been cancelled and will be rescheduled at a later date.


4. Nixyaawii senior preparing questions for governor’s debate 

By ANTONIO SIERRA, East Oregonian

“On Oct. 2, Dazon Sigo will have a rare opportunity to gain exclusive audience with the top candidates for Oregon governor.

“Democratic Gov. Kate Brown, Republican Knute Buehler, and Independent Patrick Starnes will want to listen closely to Dazon’s questions as they try to perform well enough to earn thousands of Oregonians’ votes.

“The Nixyaawii Community School senior will travel to Roosevelt High School in Portland, as a part of a gubernatorial debate sponsored by the children’s advocacy group Children First for Oregon, joining 15 other students from across the state.

In a slight twist to the usual moderated debate, Dazon and his peers will pose questions to the candidates on issues important to them… … With an 80-student enrollment, Nixyaawii is likely the smallest school to send a representative to the debate. The only other student from Eastern Oregon included in the debate, McKeely Miller of Grant Union High School in John Day, comes from a high school more than three times the size of Nixyaawii.”   Continue at http://eastoregonian.or.newsmemory.com/?token=98696b7c962cd3e65de97d46e5387d7a_5bad13f5_40a1e6&selDate=20180927&goTo=A01&artid=0&utm_source=emailMarketing&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=email+stats


5. Frustration as Opportunity

Today, let’s talk about frustration – a feeling all of us experience from time to time – and how to overcome it.

One of the roadblocks on the path to success is frustration. Everyone feels it from time to time. It’s kind of like anxiety with a little anger thrown in, isn’t it? You feel like a tiger in a cage, pacing back and forth, filled with tension and negative energy but accomplishing nothing. And that tension and negative energy represent both the danger and the opportunity in frustration.

The danger is the tension and the negativity, because negativity blocks all the positive feelings you need in order to keep going and solve the problems at hand – and you just can’t be very creative in a tension-filled environment. The opportunity in frustration is the energy, because it is the energy you want in order to overcome whatever obstacle you’re facing. As soon as you get the negative thinking under control, harnessing the energy is easy. “Ah-ha,” you may be saying, “there’s the catch. If I could do that, I wouldn’t be frustrated.” Well, you can do it and it comes from changing your internal perspective on the situation.

At the very core of frustration is our attitude toward the situation at hand. Change the attitude and you change your perspective. It’s like looking at a portrait or landscape, perhaps on a wall in a museum or gallery, and shifting your physical position. That different angle gives you a different perspective, and you see things in the painting that you didn’t see before. Changing your “mental position” is just as simple. You are shifting from a fixed to more of a growth mindset, by giving yourself the opportunity to see things from a different perspective.

We teach people how to do it all the time. Cognitive psychologists teach people to do it, too. It’s simply a question of knowing how. If you’d like to learn how, pick up a copy of Dr. Martin Seligman’s book, “Learned Optimism.” It will give you a simple technique you can use to minimize negative thoughts and substitute positive ones. It’s quite simple to master and it will make a big difference in your frustration level and the time and energy you spend spinning your wheels. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Days of Yore in The Times-Journal

A Times-Journal feature made available weekly by Devin Oil Co., Inc. 676-9633 ~ 454-2621 ~ 384-4144.  For information on our Monitor Heating System, call our plants at Heppner, 541-676-9633; Arlington, 541-454-2621; Boardman, 541-481-4876; Condon, 541-384-4144; or Wasco, 541-442-5277.

~ ~ ~

10 Years Ago

— Dan Ousley, recently appointed as Wheeler County District Attorney, is a candidate for election to the office.

— Navy Seaman Apprentice Alex Raber, son of Kelly and Glenn Raber of Mitchell, completes U.S. Navy Basic Training at Great Lakes, Illinois.

— Aviation Survival Technician First Class Michael Spencer, son of Mark and Sharon Spencer of Moro, is awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross by the U.S. Coast Guard.

25 Years Ago

— Roy and Lissie Evans of Condon are feted on the occasion of their 65th wedding anniversary by friends at the Condon Senior Meal Site.

— Historic Trails Expedition wagon train travels from Missouri to Oregon, passing through Gilliam County via Eightmile, Cedar Springs, Rock Creek and crossing the John Day River at the historic McDonald Ferry.

— “Division within the county court and actions of the court” lead to the resignation of Gilliam Co. Roadmaster Richard Hatch.

50 Years Ago

— Invitations have been extended throughout the Northwest to the dedication of the mile-long, $448 million John Day Dam, world’s largest multi-purpose dam.

— Burglars raid Arlington businesses, Thrifty Market, Village Inn and Happy Canyon Tavern.

— USDA Soil Conservation Service in Wheeler Co. receives $37,500 to assist in the revegetation after the 5,000-acre Snow Basin and Devil’s Den fires.

75 Years Ago

— The Odd Fellow and Rebekah lodges at Mayville buy a war bond to help purchase a Flying Fortress, which will cost $350,000.

— Myrtle Huddleston, Alcy Madden and Sylvia McDaniel of Lonerock attend the 50th anniversary of the Eastern Star at Condon.

— Students at the Alville School where Mrs. Helen Rondeau is teacher are Jim Nelson, Mary Ann Cushman, Betty, Beulah and Dewey Kennedy and Leona Mae Richmond.

117 Years Ago (The Globe)

— L.H. Moore left for his home in Moro, expecting to return to continue his work securing right-of-way for the new railroad.

— There is still considerable threshing to do in the Ferry Canyon neighborhood and the late heavy rain will mean considerable loss to the farmers whose grain is still in the stack.

— A band of cattle belonging to D.W. Ralston of Mayville passed through Condon going toward Arlington.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owlA New Scrabble Dictionary for a New Generation

Oregon’s 58 Top Paid State Employees

Oregon Sen. Merkley Sues To Prevent Final Vote On Kavanaugh

Wolf Pups Born In Oregon’s Cascade Mountains 

C-130 Hercules Finds Retirement Home

Solving the Problem of the Thirsty Juniper

Working to Meet Juniper Demand

Trump Addresses U.N. General Assembly: We Choose ‘Independence’ Over ‘Global Governance’


 

Sherman County eNews #254

CONTENTS

  1. Madero Winds Concert, Oct. 2

  2. Burn Ban Extended for N. Sherman & Moro RFPD & City of Moro

  3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

  4. Practice Peak Performance

  5. Lewis L. McArthur 1917-2018

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center October Meal Menu 


1. Madero Winds Concert, Oct. 2

music.notes (2)On Tuesday, October 2 at 6:30 p.m. enjoy an evening of classical music played on wind instruments presented by Gail Gillespie, Brad Hochhalter, and Dave Bergmann of Madero Winds. Refreshments will be served and all ages are welcome. For more information email shermanlibrary@sherman.k12.or.us or call 541-565-3279.


2. Burn Ban Extended for N. Sherman & Moro RFPD & City of Moro

Due to the continued warm and dry weather and heavy fuel loads, the burn ban for North Sherman RFPD, Moro RFPD and the City of Moro has been extended to at least October 15th. ~Sherman County Emergency Services


3. What’s Coming Up at Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017
The Library is open School Hours – 8am-4pm Monday, Wednesday and Thursday, 8am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm Saturday

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

YA Art Club
THURSDAY after school in the library.
Grades 6-12.
When it’s over, catch the 5:00 activity bus.

Madero Winds Concert – Tuesday, October 2 at 6:30pm
Enjoy an evening of classical music played on wind instruments presented by Gail Gillespie, Brad Hochhalter, and Dave Bergmann of Madero Winds.

Hogwarts Party – Saturday, the 6th of October at 6:00 in the evening.
Your presence is requested in the library for an evening of magical adventure. Get sorted into your house and start earning points. Make your own wand! Enjoy snacks from Honeydukes. A prize will be awarded for the best costume. ALL ages welcome, yes, ALL ages!

October’s Book Club book is The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid. Evelyn Hugo is finally ready to tell the truth about her glamorous and scandalous life. But when she chooses unknown magazine reporter Monique Grant for the job, no one in the journalism community is more astounded than Monique herself. Why her? Why now?  Monique is not exactly on top of the world. Her husband, David, has left her, and her career has stagnated. Regardless of why Evelyn has chosen her to write her biography, Monique is determined to use this opportunity to jumpstart her career.

Summoned to Evelyn’s Upper East Side apartment, Monique listens as Evelyn unfurls her story: from making her way to Los Angeles in the 1950s to her decision to leave show business in the late 80s, and, of course, the seven husbands along the way. As Evelyn’s life unfolds through the decades—revealing a ruthless ambition, an unexpected friendship, and a great forbidden love—Monique begins to feel a very a real connection to the actress. But as Evelyn’s story catches up with the present, it becomes clear that her life intersects with Monique’s own in tragic and irreversible ways.

Book Club will meet Thursday, October 18, at 6:00pm.


4. Practice Peak Performance

Today, here are a few words about peak performance aimed at everyone who would like to improve at a sport or game, and we are not talking about performance-enhancing substances.

People are finally starting to realize that “the right stuff” isn’t something you have to be born with. The fact that we can learn to tap previously unexplored potential has been quickest, perhaps, to take hold in the world of professional sports. However, the principles involved will work just as well for weekend athletes and high school athletes.

One of the best-known techniques, for what sports psychologists and counselors call “performance enhancement,” is visualization. Now, visualization is simply a form of mental practice. It’s performing the different aspects of your sport over and over again in your mind, with all the right moves and the desired end result. You can do this with your eyes closed in a quiet room, riding the bus, in the shower, while you’re waiting to see the dentist – virtually any time.

Michael Jordan, arguably the best basketball player of his generation (if not several others) shot thousands of baskets in practice, on the court. He shot many more thousands, sitting on planes, trains and in automobiles. With his eyes shut, seeing and feeling those shots in his mind.

All that’s required is that you see yourself performing – driving the ball, throwing the javelin, clearing the bar. It doesn’t matter what the action is, as long as you are doing it perfectly. Because, you see, your subconscious doesn’t know the difference between a vividly imagined picture and the actual event. And while mental practice can’t replace the discipline and hard work of physical practice, in some ways it’s even better. It guarantees that you are practicing perfection, and when you practice perfection, you are far more likely to perform perfectly.

Now, take this same practice and apply it to your interactions with people at work. Apply it to what your job requires you do. Apply it to the goals – personal, professional and organizational – you want to achieve, and watch your performance soar! ~The Pacific Institute


5. Lewis L. McArthur 1917-2018

By Douglas Perry The Oregonian-OregonLive

A five-foot-high “earthen protuberance” rises above a remote Wasco County bluff over the Columbia River. A raw, beautiful spot, it’s said. Distinctly Oregon.

This is McArthur Mound, the name bestowed by the Oregon Geographic Names Board after its longtime leader, Lewis L. McArthur, retired from the board shortly before his 90th birthday.

The 2006 naming of the rise was a playful honor: “an in-joke,” says McArthur’s daughter, Mary McArthur. “We were joking that there was no geographic feature too small to name.”

But it was also a heartfelt recognition. It only seemed right that Lew McArthur’s name be added, even if unofficially and whimsically, to the catalog of the state’s monikers.

McArthur, who died on August 29 at 101, spent much of his life researching Oregon places and their histories, becoming, in the words of retired journalist John Terry, the “dean of Oregon geographic names.”

For decades McArthur compiled and edited editions of the Oregon Historical Society’s “Oregon Geographic Names,” an essential reference work for historians of the region. It’s a family calling: His father, Lewis A. McArthur, launched the source book in 1928.

Lewis L. McArthur, the son, a Portland native, put his historical expertise to good use, serving on the state’s historic-preservation committee and the Historic Columbia River Highway State Advisory Committee. But this wasn’t how he made his living. The University of California at Berkeley graduate spent some 40 years as an industrial designer for the Ray F. Becker Co.

Becker specialized in prefab service stations, but even 50 years ago McArthur foresaw the need to move beyond the internal-combustion engine. “[H]ere we are sitting on our hands when we should be exploring new modes, new fuels and perhaps smarter cars,” he told The Oregonian in 1972. “But, of course, that affects the economy.”

Professionally McArthur looked to the future. His heart, however, remained in the past. Throughout his life he felt a deep connection to the Pacific Northwest’s history, and for good reason.

One great-grandfather, James W. Nesmith, was an Oregon pioneer and a U.S. senator in the 1860s. Another, William Pope McArthur, undertook the first U.S. government survey of “the Western Coast of the United States.”

Even in an Oregon that had been settled and urbanized, Lew McArthur carried on the family’s adventuring ways, becoming a dedicated mountaineer and finding his way to most of the highest peaks in North America.

McArthur loved to travel around Oregon, having first done so in his teens. Everywhere he went in the state he took note of the history, the tendrils from the past. “The whole idea of being connected to your history and the people,” Mary McArthur says. “He just loved that.”

Mary describes her father as a Renaissance man who embraced travel, technology and all variety of intellectual pursuit.

“He was a real role model,” she says. “He instilled in us a sense of the importance of being a productive member of society, a love of the outdoors and of Oregon. He was a good, good man. An honorable man. He saw everybody for who they were.”

He also saw every place for what it was as he relentlessly pursued his avocation.

McArthur discovered that the municipal name Delake, now part of Lincoln City, came about thanks to the way Finnish immigrants in the area pronounced nearby Devils Lake. And that the Harney County town of Drewsey was almost named Gouge Eye, a nod to a favored means of settling disputes during Wild West days. Locals soon settled on calling the town Drusy, the name of a prominent rancher’s daughter. The stories could go on and on — and they do in “Oregon Geographic Names.”

Now McArthur’s daughter has taken over the family’s historical-name business. Mary McArthur is working on a new edition of “Geographic Names,” though she insists there’s no replacing her father. “I’m not even close to the caliber he was,” she says. “He was truly amazing.” 

Lewis L. McArthur is survived by his son Lewis, daughters Mary and Sarah, grandchildren Abby Larson and Doran McArthur Simpson, and companion Marie Hall. A memorial will be held in October at the Oregon Historical Society; plans for it have not yet been finalized.

In Loving Memory 
Lewis McArthur
May 22, 1917 – Aug. 29, 2018
Lewis McArthur’s memorial gathering will be held from 4:30-6:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 6, 2018, at the Oregon Historical Society, 1200 S.W. Park Ave., Portland. For additional information, please read The Oregonian article from Sept. 6, 2018. Also please note the addition to the article: Lewis was predeceased by his wife of 56 years, Joyce; and daughter, Gail Phetteplace. For those interested in a donation in Lewis’s name, his preference was to the Oregon Historical Society. 


6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center October Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

Meal Menu

October 2018

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at 541-565-3191 the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & Up $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2 3 4 5
Salmon Patty w/ Bun Oriental Chicken Meatloaf Chicken Teriyaki Ham & Swiss Quiche
Tater Tots & Veggies Rice Pilaf & Veggies Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Sesame Noodles & Veggies Rolls & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
8 9 10 11 12
Sloppy Joe’s w/Bun Beef Stroganoff Oven Fried Chicken Pizza loaded with meat French Dip Sandwich
Potato Wedges & Veggies Rotini Noodles & Veggies Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Veggies Potato Wedges & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
15 16 17 18 19
Cheesy Potatoes w/ Ham Spaghetti w/ Meat Sauce Chicken Fried Steak Hot Ham & Cheese w/Bun Turkey Tetrazzini
Veggies Veggies & Garlic Bread Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Potato Wedges Veggies
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
22 23 24 25 26
Cheeseburgers Roast Pork Swedish Meatballs Ham Fried Rice Navy Bean & Ham Soup
Potato Wedges Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Rotini Noodles & Veggies Muffins & Veggies Cornbread & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
29 30 31  
Hamburger Gravy over

Mashed Potatoes

Salad & Dessert

Chicken a la King Mac & Cheese w/ Ham
Biscuits & Veggies Veggies
Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert

MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO AVAILABILITY — ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of food is prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


 

Sherman County eNews #253

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Middle School Football Update, Oct. 2

  2. Sherman County High School Football Update, Sept.28

  3. Update! Sherman County School Hall of Honor Celebration, Sept. 28

  4. Volunteer to Help with Youth 4-H Theatre Arts!

  5. Notice. Biggs Service District Board Meeting, Oct. 3

  6. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Oct. 3

  7. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness

  8. Skinner Ranch Family Backs Congressman Walden

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Middle School Football Update, Oct. 2

sport-football-referee2Sherman Middle School Football

Tuesday, October 2, 2018 – MS FB vs Lyle at Lyle with a start time of 5:00.  The bus will depart SCS at 3:00, class dismissal at 2:50.

~Audrey Rooney, Registrar  

Sherman High School

65912 High School Loop

Moro, OR 97039

PH: 541-565-3500 ~ Fax: 541-565-3319


2. Sherman County High School Football Update, Sept.28

Logo.Sherman High SchoolThis Friday night, September 28, 2018, the Sherman High School football team will not be playing its game against Enterprise High School. This is due to a shortage of players from a combination of injuries and failing to meet the academic expectations of a Sherman student athlete. With student safety in mind, the Sherman County School District and Sherman High School will evaluate the injury report at the end of the week and give its student athletes the academic support and opportunities they need to be back on the field at Ione on October 5. ~Mike Somnis, K-12 Principal & Head Football Coach


3. Update! Sherman County School Hall of Honor Celebration, Sept. 28

Logo.Sherman High SchoolThere will be a slight change to the schedule of the Hall of Honor Celebration on September 28, 2018.  The Sherman County School District will still be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one foundation into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Event Center that will begin at 5:30 p.m. 

There will not be a football game that evening, but the Booster Club will still be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. After the speeches have concluded, the induction ceremony will commence immediately following at the same location. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. in the Event Center.

Please join us for the $10.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased at the door or you may attend the event for free if not purchasing dinner. 

The 2018 inductees include the generous and dedicated Sherman County Athletic Foundation, Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame Member Mike Beers, Businesswoman, Farmer and Artist Karla (von Borstel) Chambers, United States Navy Executive Officer Don (Gordon) Helyer (posthumously), and long-time Sherman County Superintendent Wily Knighten (posthumously). 

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District. 

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, call Wes Owens at 541-565-3500.


4. Volunteer to Help with Youth 4-H Theatre Arts!

4-H clover1Want to help lead a new 4-H “Theatre Arts” club? No acting or performing experience needed! We’ve got lots of kids with interest in drama, there’s easy-to-use 4-H curriculum, and we just received a $2000 grant to put on a kids’ drama musical with hired instructors. 4-H clubs need to meet at least 6 times a year, usually once a month, plus you’d need to attend the monthly Sherman 4-H Assn meetings. Let the Sherman Extension Office know if you’re interested, love to have you! 541-565-3230 or email cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu


5. Notice. Biggs Service District Board Meeting, Oct. 3

The Biggs Service District will hold a public meeting on October 3rd at 8:30 am in the Commissioners Meeting room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street in Moro, Oregon 97039 to discuss items relating to the Biggs Water System Project and to the District.


6. Notice. Sherman County Court Session, Oct. 3

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, October 3, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda topics include Frontier TeleNet, Day Wireless – Wireless System Upgrades Outside of Fiber Areas; and Quarterly Reports by the Sherman County Clerk, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, Sherman County Juvenile Department, Prevention Coalition and Sherman County Emergency Services Department. The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


7. Efficiency vs. Effectiveness

Did you know that there is an important difference between efficiency and effectiveness? Let’s talk about that difference and, more importantly, why it matters.

Most businesses focus a lot of energy on running an efficient operation – efficient in the sense that things get done with a minimum of effort and motion. It’s low input and high output. In other words, efficiency is doing things right. But doing what things? Ah-ha! This is a very important question.

You see, effectiveness would be doing the right things right. And effectiveness is what you want to aim for, because you can be extremely efficient at doing the wrong things. You can practice the wrong technique or the wrong moves until you’ve got it down perfectly. And then you’re going to wonder and worry about why you’re not doing any better, why the business is failing, why your customers don’t come back when everything is running like a well-oiled machine.

So when you visualize yourself or your business, don’t just see yourself doing things right. See yourself doing the right things right. And remember that sometimes the right thing done imperfectly can beat the heck out of a flawless performance of the wrong thing. Edward Deming, the originator of the total quality management movement, once said that if you run a company on numbers alone, you are sure to fail, because the most important numbers are unknown and unknowable.

It is possible that one of the things he meant was don’t worry so much about doing things right, and concentrate instead on doing the right things. Not such a bad thing to teach our children, as well. ~The Pacific Institute


8. Skinner Ranch Family Backs Congressman Walden

Calls on Dem Candidate to Stop Using Ranch Sign

(Jordan Valley)—Congressman Greg Walden’s opponent was dealt a setback today when the seventh generation, Eastern Oregon ranch family she married into about two years ago and met for the first time this year made clear they support Walden in the race for Congress. 

“It’s time to clear up this nonsense about Jamie McLeod-Skinner being part of our ranch family.  She’s a California liberal who came out to the ranch a few months back and got a selfie under our sign. Her wife may share our last name, but they’re a distant branch of the family. We’re asking her to stop using our ranch sign in her campaign and stop misleading voters.  It’s not how we do things out here,” said Bob Skinner, former president of the Oregon Cattleman’s Association and current officer of the National Public Lands Council.

“We trust and support Greg Walden.  We asked him to give one of the eulogies at my Dad’s memorial a few years back.  He understands and supports ranchers and our Eastern Oregon way of life.  He’s a life-long Oregonian, small business owner and a guy who is always there fighting for us.  He has our full support,” said Skinner.

To prove the point, three generations of the Skinner family joined Walden for a photo under the Skinner Ranch sign. “Facts matter. And the facts in this case are clear:  the Skinner ranch family of Jordan Valley supports Greg Walden.  His opponent needs to stop misleading voters,” said Skinner.

Walden’s ancestors on his father side came to Oregon in the fall of 1845.  His father grew up in Milton-Freewater and his mother in La Grande.  Walden was born in The Dalles and has spent nearly his entire life living in the Gorge.  He and his wife Mylene owned and operated radio stations there for more than two decades. They raised their son in Hood River, where they’ve lived in the same home since 1987. Walden is a graduate of Hood River Valley High School where he served as student body president.  Their son also is a graduate of Hood River Valley High School.

“I deeply appreciate the more than 20 years of friendship with the Skinners, and greatly value their strong support of my campaign,” said Walden.


9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbKids to Ask Questions at Oregon’s Gubernatorial Debate October 3

Editorial: Campaign finance should be transparent

Walden meets with county officials

Library Book Challenges Stack Up

Why States are Leaving Common Core Education in Droves


 

Sherman County eNews #252

CONTENTS

  1. Update! Sherman County School Hall of Honor Celebration, Sept. 28

  2. Letter to the Editor: South Sherman Fire & Rescue District Concerns

  3. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, September 28-30

  4. ODOT Region 4 Weekly Construction Update

  5. Free Family History Workshop, Oct. 20

  6. More Today than Yesterday


1.Update! Sherman County School Hall of Honor Celebration, Sept. 28

Logo.Sherman High SchoolThere will be a slight change to the schedule of the Hall of Honor Celebration on September 28, 2018.  The Sherman County School District will still be celebrating the induction of four individuals and one foundation into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor at a reception in the Event Center that will begin at 5:30 p.m. 

There will not be a football game that evening, but the Booster Club will still be serving a Tri-Tip dinner between 5:30-6:15 p.m. and designated speakers will be sharing memories of each honoree beginning at 6:00 p.m. After the speeches have concluded, the induction ceremony will commence immediately following at the same location. The public is welcome to join the celebration at 5:30 p.m. in the Event Center.

Please join us for the $10.00 fundraising dinner to support the Booster Club as we honor all Hall of Honor Inductees. Dinner tickets can be purchased at the door or you may attend the event for free if not purchasing dinner. 

The 2018 inductees include the generous and dedicated Sherman County Athletic Foundation, Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame Member Mike Beers, Businesswoman, Farmer and Artist Karla (von Borstel) Chambers, United States Navy Executive Officer Don (Gordon) Helyer (posthumously), and long-time Sherman County Superintendent Wily Knighten, Sr.  (posthumously). 

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District. 

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, call Wes Owens at 541-565-3500.


2. Letter to the Editor: South Sherman Fire & Rescue District Concerns

Dear Editor,

This is a list of concerns that I have presented to the South Sherman Fire and Rescue Board. These concerns have also been submitted to various agencies and there are already a great number of individuals who have stepped forward regarding these same issues and would like to be heard and do something about these concerns. If anyone also has similar experiences and concerns, please give me a call – Deena Johnson at 541-576-4634 – so I can put you in touch with the appropriate individuals who can hear you.

CONCERNS:

  • Unfair treatment of the volunteers, with favoritism
  • Withholding of training records, training certifications, and all contracts
  • Wrongful termination
  • Safety of the children in the cadet program
  • Inappropriate sexual situations concerning members as well as cadets
  • Threats of suicide
  • Cussing at the volunteers on the radio, through social media, and in person
  • Physical threat of harm to volunteers and minors
  • Persecution for religious beliefs
  • False reporting to agencies such as DPSST and Oregon Health Authority
  • Having meetings where voodoo dolls are being burned that represent past volunteers or members of other agencies
  • Drunken parties with all the local members of the department that leave the district with absolutely no protection
  • Refusing EMTs the needed medical equipment for patients on crashes
  • Refusing to show up for medical calls in their district, when putting out lots of money to train EMTs
  • Firing people before they can finish training, and then sending them a bill, when the training was paid for with FEMA grant money
  • Some speculation of misuse of department funds
  • Unlawful sales of military surplus equipment that should not be sold to the public
  • Absolutely no way to contact board members directly
  • An elected official on the board and being the paid fire chief
  • Relationships within the department between paid employees
  • Job openings are not advertised for the public to apply
  • Videos of inappropriate conduct.

Deena Johnson

Moro


3. Tygh Valley Bluegrass Jamboree, September 28-30

music-notes

We are looking forward to another wonderful Jamboree and thank you to those wanting to participate in and attend the event.  As you know the Shaniko Preservation Guild sees preserving music as an important cultural goal. We also sponsor The Shaniko Ragtime and Vintage Music Festival in October each year for the same reason.

The educational parts of the Jamboree and the stage performances all serve to teach, inform and allow even new people to experience Bluegrass music which often leads to a desire and motivation to learn to play.  The workshops and slow jam offered by willing musicians are an excellent way for anyone that plays or who is thinking about it, to learn more and enjoy meeting others. 

The challenges and the competitive spirit of the Saturday Band Scramble is fun and the unique creative assembly, becomes a fond festival memory for those playing and those in the audience.                         

FRIDAY, September 28th

5 pm Open Mic (Three songs, sign up at the gate table)

6:30—Corral Creek

7:00 – Youngberg Hill

At 8:10 jamboree host band, Kathy Boyd and Phoenix Rising & Friends

SATURDAY, September 29th

Workshops 9 am

Band Scramble 10 am to 12:30

Lunch Break – 12:30 to 2 pm

Lunch Jam – Noon to 2 pm in Dew Drop Inn

Slow Jam 2 pm up by the entrance area & Open Mic on stage

Afternoon Bluegrass Show

3:00 to 3:50 – Rose City Bluegrass                 

4:00 to 4:50 – Green Mountain Boys & Friends

Dinner Break – 5 to 6:30

Fundraiser BBQ – $10.00 per plate or two for $18 – Children under 12 $5

Evening Roundup

6:30 to 7:20 –  Porcupine Ridge

7:30 to 8:20 – Sunny South

8:30 to 9:25 – Fadin’ By Nine

9:30 – Drawings, Grand Prize & Lifetime pass 

SUNDAY, September 30th

BLUEGRASS &/GOSPEL FINALE

Open Mic set

9 am – Phil & Front Porch Bluegrass Band,

9:30-10 am (3 bands, 3 songs each),

10:00 am – Corral Creek

10:30 am— Jericho Road

11 am – Mud Springs Gospel Band

Noon – Dick, Dave & Dallas (Three-Ds)

1 pm – Kathy Boyd & Phoenix Rising & Scavenger Hunt presentation

Work shops 

Assemble at the stage area at 9 am Saturday morning. No instruments required; if you are thinking about playing, sit in on a beginning class

Beginning Banjo 5-string by Chuck Holloway 

Beginning to early intermediate Guitar by Dave Peterson of Puddletown Ramblers 

Clawhammer Banjo by Martha Stone 

Dobro by Danny Lee Allison

Intermediate to Advanced Banjo by Mike Stahlman of Sunny South

Advanced Guitar by TBA

Beginning Upright Acoustic Bass  by Ken Luse 

Beginning Fiddle by Tim Crosby of Kathy Boyd & Phoenix Rising 

Intermediate to Advanced Fiddle – Katie Lubiens of Porcupine Ridge

Dobro by Danny Lee Allison

Harmonica by Dennis Nelson of Kathy Boyd & Phoenix Rising 

Mandolin by TBA

Uke by Tom Tower of Kathy Boyd & Phoenix Rising  

Camping hook up (electric, water, sewer) reservations are being handled by volunteer, Joanne Heare or leave preferences at the gate in a note to her.  Dry land camping is abundant, no reservations required. 

Thanks for helping us cover the expenses each year and for the preserving efforts you help the Shaniko Preservation Guild with.  Weekend Music Passes for 2018 will be the same (prepaid) $25 per person, otherwise $30 at the gate. The Shaniko Preservation Guild, PO Box 123, Shaniko, OR 97057   Event Line 541-489-3434


4. ODOT Region 4 Weekly Construction Update

Week of September 24, 2018 – Selected Counties
The Oregon Department of Transportation is committed to providing a safe, efficient transportation system. ODOT invests in Oregon’s future through roadway improvement projects. The following projects are located in ODOT’s Region 4 encompassing Central Oregon from The Dalles to Klamath Falls on the east side of the Cascades. 

All work is dependent on weather conditions and schedules are subject to change.

Where traffic is routed through or around a work zone, pedestrians, including those with disabilities, will also be provided alternate routes through the work zone.

Jefferson County

US 97: US 26 Jct. to NW 10th Street (Madras – Terrebonne) – Knife River is complete except for corrective work. There may be passing lanes closed at the Crooked River Bridge, as well as shoulder work during the day.

US 97: Spanish Hollow Creek & Trout Creek Bridges – Stellar J Corporation is performing bridge replacement work. Traffic is reduced to a single lane through the work zone and is controlled by temporary signals, minor delays anticipated. Occasional flagger controlled one-way traffic may be required.

Sherman County

US 97: Spanish Hollow Creek & Trout Creek Bridges

  • US 97 at MP 0.4 – Stellar J Corporation is completing bridge removal, pile driving, and the first stage of bridge construction. One-way traffic will be controlled continuously by a temporary signal. Occasional flagger controlled one-way traffic may be required.
  • US 97 at MP 3.1 and 3.2 – Stellar J Corporation is completing seismic retrofit substructure work. Occasional flagger controlled one-way traffic may be required. Expect minimal Delays.

US 97: Shaniko to Trout Creek – High Desert Aggregate and Paving will be performing single closures to pave the travel lanes on US 97 Sunday through Thursday from 7pm – 7am between MP 69.50 to MP 75. The Contractor will be controlling traffic with pilot cars and flaggers. Expect 10 – 20 minute delays.

Various

Region 4 Curve Warning Signs – Baker Rock Resources will be installing signs on the Shaniko to Fossil Highways (OR 218). Traffic can expect one-way traffic with flaggers and delays of up to 20 minutes.


5. Free Family History Workshop, Oct. 20

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society and the Family History Center are co-sponsoring a FREE Family History Workshop on Saturday, October 20, 2018 at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day-Saints in Hood River. The workshop is for all levels of genealogy research from beginners to advanced. There will be door prizes and lunch may be purchased for $5.00 or you may bring your own. Classes include Beginning Genealogy, DNA, using foreign records, using Facebook for family history and more. 

The church is located on 1825 May Street in Hood River. Registration begins at 8:30am, workshop begins at 9:00am and runs till 2:00pm. Public is welcome!


6. More Today than Yesterday

Today, let’s talk about one of the most powerful techniques available for personal growth – and it works for individuals, teams, organizations, communities, even nations. And you, as a leader in any of these categories, have the capacity to spark tremendous, purposeful change.

It is a simple technique that has incredible power to change lives and expand potential. In fact, there may be nothing that has more power to inspire positive change. It’s a technique you can use to help your own life grow richer and to help others, as well.

When you can see yourself, not as you are, but as you can become, you stimulate incredible growth and previously unbelievable change. People who find life exciting and who continue to grow and expand their accomplishments are people who have an expanding self-image.

Now this doesn’t mean that you go around completely out of touch with reality. But it does mean that you have a vision of reality that includes not just the past and the present, but also the future. It also means that your primary focus is not on what you are today, but what you can be tomorrow. It is this technique, this ability that motivates people to grow, to surpass themselves, to break records, to change in positive, exciting ways.

After all, if you can’t see it, how can you be it? This is what you want to do for your children, friends, relatives, co-workers – indeed, all whom your life touches. Keep painting a vivid mental picture for them of all that they can be and do. Let them know you believe in their abilities, and watch them move toward that picture.

Help them be more today than they were yesterday, and on their way to a greater tomorrow. ~The Pacific Institute