Sherman County eNews #210

CONTENTS

  1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors, Aug. 13

  2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Meeting Site Changed, Aug. 15

  3. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

  4. Maryhill Museum’s Free Counties Weekend, Aug. 18-19

  5. Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games on the Historic Maryhill Loops Road

  6. Change = Growth = Change

  7. Wildfire Smoke Inhalation Prevention


Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and he has to buy graphite rods, reels, spinnerbaits, jigs, crankbaits, jerkbaits, plastics, flies, waders, a boat and a truck. ~unattributed


1. Public Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors, Aug. 13

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting on Monday, August 13, 2018, that will include a work session and an executive session. The work session will begin at 5:30 p.m. An executive session will follow pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(k) to consider matters relating to school safety at approximately 6:30 p.m. The regular board meeting will begin at approximately 7:00 p.m. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library. 


2. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Meeting Site Changed, Aug. 15

The location of the Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, August 15, 2018, at 9:00 a.m. has changed and will be held in the Commissioners Meeting Room at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.


3. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

Making the Best of Summer
Strong Sherman County Families 
Networking parent and youth groups

4 week series

***FAMILY DINNER PROVIDED BEGINNING AT 5 PM
***TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE- CALL SHERMAN COUNTY TRANSIT 541-565-3553
***RSVP: aasher@co.sherman.or.us or call 541-565-5036
Moro Community Presbyterian Church basement: 204 4th St. Moro OR, 97039

Mondays :
July 30-August 20, 2018 (4 weeks)
4:30 – 5:00 Optional supervised play for children
5:00 – 5:30 Family meal
5:30 – 6:15 Parent and youth breakout sessions
6:15 – 6:30 Group debrief (parents and youth)

           *

Children ages 5-13 participate in group activities while learning about healthy relationships
(Responsible youth older than 13 who want to volunteer to buddy with younger students are encouraged to RSVP as well.)

          *

We are excited to offer Parent Café for any and all moms, dads and guardians during youth groups. Gather together for casual conversation about factors that strengthen family and community bonds.

Topics focus on Family and Community Relationships

week 1- Resilience- being strong and flexible

week 2-  Knowledge- family dynamic and child development

week 3- Support- everybody needs help sometimes

week 4- Communication- social and emotional intelligence.

THANK YOU TO THE MORO COMMUNITY PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH FOR THE GENEROUS USE OF THE FACILITIES!


4. Maryhill Museum’s Free Counties Weekend, Aug. 18-19

Saturday, Aug 18 & Sunday, Aug 19 | all day 

For nearly two decades, Maryhill Museum of Art has extended free admission on designated weekends to neighbors in Oregon and Washington. On August 18 & 19, 2018  residents from the following counties are granted free admission upon presentation of an I.D. with address: 

Oregon — Clatsop, Columbia, Grant, Lincoln, Morrow, Tillamook, Washington, Wheeler, and Yamhill. Washington  — Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, Jefferson, Lewis, Pacific, San Juan, and Wahkiakum.


5. Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games on the Historic Maryhill Loops Road

Friday, Aug 31 – Sunday, Sept 2, 2018

Spectators of all ages can experience the thrill of watching the world’s top downhill skateboarders, street luge pilots, and inline racers compete down a winding two-mile course on the Maryhill Loops Road. In addition to gravity sports racing, there will be music and dancing, food, and a variety of vendors. Free admission for spectators at viewing spots along the race course. For more information, including sponsors, see https://www.maryhillwindwalk.com/festival/about/


6. Change = Growth = Change

Why is it so hard for some people to change? These folks deny the need to change, push back against any change, and can make the workplace a difficult place to be. They defend the anchors that keep the organizational “ship” from moving. Before “throwing” these people “overboard,” it is helpful to understand what happens when we try to behave differently.

Did you know that whenever you act differently than you really believe yourself to be, you produce stress? It doesn’t matter whether the new behavior is worse or better than the old. If it’s significantly different, it will generate internal stress. So how in the world do people change? One way is to just grit your teeth and go ahead and throw yourself into the situation, force yourself to act differently, and hang on until the new behavior is repeated often enough to feel comfortable. Change like this takes longer, and the stress involved affects the mind, body and emotional states . . . and cascades to everyone around you.

There is a better way, a less stressful way, a way that takes much of the pain and anxiety out of change. You change the mental picture you have of yourself first. You literally rehearse the future in your head, and you see yourself acting in the new way. You take yourself through it safely and comfortably in your mind, over and over again. Soon it doesn’t feel like new behavior at all. It feels like something you routinely do. It feels normal, or natural.

Then, when it comes time for you to actually change, it’s not such a big deal. You are already in the changed state. It is “like you” to be that way. Any stress you experience will feel more like the excitement of an adventure than the anxiety of change. And those around you will thank you for not stressing them out.

By the way, the process of repeatedly seeing yourself behave in a certain way is called visualization, and it works for countless individuals. Watch the athletes during the next swim meet, track & field contest or gymnastics competition. NASCAR and Formula One drivers. MLS, MLB, NFL FIFA – a lot of them are visualizing their performance, seeing every twist and turn. Chess masters are champions at visualization, as they plot out their strategy many, many moves ahead of time.

Visualizing change can work for you, too, and you don’t need to be a professional athlete. Why not give it a try? Decide what change you want, then see it in your mind first. And remember: it’s not so much change, as it is growth. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Wildfire Smoke Inhalation Prevention

North Central Public Health District would like to remind residents of Wasco, Sherman, and Gilliam Counties to take precautions to avoid illness due to wildfire smoke inhalation.

Smoke from wildfires is a mixture of gases and fine particles from burning trees and other plant materials. Smoke can hurt your eyes, irritate your respiratory system, and worsen chronic heart and lung diseases.

Poor air quality conditions are a health threat and all residents should limit their exposure to smoke. Those with respiratory or heart disease, the elderly, and children, are advised to stay indoors when the air-quality is poor.

Air quality can change quickly. Please visit the Oregon Smoke Blog and the DEQ Air Quality Index links below. DEQ air quality monitoring data is updated hourly and is color-coded for easy to read information. Unfortunately, the only permanent monitor for our region is in The Dalles, with Hermiston and Prineville being the next closest monitors. A link is also provided below with information on the 5-3-1 Visibility Index, if there’s not a monitor near you.

Please take the following precautions to avoid breathing problems or other symptoms from smoke:

  1. Be aware of smoke concentrations in your area. See the links below for DEQ’s Air Quality Index and Oregon Smoke blog or use the Visibility Index.
  2. Avoid working or exercising outdoors when air quality is poor. Limit outdoor sports, work and recreation.
  3. Drink lots of water – staying hydrated can keep your airways moist which will help reduce symptoms of respiratory irritation such as scratchy throat, running nose and coughing.
  4. Try to avoid driving in smoky areas. If you do need to drive in these areas, keep your windows rolled up and vents closed. If you need air conditioning, make sure you set your system on “re-circulate” to avoid bringing smoke into your car.
  5. Avoid smoke by staying indoors, closing all windows and doors and use a filter in your heating/cooling system that removes very fine particulate matter. Portable air cleaners with HEPA filters can also help keep indoor air cleaner in smaller spaces.
  6. People with concerns about health issues, including those suffering from asthma or other respiratory problems, should follow their breathing management plans; keep medications on hand, and contact healthcare providers if necessary.
  7. Use of masks or bandanas doesn’t filter out gases or fine particles. An N95 respirator can provide some protection, but only if the person using it has had a fit-test to make sure it fits properly, and the respirator is worn correctly. N95 respirators are not available in children’s sizes.

For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at 541-506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


 

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