Sherman County eNews #203

CONTENTS

  1. Biggs Service District Meeting, Aug. 1

  2. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

  3. Sherman County Representative Sought for Area Agency on Aging

  4. Travel Oregon Competitive Small Grants Cycle Now Open

  5. Your Personal Superpower – Focus

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“We are, heart and soul, friends to the freedom of the press. It is however, the prostituted companion of liberty, and somehow or other, we know not how, its efficient auxiliary. It follows the substance like its shade; but while a man walks erect, he may observe that his shadow is almost always in the dirt. It corrupts, it deceives, it inflames. It strips virtue of her honors, and lends to faction its wildfire and its poisoned arms, and in the end is its own enemy and the usurper’s ally, It would be easy to enlarge on its evils. They are in England, they are here, they are everywhere. It is a precious pest, and a necessary mischief, and there would be no liberty without it.” —Fisher Ames (1807)


1. Biggs Service District Meeting, Aug. 1

Biggs Service District will meet on August 1st at 2:00pm, at Sherman County Courthouse Addition in the Hearings Room, 500 Court Street in Moro Oregon 97039, to discuss the Biggs Service District Water System Project. Contact Aaron Cook at Biggs Service District (541-739-2321) with any questions. 


2. Strong Sherman County Families Networking Parent and Youth Groups

Making the Best of Summer
Strong Sherman County Families
Networking parent and youth groups
Moro Community Presbyterian Church basement: 204 4th St. Moro OR, 97039
Mondays :
July 30-August 20, 2018 (4 weeks)
4:30 – 5:00 Optional supervised play for children
5:00 – 5:30 Family meal
5:30 – 6:15 Parent and youth breakout sessions
6:15 – 6:30 Group debrief (parents and youth)

Week 1 took place July 30th but you can still get in on the remainder of the series.

See topics below:
***FAMILY DINNER PROVIDED BEGINNING AT 5 PM
***TRANSPORTATION AVAILABLE- CALL SHERMAN COUNTY TRANSIT 541-565-3553
***RSVP: aasher@co.sherman.or.us or call 541-565-5036
Children ages 5-13 participate in group activities while learning about healthy relationships
(Responsible youth older than 13 who want to volunteer to buddy with younger students are encouraged to RSVP as well.)
We are excited to offer Parent Café for any and all moms, dads and guardians during youth groups. Gather together for casual conversation about factors that strengthen family and community bonds.
TOPIC: Family and Community Relationships
Resilience- being strong and flexible
Knowledge- family dynamic and child development
Support- everybody needs help sometimes
Communication- social and emotional intelligence.


3. Sherman County Representative Sought for Area Agency on Aging

Since MCCOG closed down, the State Unit on Aging has been looking for another organization to provide AAA services to the five counties of Wheeler, Gilliam, Sherman, Wasco and Hood River. The State Unit on Aging is in discussions with CAPECO, the community action program that serves Umatilla, Morrow, Gilliam and Wheeler counties and also provides AAA services for Umatilla and Morrow counties. It is important that there are voices from all five counties to help advise the new AAA. The next SAC meeting is August 28th at 12:00 at the APD office in The Dalles and we will be discussing membership. We meet just once a month for two hours on the fourth Tuesday.

We are looking for SAC members, maybe someone from the Sherman County Senior & Community Center board? Both the Hood River Adult Center and Mid-Columbia Senior Center have representation on the SAC, Paul Zastrow and myself.

Contact Scott McKay, SAC Chair  smckay1948@gmail.com

Mid-Columbia Senior Center, 1112 W. 9th Street, The Dalles, OR 97058 


4. Travel Oregon Competitive Small Grants Cycle Now Open

The program makes awards eligible to applicants for projects that contribute to the development and improvement of the tourism economy in communities throughout the state, supporting Travel Oregon’s vision of “a better life for Oregonians through strong, sustainable local economies.”

Eligible projects may be awarded up to $20,000. Applicants must demonstrate at least a ten percent cash match. Download the Competitive Small Grants Guidelines for specific eligibility requirements and to view the application questions.

In order to receive access to the online grant application, applicants must submit a project idea form that will be sent directly to their Regional Destination Management Organization (RDMO). Once the form is submitted, applicants will be provided with a confirmation email with a link and access code to the grant application.

Important dates:

–July 30, 2018 – Online application opens

–August 29, 2018 (5 p.m. PDT) – Online application closes

–October 17, 2018 – Competitive Small Grant application status notification (work can officially begin)

–November 15, 2019 – Competitive Small Grant Accomplishment Report due (project must be complete by this date)

Over the past decade, more than $4.5 million have been awarded to 137 projects across the state through Travel Oregon’s matching grants program. Additional details can be found at Industry.TravelOregon.com/Grants.


5. Your Personal Superpower – Focus

In this day and age of superheroes with superpowers, it’s important to remember that each of us has our own superpower, and just maybe, more than one.

In case you weren’t aware, one of the most powerful forces in the world is under your complete control, and how you use it determines what happens to you in life. Today, let’s spend a little time on this particular force.

If you are a parent, how many times have you told your kids to “Pay attention”? Probably quite a lot of the time, because you know it’s important. Teachers do the same thing, because what they are teaching is important for their students to learn. But do we really understand the power of our focused attention?

As an example, perhaps your “To Do” list has gotten too long, and you decide that today is the day to clean out that garage or closet. You start early in the day, and before you know it, the work is done. Time seems to have slowed down. What had been nagging at you, denying your ability to ignore it, is suddenly checked off of the “To Do” list. Or perhaps you’ve put off a project at work until the last possible moment, and then amaze yourself with how much you get done in an incredibly short space of time.

More than likely, we all have experienced similar things. However, it’s not the deadline itself that boosts your productivity and effectiveness. It is the incredible power of your focused attention.

Today’s point is that there is absolutely no reason why you can’t perform this well all the time. All of us have the potential to be peak performers. Unfortunately, only some of us have learned how to control and focus our attention, to harness our thoughts, beliefs and attitudes and direct them toward what we want, when we want to.

Now, we aren’t born with this superpower. However, this is a skill that can be learned. And once we have learned it, we will be amazed at how much life changes, for the better.

P.S. And even though it can be pretty cool, you won’t need a costume to display this superpower.


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyKinetic Branding (design)

White House

Leonard Cohen: Anthem

Spelling by Sound

Does diversity really unite us? Citizenship & Immigration


 

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Sherman County eNews #202

CONTENTS

  1. All Fire Evacuation Levels for Sherman County Cancelled

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1

  3. From a Different Perspective

  4. Long Hollow Fire 7.30.18 Update

  5. 4th Annual Oktoberfest Dinner Auction Benefit for The Woolery Project

  6. Oregon National Guard Reports for Wildland Firefighter Training

  7. Rep. Greg Walden on Reforming America’s Immigration System


1. All Fire Evacuation Levels for Sherman County Cancelled

Monday: This is a message from Frontier Regional Alert serving Gilliam, Jefferson, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties:

All Evacuation Levels for Sherman County have been cancelled!
Submitted:
Frontier Regional 911


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1 

The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 1 @ the Rufus Baptist Church,

Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting. Come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.  Thank You, Red Gibbs


3. From a Different Perspective

Today, imagine yourself as a business, one that manufacturers several lines of product. Imagine that this organization is creating a new product line, and for the first time in your industry’s history, you are approaching this new product with “a clean sheet of paper.” In fact, you are approaching it from an entirely new perspective.

How many times have we gone about doing a job or a task the same way because, “We always do it this way”? How many times, because of rushed time schedules or convenience, have we fallen into old patterns? While they may be tried and true, and one can have confidence in some process that we know works, what are we potentially giving up? What might we be missing?

The history books are riddled with people who have come up with new ways of looking at the status quo, and revolutionized an industry. Henry Ford, commonly accredited with the assembly line, switched perspectives and simply moved the car and not the workers. Perhaps without knowing exactly what he was doing, Ford gave up the problem to his subconscious and reticular activating system to solve the challenge.

So, what do you have coming up that might benefit from “a clean sheet of paper”? It could be a challenge in your business, or in your personal or professional life. Give your reticular activating system the goal of finding a new way to accomplish a challenge. You may find yourself doing something as simple as finding a different way home from work, looking up, and finding your own revolutionary new way of looking at the future.

Change your view by changing your perspective and allow that powerful engine between your ears to find new solutions, giving you new results. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Long Hollow Fire 7.30.18 Update

Posted: 30 Jul 2018 09:50 AM PDT

Long Hollow Fire: 34,550 acres, Containment: 58%, Reported: July 26, 4:44 P.M., Cause: Human. Although temperatures have been high and relative humidity low, there has not been a significant growth in fire acres over the last two days. On Sunday, firefighters continued to improve fire perimeter lines. The estimated containment is 58% and 34,550 acres. Temperatures Monday are forecast to be 98 to 103 degrees, minimum humidity 13 to 17%. Wind is expected to be up to 5 mph from the northwest in the morning, increasing to 8 mph from the north/ northwest in the afternoon. Hot and dry conditions will continue through Tuesday.

The post Long Hollow Fire 7.30.18 Update appeared first on Central Oregon Fire Information.


5. 4th Annual Oktoberfest Dinner Auction Benefit for The Woolery Project

4th Annual Octoberfest Auction and Dinner

October 20, 2018

A Benefit for The Woolery Project, Arlington, Oregon

The Big Tent on the Port of Arlington Peninsula

Prime Rib Dinner by Paradise Rose Chuckwagon Catering

Dinner Music by One Hum & Wheeler County Ramblers

Huge Silent & Live Auctions

Dance by Countryfied

info@thewooleryprojectinc.org

Save the Date!


6. Oregon National Guard Reports for Wildland Firefighter Training

Oregon.Flat.poleAs part of the State’s coordinated and comprehensive wildfire suppression efforts, and thanks to funds allocated by the federal government, 200 citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen from the Oregon National Guard arrived this afternoon at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem for a week-long wildland firefighter training program.  This 200 arriving at the Academy are in addition to the 200 trained earlier this month at Camp Rilea near Warrenton, Oregon.

Federal funds were allocated, at the request of state officials, to help prepare members of the National Guard in case their assistance will be needed to support wildland firefighting efforts around the state.

The week-long training is being provided by the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) and is the same training required of all public and private wildland firefighters. This training the members of the Oregon National Guard will be receiving is often known as “red card” training and consists of both classroom and hands-on sessions.

Classes include a wide-variety of topics including safety considerations, communications, protecting tribal artifacts, fire behavior, etc.  Hands-on sessions include fire shelter deployment, hand lines, gridding, hand tool work, pumps, water sources, and related skills.

DPSST’s Director Eriks Gabliks said “all of these classes combined will allow the citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen to be safe and effective in their work in case they are required this year to help support the efforts of wildland firefighters around the state.”

The Oregon National Guard has a proven track record of supporting wildfire suppression efforts, from the air and on the ground, around the state in recent years.  In 2015, members of the Oregon National Guard assisted with wildfire suppression efforts in John Day and Enterprise.  In 2017, more than 400 citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen supported Oregon’s firefighting efforts (air and ground) at High Cascades Complex (near Crater Lake), Chetco Bar, Blanket Creek, Horse Prairie, and Milli fires.

The Oregon National Guard has a long-standing agreement with the Oregon Department of Forestry known as Operation Plan Smokey, which stipulates the details of how Oregon National Guard members will be utilized to assist in annual firefighting efforts if needed. This agreement is reviewed on an annual basis by both agencies and the Governor’s Office.

What is different this year is that funds were requested by state officials, and approved by the federal government, to provide training to members of the National Guard ahead of the need.  Gabliks said, “This will allow these wildland firefighter trained citizen-soldiers and citizen-airmen to be activated and deployed much faster should the need arise for their assistance.”

On July 18, 2018, Governor Kate Brown declared a statewide wildfire emergency, which activated Operation Plan Smokey to make Oregon National Guard (ONG) troops and resources available to the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF).

For more information on the Oregon National Guard’s preparation and participation in this year’s wildfire fighting efforts, or to visit the training being offered at DPSST, please contact SFC April Davis, Public Affairs Specialist, Oregon Military Department, phone 503-584-3807, email april.l.davis@state.or.us


7. Rep. Greg Walden on Reforming America’s Immigration System

American flag2In recent years, I’ve met with numerous Dreamers and their families from across Oregon. These kids were brought here illegally as children through no fault of their own. Some have been valedictorians in their high schools, captains of their sports teams, managers at local businesses, and more. Recently, I voted to give legal status and a pathway to citizenship for those Dreamers.

The situation these kids find themselves in is yet another example of how broken and convoluted our immigration system is. The Border Security and Immigration Reform Act would have allowed all of those who were eligible under the Obama Administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy to receive a six-year, indefinitely renewable, legal status. After five years, they would be able to apply for a green card, which gives them permanent legal status and an opportunity to apply for citizenship.

This legislation also focused on helping keep families together by focusing preferential visas on the nuclear family. We also should not be separating minors from their parents at the border. This legislation makes needed clarifications to court decisions that led in part to the heartbreaking situation we’ve watched unfold on the border this year.

Further, it provides up to $7 billion for family residence centers to ensure we are able to properly house and care for families while asylum claims are processed at the border.

America’s legal immigration system, like other federal bureaucracies, is in need of reform, and it is past time for Congress to act on this issue to secure our borders and provide certainty to those who were brought here illegally as children through no fault of their own. The Border Security and Immigration Reform Act would have gone a long way towards strengthening our border security and making needed fixes to our immigration policies. While this legislation failed to pass the House, I remain committed to making these much needed reforms.

It is an honor to represent you in the U.S. Congress.

Best regards,

Greg Walden

U.S. Representative

Oregon’s Second District


 

Sherman County eNews #201

CONTENTS

  1. Moving in the Right Direction

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1

  3. Long Hollow Fire Update, July 29

  4. More Substation Fire Thank You Notes

  5. Post-Fire Resources for Wasco and Sherman County

  6. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Moving in the Right Direction

If you are busier than you would like to be, but also less productive, then read on.

Here is a question for you: How busy are you these days? Now, here’s another question: How productive are you? As most of us know, the two just aren’t the same. All too often, being busy may have nothing at all to do with the results we get and what we achieve.

We spend our days, often very long days, in a flurry of activity. But, when the day or week is over, we’re disappointed at the level of our accomplishment. Our disappointment creates stress and we push ourselves even harder to “get more done.” However, pushing hard isn’t the answer, either.

So, what is the answer? With experience, we find a sense of priorities based on a clear purpose and well-defined short- and long-term goals are what we need. The world is full of folks who are definitely in motion, but they’re not exactly sure where they’re going. And, they don’t know why, either. Perhaps they get going so fast that they never take the time to figure it out. If that’s your situation, perhaps it is time to set aside some a few moments for personal reflection, some values clarification and goal-setting.

There’s nothing like a strong sense of purpose, based on clearly spelled out values, to keep you moving. But more than that, it keeps you moving in the right direction. Without it, as the saying goes, “You can climb the ladder of success, but when you get to the top, you may find that it’s leaning against the wrong building!”

There is enough stress in the world that we don’t need to manufacture more for ourselves. Take the time and space to discover what accomplishment truly means, for you. Understand the difference between accomplishment and “busy-ness” for the sake of looking busy. Give yourself the opportunity to discover a new truth, for you. ~The Pacific Institute


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1

church.family1The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 1 @ the Rufus Baptist Church.

Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting. Come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.  Thank You, Red Gibbs 


3. Long Hollow Fire Update for Monday, July 30

The fire burning 5 miles south of Dufur, is now reported at 34,550 acres in size and 58% contained according to InciWeb.


4. More Substation Fire Thank You Notes 

GRATEFUL. July 21st: I’m sitting in my truck watching our combine run for the first time in days. I’ve had time to gather my exhausted thoughts. As the Substation Fire headed towards our farm the calls started coming in offering help, food, water and trailers to move our animals and texts offering support and prayers. I began to realize how truly lucky Chris & I really are. I’ve also decided it’s time to stop watching the news and remember how many truly wonderful people there are in this world. We are forever grateful for the efforts of our friends and neighbors as we worked together in this battle. Thank you! Chris & Carrie Kaseberg 

THANK YOU! The Substation Fire. A bit past our fire-fighting years, we are so grateful for everyone who expressed concern and offered help and for the one who insisted upon our evacuation (however briefly) during this fire as it raged toward our families, crops and homes. We thank our family members, neighbors, farmers, friends and rural fire district volunteers who braved extremely dangerous conditions with grit and determination, shovels, tractors, trucks and water tanks. We’re grateful for road department personnel and equipment, local and state law enforcement officers, local officials, and state and federal fire-fighting teams and officials… and people helping people in so many ways! ~Larry and Sherry Kaseberg

THANK YOU! Thank you firefighters and neighbors for your amazing job of saving homes and crops during Substation fire. YOU ROCK. ~Kenton Mathewson & Nancy Allen


5. Post-Fire Resources for Wasco and Sherman County

~Regional Solutions Office, Governor Kate Brown

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown asked her Regional Solutions Team to pull together a document to outline resources for individuals, families, farms, and businesses affected by the recent fires in Oregon. This document contains thoughts and resources for working with insurance agents, rebuilding lost homes, and accessing resources for agricultural producers and other businesses.

If you have immediate needs that are not covered on this sheet, please call 2-1-1 or go to http://211info.org.

Gov. Brown’s coordinator for the region, Nate Stice, can discuss additional issues and concerns related to recovery and can be reached at Nate.Stice@oregon.gov.

Call your insurance agent

Important reminder: Remember to reach out to your insurance agent as soon as possible to start the claims process. Whether for crops, or personal or business property losses, policies require starting a claim within a certain period of time. For example, crop insurance often requires claims within 72 hours of the loss.

If you need help or have questions about your insurance, the Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation provides free consumer advocacy help for Oregonians who have questions or complaints about their insurance. You can contact a consumer advocate at 888-877-4894.

More information: dfr.oregon.gov.

Housing/Rebuilding Resources

  • If you have lost your home and have immediate disaster needs, please contact the Red Cross at 888-680-1455 (toll-free) and the Salvation Army at 541-296-6417.
  • In most cases, homeowner and renter insurance will pay for your additional living expenses as a result of loss of use to your home due to the fire. This includes meals, fuel, and housing. Be sure to keep your receipts and talk with your agent about, “Additional Living Expenses.”

Lower income Oregonians (less than 200 percent Federal Poverty Guidelines) whose (primary) homes have been damaged or destroyed by wildfire are eligible to receive up to $7,000 of assistance. Contact: wildfire.relief@oregon.gov; 503-986-2000

  • More information: https://www.oregon.gov/ohcs/pages/wildfire-damage-housing-relief-program.aspx
  • The state and county are working to help streamline and coordinate a process for rebuilding. If you lost your home or any other structure during the fire, please reach out to Wasco County Planning at 541-506-2560 prior to rebuilding.
  • The Small Business Administration, through its Office of Disaster Assistance, can provide low-interest disaster loans to business of all sizes, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners, and renters to repair or replace real estate, personal property, machinery and equipment, inventory, and business assets that have been damaged or destroyed in a declared disaster. The SBA loan process requires a disaster declaration, which is not yet in place. We will update this information if the program is activated. https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/
  • The Tri-County Household Hazardous Waste and Recycling Program can help assess and, in some cases, remove of household hazardous waste materials and items that can be recycled. For materials management guidance, please call 541-506-2636.
  • If you have lost a home or other structure, individuals may be entitled to property tax relief. Please contact the Wasco County Assessors’ Office at 541-506-2510. More information at https://goo.gl/LNkHSK

Crop Loss and Management

  • It is important to start your claims process with your agent as soon as possible for both federal and private crop insurance. There is some concern about the availability of this program for the Substation Fire. Oregon’s Congressional Offices and Gov. Brown are working to secure access for federal programs. Even with this uncertainty, it is important to start the claims process with 72 hours of your loss.
    • The USDA Farm Service Agency has a variety of programs and loans that may come in to play after a wildfire to help crop and livestock losses and lost fencing. For more information on these programs, visit fsa.usda.gov/disaster or contact your local FSA office. Wasco County FSA Office: 541-298-8559, Ext. 2
    • Sherman County FSA Office: 541-565-3551, Ext. 2

Proper management of lands after a fire are critical and several state and local partners can help farmers access technical resources and assistance after a fire. The Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) and Soil and Water Conservation Districts have funds available in the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP) and small grant programs to provide financial assistance with erosion control and restoration after the wildfires in Sherman and Wasco County. They can also provide technical assistance. If interested contact NRCS as soon as possible. Wasco County Office: 541-298-8559

Sherman County Office: 541-565-3551

  • The Extension Service in Wasco and Sherman counties is your link to Oregon State University and can provide technical assistance to farmers and ranchers after the fire. Extension county agents are Oregon State University faculty members who extend the university to Wasco and Sherman County residents. The Extension Service also keeps the university informed about research and informational needs of the community. County faculty bring the university to you. Wasco County Extension Office: 541-296-5494
  • Sherman County Extension Office: 541-565-3230

Business and employment disruptions

People experience often employment or business disruption as a result of disasters. Several tools and resources may come into play for such losses.

If you have business property loss or experienced interruptions to your business because of the fire, you may be covered by your business insurance. Speak with your agent and check to see if you have business property insurance and business interruption insurance. These benefits can pay to replace your lost equipment, help pay for payroll, and even pay for a temporary work space while you rebuild.

  • The CGCC Small Business Development Center can provide technical assistance to help your business come up with a recovery plan and assess economic injury. This includes: Summarizing past performance in a format more understandable to lenders, insurance companies, and other programs that provide resources to businesses impacted; Developing cash flow forecasts moving forward; Understanding documentation requirements for various loan and grant applications

Counseling is confidential and at no charge to the affected businesses. Call 541-506-6121.

Potential lending sources for business or farms The SBA, through its Office of Disaster Assistance, can provide low-interest disaster loans to business of all sizes, private nonprofit organizations, homeowners, and renters to repair or replace real estate, personal property, machinery and equipment, inventory, and business assets that have been damaged or destroyed in a declared disaster. The SBA loan process requires a disaster declaration, which is not yet in place. We will update this information if the program is activated. https://disasterloan.sba.gov/ela/

  • The Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD) provides loans for the financing needs of small businesses. The average loan size is approximately $75,000. To discuss loan terms or for more information, visit MCEDD’s website at https://www.mcedd.org/financing/business-loans/ or contact Eric Nerdin at eric@mcedd.org or 541-296-2266.
  • Business Oregon also offers flexible loan products for traded sector business (not farms). Interested businesses should call Tom Schnell at 541-280-1631.
  • Connect with Worksource Oregon to discuss strategies to stabilize and maintain a relationship with your employees. The Oregon Employment Department offers a variety of programs to help employers and employees. Employees experiencing a temporary layoff can file an unemployment insurance claims. For eligibility information, or to file an unemployment insurance claim, call 1-877-345-3484 (toll-free) or visit us online Oregon Employment Department.
  • The Oregon Work Share program can help while allowing an employer and employee to maintain a relationship and avoid a layoff. Employers must apply for a Work Share plan by contacting the UI Special Programs Center at 1-800-436-6191 (toll-free) or you can learn more about the program online at OregonWorkShare.org
  • Contact or visit your local WorkSource Oregon Center. The Dalles: 541-296-5435
  • Hood River: 541-386-6300
  • Hermiston:541-567-3381
  • Redmond: 541-548-8196

6. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017The Library is open Summer Hours -11am-7pm Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm Saturday

Community Preschool Storytime – Every Tuesday at 10am
Join us for Preschool Storytime and crafts. Ages 0-6.

Music and Movement – Saturday, August 4 at 10:00 and the first Saturday of every month.  Join the fun of creative play, rhyme and rhythm while fine tuning motor skills and coordination. Ages 0-6

CANCELED – Signs for kids, we have rescheduled the Summer Reading Party instead!

Summer Reading Party – August 11 from 11am to 3pm.
Come any time from 11am to 3pm to claim your prizes and enjoy ice cream! Adam Miller will perform at 3:00 pm

Adam Miller presents Old Songs for Young Folks – Saturday, August 11, 2018 at 3pm
It wasn’t that long ago when only kings and queens were rich enough to have other people play music for them. In the old days, regular folks like you and me had to make our own music. That’s why it’s called “folk music!”

Young Adult Night – Thursday, August 2 from 6pm to 8pm
Jr/Sr high students, come hang out, eat snacks, do crafts, watch a movie or start a book club, we decide! Come help plan our new young adult space!!

August’s Book Club book is Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng:
From the bestselling author of Everything I Never Told You, a riveting novel that traces the intertwined fates of the picture-perfect Richardson family and the enigmatic mother and daughter who upend their lives.

In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

Enter Mia Warren – an enigmatic artist and single mother – who arrives in this idyllic bubble with her teenaged daughter Pearl, and rents a house from the Richardsons. Soon Mia and Pearl become more than tenants: all four Richardson children are drawn to the mother-daughter pair. But Mia carries with her a mysterious past and a disregard for the status quo that threatens to upend this carefully ordered community.

When old family friends of the Richardsons attempt to adopt a Chinese-American baby, a custody battle erupts that dramatically divides the town–and puts Mia and Elena on opposing sides. Suspicious of Mia and her motives, Elena is determined to uncover the secrets in Mia’s past. But her obsession will come at unexpected and devastating costs.

Little Fires Everywhere explores the weight of secrets, the nature of art and identity, and the ferocious pull of motherhood – and the danger of believing that following the rules can avert disaster.

Give us a call, email or stop by to reserve your copy, available in large print and audiobook by request. Book Club will meet Thursday, August 16, 2018 at 6pm.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbColumbia Generating Station

Energy Northwest 

Sherman County Facebook Public Group

South Sherman Fire & Rescue

Citizens In Liberal Oregon Push Back Hard Against Their Pro-Sanctuary City State Government

Stop Oregon Sanctuaries!

Current Indicators of Farm Sector Financial Health

Fourth-Warmest Year on Record? The Devil’s in the Details

 Fight for the Value of Your Citizenship

The IRS Has Rehired Hundreds of Fired Employees. Congress Should Step In.


 

Sherman County eNews #200

CONTENTS

  1. Employment: Assistant Child Care Provider

  2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1

  3. Long Hollow Fire Alert, Level 1

  4. Central Oregon Fire Information: Long Hollow Fire

  5. Ag groups seek donations for Oregon wildfire victims

  6. Survey: Top and Least Important Benefits among Members of Cultural Organizations

  7. Communicating Expectations

  8. Eating in the Fifties


In To Kill a Mockingbird, Atticus Finch told Scout, “You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view, until you climb inside of his skin and walk around in it.” This is the essence of empathy. You can’t understand someone until you’ve walked a mile in his shoes.
~AmericanThinker


1. Employment: Assistant Child Care Provider

Assistant Child Care Provider:  Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco.  Experience preferred but will train.  Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours.  For application and further details: call 541-442-5024 or email to: abchuskies@yahoo.comEmployment Application is available on our website at  http://www.abchuskiesdaycare.com. ~Sherman County Child Care Foundation


2. All County Prayer Meeting, Wednesday, Aug. 1 

The All County Prayer Meeting is Wednesday August 1 @ the Rufus Baptist Church,

Fellowship starts at 6:30 PM, Pray time starts at 7:00 PM and ends at 8:30 PM. Everyone is welcome to come and join the meeting. Come and join in when you can get there and stay as long as you can.  Thank You, Red Gibbs


3. Long Hollow Fire Alert, Level 1

This is a message from Frontier Regional Alert serving Gilliam, Jefferson, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties:

All Sherman County, everyone south of Rutledge Lane is a level 1…
Submitted:
Frontier Regional 911

[See Sherman County Emergency Services at https://www.facebook.com/Sherman-County-Emergency-Services-172894456734701/?hc_ref=ARQqL_p0MXHQJK06oQaiBHqEuIH6AlfuzvhxqqNzsGB9P-L9II35alCCbcL_mPa3vG0 and South Sherman Fire & Rescue at https://www.facebook.com/South-Sherman-Fire-and-Rescue-1006428939421956/]


4. Central Oregon Fire Information: Long Hollow Fire

http://www.centraloregonfire.org/ 


5. Ag groups seek donations for Oregon wildfire victims

Oregon agricultural groups are asking their members to aid farmers and ranchers who lost crops, livestock, equipment and feed to the wildfires that have swept across parts of the state. A fund has also been established for the family of the farmer who died while cutting a fire line to protect a neighbor’s property.

Both the Oregon Farm Bureau and the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association have efforts underway to raise money for the victims. The cattlemen’s association is also collecting hay, equipment and supplies for the victims.

“Please, please, please consider donating to help out the farmers devastated by the Substation Fire,” Kathy Freeborn Hadley of the Oregon Farm Bureau wrote in a Facebook post.

“Rural Oregonians support their neighbors, as we saw by the immediate action taken by many heroic farmers who worked alongside first-responders to put out the Substation Fire,” said Anne Marie Moss, Farm Bureau communications director, in a press release.

The wind-driven Substation Fire burned 123 square miles of north-central Oregon — much of it farms and ranch land — before it was brought under control late this week.

A farmer, 64-year-old John Ruby, died as he was plowing a fire line in an effort to protect his neighbor’s property, and growers lost upwards of 2 million bushels of wheat to the flames. That’s about 25 percent of the area’s wheat crop.

“It is with heavy hearts that we continue to witness the mass destruction and devastation caused by wildfires that continue to rage across Oregon, affecting ranching families,” the cattlemen’s association said in a press release. “Not only have these ranchers lost horses, feed and beef cattle, one farmer lost his life trying to prevent fire from spreading.

“We ask Oregon ranchers to come together and support their fellow ranching families in this time of need,” the group said.

To donate to the wildfire relief, go to the Oregon Cattlemen’s Association Stewardship Fund at https://orcattle.com/donate/ and click on “Donation-Stewardship Fund.” Under purpose, click “Fire Assistance Fund.” Funds raised will be given to a wildfire relief fund.

“The surviving cattle and ranching families are in desperate need of essentials like hay and fencing,” the OCA said. To make a donation of fencing, material, hay, trucking or time, email OCA Communications Director Robyn Smith at robyn.smith@orcattle.com.

“We are working hard to build a relief effort team and would appreciate any assistance we can get,” the organization said.

Checks made out to the “Oregon Farm Bureau Fire Relief Fund” can be mailed to the Oregon Farm Bureau, c/o Patty Kuester, 1320 Capitol St. NE, Salem, OR 97301. The OFB and Wasco County Farm Bureau will work together to decide where to best use funds that are received.

For those wanting to help the family of John Ruby, the farmer who died, Columbia Bank in The Dalles has set up a fund. Donations can be sent to Columbia Bank, 316 E Third St., The Dalles, OR 97058. Call 541-298-6647 for more information.

~The Capital Press http://www.capitalpress.com/Livestock/20180727/cattlemens-group-seeks-aid-for-oregon-wildfire-victims?utm_source=Capital+Press&utm_campaign=b137adaad3-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_27_05_28&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_3bfe2c1612-b137adaad3-244947097


6. Survey: Top and Least Important Benefits among Members of Cultural Organizations

Check out this interesting article on survey results for the top benefits and least important benefits among members to cultural organizations in the U.S. paying equal or less than $250 per year for their membership: https://www.colleendilen.com/2018/07/25/important-membership-benefits-data/#.W1nqWUHuqZE.facebook.

Turns out, supporting the organization’s mission matters a lot to members. There is also a breakdown of millennial specific data. If membership is a hot topic in your organization, check out this article and see if it might add to your discussion.


7. Communicating Expectations

What do you expect from your kids? How do you communicate your expectations to them? Today, let’s talk about what’s reasonable and what’s not.

All parents expect certain things from their children. But expectations that are too high, too low, or never clearly expressed can lead to trouble. Having expectations that are too high promotes failure rather than success and leads to an enormous amount of stress for both you and your kids. We want to avoid the “I will never measure up,” syndrome that interrupts trying before it ever gets started.

On the other hand, expectations that are too low can lead to failure, too, because they don’t help your children to stretch their capacities and develop a sense of competence and resiliency. Reasonable, higher expectations also allow children the opportunity to discover more of who they are and what they can do. It’s realizing potential and getting the positive feedback from that discovery.

And here is a vital component to the process: Make sure you talk to your kids about your expectations and spell them out as clearly as possible. If you expect them to clean their room once a week, make sure they understand exactly what “clean” means and which day of the week they need to have it done by. At the same time, tailor your expectations so that they are realistic and appropriate to that particular child at that particular stage of their development.

What’s right for one doesn’t necessarily fit another and what was reasonable ten years ago may no longer make much sense today. And remember, the only failure is in not trying. Even a modest success is the foundation for a positive learning experience.

By the way, if you expect your kids to share certain values you cherish – such as honesty, confidence, and dependability – make sure you serve as a good role model. Even when they may not seem to be listening to what you say, you can bet they are paying close attention to what you do.

P.S. Everything above goes for the workplace, as well. Clearly expressed expectations drive clear and well-understood goals, which then return excellence in performance and results. Leadership drives the organizational culture. So if you want honest, confident and dependable employees and team members, they will be looking to you as their example. ~The Pacific Institute


8. Eating in the Fifties

Pasta had not been invented. It was macaroni or spaghetti.

Curry was a surname.

A take-away was a mathematical problem.

Pizza? Sounds like a leaning tower somewhere.

Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas time.

All chips were plain.

Oil was for lubricating; fat was for cooking.

Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves and never green.

Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.

Chickens didn’t have fingers in those days.

None of us had ever heard of yogurt.

Healthy food consisted of anything edible.

Cooking outside was called camping.

Seaweed was not a recognized food.

‘Kebab’ was not even a word, never mind a food.

Sugar enjoyed a good press in those days, and was regarded as being white gold.

Prunes were medicinal.

Surprisingly muesli was readily available. It was called cattle feed.

Pineapples came in chunks in a tin; we had only ever seen a picture of a real one.

Water came out of the tap. If someone had suggested bottling it and charging more than gasoline for it, they would have become a laughing stock.

The one thing that we never ever had on/at our table in the fifties …

was elbows, hats and cell phones!

~Unattributed


 

Sherman County eNews #199

CONTENTS

  1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

  2. CLASSIFIEDS

  3. CALENDAR


1. SPIRITUAL MATTERS

Moro Community Church in the Park, Picnic & BBQ, July 29

All are invited to

Community Picnic & BBQ

Moro City Park

Hosted by Moro Community Church

Sunday, July 29th

10:45 am – Church in the Park

12:00 n – 1:30 pm – BBQ & Picnic

1:30 pm – Clean-up/take down

If you wish, bring a salad, chips, or dessert to share.

Hamburgers, hot dogs, condiments, drinks & paper goods will be provided.


2. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

memo.pencilREMINDERS:

CLASSIFIED ADS, NOTICES & NEWS: Please! No posters or flyers.

CLASSIFIED ADS. Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

 THANK YOU! The list of people to thank is longer than my arm. If I had to point to one person, Zack Blalock saved our house.  Thank you!! To all, Thank You. ~The McLeods

THANK YOU! A huge THANK YOU to all the friends, neighbors, and many, many firefighters (both local and from all over Oregon) who monitored the situation on Gordon Ridge and were able to save structures and wheat fields.  Someone plowed our field on the corner by the Quonset hut.  Thank you!  All your hard work also helped to save Mark and Dee’s home.  That means a lot to us as well.  It is a blessing to live here.  ~Mary and Bo Macnab

APPRECIATION TO THE FIREFIGHTERS. Once again, we must thank so many, Friends and Neighbors who stopped their harvest to fight fire and, of course, all of the Fire Departments and personnel. It was only through your perseverance (throughout the night) that kept our homes and crops safe. We are so grateful and appreciative for your time and equipment for extremely dangerous, hard work. To the general public we call upon your support to help prevent fires that happen much too often, endangering many lives. Thank you! ~McKinney Ranch, Jean & Mac, Bryan & Kim

 THANK YOU! We wish to express our sincere thanks to the many who assisted in defending our property near the Deschutes River from the fire on Wednesday, July 18. The efforts of local and out of area fire departments, farmers, friends, neighbors, local residents, and the dedicated work of those who provided tractors and equipment to help fight this fire in extremely dangerous conditions made it possible for all the buildings on our property to be saved. Words cannot describe our gratitude for all the expressions of concern and encouragement, along with the incredible outpouring of prayer for us and all others affected by this event. May God bless you all. ~Ron & Jenine McDermid

 THANK YOU! Two simple words that mean so very much! Dwight and I want to thank our family, friends, and neighbors, as well as all the firefighters who helped fight, not only our harvest fire, but also the fire that threatened Sherman County. A big thank you to everyone who worked so tirelessly throughout the day and night to keep our home safe. When something like this happens we truly see the definition of “Community” in action. Again, we want to express our heartfelt appreciation. ~Dwight and Charmayn Alley

THANK YOU! Sherman County Court would like to give our sincerest thank you to all of those who helped keep our beloved Community and County safe during the wildfire that swept through our lands during the past week. To the Fire Departments, firefighters, farmers, locals, and other agencies who banded together during this time of crisis, words cannot fully express the gratitude from the Community and County for the time, effort, dedication, equipment use, and resources it took to keep us all safe throughout the dangerous conditions set before you. The swift coordination and organization by all parties involved as you jumped into action, was appreciated and will not be forgotten. Our deepest sympathy goes out to those who are suffering various magnitudes of loss during this time.

THANK YOU!! We are extremely grateful for all the neighbors, friends and North Sherman RFPD who responded to the recent fire on the Kent Thomas property. A tree caught fire after making contact with a power line and, with the help of a strong west wind, flames quickly spread to the nearby pasture and further east into a chem fallow field. Thanks to the hard work of folks with tractors/discs, a multitude of water tanks and the fire department, the situation was quickly controlled and overall damage was kept to a minimum. We would also like to thank the Sherman County Sheriff’s Department for investigating the situation so promptly. We feel blessed to live in a community where folks drop everything to help others in a crisis situation. Thank you so much!! ~ Kent & Melva Thomas and Chris & Carrie Kaseberg

THANK YOU! The Olsen Family wishes their heartfull thanks to each and everyone who helped during the Substation Fire which reached our property in Sherman County. We are so thankful for all of the neighbors- friends- family- equipment- fire fighters-calls-concern-offers of help. Support was amazing! ~Bob & Mavis, Rob & Theresa, Bruce & Synoma Olsen


THANK YOU, FIRE FIGHTERS! Many thanks to neighbors, fire departments, and the crews who fought the lightning fire on the fields around our buildings at the Jackknife fire. Your hard work saved our home, out-buildings, and cattle once again. We are so grateful to you for all your hard work and generosity. ~Jim and Joyce Brown & Bill and Jill Martin

JOYFUL NEWS!

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:  

EMPLOYMENT: 

SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS. Mid-Columbia Bus Company needs school bus drivers. No experience necessary. Paid training. 401K. Hiring bonuses up to $350. Flexible hours. Holidays off. Please call today: 541-442-5723.

FOR SALE:

MORO PROPERTY. NEW PRICE OF $44,900.00 A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. RMLS# 17410095. Contact tiffany@drysideproperty.com 9/28

UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED OUTDOOR FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS AND FURNITURE REHABILITATION: Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other local reclaimed materials. Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 |https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com 7/27

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

BRAND NEW HOUSE FOR RENT IN RUFUS, OREGON
* It is a beautiful new house built in 2018, located in Gorge Vista Development. Enjoy this home with all the surrounding view of the Columbia River Gorge. It has an open living room plan for your comfort.
* It has 3 bedrooms located upstairs. The master bedroom has its own bathroom, while the other two rooms share one bath.
* Take advantage of this opportunity, if you love the river, the trails and fishing, this house could be a good option.
* This house comes fully furnished. The price is $1600 per month, utilities included.
* For more information, call this number: 541-340-1773.  7/27 

FREE:

SERVICES:

LOCAL HANDYMAN, GENERAL CONTRACTOR & EQUIPMENT OPERATOR. Large and small projects, indoors or out. Furniture repair & refinishing. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 7/27

NEWSPAPERS

  • The Times-Journal – a weekly serving Wheeler, Gilliam & Sherman counties, P.O. Box 746, Condon, OR 97823 | Ph. 541-384-2421 | FAX Fax 541-384-2411 timesjournal1886@gmail.com $35/year

VISITOR INFORMATION:

 

WANTED:

LOCAL HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS. Non-profit ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION, and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 8/24


3. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

sun.circleJULY

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Linda Krasfic’s Baby Quilts

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

27 Lunar Eclipse

28 Show ‘n Shine Car Show 9 Earl Snell Park in Arlington, Oregon

28 WWI Began 1914

28 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

29 Moro Community Church in the Park, Picnic & BBQ 10:45 Moro City Park

30 Post Fire Resources Open House 4-7 Fort Dalles Readiness Center, 402 E Scenic Dr,

30-Aug. 3 Pacific NW Plein Air Paint Out

30-Aug. 25 Pacific NW Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge

31 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Post Fire Resources Open House 4-7 Sherman County School

wheat.blwh1AUGUST

1 Sherman County Court 9

1 Gilliam County Court 10

1 Wheeler County Court 10

1 All County Prayer Meeting, Rufus Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

1-4 Union County Fair, LaGrande

1-5 Deschutes County Fair, Redmond

1-31 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families – Sherman Historical Museum

1-31 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Abbey Phelps, Knitting & Fiber Arts

2 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 NORCOR

2 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

3 Jawbone Flats Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

3 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot.

3 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

4 Class: Learn to Love Your Sewing Machine 10-12 Wasco School Events Center

4 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

4 Plein Air Reception 5-7 Maryhill Museum of Art

4 Music & Movement for ages 0 to 6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

4 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

4 Art Walk in Moro: Wool Spinners & Quilts

4-11 Wallowa County Fair, Enterprise

4-5 Shaniko Days

6 Grass Valley City Council 7

6-10 Sherman County Summer Drama Day Camp

7 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

7 Vietnam War Began 1964

7 Moro City Council 7

7-10 Baker County Fair, Baker City

7-11 Umatilla County Fair, Hermiston

8 Sherman County Community & Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

8 Rufus City Council 7

8-11 Crook County Fair, Prineville

8-11 Yakima Valley Fair & Rodeo, Grandview

8-12 Wheeler County Fair & Rodeo, Fossil

9 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 My Little Pony

10 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

11 Sherman County Public/School Library: Signs for Kids Just in Time for Fair 11

11 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Helicopters

11-12 Equine Mania, LLC Advanced Cattle Sorting Clinic, Wasco, Oregon

14 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

14 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

16 Sherman County Public/School Library Young Adult Night 6-8

17-18 Sherman Class of ’68 Reunion

18 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

20 Eastern Oregon Regional Tourism Gathering 10-3 Silvies Valley Ranch

20-26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Activities Every Day

21 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

21 Wasco City Council 7

21-26 Sherman County Fair & Rodeo, Moro

23 Sherman County Public/School Library Movie Night 6 Pacific Rim Uprising

23-26 Wasco County Fair, Tygh Valley

27 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11

28 Community Story Time for ages 0-6 at 10 Sherman County Public/School Library

28 Craft Day 11-3 Sherman County Public/School Library

31 Movie Nights 8:30 Bring your chairs to Moro City Hall parking lot

31-Sept.2 Maryhill Windwalk: Gravity Games – Historic Maryhill Loops.

alphabet blackboardSEPTEMBER

1 Art Walk in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 10-1 Main Street in Moro

1 Sherman County Mobile Farmers’ Market 2-4 RR Depot in Wasco

1 Street Dance in Moro 5-10

1 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

1 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9

1-30 Blue Star Museum: Free admission for active military personnel & families / Sherman Historical Museum

1-30 Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series: Photographs John Day Dam, 50 years Ago

2 V-J Day WW II Japanese Surrender 1945

3 Labor Day

4 Sherman County School Classes Resume

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 Moro City Council 7

5 All County Prayer Meeting, Moro Presbyterian Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

6 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 Sherman County Courthouse Dedication 11

8 Maryhill Museum’s Annual Benefit Auction, Paradise Rose Dinner

8-9 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Hood River Fly-In

9 Grandparents Day. Free Admission at Sherman County Historical Museum 10-5

11 Patriot Day & National Day of Service & Remembrance

11 North Central Public Health District Board of Directors Meeting 2

11 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Committee 12:30

12 Rufus City Council 7

14 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

15 Maryhill Museum Library Storytime 11

18 Cottonwood Experience Center Ribbon Cutting

18 Wasco City Council 7 City Hall

22 Smithsonian Museum Day Live at Maryhill Museum tickets at www.smithsonianmag.com/museumday/museum-day-live-2017

22 “Back to School” Night Fund Raiser for the Wasco School Events Center

22 Romanian Cultural Festival at Maryhill Museum 10-5

23 Autumn Begins

24 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10

28 Association of Oregon Counties Disrict 3 Meeting, Wasco County

29 Tango at Maryhill Museum 6-9


 

Sherman County eNews #198

CONTENTS

  1. Farm Bureau Fund to Support Substation Fire Farmers & Ranchers

  2. Post-Fire Resources Open House, July 30 & 31

  3. Shaniko Days, August 4-5

  4. Market Beets: Your Farmers’ Market eNews

  5. Grass Valley Man Loses Life in Single Motorcycle Crash on I-84 near Mosier

  6. Knowledge and Wisdom Gained

  7. Sherman County Court News, June 20


Be impeccable with your words.
Don’t take anything personally.
Don’t make assumptions.
Always do your best.
~The Four Agreements, Don Miguel Ruiz


1. Farm Bureau Fund to Support Substation Fire Farmers & Ranchers

Farm Bureau has established a fund to provide support to farmers and ranchers impacted by the recent Substation Fire.

“Rural Oregonians support their neighbors, as we saw by the immediate action taken by many heroic farmers who worked alongside first-responders to put out the Substation Fire,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

“We established a fund so members of the Farm Bureau family and others could contribute and provide some relief to those most impacted by the devastating wildfire,” she said.  

To contribute, make a check out to “Farm Bureau Fire Relief Fund” and send to Oregon Farm Bureau, c/o Patty Kuester, 1320 Capitol St. NE, Salem, OR  9730.

The Oregon Farm Bureau Board of Directors, in consultation with Wasco County Farm Bureau, will decide how to best use funds received.

For those wanting to help the family of John Ruby, the farmer who died while cutting a fire line to protect a neighbor’s place, Columbia Bank in The Dalles has a fund specifically for that family. Columbia Bank, 316 E 3rd St, The Dalles, OR 97058, 541.298.6647.


2. Post-Fire Resources Open House, July 30 & 31

toolbox4Local, state, and federal partners will hold two open houses to connect fire impacted families and communities with relevant federal, state, and local programs and information.

The open houses will include information on:
• Rebuilding lost homes/structures
• Working with insurance claims on crop and other property loss
• Technical and financial information on crop management, post fire
• And other resources

Date: July 30
Time: 4pm-7pm
Location: Fort Dalles Readiness Center, 402 E Scenic Dr, The Dalles, OR 97058

Date: July 31
Time: 4pm-7pm
Location: Sherman County School, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039

Participating agencies include Oregon State University, Sherman County, Wasco County, DCBS Consumer & Business Services, Wasco County Conservation District, Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District, Worksource Oregon, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, U.S. Small Business Administration, America’s SBDC Oregon and U.S. Department of Agriculture.

If you represent an agency interested in participating, please email Nate Stice,
nate.stice@oregon.gov
Office of the Governor
160 State Capitol, 900 Court St. NE
Salem, OR 97301


3. Shaniko Days, August 4-5

WANTED:

You!

For Shaniko Days

August 4-5, 2018, Shaniko, Oregon 

SATURDAY

Parade 10 am

  Mud Springs Gospel Band 11am

Sunshine Exchange Cloggers 1 pm & 2:30 pm at Schoolhouse

                       Ragtime & Vintage Music in Stagecoach Station

          Bluegrass & more, Two Bands 3:30 to 7 pm

(Phoenix Duo and Keening Foxhounds)

Bakes Sale, Raffles, Kiddie Train rides & Black Powder Gunfights throughout the day.

Street Dance 7 to 10 pm

SUNDAY:

Church in the Schoolhouse 10 am

Vendors, Shops, Museums downtown & Toy & Game Museum in the school all weekend

Sponsors:  City of Shaniko, Shaniko Chamber of Commerce &

The Shaniko Preservation Guild.  For info call City at 541-489-3434

REWARD: A Blast in the Past


4. Market Beets: Your Farmers’ Market eNews

The Gorge Grown Mobile Market brings 100% locally grown produce to communities throughout the Gorge with stops in the Heights, Odell, Lyle, Cascade Locks, Klickitat, Wasco and Moro. The Mobile Market accepts WIC and Senior FDNP vouchers, Veggie Rx, Debit and Credit Cards and SNAP EBT. SNAP customers can receive an additional $10 to spend at the Market. See more & subscribe here: https://mailchi.mp/33f5e3166056/market-beets-your-farmers-market-e-news?e=8791fa8984  


 5. Grass Valley Man Loses Life in Single Motorcycle Crash on I-84 near Mosier

~Oregon State Police July 26th, 2018 9:53 AM

On Wednesday, July 25th at approximately 6:47AM, OSP Troopers from The Dalles responded to the report of a single motorcycle crash westbound on I 84 near milepost 69, which is just west of Mosier in Wasco County.

OSP and Hood River Medics arrived at the scene within 15 minutes of the reported crash.  The operator of the motorcycle was determined to have succumbed to injuries sustained in the crash.  Preliminary investigation revealed the operator, 60 year old Mike Layton WALLACE, was traveling westbound in the slow lane at or just below the speed limit.  A witness who was following WALLACE, observed him reach back towards a saddle bag along the left rear side of the motorcycle when he lost control and began to wobble back and forth.  WALLACE was ejected off the motorcycle and came to rest along the shoulder.  The motorcycle continued to travel under its own power before stopping along the center median approximately 1000 feet from WALLACE.

Distracted driving appears to be the cause of this crash.  It was also determined WALLACE was not utilizing a DOT approved helmet, however this did not factor into WALLACE’s injuries.  The freeway was limited to one lane of travel for approximately 2 ½ hours as the investigation was completed.  The Oregon State Police was assisted by Hood River Fire, Mosier Rural Fire and the Oregon Department of Transportation. 


6. Knowledge and Wisdom Gained

What is a mentor? What is it that mentors do? Can having a mentor help you succeed? Today we’re going to be answering these questions.

These days, there are many sophisticated tools available to help those who want to be successful. But one of the most valuable assets anyone can have is also one of the oldest. What we are talking about is a mentor – someone who can help you learn the ropes, find your way around obstacles, and chart a course that will get you where you want to go.

Just about every successful person you will read about, whether they are in business or one of the professions, sports, the arts, or any other field of endeavor, has had the benefit of at least one mentor. Very often, they’ve had many more than that. In many large corporations, one very successful way to get ahead is to be mentored by someone in a leadership position.

Mentors are people who have achieved success themselves and want to pass along what they’ve learned to others. It’s the knowledge and wisdom gained from experience that are so valuable. (Many organizations have structured mentorship programs as a part of their leadership training.) Mentors don’t usually tell you what to do – that’s not their role – but they do help you weigh your options and think through decisions.

Mentors don’t only exist in large corporations, however. They exist in many areas of society, like the Big Brothers and Big Sisters organization. You, too, could be a mentor to someone looking for a little help in navigating the sometimes-confusing paths of life. Let’s face it. Everyone needs a little help, every once in a while.

So, who are you mentoring and who is mentoring you? ~The Pacific Institute


 7. Sherman County Court News, June 20

ShermanCoLogoSherman County Court

June 20, 2018

Contact: Kayla von Borstel 541-565-3416

USDA Biggs Water System, Workman’s Comp Renewals, Biggs Service District Budget Hearing, Executive Session on Personnel, Executive Session on Exempt Documents, and County Counsel Request for Proposal/Qualifications Document Formation were the main items on the agenda during the June [20]th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Biggs Service District (BSD) entered into a Public Hearing. Local newspapers did not advertise the previous public hearing held, as scheduled for BSD, regarding the BSD Water System project updates to the public. Due to notice failure, another public hearing was set and was currently in session. BSD has a waste water system, with all individuals/businesses connected to private water systems in the area. Those private systems have had some challenges and health related risks that have caused shut downs in the last few years, as well as no fire protection. A larger study was conducted in 2003 to determine what it would take to build a municipal water system in BSD. An application was submitted for United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Rural Development funding for the development of new water supply well and incorporating one to two existing wells as backup, a 400,000 gallon reservoir which will allow enough system pressure to supply the whole system as well as storage and correct flows for fire protection, and a transmission system throughout the entire District. Total project budget was approximately $2.29 million dollars including the additional funds for contingency and administration costs. Carrie Pipinich, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD), has drafted some loan documents which will be sent to USDA and Bond Counsel, to make sure the documents meet all requirements and do not impact taxes and status of the bond regarding interim financing for the BSD Water project. USDA expects a very clear and specific process for how payments will be processed, how invoices from the contractors will be viewed and approved by the various parties required, and in which ways all the parties will be interacting. Being no further business the Public Hearing closed.

Mike Elliot, SAIF Corporation, presented Court a packet regarding their services for Workman’s Compensation. He wanted to inform the County of a program called Log and Learn which allows staff to partake in online trainings through the policy. The Policy Savings Report showed in the last five years the County saved 22%, due to SAIF reviewing all bills that are submitted for workers. The Dividend History section showed last year the County received almost 33% back of the premium paid. Dividend payments are never guaranteed as it depends on SAIF reserves. Dividends are split into two types of dividends, one is based on the premium paid, and the other is based on the County’s loss factor. SAIF is a nonprofit organization and charges only enough to sustain them, and if there are funds left over it goes back to businesses in the form of a dividend. If this year’s renewal is approved, Sherman County will be paying 15.5% less compared to last year. Rates have gone down over the years as everyone seems to be more aware of safety and proper treatment with every passing year. No coverage has changed from last year; the total premium for the County is $37,227.00. County Court motioned to approve payment to SAIF for 2018 – 2019 fiscal year in the amount of $37,227.00.

Biggs Service District Board of Directors entered into a Budget Hearing. Aaron Cook, BSD Administrator spoke to the Biggs Service District (BSD) Board about the BSD budget. Debbie Hayden, Finance Officer, has been a valuable resource to Cook obtaining accurate numbers, and old templates to follow. There are no major changes from last year, with the exception of the addition of the Water fund to the budget, in the event the system was completed and operational in the next fiscal year. It was noted the operations contract in the budget for the water system was $9,000 as a place holder for a six month period. The Reserve fund and the Union Pacific fund were kept, and are available as there has been no need for them thus far. The tax rate will remain the same, and tax revenue was based off last year’s rate as the assessed value is not yet known; it usually increases 1%, however Cook used last year’s rate as he knows that amount is secured to come in at the very least. If additional tax revenue is received, a supplemental budget will be required before those funds can be spent. Being no further business the Budget Hearing was closed. The Board motioned to adopt the Biggs Service District budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year by Resolution No. 2018-01 in the matter of adopting the Biggs Service District budget for the 2018-2019 fiscal year in the total sum of $2,496,484 and imposing taxes provided for the adopted budget at the rate of $4.0061 per $1,000 of assessed value for operations, and that these taxes are hereby imposed and categorized for tax year 2018-2019 upon the assessed value of all taxable property within the Biggs Service District as of July 1, 2018, and authorize the Biggs Service District Board of Directors to sign. The Board motioned to amend to Intergovernmental Agreement contract with the City of Rufus to increase the administration fee from $3,000 to $3,500 effective July 1, 2018, and authorize Judge Thompson to sign.

County Court entered into Executive Session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel. Discussion was held on County Personnel.

County Court entered into executive session in Accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Public Records. Discussion was held on the Continuity of Government Plan documents.

County Court reviewed the draft Request for Proposal (RFP) for Legal Counsel that Kayla von Borstel, Administrative Assistant, had prepared. After brief discussion, County Court agreed to release the RFP through the proper avenues seeking County Counsel to include Biggs Service District as soon as possible. 

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • approved the resolution for interim financing between Biggs Service District and USDA for the Biggs Service District Water System Project in the amount of $1,117,110 and authorize County Court to sign pending Legal Counsel approval.
  • declared as surplus numerous office and building-related items previously utilized by Sherman County departments and deemed no longer to be necessary in the execution of departmental functions, including numerous executive, task, and other miscellaneous chairs; numerous desks of varying configurations; conference tables; wood cabinets; numerous filing cabinets; antique metal storage unit; several miscellaneous tables; large mailbox/ballot box; used doors; toilet/sink unit from former holding cell; TV/monitors and used copier; and other items as determined.
  • approved the volunteer application for Nancy Simpson as a Meals on Wheels driver through the Sherman County Senior Center.
  • approved, as recommended by the Finance Director, a Resolution In the Matter of the County Court Approving the Transfer of Funds Within the County General, Community Transit, Ambulance, Prevention, Community Development, Court Security, Emergency Services, General Road, County Fair, Tri-County Corrections, Wellness Center, Tri-County Veterans’ and Senior Center Funds, and authorize County Court to sign.
  • approved, as recommended by the Finance Director, a Resolution of Inclusion Under the State of Oregon Deferred Compensation Plan, and authorize Judge Thompson to sign.
  • approved the Intergovernmental agreement between Mid-Columbia Economic Development District and Sherman County for Grant Administration services for the Biggs Service District Water System Project for option 2, in the amount of $30,000, and authorize Judge Thompson to sign.
  • authorized County Judge, Gary Thompson, to sign the final Resolution Transferring Funds ending the 2017-2018 fiscal year.
  • approved the Budget Committee minutes of April 23-24, 2018, as amended.
  • approved the Revenue/Expenditure Summary for the month of May 2018, as presented.
  • approved the Treasurer’s Report for the month of May 2018, as presented.

Topics of discussion were ABC Huskies Child Care Thank You Note, Biggs Service District Audit, Biggs Service District Draft Rates Discussion, and Commissioner Reports.


 

Sherman County eNews #197

CONTENTS

  1. Moro Community Church in the Park, Picnic & BBQ, July 29

  2. Letter to the Editor and Residents and Friends of the City of Wasco

  3. Solving Difficult Problems

  4. Space Weather: Lunar Eclipse & Martian Conjunction, July 27

  5. Sherman County Court News, June 6

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center August Meal Menu


As for information received and passed on to others, we could apply the Rotary Club’s four-way test:
• Is it true? 
• Is it fair to all concerned? 
• Will it build goodwill and better friendships? 
• Will it be beneficial to all concerned? 
If the answer is “no” to any of these questions, don’t participate!


1. Moro Community Church in the Park, Picnic & BBQ, July 29

All are invited to

Community Picnic & BBQ

Moro City Park

Hosted by Moro Community Church

Sunday, July 29th

10:45 am – Church in the Park

12:00 n – 1:30 pm – BBQ & Picnic

1:30 pm – Clean-up/take down

If you wish, bring a Salad, Chips, or Dessert to share

(Hamburgers, Hot Dogs, Condiments, drinks & paper goods provided)


2. Letter to the Editor and Residents and Friends of the City of Wasco

July 17, 2018

City of Wasco, Oregon

Dear friends of Wasco, Oregon:

I regret to inform you that I need to resign as the mayor of the city of Wasco. Family circumstances require that I be at home, especially in the evenings.

I have been honored to serve as the mayor of Wasco for the past 3 ½ years. I feel that we, as the council, have worked well together and have addressed and resolved several important issues along with the day to day city issues. So please accept this letter of resignation affective tonight, Tuesday, July 17, 2018. Council president, Eileen Wainwright, will be filling my position until the next election this November 2018

Carol MacKenzie

Mayor, City of Wasco, Oregon


3. Solving Difficult Problems

When you have a complex problem to solve, how do you go about solving it? Here is some information that might help you.

Sometimes, when we have complex or difficult problems to solve, our feelings of being under pressure cause us to push so hard for solutions that we wind up spinning our wheels. We study the problem from every possible angle, collect huge amounts of information, struggle hard and do lots of analysis. Still the answer evades us.

Some of this is because it’s hard for us to tolerate feeling confused for very long. We want certainty, and we want clear answers. However, sometimes it’s better not to push it. Dr. Peter Carruthers, one-time head of theoretical physics at Los Alamos National Laboratory, said that our unconscious (or what we refer to as the subconscious) is an important factor in solving complex problems.

This means that while you certainly need to collect all the information you can, and sometimes literally immerse yourself in the problem, at some point it’s important to back off and leave it alone for a while, trusting that creative, productive mental work will continue even if you’re not aware of it. Peak performers of all kinds demonstrate this, and researchers confirm it: analysis and intuition are partners in creative work. They need each other to be truly effective.

People who won’t relax their dependence on concrete, countable information often just can’t see possibilities that don’t fit into what they already know. The lock on to what they know and lock out the possibility of other insights. However, if you’re willing to let go for a while and let your subconscious and creative subconscious have a turn, you may be surprised and pleased at the results. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Space Weather: Lunar Eclipse & Martian Conjunction, July 27

http://spaceweather.com
https://www.facebook.com/spaceweatherdotcom
LUNAR ECLIPSE AND MARTIAN CONJUNCTION: Friday, July 27th, is a big night for astronomy. Mars will be at opposition, making a 15-year close approach to Earth. The full Moon and Mars will be in conjunction. And, best of all, the Moon will pass through the shadow of Earth, producing the longest lunar eclipse in a century. Visit today’s edition of Spaceweather.com for sky maps, animations, and observing tips.
Remember, SpaceWeather.com is on Facebook!


5. Sherman County Court News, June 6

ShermanCoLogoSherman County Court

Contact: Kayla von Borstel 541-565-3416

Sherman County Budget Hearing, Sherman County Supplemental Budget Hearing, Opportunity Zones, The Dalles Disposal Rates Review, Finnegan Creek Bridge, Intergovernmental Agreement between Sherman County School District and Sherman County, Insurance Policy Updates, Biggs Service District Budget Hearing, Biggs Service District Draft Ordinances, and Sherman County Broadband Project, were the main items on the agenda during the June 6th session of Sherman County Court in Moro.

Sherman County Court entered into Sherman County Budget Hearing. Debbie Hayden, Finance Officer, provided Court with a letter from the Budget Committee community members regarding the submitted request by the deputies, for a salary increase for the Sheriff; the request was denied. An approval of the request would mean decreasing his salary. The Court motioned to adopt the budget approved by the Budget Committee for the 2018-2019 fiscal year in the total sum of $51,520,484 and imposing the taxes provided for in the adopted budget at the rate of $8.7141 per $1,000 of assessed value for operations, and that these taxes are hereby imposed and categorized for tax year 2018-2019 upon the assessed value of all taxable property within the County of Sherman as of 1:00 a.m., July 1, 2018. Additionally to approve appropriations as recommended by the Finance Director and authorized County Court to sign. Being no further business the Budget Hearing closed.

Sherman County Court entered into Sherman County Supplemental Budget Hearing. Debbie Hayden, Finance Officer, stated more revenue was received than anticipated; in order to spend the funds a supplemental budget was required. The Court motioned to approve the resolution summary of proposed budget changes appropriating $60,000 to the County School per Capita Fund, $21,281 to the CAMI Fund, and $52,647 to the DA-VWAP Fund for the Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2018, and authorize County Court to sign. Being no further business the Budget Hearing closed.

Carolyn Meece, Business Oregon Regional Development Officer, spoke on Opportunity Zones. There are 86 opportunity zones declared in Oregon; however, funds for Opportunity Zones are not secured in Oregon. Sherman County has been designated as an Opportunity Zone. Meece presented information compiled from multiple sources to the best of her ability. Opportunity zones were identified in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 with purposes to use Federal tax incentives to draw long term investments to business that continue to struggle. This is done by taking capital gain funds and placing them into a project; the longer the funds are held there, the less taxes would have to be paid on the capital gains. Capital gains would need to be invested within 180 days from the time of sale. If the funds are held for 10 years it falls under permanent exclusion. Carolyn stated projects needed to be large in scale and provide significant improvement to the area such as repowering wind turbines, a big housing project, or building in the Rufus Industrial Park. Currently it is unknown what entity would have approval authority for such projects.

The Dalles Disposal requested a rate increase for operations. The Dalles Disposal requested 85% of the West Coast CPI rate used, due to their efficiency. A 32 gallon can will the increase by $0.52 per month, and a 2 yard dumpster will increase by $0.12 – $1.03/month depending on pick up frequency. County Court motioned to approve a 2.11% increase in The Dalles Disposal fees for annual operational costs to be effective July 1, 2018. 

County Court discussed the memo and proposal provided by Mark Coles, Road Department. Coles was only able to obtain one bid for the Finnegan Creek Bridge. Other businesses contacted did not have enough time in their schedules to take on the task. The Court motioned to accept Oregon Transportation Professionals proposal quote up to $283,000 for the preliminary Engineer Phase, right of way phase, and construction engineering phase of the Finnegan Creek Bridge. 

County Court reviewed the Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) between Sherman County School District and Sherman County for the Sherman School District Safety Plan. The IGA, to be put in place for insurance purposes, designates armed staff as special deputies, who can then be insured as such through the County. There are not a set number of special deputies as it will vary on who the Sheriff’s Department feels is adequate. Matt McGowan, Payne West Insurance, stated the School will assume the majority of the liability; the County is only liable during active threat situations. The School will compensate the County the special deputy insurance premiums charged. County Court motioned to approve the Intergovernmental Agreement between Sherman County School District and Sherman County to collaborate in implementing the Joint Sherman County School District’s and Sherman County Sheriff’s Office Safety Plan, and authorize Judge Thompson to sign. 

Matt McGowan, Payne West Insurance, presented the insurance renewal packet for review of CIS (City County Insurance). The County would be responsible for first $15,000 of any settlement and must use the insurance’s attorneys, and if there are two or more incidents, the rates will increase. Changes since last year included the addition of two special deputies and Property Coverage due to the Courthouse Addition; building value increased from $8,000,000 to $15,000,000 with a total property limit of $22,549,147. Equipment and Property Breakdown would cover for any damages to the equipment in the buildings. The policy also has $250,000 in blanket Crime Coverage for all employees including computer and transfer fraud. Cyber liability would cover if County systems were hacked or private information on file was stolen. CIS has a very limited Pollution Liability policy, so yearly they recommend gaining a policy larger in size for pollution as seen in the packet due to large farms. The Court motioned to approve PayneWest 2018- 2019 insurance renewal for $162,978.41

Biggs Service District (BSD) Board of Directors entered a Budget Hearing. Aaron Cook, BSD Administrator, presented a draft budget to the BSD. The major fund BSD has is Sewer; and has a long term contract with CH2M Hill to handle all operations which well end next fiscal year. Cook budgeted for any unforeseen maintenance to the Sewer system. Cook combined the funds instead of keeping them separate to streamline the budget. The Board inquired why the beginning fund balance had increased significantly since last year. Judge Thompson sought out Debbie Hayden, Finance Officer, for some clarification on where these funds come from. Hayden stated the $240,000 funds transferred to BSD was comprised of Special District tax dollars from the BSD Reserve Account, and $512,000 of that was committed by the County to reimburse BSD for payments made to Anderson Perry & Associated relating to the Water System Project. Carrie Pipinich, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD), stated the Water System needed to have its own account. There was some confusion among those present on numbers found in the budget relating to where some of the budget numbers came from and why BSD was operating at a loss. BSD took a recess in order for Cook and Hayden to research past budgets and come up with proper budget figures. BSD Board reentered the Hearing. A raise of $12,000 as an Administration fee was proposed; the Board denied the request as BSD is contracted with Rufus for $3,000 per year. The Board stated MCEDD was to be hired to manage the BSD Water System Grant. Cook stated there was not a Water Fund as it does not exist yet, however, he estimated for one in anticipation the system would be running during the next fiscal year. Water expenses mirrored sewer expenses. The Board stated there significant errors in the budget that needed to be recalculated as there was no validity to the majority of the numbers presented. County Court motioned to approve CH2M Hill Amendment No. 10 for Biggs Service District 2018-2019 Sewer Operation Services in the amount of $85,446, and authorize the Biggs Service District Board Chair to sign.  County Court motioned to approve the total taxes by permanent rate of $4.0061.County Court motioned to approve Biggs Service District 2018-2019 Sewer and Water budget total in the amount of $2,857,400. Being no further business the Budget Hearing closed.

Carrie Pipinich, Mid-Columbia Economic Development District, discussed Biggs Service District (BSD) draft water ordinances as part of the grant requirements for the BSD Water System Project. All references to fees and rates throughout the ordinance packet will be set by resolution. BSD Board concluded to have a non-refundable hookup fee for new customers; existing customers will be grandfathered in. All hookups will be metered, and consumers will be billed according to usage. There will be one meter per building; if one building has more than one business, it will be the building owner’s responsibility to allocate usage by business. A $100 late charge will be assessed with 12% interest for non-payment; if the District so chooses, the bill may be sent to the County, to be set as a lean and paid by taxes. The water system operator will notify of restricted water use due to contamination to BSD Board of Directors; who will make the final determination during a public hearing until further notice. It was stated finding an operator for a rural area may be a challenge as many are retiring and with few replacements. Aaron Cook, BSD Administrator, was asked to inquire cost for running both sewer and water systems with CH2M Hill. Pipinich will work on obtaining three quotes for the District. USDA also asked that a resolution be made in Court for the interim financing supplied by the County for the water system project to be paid back by USDA after project completion. Bond Counsel had some concerns on two resolutions made around the formation of the District that had different legal descriptions; Pipinich was awaiting response from the District’s attorney.

Carrie Pipinich, Mid- Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD), stated three Request for Proposals (RFP’s) were received; the Review Committee met with the top candidate, GorgeNet as they could provide fiber to the home in the four cities and Biggs Service District. GorgeNet will pay half of the total cost to build the project, while the public will need to match $303,689.94. A Regional Infrastructure Fund application was submitted for $200,000. The current match amount thus far is approximately $50,000 between the County and Cities who have committed. Judge Thompson stated GorgeNet is interested in spreading high speed internet to not just the Cities, but to individual residents outside of city limits as well. GorgeNet has proposed a monthly rate of approximately $50; they will also offer phone service as well. GorgeNet has stated they would like to start implementation this fall with the hope of 60 days of construction per city; not all cities have given final approval of commitment currently. The Court motioned to approve the County Court moving forward with the Sherman County Broadband Project, and to fill the expense gap if the Regional Infrastructure Fund grant is not received, and contingent upon coming to an operating agreement with GorgeNet.

Actions taken by the Court included:

  • approved an Intergovernmental Agreement between Mid-Columbia Economic Development District and Sherman County in the amount of $40,000 for the provision of local economic development services effective July 1, 2018, to June 30, 2019, and authorize Judge Thompson to sign.
  • approved the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) Request for Assistance for the cities of Rufus, Wasco, Moro, and Grass Valley, in the Eastern Oregon Economic Development Planning Project.
  • approved the Department of Land Conservation and Development (DLCD) Request for Assistance for the cities of Rufus, Wasco, Moro, and Grass Valley, in the Oregon Housing Planning Project.
  • approved Early Childhood Education funding for 2018-2019 fiscal year as follows: Little Wheats $26,666.67; Sherman County Child Care Foundation (ABC Huskies Child Care) $26,666.67; Sherman County Preschool $26,666.67.
  • approved the order to void returned resident incentive checks for 2017.
  • approved the intergovernmental agreement between Oregon Department of Revenue and Sherman County, for $60 per hour with a total of 38 hours per year, for Oregon Department of Revenue to perform map maintenance and cartographic activities, and authorize County Court to sign.
  • accepted the Asher Development purchase proposal for lot 1204, made by Derrick and Lana Mauritson, in the amount of $34,200, and authorize the additional two lots in the subdivision to be advertised for sale in the amount of $34,200.
  • approved the Work Session minutes of April 19, 2018, as presented.
  • approved the minutes of May 16, 2018, as presented.
  • approved the Claims for the month of May 2018 as presented.

Topics of discussion were Commissioner Reports.


6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center August Meal Menu

We serve lunch at 12:00 noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at 541-565-3191 the day before to ensure that we make enough food!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. $7.00 ~~ 60 Yrs. & Up $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
                2 3
Pork Chops Chicken Broccoli Quiche Salmon Patty/Bun
Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Salad & Veggies Tater Tots
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert
6 7 8 8 10
Ham Fried Rice Grilled Reuben Sandwich Meatloaf Chicken Strips w/ Dip Hot Beef Sandwich
Veggies & Salad Potato Wedges Hash Brown Casserole Potato Wedges Mashed Potatoes /Gravy
Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert Salad, Veggies & Fruit Salad, Veggies & Dessert
13 14 15 16 17
Oven Fried Chicken Swedish Meatballs Taco Salad Bar Cheeseburgers BLT Sandwich
Potato Wedges Rotini pasta, Veggies Refried Beans, Salad Tater Tots & Salad Potato Wedges
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Dessert Veggies & Fruit Salad & Dessert
20 21 22 23 24
Philly Beef Sub Chicken a la King Spaghetti w. Meat Sauce Chef Salad Pizza loaded w/ Meat
Potato Wedges, Salad Biscuits Veggies, Garlic Bread Rolls & Veggies Veggies & Salad
Veggies & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert Fruit Dessert
27 28 29 30 31
Cheesy Potatoes w/ Ham Jamaican Jerk Chicken Chicken Fried Steak BBQ Burger & Cheddar Baked Potato Bar
Veggies & Salad Tortillas, Veggies Mashed Potatoes w/ Gravy Cornbread Pie Chili, Cheese, Onions
Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert

Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.