Sherman County eNews #155

CONTENTS

  1. The Importance of Forgiveness

  2. Sherman High School May 29, 2018, Academic & Athletic Awards

  3. Sherman County School 2018 Senior Scholarships

  4. Notice. Correction: Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, June 14

  5. Presentation about the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building in The Dalles, June 30

  6. 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 4

  7. CGCC Learning Communities help students succeed

  8. Final Defendant Sentenced for Armed Takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge


1. The Importance of Forgiveness

Many people throughout the ages have spoken of the virtues of forgiveness. Today, let’s look at this most personal, yet universal, of subjects and perhaps add a special twist.

Against whom are you carrying a grudge? Is there someone who has done you a wrong, in some way, and who you just can’t forgive? Have you, yourself, done things that you can’t forgive? When we cannot forgive, we have the tremendous potential of doing incredible damage to our selves, if we don’t let go of these hurts. In order to be fully human, we must learn to forgive and forget.

Confucius said that, “To be wronged is nothing unless you remember it.” He was absolutely right, and here’s why. Every time you remember something bad that happens to you, some wrong that was done to you, you feel those bad feelings all over again. You record the event in the neuron structure of your brain, and it plants itself in your subconscious. You reinforce the neural pathways, keeping that hurt within easy access.

Now the subconscious doesn’t know the difference between a vividly imagined or remembered event and the real thing. It is all “real” to the subconscious. When we subject ourselves, over and over again, to painful, angry memories, eventually our inner system begins to break down. The poison of the not forgiven hurt and anger attacks from the inside and then makes its way out.

12-step programs often emphasize the importance of forgiveness, because they recognize that forgiveness is the key to action and freedom. Jesus forgave those who crucified him while he was still on the cross. When apartheid ended, South Africa went through a sometimes wrenching forgiveness and reconciliation process, because they knew they could not have a successful future if they were still trapped in the past. Examples of acts of forgiveness are everywhere; we just need to look for them.

When we forgive, we let go of past hurts and open up to wonderful new possibilities. What wonderful possibility awaits you? What do you need to let go of, in order to meet that possibility? ~The Pacific Institute


2. Sherman High School May 29, 2018, Academic & Athletic Awards

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSherman High School academic and athletic awards were presented on May 29th  at the Sherman County School.

Mr. Jared Collins presented agriculture and shop awards to Outstanding Ag Student Emma Witherspoon, Outstanding Shop Student Loren Henderson, Outstanding Vet Science Student Savannah Moe, Outstanding Careers Student Bradley Moe, and Outstanding Personal Finance Student Brianna McKinney.

Mr. Jarek Bartels recognized Best Overall Band Student Mana Chamoto, Best Brass Player Kay Cyrus, Best Attitude Valeria Ambriz, Most Valuable Player Will James, Musicianship Darian Davis, Most Improved Christian Derting, Leadership Student Morgan Lesh, Student of High Achievement Catherine Rhodes, Heart of a Teacher Student Emma Witherspoon and Best Woodwind Player Izabella Montesanti.

Mr. Tim Zacharias presented the Exceptional 9th Grade English Award to Jed Harrison and Lindsey Jones; Exceptional 10th Grade English to Mana Chamoto, Alyssa Hill and Darian Davis; Exceptional 11th Grade English to CJ Johnson and Luke Martin; Exceptional 12th Grade English to Rebecca Earl and Treve Martin; and Most Improved English Award to Christian Derting and Angel Olea.

Math awards, presented by teacher Gerald Casper, went to Outstanding Math Student Luke Martin; 4-Year Advanced Math Students Kiersten Casper, Rebecca Earl, Alexis Grenvik, Brianna McKinney and Makoa Whitaker. Luke Martin was recognized for Calculus, Kiersten Casper for Pre-Calculus, Desiree Winslow for Algebra II, Mana Chamoto for Geometry and Emma Witherspoon for Algebra I.  Lindsey Jones was recognized for Leadership and Gavenn Lohrey and Isaak McLemore for Personal Finance. 

Mr. Kevin Stuart credited Social Studies achievement with the Margo Lee Shetterly Award to Jordan Barrett, Stephen Ambrose Award to Gavenn Lohrey, Barbara Tuchman Award to Emma Witherspoon, Shelby Foote Award to Zachery Fluhr, Ellen J. Langer Award to CJ Johnson, David McCullough Award to Luke Martin, Dorris Kearns Goodwin Award to Alyssa Hill and George Washington Award to Bradley Moe. 

Biology awards were presented by Mr. Tyler Dearborn to Jordan Barrett, Christian Derting, Alyssa Hill, Jaelyn Justesen and Emma Witherspoon. Chemistry awards went to Madison Brokaw, Michaela Lloyd, Luke Martin and Makoa Whitaker. Nate Ruise received the STEAM Award.

Mr. Gary Lewis recognized Physical Education students Rebecca Earl, Treve Martin and Bradley Moe with an Outstanding Weights Award.

Principal Mike Somnis recognized the 2017 Outdoor School Counselor Morgan Lesh.

The 2017-18 Student Council was recognized by Ms. Angie Totaro: President Savannah Moe, Vice President Luke Martin, Secretary CJ Johnson, Treasurer Brianna McKinney, Ad Manager Morgan Lesh, Senior Class President Rebecca Earl, Junior Class President Desiree Winslow, Sophomore Class President Loren Henderson, Freshman Class President Lindsey Jones, FFA Representative Bradley Moe, National Honor Society Representative Alexis Grenvik and Pep Band Representative Izabella Montesanti. 

Principal Mike Somnis presented Husky Scholar Athlete Awards to CJ Johnson, Samantha Lepinski, Luke Martin, Treve Martin, Savannah Moe, Emma Stutzman and Desiree Winslow, an award given only once to any junior or senior who achieved a 3.50 CUM GPA or above and lettered in a sport.

Mr. Lewis presented 4-Year, 3-Sport awards to Jacob Justesen and Treve Martin. Family members presented the Susie, Don & Ron Thompson Memorial Scholarship Award to Kiersten Casper. The Jerry DuBois Memorial Scholarship Award went to Bradley Moe.

Baseball coach Justesen presented state baseball participants, Wade Fields, Will James, Jacob Justesen, Treve Martin, Bradley Moe, Patrick Remos and Jack Woolworth. Wade Fields was named Most Improved and Jacob Justesen Most Inspirational, and the Hustle Award went to Treve Martin and Bradley Moe. Athletic letters went to 1st year Wade Fields, Will James, Patrick Ramos and Jack Woolworth, and 4th year to Jacob Justesen, Treve Martin and Bradley Moe.

Tennis coach von Borstel presented tennis participants Valeria Ambriz, Jordan Barrett, Caleb Fritts, Alyssa Hill, Michaela Lloyd and Trenton Mason and regional participants CJ Johnson, Savannah Moe and Gaby Rubio. Alyssa Hill was named Most Improved and CJ Johnson Most Inspirational. Caleb Fritts received the Hustle Award. Tennis letters went to 1st year Alyssa Hill; 2nd year Valeria Ambriz, Jordan Barrett and Trenton Mason; and 3rd year to CJ Johnson, Savannah Moe and Gaby Rubio.

Track coach Somnis recognized participant, Nancy Ambriz, and state track participants Jeremy Ballesteros, Tyler Bledsoe, Mercedez Cardona, Mana Chamoto, Owen Christiansen, Keenan Coles, Alexis Grenvik, Jed Harrison, Loren Henderson, Tyler Jones, Jaelyn Justesen, Savanna Orendorff, Nick Riggs, Makoa Whitaker and Desiree Winslow. Jed Harrison was named Most Improved for track and Desiree Winslow Most Improved for field events. Makoa Whitaker was named Most Inspirational. Letters for track went to 1st year Jeremy Ballesteros, Tyler Bledsoe, Mercedez Cardona, Mana Chamoto, Jed Harrison, Loren Henderson, Tyler Jones, Savannah Orendorff and Nick Riggs; 2nd year to Owen Christiansen, Alexis Grenvik, Jaelyn Justesen and Makoa Whitaker; and 3rd year to Keenan Coles and Desiree Winslow.


3. Sherman County School 2018 Senior Scholarships

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSherman County School District and Scholarship Association awarded scholarships to seniors in May, 2018. 

Reese Blake

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Dave Miller Memorial Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

Randy Rood Memorial Scholarship

Kiersten Casper

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

CGCC Foundation Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

Susie, Don, & Ron Thompson Memorial

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Wasco Lodge Masonic Scholarship

Rebecca Earl

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Sierra Fellner

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Jared Fritts

John Deere “Access Your Future” Internship and Training Program

Alexis Grenvik

Mid-Columbia Bus Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Jacob Justesen

Sherman County Scholarship/Sherman County Court       

Mid-Columbia Bus Scholarship

Nina Rhinehart Fleckenstein Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Nicolas Lesh

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Treve Martin

Bank of Eastern Oregon Scholarship

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Oregon Wheat Foundation & Sherman Wheat Growers

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust 

Brianna McKinney

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Michael Simantel Citizenship Scholarship

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Raleigh T. Curtis Memorial Scholarship

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust

Bradley Moe

Bank of Eastern Oregon Scholarship

Charles Davis and Sherman County Court

Jerry DuBois Memorial Scholarship

May Barnum & Dorotha Moore Leadership Scholarship   

OAKS/Smarter Balanced Assessment

Walter & Helen Bruckert Scholarship Trust.


4. Notice. Correction: Wasco School Events Center Board Meeting, June 14

The Wasco School Events Center Board of Directors will hold a meeting on June 14th,
2018- 6 p.m. at the WSEC (903 Barnett St.). The public is welcome to attend!


 5. Presentation about the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building in The Dalles, June 30

Wasco County Historical Society invites the public to attend local archaeologist Eric Gleason’s presentation on the 1863 Waldron/Ginchell Building with its long history and possible future.  The free presentation will take place at 11 a.m. on June 30 at 210 E. 1st St., just east of the Baldwin Saloon, in the Wing Hong Hai Building.


6. 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, Aug. 4

golf1The 19th Annual Founder’s Cup Golf Tournament, presented by Columbia State Bank and Columbia Gorge Community College Foundation, will be held at Indian Creek Golf Course in Hood River on Saturday, Aug. 4. The annual event promises a fun-filled day that brings together golf, friends, food, and raffle prizes. This year, the tournament will benefit student scholarships.

Sponsorship opportunities and four-person team entries are available. To sponsor the tournament, or to register a team at either the gold ($600) or silver ($500) team level, please contact Stephanie Hoppe, shoppe@cgcc.edu or call (541) 506-6113. Only 28 teams may enter the tournament so please contact the foundation to register a team at your earliest convenience. For more information, visit cgccfoundation.org.


7. CGCC Learning Communities help students succeed

By Rose Kelly

Attending college can be a challenge. Personal finance, time management, language barriers and life’s everyday stresses sometimes lead students to drop classes or quit college entirely.

That’s where Learning Communities help make a crucial difference, as students discover they don’t have to face these challenges alone.

In 2012 instructor Tim Schell and Julie Belmore started CGCC’s first learning community, comprised of Reading 90, Writing 90, Career Guidance 101 and ALC 51, a three-hour per week lab where students work with their reading and writing instructors.

Learning Communities help break down traditional barriers between subject content, encouraging students to apply math skills, for instance, in everyday communication and, conversely, how reading and writing skills often apply to math problems. But most importantly, Learning Communities bring students and teachers together as a team, overcoming the sense of isolation many students feel with unfamiliar academic topics.

These days, Tim teaches Writing 90 and a Learning Community lab he shares with Reading 90 instructor Jenn Kamrar. Each instructor works with a group of students for 40 minutes, and then they switch groups.

“When it comes to teaching, we also cross pollinate our curriculum,” Jenn explains. “While we may be focused on writing personal narratives in the writing course, we’ll read and analyze personal essays in the reading course. Each class then reinforces and deepens the learning that happens in the other.”

Learning Communities’ effect on students is profound, as attested by two students who recently described their experiences to CGCC’s board of directors.

Cindy Vandeventer is an expansive, outgoing woman who came to CGCC from Mercy House, a faith-based, clean and sober treatment center she joined following prison. Mercy House encouraged her to go back to school, so she checked out The Dalles campus of CGCC; she was so impressed she signed up that day. Yet she found the first day of class intimidating.

“I felt like a fish out of water,” Cindy recalls. “I was the oldest person in the class, and I was nervous about coming back. I was considering dropping and taking all online classes where I wouldn’t have to be around other students.” But that changed when she met Jenn at the Learning Community. Jenn offered one-on-one help, giving Cindy the skills and confidence to succeed.

Brenda Perez is composed and self-possessed, but she had similar feelings about attending school. “I was super-nervous, and worried that I didn’t blend in,” Brenda explained.

She was pleasantly surprised by the Learning Communities and impressed by the support she discovered there. Brenda not only benefitted through her studies, but wanted to become even more involved by encouraging and helping other students in the class, calling upon her bi-lingual skills to explain content to her classmates, even translating when necessary. Getting to know everyone in the Learning Community made her want to stay in school and pushed her to do her best. When she started at CGCC Brenda intended to proceed quickly, obtain her certificate after a year and move on. But the encouragement she received from Tim and Jenn convinced her this should only be the beginning.

“Jenn makes me want more out of life,” Brenda said.

Life can be rough. After a close relative passed away, Cindy was overwhelmed by grief, falling into depression. She was ready to quit school, but Jenn gave her the encouragement to continue. “Jenn not only was helpful with my education, but I learned so much about myself, my inner self,” she recalls.

When students enroll in a Learning Community they join a cohort and stay together for three consecutive classes of reading and writing, spending the year together. “We really get to know each student and what they’re individually going through,” Jenn explains. “We also have the opportunity to offer them support in ways that other, more traditionally scheduled college courses might not.” Indeed, Tim and Jenn have each taken students to counselors, referring suicidal students to the Center for Living, a professional counseling service.

Personal tragedy sometimes also brings creative ways of coping.

“We had one student whose apartment burned down, causing her, her husband and three small children to flee in the middle of the night,” Tim said. “The student did a research paper about PTSD in children. She also said to us: ‘You really care about us.’”

The skills Cindy learned in class helped her heal. One of her assignments was a personal essay; she wrote an honest, brutal paper describing some of the challenges of abuse, domestic violence and addiction she has faced. As students read their essays aloud, hers resonated with others who had faced some of the same issues in their lives.

“I was so impressed by the young people in my class,” Cindy said. “They are breaking away from some of the same hardships I have faced and starting a journey toward a different life.”  Cindy is growing and changing also, now spending her spare time attending church, AA, and visiting her kids and grandchildren. She wants to be a counselor, specializing in drug and alcohol or sexual abuse. 

Brenda works with children while continuing her education. She is a hard worker who likes getting things done. Her diligence is paying off, as she completes her two-year associate degree in Science and Early Childhood Education. Next, Brenda plans to attend Portland State University. Her goal is to own and operate a preschool. (When time allows, she enjoys the beautiful outdoors, too.)

For instructors Jenn Kamrar and Tim Schell, Learning Communities are intense but rewarding. “My students are beyond inspiring,” says Jenn. “I’m humbled by their power, and I couldn’t be more proud of their accomplishments.”

“Teaching in these Learning Communities has been very rewarding because I can see the difference in these students’ lives,” Tim added. “Sometimes the biggest challenge is keeping a student in school, and when these students get to know each other — as they always do — they push each other to stay and work, and not give up. Another reward is we get to see students help each other in the lab. It sounds simple, but it is truly beautiful to behold.”


8. Final Defendant Sentenced for Armed Takeover of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

Oregon.Flat.polePORTLAND, Ore. – Blaine Cooper aka Stanley Blaine Hicks, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona, was sentenced today to time served in prison for his role in the 41-day armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge beginning in January 2016.

Cooper is the eighteenth and final defendant sentenced for crimes associated with the occupation. Eleven defendants pleaded guilty to felony conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. Four other defendants were convicted of felonies by a federal jury in a trial ending in March 2017. Three additional defendants pleaded guilty to misdemeanor trespassing. Seven defendants, including occupation leaders Ammon and Ryan Bundy, were acquitted of all charges in a trial ending in November 2016.

“I firmly believe that our communities and state are stronger because of our shared experience responding to and litigating the armed occupation of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “I want to sincerely thank the countless federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officials that played a role in bringing these eighteen defendants to justice. Our message is clear,” continued Williams, “taking up arms because you don’t like how things are done will never be accepted as a lawful way to protest here in Oregon or elsewhere.”

“The U.S. Constitution granted Americans both rights and responsibilities. With state, local and tribal partners, the FBI responded to this armed takeover by defending the rule of law and protecting the people of Harney County. We stand with Oregonians committed to finding peaceful solutions and will always work to protect our communities from violent conflict,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

Beginning on January 2, 2016, Ammon Bundy, Ryan Bundy, and several dozen followers, seized the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge near Burns, Oregon in Harney County. For forty-one days, the armed occupiers prevented federal officials from performing their official duties at the refuge by force, threats, and intimidation. The Bundys and several other occupiers, were arrested on January 26, 2016 on U.S. Highway 395 near Burns en route to a community meeting in John Day, Oregon. The occupation officially ended on February 11, 2016 when the last four occupiers turned themselves in to federal authorities.          

Summary of sentences imposed:

–Dylan Anderson, 37, of Provo, Utah, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Sandra Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Sean Anderson, 50, of Riggins, Idaho, was sentenced to one year of probation and $1,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of misdemeanor trespassing.

–Jason Blomgren, 44, of North Carolina, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Brian Cavalier, 47, of Bunkerville, Nevada, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Blaine Cooper, 38, of Humboldt, Arizona was sentenced to time served in prison and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Travis Cox, 23, of Bend, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Duane Ehmer, 47, of Irrigon, Oregon, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

–Eric Flores, 24, of Tulalip, Washington, was sentenced to two years’ probation with home detention after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Wesley Kjar, 34, of Manti, Utah, was sentenced to 250 hours of community service, two years’ probation, and $3,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Corey Lequieu, 47, of Fallon, Utah, was sentenced to 30 months in prison and three years’ supervised release after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Joseph O’Shaughnessy, 46, of Cottonwood, Arizona, was sentenced to time served in prison, two years’ supervised release, and $7,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Jason Patrick, 46, of Bonaire, Georgia, was sentenced to 21 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

–Ryan Payne, 34, of Anaconda, Montana, was sentenced to 37 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–John Ritzheimer, 34, of Peoria, Arizona, was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, one year in a residential reentry center, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after pleading guilty to one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility.

–Jake Ryan, 29, of Plains, Montana, was sentenced to 12 months in prison, three years’ supervised release, and $10,000 restitution after being found guilty on one count of depredation of government property and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing and tampering with vehicles and equipment.

–Geoffrey Stanek, 28, of Lafayette, Oregon, was sentenced to two years’ probation after pleading guilty to one count of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S.

–Darryl Thorn, 33, of Monument, Oregon, was sentenced to 18 months in prison and $5,000 restitution after being found guilty of one count each of conspiracy to impede officers of the U.S. and possession of a firearm in a federal facility and one count each of misdemeanor trespassing, tampering with vehicles and equipment, and destruction and removal of property.

The case was investigated by the FBI and prosecuted by Geoffrey Barrow, Ethan Knight, and Craig Gabriel, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.


 

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