Sherman County eNews #119

CONTENTS

  1. Teacher Appreciation Week in Sherman County, May 7-11

  2. Mothers Receive Free Admission to Maryhill Museum on Mother’s Day

  3. An Oregon Stories Concert featuring Rindy & Marv Ross with Eddie Parente, May 18

  4. Sherman County Summer Drama Day Camp, August 6-10

  5. Strandbeest: Sculptures that Move with the Wind

  6. Getting Back to Business

  7. Workshop: Vintage Scrapbooks & Photo Albums, May 21

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“It is the duty of parents to maintain their children decently, and according to their circumstances; to protect them according to the dictates of prudence; and to educate them according to the suggestions of a judicious and zealous regard for their usefulness, their respectability and happiness.” —James Wilson (1791)


1. Teacher Appreciation Week in Sherman County, May 7-11

 ShCoSchool#26TeacherAppreciation2018


2. Mothers Receive Free Admission to Maryhill Museum on Mother’s Day

bouquet.red.pinkCome explore Maryhill with mom. From couture attire in the Théâtre de la Mode exhibition and dreamy Art Nouveau glass to artifacts from Queen Marie’s personal collection and expansive landscapes, Maryhill’s exhibitions are full of treasures that will delight mom. All mothers receive free admission on Mother’s Day and a free mimosa (or other choice of drink) with lunch orders at Loïe’s Café.


3. An Oregon Stories Concert featuring Rindy & Marv Ross with Eddie Parente, May 18

Oregon.BeaverThe Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum welcomes Rindy and Marv Ross, who will be performing a rare acoustic concert of songs called ‘Oregon Stories’ with violinist Eddie Parente on Friday, May 18th at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center.  Tickets for the 6 p.m. dinner and program are $30, and the 7 p.m. concert only is $15. Purchase tickets by May 16. For tickets and information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit http://www.gorgediscovery.org<http://www.gorgediscovery.org.


4. Sherman County Summer Drama Day Camp, August 6-10

drama1Oregon State University Extension was recently notified it has received a $1300 grant from the Sherman County Cultural Coalition.  Extension staff will offer a one-week summer drama day camp August 6-10, offering dancing, singing and/or theatre to youth ages 5 to 18, with a small “Variety Show” performance at the end for parents.  The grant funding will allow for the hiring of drama educator and experienced actor Hayley Hoyt of “The High Heeled Housewife” in Pasco, WA. 

Sherman Extension has noted an increase in drama interest by area youth.  The Missoula Childrens’ Theatre is offered annually, thanks to funding by Sherman Prevention.  This spring, there were more children trying out for roles than there were parts available.  To give kids more “stage time”, Sherman Extension hosted a 3-day drama day camp during spring break, with 37 youth ages 5-14 attending. 

This grant from the Sherman County Cultural Coalition will give Sherman youth another exposure to drama and performing arts.   Drama offers a number of benefits to children, including cooperation and collaboration, self-confidence and public speaking, imagination and creative thinking, problem solving, concentration and memorization, self-discipline and communication skills.  According to some studies, drama students have higher SAT scores, increased reading comprehension, better verbal and non-verbal communication skills, and increased skills and academic performance in children. 

Cindy Brown, Educator. Oregon State University, OSU Extension Service – Sherman County – College of Public Health & Human Sciences

4-H Youth Development & SNAP-Ed, 66365 Lonerock Rd., Moro, Oregon 97039

P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291  extension.oregonstate.edu/Sherman


5. Strandbeest: Sculptures that Move with the Wind

Sculptures that move when the wind blows made by Theo Jansen from the Netherlands are called Strandbeest. No batteries – only wind!  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U9pQPBMtvTM


6. Getting Back to Business

As we move through this season of renewal – at least here in the northern hemisphere – and expectations of new beginnings are as vibrant as the daffodils and camellias, setbacks can seem overwhelming. Today, let’s talk about how to bounce back from adversity.

When adversity strikes, whether it be loss of your job, an illness, a natural disaster or when you take a big hit that really knocks you off your feet for a while, how fast you get up again depends on a number of things. Consider how good your support network is; how solid your self-esteem is; the extent to which you believe that you can control your own destiny, and your experiences at overcoming adversity in the past.

If you want to shorten the time it takes to get back on your feet, try this: Ask yourself how it will look when you no longer have your current problems. Spend time visualizing yourself in that picture and imagining how you will feel. Do it over and over, day after day, week after week. In addition, list your strengths and past accomplishments and add to this list on a daily basis.

At the same time, set and prioritize some immediate, short-term goals to improve your situation. Write a detailed plan of action for the top three, including day and time. (By the way, this works as well for organizations, departments and teams as it does for individuals.)

Once you have accomplished a few short-term goals, you may feel ready to do some long-term visioning and goal-setting. Finally – and this is very important – no matter how much you have lost, take time to help someone else who is struggling. Even the worst adversity can be used to learn and grow. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Workshop: Vintage Scrapbooks & Photo Albums, May 21

Albums of Ephemera with Elizabeth Chambers May 21 9:30 am – 2:30 pm Willamette Heritage Center Salem, OR

Registration deadline: May 17th

Register at: http://oregonmuseums.org/

$35 for Oregon Museums Association (OMA) members

$50 for non-members, which includes OMA membership Lunch is provided.

The archiving of vintage scrapbooks and photo albums challenges museums and families alike.  Grandma’s cherished scrapbook-its yellowed pages filled with family history such as old letters, announcements, invitations, faded photographs, and torn newspaper clippings-represents both a treasure trove and conservation nightmare.  Join Conservator Elizabeth Chambers and discover how to best to preserve individual album components, while respecting the integrity of the whole. During the workshop, Elizabeth will discuss the proper handling, care, documentation, and storage of scrapbooks and photo albums.  Speaking to specific examples brought in by participants, Elizabeth will explore the practical and ethical issues surrounding the care of vintage albums.

About the Presenter: Elizabeth Chambers is a Paper Conservator in private practice and Affiliated Conservator with the Heritage Conservation Group in Portland, Oregon. Elizabeth’s professional history includes 28 years in the conservation department of the Portland Art Museum as well as 23 years as a private paper conservator.  She has had a variety of experiences with collection condition surveys; from international exhibitions to private and institutional collections.  She is a professional associate of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

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