Sherman County eNews #84

CONTENTS

  1. April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

  2. Sherman County Lions Monthly Meeting, April 4

  3. Letter to the Editor: Questions for Sherman County Judge Candidates

  4. Petition: Pledge to Obey and Enforce Federal Immigration Law

  5. Proclamation: Sexual Assault Awareness Month, April 2018

  6. Proclamation: National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 8-14

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


I saw behind me those who had gone, and before me those who are yet to come. I looked back and saw my father, and his father, and all our fathers, and in front to see my son, and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes. As I felt, so they had felt and were to feel, as then, as now, as tomorrow and forever. Then I was not afraid, for I was in a long line that had no beginning and no end, and the hand of his father grasped my father’s hand, and his hand was in mine, and my unborn son took my right hand, and all up and down the line that stretched from time that was to time that is, and time that is not yet come, raised their hands to show the link, and we were as one. ~ How Green Was My Valley by Richard Llewellyn.


1. April is National Distracted Driving Awareness Month

And the week of April 9-13 is National Work Zone Safety Awareness week

Startling statistics (distracted driving): On average, in Oregon…

  • A distracted driver causes a crash every 2.5 hours—almost 10 crashes each day.
  • Distracted driving causes one in every 12 serious injury crashes in Oregon. 

Startling statistics (work zones): On average, in Oregon…

  • A work zone crash occurs every 17 hours.
  • An inattentive (distracted!) driver is the most common cause of work zone crashes.
  • Four out of five work zone fatalities are drivers and their passengers.
  • Fines double 24/7. Workers or not.

 Help us mark the month of April and the week of April 9:

  • Think about your one and only job when you’re behind the wheel: driving. #DriveHealthy: Hands on the wheel, mind on the road. Put your phone in the glove compartment or hand it to a passenger.  
  • When you’re a passenger, don’t let your driver drive distracted. Ask for their phone—you can answer, instead. Or put it in the glove compartment!
  • Pay attention all the time you’re driving, but especially when you see orange signs, barrels, cones and barricades. Stay alert in work zones.

2. Sherman County Lions Monthly Meeting, April 2

The Sherman County Lions will be holding its monthly meeting this coming Monday April 2nd at the Sherman County Senior and Community Center in the large meeting room at 12:00. Topics to be discussed include an update on progress for the new baseball fields located on the Sherman County School Districts property in Moro and potential partnerships and best use of Lions funds to serve its mission. Please join us for lunch and a discussion on how Lions can continue to serve our County. Welcome to all, Mike Smith Lions President


3. Letter to the Editor: Questions for Sherman County Judge Candidates

To the Editor:

Sherman County eNews’ issue #78 on March 26th editorial entitled “Let’s Ask Our Candidates for County Judge” listed a series of questions to the candidates.

As one of those candidates, I would like to say that they are very worthwhile to ask and I am glad to answer those or any other questions our citizens feel are important to make an informed decision as to who should serve as Sherman County Judge.

I will be working hard to meet with as many voters as possible and am glad to discuss questions and views on the position. Please feel free to invite me over for a chat to your home or ours or meet at a public place, call me at 541-306-1202, e-mail me at michaelsmith204@gmail.com, write to me at P.O. Box 127 Moro, Or 97039 or private message me on Facebook.

I hope I can talk to as many citizens as possible.

Respectfully,
Mike Smith
Candidate for Sherman County Judge


4. Petition: Pledge to Obey and Enforce Federal Immigration Law

PETITION TO YOUR GOVERNOR
TO TAKE THE PLEDGE TO OBEY & ENFORCE
FEDERAL IMMIGRATION LAW 

Whereas, the subject of illegal immigration enforcement in America is a matter of preeminent importance to each and every local, state and federal taxpayer and,

Whereas, it’s a fact that illegal immigration touches our lives in many ways: And without a doubt, a portion of the true costs of illegal immigration is in the local, state, and federal taxes we pay;

Whereas, a majority of Americans agree that the reason we have illegal immigration is that past federal, state and local enforcement efforts have been “grossly inadequate,” and;

Whereas, a modest estimate of the total net cost to American taxpayers each year is $113 BILLION.

Therefore, I, the undersigned taxpayer, call upon you to pledge that you will do everything in your power to uphold the rule of law and obey and enforce all laws against illegal immigration.

~Judicial Watch Petition Form https://www.judicialwatch.org/immigration/petition.html?source=69&utm_medium=display&utm_source=google&utm_campaign=20170309_Judicial-31202_google&utm_content=Judicial-31202


5. Proclamation: Sexual Assault Awareness Month, April 2018

Sexual Assault Awareness Month calls attention to the fact that sexual violence is widespread and impacts every person in this community. The goal is to raise public awareness about sexual violence and educate communities on how to prevent it. Rape, sexual assault, and sexual harassment harm our community, and statistics show one in five women and one in 67 men will be raped at some point in their lives (Smith et al., 2017).

Child sexual abuse prevention must be a priority to confront the reality that one in six boys and one in four girls will experience sexual assault before age 18 (Dube et al., 2005). On campus one in five women and one in 16 men are sexually assaulted during their time in college (Krebs, Lindquist, Warner, Fisher & Martin, 2007).

The theme of this year’s campaign is EMBRACE YOUR VOICE. The campaign informs individuals on how they can use their words to stop sexual violence before it happens by promoting safety, respect and equality. Our words shape the world around us. Whether you speak out against locker room talk or help someone better understand these issues, your voice is powerful and necessary in this conversation.

Individuals can embrace their voices to show their support for survivors, stand up to victim blaming, shut down rape jokes, correct harmful misconceptions, promote everyday consent, and practice healthy communication with kids.

I join advocates and communities across the country in taking action to prevent sexual violence. April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month and each day of the year is an opportunity to create change for the future.

/s/ Gary Thompson, Sherman County Judge 3/21/18/


6. Proclamation: National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 8-14

Whereas, Americans are the victims of 20 million crimes each year, affecting individuals and communities;

Whereas, years of investment in crime victims’ rights and services have developed a system of victim response that can help victims recover from crime;

Whereas, reaching and serving all victims of crime is essential to supporting thriving communities, because those who receive holistic services and support are more likely to remain invested in their communities;

Whereas, dedicated victim service providers are working every day to meet the needs of crime victims, yet there are still too many victims without meaningful access to rights and services;

Whereas, many victims face barriers – such as isolation, distrust of authorities, language limitations, lack of transportation, or cultural barriers – that keep them from accessing the services and criminal justice systems that can help them recover from crime;

Whereas, we must make a dedicated effort to expand the circle of those prepared to respond to victims and link them to the resources that can help them recover;

Whereas, engaging a broader array of healthcare providers, community leaders, faith organizations, educators, and businesses can provide new links between victims and services that improve their safety, healing and access to justice;

Whereas National Crime Victims’ Rights Week provides an opportunity to recommit to ensuring that all victims of crime – especially those who are challenging to reach or serve – are afforded their rights and receive a trauma-informed response; and

Whereas, Sherman County is hereby dedicated to strengthening victims and survivors in the aftermath of crime, building resilience in our communities and our victim responders, and working for justice for all victims and survivors.

Now, therefore, I, as County Judge of Sherman County, do hereby proclaim the week of April 8-14, 2018, as Crime Victims’ Rights Week,

And reaffirm this County’s commitment to creating a victim service and criminal justice response that assists all victims of crime during Crime Victims’ Rights Week and throughout the year; and to express our sincere gratitude and appreciation to those community members, victim service providers and criminal justice professionals who are committed to improving our response to all victims of crime so that they may find relevant assistance, support, justice and peace.

/s/ Gary Thompson, Sherman County Judge 3/21/18.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Patriot Post: Resurrection Day Meditations

Judicial Watch: Immigration Law Petition Form

Prager University: Let Kids Be Kids

American Thinker


 

Sherman County eNews #83

CONTENTS

  1. CLASSIFIEDS

  2. CALENDAR


1. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory Notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU TO ALL WHO VOLUNTEER! To all in Sherman County who volunteer on any level for any task, my most sincere thanks for what you do! Each day I am witness to the people of Sherman County performing selfless acts to help others. Many of these tasks are thankless, time consuming and inconvenient. We are blessed by your presence in our community. Your selfless actions make our county safer, healthier, better educated, more secure and more enjoyable. Time is our most valuable commodity it seems. Each of you who are willingly giving “us” your time and efforts are priceless. Please know that I appreciate you more than could possibly know. Thank you for what you do. ~ Solomon Jacobsen

Appreciation can make a day – even change a life.

Your willingness to put it into words

is all that is necessary.

~ Margaret Cousins

JOYFUL NEWS! 

WELCOME to The Times-Journal, Jessica Isley! ~Sherman County eNews

 COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER BOOK | SHERMAN COUNTY PHOTOGRAPHS. Hello, Sherman Countians! You may have heard rumors about the gorgeous 75-page full-color “coffee table” photo book we have put together featuring local photographers’ best photos of Sherman County. There is a book at the Senior Center in Moro where you may view one in person, and one at the Wasco School Events Center as well. Books will be between $55-$75, depending how many copies are pre-ordered. We’d like to get pre-orders in by March 31st and books will be here before Memorial Day. Proceeds will be donated to the Wasco School Events Center. Please call Kari Silcox 541-521-0073 if you have any questions or would like to order a copy. Thanks!   3/30

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES:

BUDGET COMMITTEE OPENINGS (3): The City of Moro has three (3) openings for the Budget Committee. The term is two years and is a Council appointed position. This position consists of one/two meetings yearly. Anyone interested in the above position should contact: Erik Glover, Moro City Administrator, 541-565-3535, moro@embarqmail.com or send a letter to: City of Moro, Attn: Budget Committee, PO BOX 231, Moro, OR 97039 by April 02, 2018. 3/30

EMPLOYMENT:

 EDUCATION COORDINATOR. North Central ESD Early Education has an opening for an Education Coordinator. This person will work closely with community Preschools and families throughout Wheeler and Sherman counties to ensure the Head Start program meets performance standards.

This person will be a support for teachers and families to enhance quality learning, interactions and positive parent-child relationships.Good oral and written communication skills, good interpersonal skills, keyboarding and computer skills, understand boundaries, nonjudgmental, culturally sensitive, organized, self-motivated and able to complete paperwork in a timely manner.

  • $14.17 – $20.17 Depending on experience
  • 32 hours/week with benefits
  • Hold current valid driver’s license and auto liability insurance
  • Willing to travel and attend multiple day out of town training’s
  • Preferred Bachelor’s degree in Early Childhood Education or in related field
  • Position will be open until filled.

Please submit resumes to Penny Grotting at pgrotting@ncesd.k12.or.us

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer. ––from Condon Chamber of Commerce posting.

ROAD MAINTENANCE POSITION. Sherman County Road Department is accepting applications for a Maintenance Worker. Applicant must possess a Class A CDL or have the ability to obtain one within six months of hire. The person will perform a variety of manual and skilled tasks involving heavy lifting; operating heavy and specialized equipment in the general construction and maintenance of county roads, bridges and related facilities. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. Applications are available on Sherman County’s website: co.sherman.or.us and the Sherman County Road Department (phone: 541-565-3271) in Moro, Oregon. All road department personnel are subject to random drug testing and before hiring, applicants will have to pass a drug test. The final day to accept applications will be April 10, 2018. 4/6
RETAIL & DELIVERY. Mid Columbia Producers is now hiring for multiple positions.

  • Full Time Retail Associate – Wasco, Oregon Closes 4/13
  • Full Time Petroleum Delivery Driver- Moro, Oregon Closes 3/31
  • Full Time Customer Service Representative- Bend, Oregon Closes: 3/31

For complete job descriptions please visit www.mcpcoop.com. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark

PO Box 344 Moro, OR 97039  Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  Brittany@mcpcoop.com

CUSTODIAN. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified custodial candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included.

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.

Application Method/Materials Required Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district) and resume if you are interested in the position to:

Wes Owens, Superintendent, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039

(541) 565-3500

wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will close on April 2, 2018.  Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer. 3/30

.5 PHYSICAL EDUCATION-HEALTH /.5 DEAN of STUDENT SUCCESS

Position Description:    

Sherman County School District is seeking a licensed 7-12 Physical Education/Health (.5 FTE) and Dean of Student Success (.5 FTE) to teach full time. The successful candidate will spend a portion of their day teaching Physical Education/Health and the other providing services that support the district in meeting its goals. This is a great opportunity for someone interested in pursuing a future position in administration.

The district is looking for applicants who have the ability to work as a team. Applicants should also have working knowledge of Common Core State Standards and effective teaching strategies. Moreover, prospective applicants must possess the ability to communicate with students, parents and colleagues. Numerous extended duty and coaching contracts are also available.

Campus Description: The Sherman County School is a K-12 progressive school with approximately 250 students, located in Moro, Oregon. The 2016-17 school year brought the opening of a new elementary wing and remodeled Jr./Sr. High School that joined as one modernized facility.

Application Process: If you are interested in applying for this position, please email Mike Somnis at msomnis@sherman.k12.or.us.  Mr. Somnis will provide you with an official application packet.

Application Requirements Shall Include:

  • Completed SCSD Application Form (Available from the School District)
  • Letter of Interest
  • Current Resume
  • Copy of Teaching License (or eligibility to obtain same)
  • Minimum of three (3) Letters of Recommendation (written within the last 3 years)
  • Copies of all transcripts
  • Other material as desired

This position will close on April 11, 2018. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing required.

Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 4/6

2018-19 ART TEACHER with OTHER ENDORSEMENTS

Position Description:  Sherman County School District is seeking a highly qualified Art teacher with other endorsement(s) to teach full time. The successful candidate will spend a portion of their day teaching Art and the other providing services dependent upon qualifications. The district is looking for applicants who have a strong understanding of Professional Learning Communities and the ability to work as a team. Applicants should also have working knowledge of Common Core State Standards and effective teaching strategies. Moreover, prospective applicants must possess the ability to communicate with students, parents and colleagues.  In addition, numerous extended duty and coaching contracts are also available.

Campus Description: The Sherman County School is a K-12 progressive school with approximately 250 students, located in Moro, Oregon. The 2016-17 school year brought the opening of a new elementary wing and remodeled Jr./Sr. High School that joined as one modernized facility.

Application Process: If you are interested in applying for this position, please email Mike Somnis at msomnis@sherman.k12.or.us.  Mr. Somnis will provide you with an official application packet.

Application Requirements Shall Include:

  • Completed SCSD Application Form (Available from the School District)
  • Letter of Interest
  • Current Resume
  • Copy of Teaching License (or eligibility to obtain same)
  • Minimum of three (3) Letters of Recommendation (written within the last 3 years)
  • Copies of all transcripts
  • Other material as desired

This position will close on April 11, 2018. Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing required.

Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 4/6

SPANISH TEACHER WITH OTHER DUTIES. Sherman County School District is seeking a highly qualified Spanish teacher with other endorsement(s) to teach full time ($37,807 – $54,347) for the 2018-19 school year. The successful candidate will spend a half day teaching Spanish and the other half teaching and providing services dependent upon qualifications. The district is looking for applicants that have a strong understanding of Professional Learning Communities and the ability to work as a team. Applicants should also have working knowledge of Common Core State Standards and effective teaching strategies. Moreover, prospective applicants must possess the ability to communicate with students, parents and colleagues effectively. This position will remain open until filled. See: https://www.google.com/search?q=Sherman+County+School+district+moro+oregon+positions+open&rlz=1C1GCEA_enUS782US782&oq=sherman+&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j0j69i59j69i60j69i57j69i60.4684j1j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

AGRICULTURE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY/CAREER TECHNICAL EDUCATION TEACHER

Position Description: Licensed Agriculture Science and Technology/Career Technical Education Teacher, 1.0 FTE, grades 7-12, Woodshop, Metal Shop, Welding, Diesel Mechanics, Agribusiness and/or Small Engines. Other classes will be dependent upon licensing and qualifications of successful candidate. Extended duty and coaching contracts may also be available.

See: https://www.google.com/search?q=Sherman+County+School+district+moro+oregon+positions+open&rlz=1C1GCEA_enUS782US782&oq=sherman+&aqs=chrome.0.69i59j0j69i59j69i60j69i57j69i60.4684j1j8&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

FOR SALE:

SHERMAN COUNTY BOOK | SHERMAN COUNTY PHOTOGRAPHS. Hello, Sherman Countians! You may have heard rumors about the gorgeous 75-page full color “coffee table” photo book we have put together featuring local photographers’ best photos of Sherman County. There is a book at the Senior Center in Moro where you may view one in person, and one at the Wasco School Events Center as well. Books will be between $55-$75, depending how many copies are pre-ordered. We’d like to get pre-orders in by March 31st and books will be here before Memorial Day. Proceeds will be donated to the Wasco School Events Center. Please call Kari Silcox 541-521-0073 if you have any questions or would like to order a copy. Thanks! 3/30

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE, NOVELTY GIFTS & FURNITURE REPAIR & REFINISHING. Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels and other reclaimed materials.  Special orders available.  Furniture repair and refinishing. ~The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282 | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/  4/6

LAND. RMLS# 17410095. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but in the country. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $50,000. Call Tiffany Hillman with Dryside Property @ 541-993-7006 5/1

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

FREE:

SERVICES:  

SHERMAN COUNTY PRESCHOOL EARLY ENROLLMENT. Sherman County Preschool is offering early enrollment packets to be mailed out or picked up during the month of March. We will be holding our regular Open House enrollment during April, but if you would like to receive an enrollment packet early, please contact the preschool at shermanpreschool@yahoo.com or call (541)565-3320. We especially encourage families who may be interested in Head Start services to enroll early as both Head Start agencies we contract with are going to be filling their spots during March and April. For more information on what Head Start is and what services are offered please visit https://umchs.com/ or http://ncesdee.wixsite.com/website. 3/30 

READY FOR HELP WITH THOSE SPRING PROJECTS?  Local Handyman/General Contractor/Equipment Operator.  Large and small projects. Indoors or Out. Please call Kevin – 541-993-4282 | KCK, Inc. | Licensed, bonded and insured. CCB #135768. References available. 4/6

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION:

 

WANTED:

EXCHANGE STUDENT HOST FAMILIES. Non-Profit Organization is Seeking Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students | ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to http://www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 


2. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

MARCH

26-30 Spring Break: Sherman County School District

30 Good Friday

31 North Sherman Rural Fire Department Egg Hunt & Easter Bunny 12 noon Rufus City Hall

31 SWCD Tree & Shrub Sale 8-12 Moro

 APRIL

1 Easter

2 Sherman County Blood Drive, Sherman County School

2 Sen. Ron Wyden Town Hall 10:30 Wheeler High School gym

2 Sen. Ron Wyden Town Hall 12:45 Condon High School

3 Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) Input Session 12 Sr. Center

3 Moro City Council 7 Moro City Hall

3 Rufus City Council 7 Rufus City Hall

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Church of Christ Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

4 Sen. Ron Wyden Town Hall 1:30 Sherman County School

5 Sherman County Fair Board 7

7 North Central Oregon Rural Skill Builder Training | Hood River

7 Crab or Ribeye Steak Feed 6 Condon Elks Lodge, Condon

9 Sherman County School District Board Meeting 7

10 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

10 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

10 North Central Public Health District 3 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30

11-13 Oregon Heritage Conference

12 EFT (Tapping) Techniques with Orice Klaas 6 Sherman Public/School Library

12 An Evening with Haven 5:30-8:30 The Fort Dalles Readiness Center

13 North Central Livestock Association Annual Bull Tour 7:30 The Dalles

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Speedsters & Racers

14-15 Shaniko Hoot, Hollar & Sing 541-489-3263 Shaniko, Oregon

17 Income Tax Day

18 Sherman County Court 9

19 Gilliam County Historical Society Monthly Meeting 3:30

20-22 Gorge Artists Open Studio

21 Super Women/Sidekick Sons Dinner and Dance 5 Wasco School Events Center

21-22 Blossom Craft & Quilt Show 10-5 Hood River County Fairgrounds, Odell

22 Earth Day

23 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office…everyone welcome!

23 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 2

23-24 Sherman County Budget Committee 8

25 Tri-County Court Meeting 10 Condon

26 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget 10 Board Meeting to Follow

26 Sherman County Book Club 6 Sherman Public/School Library

27 Arbor Day – Plant a tree!

27-29 39th Annual Cherry Festival – The Dalles

http://thedalleschamber.com/northwest-cherry-festival/

28 Cherry Festival Parade 10 The Dalles

28 Agriculture Job Fair 12-6 Cherry Festival, The Dalles

28-29 Oregon Ag Fest, Salem

29 Agriculture Job Fair 10-4 Cherry Festival, The Dalles

29-May 1 Oregon Cattlemen’s Mid-Year Conference 503-361-8941 Sunriver

MAY

1 Sherman County Historical Museum Opens for the Season

2 Gilliam County Museum Complex Opens for the Season

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Exec. Board Meeting 4

3 National Day of Prayer

3 Sherman County Fair Board 7

3 All County Prayer Meeting, Kent Baptist church (Thursday, National Day of Prayer) Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

4 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Meeting 10 NORCOR

5 Wasco County Pioneers’ Annual Reunion | Fort Dalles Readiness Center

7 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-1 Rufus

8 Sherman County Watershed Council 8

8 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board of Directors 11-2 The Dalles

8 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

8 V-E Day Declared 1945

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

12 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Popular Postwar Cars

13 Mother’s Day

15 ELECTION DAY

16 Sherman County Court 9

19 Armed Forces Day

24 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Budget Meeting 10 NORCOR

28 Memorial Day (observed)

30 Memorial Day 

JUNE

6 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Methodist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

9 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Steam Cars, Hit & Miss Engines

9 Rose Festival Parade, Portland

12 Experiment Station Field Day, Pendleton

13 Experiment Station Field Day, Moro

14 Flag Day

15 The June Bugs Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

16-17 A-Town Throwdown: Kite, SUP & Windsurf Competition, Arlington

17 Father’s Day

25 Korean War Began 1950

29 Home Run Derby, Condon

30-July 1 Harvester’s Classic Coed Soft Ball Tournament, Condon

JULY

4 Independence Day

4 HYATUS Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

4 All County Prayer Meeting, Grass Valley Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

8-11 Portland Horseless Carriage Club Tour: Journey Through Time Scenic Byway, John Day

7 Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

7 14th Annual Fossil Cruz-in 9-4 Fossil

9-15 Summer Fishtrap Gathering (Writers in the American West) Wallowa Lake

14 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Traffic Jam Show

27 Korean War Ended 1953, National Korean War Veterans Armistice Day

28 WWI Began 1914

AUGUST

1 All County Prayer Meeting, Rufus Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

3 Jawbone Flats Concert 6:30 & Artisans’ Market 4-7, Condon City Park

7 Vietnam War Began 1964

11 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Helicopters

SEPTEMBER

2 V-J Day WW II Japanese Surrender 1945

3 Labor Day

5 All County Prayer Meeting, Moro Presbyterian Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

8-9 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Hood River Fly-In

11 Patriot Day & National Day of Service & Remembrance

23 Autumn Begins

OCTOBER

3 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Church of Christ Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

7 Afghanistan War Began 2001

8 Columbus Day (observed)

12 Columbus Day

13 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Antique Gliders & Bikes

31 Halloween

NOVEMBER

4 Day Light Saving Time Ends (set back clock one hour)

6 Election Day

7 All County Prayer Meeting, Kent Baptist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

10 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Military Vehicles

11 Veterans Day

12 Veterans Day (observed)

22 Thanksgiving Day

DECEMBER

5 All County Prayer Meeting, Wasco Methodist Church Refreshments and social time at 6:30, prayer time from 7:00 to 8:30.

7 National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day

8 War Declared on Japan 1941

8 Western Antique Aeroplane and Automobile Museum 9 Flying Around the World

15 Bill of Rights Day; Iraq War Ended 2011

21 Winter Begins

25 Christmas Day

31 Official End of WWII 1946


 

Sherman County eNews #82

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman Museum Opens with New Exhibit & Preview, April 29

  2. Writing Tips: Quotation Marks, Periods & Commas

  3. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Exec. Session, April 4

  4. Sherman Extension Hosts Drama Camp, Wins Drama Production Package

  5. Medicare & Medicaid to Issue New Medicare Cards to Beneficiaries

  6. Public Input Sought for Area Agency on Aging Service Area

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Another not unimportant consideration is, that the powers of the general government will be, and indeed must be, principally employed upon external objects, such as war, peace, negotiations with foreign powers, and foreign commerce.” —Joseph Story (1833)


1. Sherman Museum Opens with New Exhibit & Preview, April 29

m_returnThe Sherman County Historical Museum opening for the season is right around the corner on May 1, in Moro, Oregon. For this 2018 season the museum has a new temporary exhibit to share, “From This Day Forward,” a wedding exhibit. We are so excited about our new exhibit we will be having a Preview Event on Sunday, April 29th from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Museum. We will be having a ‘reception’ with wedding cake and refreshments!

Museum volunteers invite the community to share their wedding photo to be displayed alongside wedding photos from our archives. Be part of history and be part of our photo display! Another reason to visit the museum is to see the creative work of the Sherman Elementary Students that are the local featured artists for the month of May.

The museum is always looking for volunteer Museum Hosts to greet our visitors at the Museum and the Sherman County Visitor Center. Our volunteers are very important to our National Award Winning museum and it is how we keep our doors open every day to share our local history. Please call 541-565-3232 and consider being a volunteer at the museum!

The Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon and will be open every day from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 1st through October 31st. For more information, please call 541-565-3232.


2. Writing Tips: Quotation Marks, Periods & Commas

pencil.spiralThe most common question people ask about quotation marks is whether periods and commas go inside or outside, and the answer depends on where your audience lives because in American English we always put periods and commas inside quotation marks, but in British English periods and commas can go inside or outside

See more here: https://www.quickanddirtytips.com/education/grammar/how-to-use-quotation-marks


3. Public Notice. Sherman County Court Exec. Session, April 4

ShermanCoLogoDuring the April 4, 2018 Court session, Sherman County Court will meet in executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Public Records, for the purpose of internet security.

 


4. Sherman Extension Hosts Drama Camp and Wins Drama Production Package

girl.hopOregon State University Sherman County Extension hosted a fun “spring break drama day camp” Monday, March 26 through Wednesday, March 29 at the Fairgrounds in Moro.  Thirty-seven youth ages 5 to 14 enjoyed a great variety of activities including drama games, creating “shapes” with the group, using their bodies and voices to tell a story, singing and dancing, and presenting short skits each day to their adult audience.

First time “rookie director” Cindy Brown, 4-H Youth Development/SNAP-Ed Educator, relied on curriculum available on-line from Beat to Beat Press.  This included two “e-books”:  Teaching Drama: The Essential Handbook (with 16 ready-to-go lessons to build a better actor) and Drama Games for Kids.  After purchasing the e-books, she completed the company’s on-line survey about its website.  On Thursday, March 30, Brown was notified that OSU Sherman County Extension was the first place winner from a drawing by Beat to Beat Press.  The prize was a Production Kit to any of the kids’ musicals offered by Beat to Beat Press, up to a $299 value.  This Kit includes an Actor Book, Director Book, Piano Vocal Score and Logo Pack in a digital download, plus the Accompaniment CD and Vocal CD.

OSU Sherman County Extension is looking forward to offering more fun, entry-level drama activities to serve Sherman County youth in the future.


 

5. Medicare & Medicaid to Issue New Medicare Cards to Beneficiaries

–Beneficiaries Need to be Aware that this is Not a Scam . . .

Beginning in April 2018, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) will start mailing new Medicare cards to all people with Medicare. A new alpha-numeric identifier will replace the current Social Security Number-based identifier. This roll-out will occur over a several month period, based upon the geographic location of the Medicare beneficiary.

MedicaidCards.Old.New2018

There are concerns that people might believe that this is a “scam,” and therefore, will ignore notifications or throw new identification cards away.

If you are a Medicare beneficiary, please watch your mail closely over the next few months for notifications from Medicare relating to this change. Medicare beneficiaries should begin bringing their new card with them to healthcare visits as soon as they receive it. Here is the way this will work:

*NEWLY ELIGIBLE Medicare beneficiaries will get a card with a unique number, regardless of their geographic location.

*Distribution of cards for current beneficiaries will be randomized by geographic location. Residents of OREGON AND CALIFORNIA, along with other states and territories will begin receiving their new Medicare cards between April and June 2018. Residents of WASHINGTON can expect to start receiving their new cards after June 2018

*Starting in APRIL, people with Medicare will be able to go to Medicare.gov/newcard to sign up for emails about the card mailing, and to check the card mailing status in their state.

*People with Medicare should use the new card once they receive it, but either the Social Security Number-based (old) card or the new random alphanumeric-based numbers can be used through December 2019.

*Beginning January 1, 2020, only the new card will be usable.

*For more information, please visit: https://www.cms.gov/medicare/new-medicare-card/nmc-home.html


 6. Public Input Sought for Area Agency on Aging Service Area

Salem, Ore. — Oregon Department of Human Services — The Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) program within the Department of Human Services will host a series of public meetings in April to seek input on the creation of a new service area for the Area Agency on Aging (AAA) in Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler, Umatilla and Morrow counties.

AAAs in Oregon are designated by APD, under the Older Americans Act, to offer services that help older adults remain in their homes.

The proposed new Planning and Service Area stems from APD’s recent public process to designate the Community Action Program of East Central Oregon (CAPECO) as the AAA to serve Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties. CAPECO also currently administers the AAA in Umatilla and Morrow counties.

Federal law and state rules dictate how APD designates a new Planning and Service Area. In accordance with state rule, APD will hold public meetings and seek public comment on the change in service area boundaries to include seven counties.

APD sought a new entity to assume the role of the AAA in Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Gilliam and Wheeler counties when the former administrator, the Mid-Columbia Council of Governments, announced it would cease providing services under all its programs this past fall. APD assumed administration of the AAA on February 1, 2018, and will continue until the program is transitioned to CAPECO on or about September 1, 2018.

APD’s public meetings seeking public comment on the change in service area boundaries will be held from April 2 to April 11 at the following locations:

Wasco County – 1 p.m., April 2, Mid-Columbia Senior Center, 1112 W. 9th St., The Dalles, OR 97058

Sherman County Noon, April 3, Sherman County Senior & Community Center, 300 Dewey Street Moro, OR  97039

Wheeler County – 1 p.m., April 4, Fossil Senior Meal Site, Wheeler County Fairgrounds, 702 3rd St. Fossil, OR  97830

Gilliam County – Noon, April 5, United Church of Christ Condon Senior Meal Site, 110 S. Church St. Condon, OR 97823

Hood River County – 1 p.m., April 6, at the Hood River Valley Adult Center, 2010 Sterling Place, Hood River, OR  97031

Umatilla County – Noon, April 10, Milton Freewater Senior Center, 311 N. Main, Milton Freewater, OR 97862

Morrow County Noon, April 11, St. Patrick’s Senior Center, 182 N. Main, Heppner, OR 97836

The meeting locations are accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility, to request an accommodation or to get more information about the meetings, please contact APD Program Analyst Debbie McCuin at (541) 301-1672 or debbie.mccuin@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.Envelope Travel Oregon | Places to Go | Things to Do

Trump’s Religious Upbringing and Faith Journey Chronicled in New Book

Atheist Richard Dawkins Warns Christianity Could be Replaced by ‘Something Worse’=

Incredibly Detailed Map Of The World’s Religions

NEWSMAX. Independent. American.

US, Mexico Open New Maritime Front in Drug War

Interview with God

 

Gun Ownership Rates by State


 

Sherman County eNews #81

CONTENTS

  1. World War II Camp Rufus Sign Dedication, April 18

  2. Editorial Note. Precinct Committeepersons and Candidates for Appointment

  3. End of Month Analysis

  4. Sherman County eNews Policies: News & Letters to the Editor

  5. Ked Al Dejmal 1934-2018

  6. Writing Tips: Sixties, 60’s or ’60s

  7. Help ODOT plan the future of the Columbia Gorge Express: Share your thoughts by April 9

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Enlighten the people, generally, and tyranny and oppressions of body and mind will vanish like spirits at the dawn of day.” ~Thomas Jefferson

“Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted.” ~Vladimir Lenin, communist protagonist


1. World War II Camp Rufus Sign Dedication, April 18

SCHM_clr_wtOn Wednesday, April 18, at 11:00 a.m. in Moro, Oregon, the Sherman County Historical Society will be dedicating the sign that tells the story of the military training site Camp Rufus.

From December 1944 to April of 1945, during WWII, a Combat Engineer Battalion, Heavy Pontoon Engineers along with an Engineer Maintenance Company totaling around 1,000 men camped along the Columbia River west of Rufus, Oregon. The weather in Rufus closely resembled that of the actual weather and river conditions which helped with the experimental construction of pontoon bridges for the proposed bridging of the Rhine River during WWII. The Kaiser shipyards in Portland, Oregon, made the newly developed parts of the bridge and all of the information about this project in Camp Rufus was carefully guarded. During WWII the Ludendorff Bridge over the Rhine River was saved and not completely destroyed but soon failed and the pontoon bridges were needed to cross the river during the war.

This history will now be displayed and shared at two locations after generous donations to have these signs built. One sign is outside of the Sherman County Historical Museum and the other along the Biggs/Rufus Highway near Rufus, Oregon. Thank you to Nell Melzer, Del Peake and Dick Tobiason for taking on this Camp Rufus project and preserving part of our Sherman County history.

The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information call 541-565-3232.


2. Editorial Note. Precinct Committeepersons and Candidates for Appointment

pencil.sharpQ. How are vacant commissioner positions on the County Court filled?

A. (briefly) The process is like the one that led to Tom McCoy’s appointment to a county commissioner position. Elected precinct committeepersons advertise for candidates (Republican only in this case because the position was vacated by a Republican), interview and then send 3-5 names to the County Court for consideration. This part of the process is governed by Republican party rules.

The County Court then makes the decision. If they can’t agree the position stays vacant until next election. This latter part of the process is governed by state statute.


3. End of Month Analysis

So, here we are, nearing the end of March, which was designated National Optimism Month in the U.S. Earlier this month, we challenged you to make a conscious effort to notice the negative, then another conscious effort to turn each negative around to a positive. How did you do? It was probably easy to notice the negative. The challenge came in turning the negative to a positive.

As Lou Tice once said, “The first thing I realized was just how negative the world around me really was. I hadn’t heard it before, but once I became aware, I couldn’t hang around in the teacher’s lunchroom. The negativity actually soured me on lunch!

“Just getting away from the negative conversations wasn’t enough. I needed to take hold of the world around me. First, I needed to internally refute the negativity I was hearing, and change the picture in my mind to a more positive one. Then, once I was more confident and comfortable with in my internal conversation, it was time to externally stop the negativity, by literally saying, “Stop. No more. This isn’t helping the situation. What if…” and then I’d go on to paint the picture of a solution rather than continue to dwell on the problem.”

If this whole idea of taking a negative and rephrasing – or reframing – the conversation into the positive is new to you, then this will take a little practice. However, it is possible, and the more you do it, the easier it becomes. In no time at all, it becomes automatic for you, as this new habit pattern becomes a part of who you are.

Once you get the hang of it, and become mindfully effective at moving to the positive, it’s almost a guarantee that you will be calmer, happier, and able to handle whatever comes your way. And those around you? Well, they will want to be just like you. Go ahead, give them the secret. Maybe it’s time optimism goes viral . . . ~The Pacific Institute


4. Sherman County eNews Policies: News & Letters to the Editor

sherrycaricatureNEWS RELEASES. Please submit event and information news, meeting notices and calendar dates by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, how & why with contact or source information. As appropriate, follow up with news of event results. Links are welcome. Text, please; no posters or flyers. Keep it relevant, no longer than 350 words.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. We encourage letters to the Editor that focus on ideas and opinions about public issues and events rather than personalities or private matters. We reserve the right to change policies at any time and to reject or edit any Letter to the Editor.

  • Keep it short, no longer than 350 words.
  • Keep it simple with one or two clear points. No attachments.
  • Keep it fresh with no more than one letter per writer per month.
  • Keep it civilized, in good taste and free from libel.
  • Keep it relevant; focus on a local event, previous letter or issues of general concern – not personalities.
  • Letters must be signed, name and town. Anonymous letters will not be posted.
  • Please submit Letters to the Editor by using the Submit News page.

5. Ked Al Dejmal 1934-2018

flower.rose.starKed Al Dejmal, of Eugene, OR passed away on March 14, 2018 at the age of 83. He was born in Chester, Nebraska on December 15, 1934 to Amos and Naomi (Peake) Dejmal. He grew up near Ontario, OR, and graduated from Ontario High School where he was active in FFA. He was awarded the State Farmer degree by the FFA.

Ked started college at Boise Junior College and graduated from Eastern Oregon College in La Grande, OR where he met his wife Nina Marie Belshee. They were married for 53 years before she preceded him in death in 2014. Ked earned a Masters of Science in Education from Eastern Oregon College in August of 1962. He taught in Harper, Oregon (2 years) and Sweet Home, Oregon (5 years) before moving to Eugene to teach middle school science at Spencer Butte Junior High/Middle School until he retired in 1990.

Ked served in the National Guard for 8½ years. He enjoyed woodworking, bee keeping, traveling, short term missions trips, gardening, and running The Tree Patch, a U-cut Christmas tree business. Hunting geese with his father-in-law, Russel Belshee, was always a highlight of his year. He and his wife Nina were members of Bethel Danebo Baptist Church in Eugene followed by Eugene Friends Church where they donated many hours of volunteer service. He enjoyed being part of Volunteers on Wheels where he and Nina traveled to various locations to be part of different work projects. He was an Everence Advocate for 22 years.

Ked was predeceased by his son Alan Russel Dejmal and his wife Nina. He leaves behind daughter Sheri (Carlin) Hagen of Janesville, CA and their sons Alan Wayne Hagen of Shafter, CA, and Ethan (Sydney) Hagen of Sacramento, CA; and daughter Lynette (Dan) Andersen and their sons Nathan Ked Andersen, Joshua Spencer Andersen, and Luke Daniel Andersen, all of Vale, OR; brother Roger (Libby) Dejmal of Roseburg, OR; niece Lori (Cory) Schwepler and their 5 children; nephew Scott (Kim) Dejmal and their daughter; and many friends. He will be remembered for his love of God, his family, and other people, and his generosity and sense of humor.

A Memorial Service will be held Sunday, April 8 at 2 pm at Eugene Friends Church, 3495 West 18th Avenue in Eugene, OR. In lieu of flowers, memorial gifts may be sent to Eugene Friends Church, 3495 W 18th Ave, Eugene, OR 97402 marked Ked Dejmal Missions Fund.


6. Writing Tips: Sixties, 60’s or ’60s

When referring to a year, always use numerals. Do not spell out a year. It is acceptable to spell out a decade span and to abbreviate a decade span on second reference. 

When abbreviating a decade span, put an apostrophe before the numbers (facing the correct way) but NOT before the “s.” A decade cannot possess anything! 

NOT 60’s, but ’60s. 

Examples: He graduated in 1992. The nineties were a great decade. He thinks the ’90s were overrated. 

~ http://newsroom.unl.edu/announce/snr/2789/15239


 7. Help ODOT plan the future of the Columbia Gorge Express: Share your thoughts by April 9

PORTLAND – Following a successful pilot in 2016 and 2017, the Columbia Gorge Express is expanding in 2018. ODOT is seeking public feedback through an online survey to refine the service plan for season three as well as the long-term vision. 

The survey is available until April 9 at https://survey.participate.online/s3/CGE-2018.

Expanded transit service in the Gorge will help address congestion and safety while improving access for Gorge residents and visitors. ODOT is planning the following improvements in 2018:

  • Extended service with new stops in Cascade Locks and Hood River
  • Service seven days a week starting in June 2018
  • A new and improved schedule

In 2017, 99 percent of surveyed riders said they would recommend the Columbia Gorge Express to others. Public input gathered through the online survey will ensure the new and improved service continues to meet riders’ needs and provides a fun, convenient and reliable travel option. The survey asks questions about schedules, stop amenities, fares and future destinations the Gorge Express could serve.

The Columbia Gorge Express offers an inexpensive and hassle-free way to visit some of the Gorge’s most popular destinations. The service also increases access for visitors who do not have access to a car. All buses are wheelchair accessible and can accommodate bikes.

For more information, go to http://www.ColumbiaGorgeExpress.com or contact info@columbiagorgeexpress.com.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

bird.owl3Sherman County Sheriff’s Facebook Photos: Courthouse Cupola

Sherman County Facebook

Bend Summer Concerts

U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden Gains an Influential Ally in His Battle for Hemp

A Quiet Win at the U.S. Department of Education

In Defense of ‘Gunsplaining’


 

Sherman County eNews #80

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Prevention: Super Women/Sidekick Sons Dinner & Dance, April 21

  2. KIDDE Smoke Alarm Recall

  3. Relationships and Change

  4. U.S. Census: How Our Data Are Used

  5. An Amazing 2 Letter English Word

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center April Meal Menu

  7. Columbia Gorge Community College Announces Next President

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Prevention: Super Women/Sidekick Sons Dinner & Dance, April 21

boy.telephonetalkWhat: Super Women/Sidekick Sons Dinner and Dance aka Mother/Son Dance

With: Optional Super Hero Costume Contest. Attire as casual or formal as you want. Childcare provided for siblings.

Registration: Ends April 14th in order to plan for food and childcare.

Who: No need for blood relation if you are the mother figure in a young man’s life, age 3-12, please joins us for FUN, FOOD, Photographer, DJ and MEMORIES.

Where: Wasco School Event Center

When: April 21st 2018 @ 5 p.m.

Cost: Free…nonperishable food item donations for the Sherman County Food Bank are GREATLY encouraged.

Questions? Volunteer? Willing to volunteer to make this a successful event?

THIS IS A DRUG AND ALCOHOL FREE EVENT

Contact:

Amy Asher

Sherman County Prevention Coordinator/Outreach Coordinator

Office: 541-565-5036

aasher@co.sherman.or.us


2. KIDDE Smoke Alarm Recall

arrow-rightOregon State Fire Marshal —- On March 21, 2018, Kidde issued a recall of 452,000 dual sensor (photoelectric and ionization) smoke alarms sold in the United States. The smoke alarms have the model numbers PI2010 (AC/hardwired) and PI9010 (DC/battery powered). “KIDDE” is printed on the front center of the smoke alarm. The model number and date code are printed on the back of the alarm.

Kidde states that a yellow protective cap in limited instances may have been left on one of the two smoke sensors during the manufacturing process, which could compromise the smoke alarms’ ability to detect smoke.

Consumers should remove the alarm from the wall/ceiling and visually inspect it through the opening on the side of the alarm for the presence of a yellow cap. Consumers should not attempt to take apart the alarm, open the casing, or otherwise remove the cap themselves. If the yellow cap is present, the consumer should immediately contact Kidde to receive instructions and request a free replacement alarm. They should remove the recalled smoke alarm ONLY AFTER they receive and install the replacement alarm. If no yellow cap is present, consumers should reinstall the smoke alarm and no further action is needed.

Alarms were sold at Menards, The Home Depot, Walmart and other department, home, and hardware stores nationwide and online at Amazon.com, ShopKidde.com, and other websites from September 2016 through January 2018 for between $20 and $40.

For more information, visit the Kidde website: https://kidde-smoke-alarm-recallusen.expertinquiry.com/ or the Consumer Product Safety Commission website: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2018/kidde-recalls-dual-sensor-smoke-alarms-due-to-risk-of-failure-to-alert-consumers-to-a

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal’s Smoke Alarm Installation Program does not distribute Kidde smoke alarms, therefore alarms issued by the OSFM to Oregon fire agencies, the American Red Cross Cascades Region, or other organizations are not affected by this recall.

For more information on smoke alarms, visit the OSFM Smoke Alarm Information Center: http://www.oregon.gov/osp/SFM/Pages/CommEd_SA_Program.aspx


3. Relationships and Change

What happens to an ongoing relationship when you decide to change? Let’s try to answer this important question today.

As you move forward with your plans for personal growth and change, there is bound to be a consequent change in your closest relationships. You see, your personal changes may be threatening to a partner who is uncomfortable or insecure with change. You may find yourself facing spoken or unspoken messages that say, in essence, “Change back! You can’t grow because I don’t want you to!”

If this happens, it is up to you to decide what is best to do. You may choose to return to your old self and not change. Or you may decide that you cannot afford to not change, and choose to forge ahead with your plans.

If you reach an impasse and the situation gets too rough, you may choose to leave the relationship or you may choose to take the risk of change and work toward helping your partner change. Of course, it won’t be helpful to push her or him into change. It needs to be seen as something desirable, so painting a visual and verbal picture of the benefits both of you would receive is probably the way to go.

Be patient and persistent, and try to put yourself in the other person’s shoes. Demonstrate self-respect and respect for your significant other as well. If real caring and intimacy exist in your relationship, almost any change can be worked out, and will eventually be another reaffirmation of your love and commitment to each other. ~The Pacific Institute


 4. U.S. Census: How Our Data Are Used

To determine the distribution of Congressional seats to states:

  • Mandated by the U.S. Constitution
  • Used to apportion seats in the U.S. House of Representatives
  • Used to define legislature districts, school district assignment areas and other important functional areas of government

To make planning decisions about community services, such as where to:

  • Provide services for the elderly
  • Build new roads and schools
  • Locate job training centers
  • To distribute more than $675 billion in federal funds to local, state and tribal governments each year.

Census data informs how states and communities allocate funding for:

  • Neighborhood improvements
  • Public health
  • Education
  • Transportation
  • Much more

To provide Age Search information for:

  • Qualifying for Social Security and other retirement benefits
  • Passport applications
  • Proving relationship in settling estates
  • Researching family history or a historical topic

~https://www.census.gov/about/what.html


 5. An Amazing 2 Letter English Word

A reminder that one word in the English language that can be a noun, verb, adjective, adverb and preposition:  UP      

Read until the end …  you’ll laugh.         

This two-letter word in English has more meanings than any other two-letter word, and that word is ‘UP.’  It is listed in the dictionary as an [adv.], [prep.], [adj.], [n] or [v].      

It’s easy to understand UP, meaning toward the sky or at the top of the list, but when we awaken in the morning, why do we wake UP?  

At a meeting, why does a topic come UP?  Why do we speak UP, and why are the officers UP for election and why is it UP to the secretary to write UP a report?  We call UP our friends, brighten UP a room, polish UP the silver, warm UP the leftovers and clean UP the kitchen.  We lock UP the house and fix UP the old car.            

At other times, this little word has real special meaning. People stir UP trouble, line UP for tickets, work UP an appetite, and think UP excuses.      

To be dressed is one thing but to be dressed UP is special. And this UP is confusing:  A drain must be opened UP because it is stopped UP.

We open UP a store in the morning but we close it UP at night.  We seem to be pretty mixed UP about UP!      

To be knowledgeable about the proper uses of UP, look UP the word UP in the dictionary.  In a desk-sized dictionary, it takes UP almost 1/4 of the page and can add UP to about thirty definitions.            

If you are UP to it, you might try building UP a list of the many ways UP is used. It will take UP a lot of your time, but if you don’t give UP, you may wind UP with a hundred or more.      

When it threatens to rain, we say it is clouding UP.  When the sun comes out, we say it is clearing UP.  When it rains, the earth soaks it UP.  When it does not rain for a while, things dry UP.  One could go on and on, but I’ll wrap it UP, for now . . . my time is UP!      

Oh . . . one more thing:  What is the first thing you do in the morning and the last thing you do at night?  U  P!  Did that one crack you UP?


6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center April Meal Menu

April 2018

  We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served. 

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
2 3 4 5 6
Chicken ala King Ham & Broccoli Quiche Beef Burgundy/Noodles Pork Carnitas Split Pea/Ham Soup
Biscuits & Veggies Cran-Apple Muffins Veggies & Salad Mexican Rice & Tortillas Dinner Rolls & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
9 10 11 12 13
French Dip Sandwich Hot Turkey Sandwich Baked Ham Hamburger Gravy over Mac & Cheese w/Ham
Potato Wedges, Salad Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Cheesy Potatoes Mashed Potatoes Veggies & Salad
Veggies & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Dessert
16 17 18 19 20
Cheeseburgers Chicken Tetrazzini Meatloaf Oriental Chicken Pizza loaded w/ Meat
Potato Wedges Veggies & Salad Mashed potatoes/Gravy Rice Pilaf & Veggies Veggies & Salad
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Dessert
23 24 25 26 27
Oven Fried Chicken Ham Fried Rice Chicken Fried Steak Sweet & Sour Meatballs Baked Potato Bar
Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Veggies & Salad Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Rice Pilaf w/ Chili & Cheese
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad, Veggies & Dessert
30 Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.

 
Tuna/Salmon Casserole  
Veggies & Salad  
Dessert  

7. Columbia Gorge Community College Announces Next President

After eight months and a field of 44 applicants, Columbia Gorge Community College’s board of education Tuesday night approved a contract with Dr. Marta Yera Cronin as CGCC’s next president. The decision was unanimous.

Cronin, vice president of academic affairs at Indian River State College in Florida, will become the third president since CGCC was established in 1977. During her tenure there, Indian River was twice selected as a finalist for the prestigious Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence.

She emerged with a strong vote of confidence from the board after extensive on-campus interviews with four well-regarded finalists.

“Marta’s combination of experience innovating new programs, working with a diverse student population, and guiding faculty professional development promise great things for CGCC,” said board chair Stu Watson. “She is assertive, creative and passionate about making CGCC a destination – for students and residents of the Gorge community.”

Led by board vice chair Lee Fairchild, a search committee involving a broad mix of Gorge residents spent days reviewing applications from across the country. They selected 10 semifinalists for on-line interviews in February.

That process helped the committee trim its list of top candidates to the final four, also including Dr. Leanne Frost, of Great Falls College-Montana State University, MT; Dr. Paul Jarrell, of Santa Barbara City College, CA., and Dr. Sara Thompson Tweedy, of SUNY Westchester, NY. Campus visits by the four finalists included meetings with faculty and staff, college leadership, the community and board of education.

“Marta brings impressive experience working with staff and faculty to improve student success,” Fairchild said. “In the face of tight budgets, she also showed a track record of success in securing more than $12 million in grants. She loves to work with her team to leverage limited resources for new programs. We’re excited to have her talents and experience at CGCC.”

Cronin is fluent in three languages. She studied French as an undergraduate at the University of Miami, earned her master’s in reading from Barry University, Miami Shores, FL, and received a Doctorate of Education in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Sarasota (now Argosy University-Sarasota), FL. Before moving to Indian River, she taught French, Spanish and reading in public high schools. At Indian River, Cronin helped develop a teacher education bachelor’s degree program, helped reform math instruction, and convened 11 Florida colleges to collaborate on an $8.3 million federal grant. She currently serves as president of the Florida Association of Colleges of Teacher Education, and was chosen as a leadership fellow to the American Association of Community Colleges National Community College Hispanic Council.

After a period of personal and professional transition, Cronin will assume her leadership role at CGCC July 1, 2018. Chief academic officer Lori Ufford continues as the college’s interim president prior to that date.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyPendleton Underground Tunnels

Second Largest Tree

U.S. Census Bureau

 

California to sue Trump admin over citizenship question in 2020 census


 

Sherman County eNews #79

CONTENTS

  1. Discover the art and passion of tango!

  2. Commitment is Key

  3. Class: How Communication Influences Care in the Non-dementia Adult Population

  4. Oregon’s 142nd Fighter Wing F-15s deployed to Leeuwarden Air Base, Netherlands

  5. National Vietnam War Veterans Day, March 29

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Discover the art and passion of tango!

music.notes (2)Join us at Maryhill Museum of Art on Saturday, March 31, as we kick-off another season of tango! With the Columbia Gorge as a backdrop, tango at Maryhill will engage your senses and transform your spirit. Beginning, novice and more experienced dancers are invited to take a lesson at 6 p.m. followed by dancing until 9 p.m. Come with a partner or solo; all levels welcome. Light refreshments included.

Cost: $7 Maryhill Museum of Art members / $10 nonmembers. Registration preferred; but not required. To reserve, call 509.773.3733 ext. 25. To gain entry after hours, please use the glass doors to the Mary and Bruce Stevenson Wing just off the Cannon Power Plaza.

Mark your calendar for all of our Tango events in 2018: April 28, May 19, June 23, July 28, September 1, September 29 and October


2. Commitment is Key

key.goldThere is no question about it: Commitment is a key to success whether it’s in a marriage, a business, personal and professional growth, or sports – an example we use today.

What made Larry Bird one of the best players in basketball? He was considered slow, and many thought he could not jump. Sometimes it almost looked like he was playing in slow motion. But Larry Bird succeeded as a player because he was totally dedicated to success. He practiced more, played harder, and had more mental toughness than most of his competitors. He got more out of his talents than almost anyone did.

The same was true with Tom Watson, the great golfer. Tom was nothing special at Stanford, considered just another kid on the team. Long after college, his coach still talked about him, saying, “I never saw anyone practice more.”

Russell Wilson, quarterback of the NFL Champion Seattle Seahawks, has always been considered too short to play the pivotal position. But it is his dedication to improving at every practice and every game, constantly watching film of upcoming opponents, and ultimately, goal-setting to do whatever is necessary to win each game that has made him a football household name, of late.

You see, the difference in physical skills between athletes doesn’t tell you much. It’s the quality of their commitment that separates the good players from the great. People who are committed to success are willing to do whatever it takes, as long as it doesn’t harm anyone else. Everything they do reflects their commitment.

Ask yourself the following questions and think about your answers: “How strong is my commitment – to my career, my relationships, my personal growth? How much of my time and energy do I give these things? Do the results I get reflect my level of commitment?”

Now here is another question for you to consider: How do you feel about your answers? ~The Pacific Institute 


 3. Class: How Communication Influences Care in the Non-dementia Adult Population

Oregon Care Partners

Class: How Communication Influences Care in the Non-dementia Adult Population

FREE to those who live or work in Oregon

Saturday, April 7th, 12:30 p.m.-5:00 p.m.

Check-in starts at 12:00 p.m.

Mid-Columbia Medical Center

1810 E. 19th Street

The Dalles, OR 97058

Free CEUs 4 available for qualified professionals.

How does your personal communication style impact the person in your care, especially those who are experiencing challenging behaviors? This intensive, self-discovery class will focus on identifying your individual style of communication and how you read and respond to stressful situations. An expert instructor will help you see how biases, belief systems and assumptions can impact how you respond to a challenging behavior and will help you learn how changing your behavior and finding new ways to respond can create a more positive outcome.

Register here:

https://oregoncarepartners.com/classes/in-person/how-communication-influences-care-in-the-non-dementia-adult-population-40/

Oregon Care Partners helps caregivers improve the lives and care for aging Oregonians by providing access to no-cost, high quality trainings in all corners of the state. Professional and family caregivers, administrators and members of the public are encouraged to sign up for free classes and learn more at www.OregonCarePartners.com.


4. Oregon’s 142nd Fighter Wing F-15s deployed to Leeuwarden Air Base, Netherlands

American flag2RAMSTEIN AIR BASE, Germany — The U.S. Air Force deployed F-15s from the 142nd Fighter Wing, Portland, Oregon, and the 104th Fighter Wing, Westfield, Massachusetts, to Leeuwarden Air Base, Netherlands, as part of a Theater Security Package in support of Operation Atlantic Resolve.

Nearly 260 Airmen from the 142nd Fighter Wing deployed with the aircraft as the 123rd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron. Approximately 40 Airmen from the 52nd Fighter Wing, Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, will support the 123rd EFS for this mission.

Since 2015 the U.S. Air Force schedules and deploys force packages of fighters and tankers throughout the U.S. European Command area of responsibility. TSP deployments to Europe vary in length and are supported with total force aircraft and Airmen from stateside units.

Once in theater, the aircraft will forward deploy to multiple locations throughout the theater, participating in exercises and training with our allies and partners. This highlights the United States’ ability to deploy fighter aircraft to support our partners and allies in the European theater, and around the world.

The 123rd EFS will conduct training missions from Leeuwarden Air Base, Netherlands, Royal Air Force Lakenheath, U.K., and Graf Ignatievo, Bulgaria, and will participate in Frisian Flag 2018, a Royal Netherlands Air Force-led exercise.

The TSP supports Operation Atlantic Resolve, and is funded by the European Deterrence Initiative. Activities funded through EDI increase the capability and readiness of U.S. forces, allowing for a faster response in the event of any aggression by a regional adversary against NATO sovereign territory.


5. National Vietnam War Veterans Day, March 29

Oregon.Flat.poleOregon Department of Veterans Affairs — Forty-five years ago on March 29, combat and combat support units withdrew from South Vietnam. This marked the beginning of the end of nearly two decades of direct U.S. military involvement in Southeast Asia, but the social, cultural and psychological wounds of the Vietnam War still linger for those Americans who lived through it, and especially for the veterans who served during this turbulent time in our nation’s history.

There are over 120,000 Vietnam-era veterans living in Oregon today, representing more than a third of our total veteran population. They represent the largest single demographic and the true leaders in our veteran community today.

And yet, too often and in too many ways, our Vietnam-era veterans remain invisible to the general public. Their incredible courage and remarkable achievements, both in Southeast Asia and here at home, too often go unrecognized. Their unique challenges and adversities too often go unacknowledged.

Young men and women returning from their service in Vietnam were not welcomed home. They were shunned and ignored. They were not allowed to take their rightful place among America’s heroes. They came home, not to the soldier’s rest that they deserved, but to a new battlefield, one in which they would be forced to struggle for the respect and recognition they had rightfully earned.

It has taken generations for the fruits of their labor to be known, but today we stand as a proud and grateful nation, humbled by the valor and sacrifice of those who answered their nation’s call–including the 58,000 U.S. service members who went to Vietnam and never came home.

They did not make the decision to go to war; they went because their country asked them to. They kept the faith. They represented the best the United States of America had to offer and they fought for freedom, the mark of a true patriot. They put their lives on the line to help and save others.

We stand together to say now, what we should have done 45 years ago: “Thank you, and welcome home.”


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbLeague of Oregon Cities

 

Oregon Law: Public Contracting, ORS Chapter 279

Qustodio | Internet Parental Control App

Masters of Love

 

For Women Only: Discover the Truth He Wants You to Know

 

For Men Only: A Straightforward Guide to the Inner Lives of Women

The Oregon Trail Game & Geiko Ad

 

Eight Reasons Why Rome Fell

 

US Defence Secretary says it ‘kinda looked like’ Kim Jong Un made secret visit to China as North Korea train leaves Beijing


 

Sherman County eNews #78

CONTENTS

  1. County Court – Board of Commissioners

  2. Shared State and County Services Serve the Same Oregonians!

  3. Sherman County Court & Regional Coalitions

  4. Sherman County Court: Duties & Compensation

  5. Editorial. Let’s Ask Our Candidates for County Judge


 1. County Court – Board of Commissioners

Oregon.Flat.poleOregon Revised Statutes 202.010 “County court” defined. As used in this chapter, unless the context requires otherwise, the term “county court” includes board of county commissioners.

203.035 Power of county governing body or electors over matters of county concern.

(1) Subject to subsection (3) of this section, the governing body or the electors of a county may by ordinance exercise authority within the county over matters of county concern, to the fullest extent allowed by Constitutions and laws of the United States and of this state, as fully as if each particular power comprised in that general authority were specifically listed in ORS 203.030 to 203.075. [http://landru.leg.state.or.us/orcons/orconst.html for the Constitution of the State of Oregon]

(2) The power granted by this section is in addition to other grants of power to counties, shall not be construed to limit or qualify any such grant and shall be liberally construed, to the end that counties have all powers over matters of county concern that it is possible for them to have under the Constitutions and laws of the United States and of this state.

203.111 County governing body; legislative authority; quorum. Unless otherwise provided by county charter, a county court shall be the governing body and shall exercise general legislative authority over all matters of county concern and shall consist of the county judge and two county commissioners and a majority of those persons shall constitute a quorum. [1981 c.140 s.3 (enacted in lieu of 203.110)]

203.240 Organization, powers and duties of board.

(1) A board of county commissioners shall:
(a) Have the powers and duties and be otherwise subject to the laws applicable to county courts sitting for the transaction of county business.
(b) Unless provided otherwise by county charter or ordinance, consist of three county commissioners. A majority of the board is required to transact county business.

204.010 Terms of office of county officers. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, the term of office of each officer mentioned in ORS 204.005 is four years.

204.020 When terms of office commence; filing certificate of election, oath and undertaking. (1) The term of office of each officer mentioned in ORS 204.005 shall commence on the first Monday of January next following election to office.

204.601 Number and appointment of deputies and other employees.

(1) The county court or board of county commissioners of each county shall fix the number of deputies and employees of county officers whose compensation is to be paid from county funds.
(2) All such deputies and employees shall be appointed by such county officer, and shall hold office during the pleasure of the appointing officer. [1953 c.306 s.9]

5.020 Juvenile court jurisdiction in certain counties. The county court of counties from which no transfer of jurisdiction is made under ORS 3.260 or 3.265 or other provisions of law shall have all juvenile court jurisdiction, authority, powers, functions and duties.


 2. Shared State and County Services Serve the Same Oregonians!

The State:

–general administrator

—state property manager

—state courts, patrol, prison

—child protection

—mental health hospital

—housing

—highways

—state parks.

Services Shared by County and State:

—administration

—assessment and taxation

—PERS [Public Employees Retirement System]

—elections

—county jails [Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility]

—community corrections [Tri-County Community Corrections]

—court security

—district attorney

—9-1-1 [Frontier Regional 911 Agency]

—juvenile services

—aging services [Community Action Program of East Central Oregon]

—alcohol/drug programs

—children and families

—developmental disabilities

—mental health services [Tri-County Mental Health / Center for Living]

—veterans’ services [Tri-County Veterans Services]

—public health [North Central Public Health District]

—environmental health

—planning

—economic/community development [Mid-Columbia Economic Development Dist.]

—engineering

—roads [Oregon Department of Transportation, Sherman Count Road Dept.]

—housing [Mid-Columbia Housing Authority]

—Oregon Plan

—public forests

—federal land policy

—telecommunications [Frontier TeleNet, Sherman, Gilliam & Wheeler]

—county fair [Sherman County Fair]

—water-master.

Counties:

—administration

—property management

—records

—county law library

—sheriff patrol

—medical examiner

—animal control

—solid waste

—surveying

—capital projects

—county forests, parks

—libraries.

~Association of Oregon Counties 


3. Sherman County Court & Regional Coalitions

pencil.sharpRegional coalitions, formed by contracts between two or more counties or counties and the state, centralize and economize the receiving and administering of state-and federally-funded programs that are shared between the counties — including Sherman County. Commissioners at these meetings determine policy, direction, program priorities and outcomes.

A good example is the Mid-Columbia Center for Living / Tri-County Mental Health Board. This Board employs administrators and mental health professionals to provide services for Sherman, Hood River and Wasco Counties from offices in The Dalles, Hood River & Moro with state and federal funding for the three counties. State and federal funding streams are not distributed to single counties of our size, but to groups of counties by the efficient use of one administrative office and joint staff.

The same is true for other boards where county commissioners exercise leadership and opinions on behalf of Sherman County citizens and their interests. In some cases, this representation involves legislative action, visits to legislators and editors of major newspapers, prioritizing regional interests and making sure that Sherman County receives its share of services. Regional and statewide views are important to all of us — the bigger picture that affects us in a multitude of ways.

Our Commissioners and County Judge influence the policies, budgets, personnel and programs of REGIONAL boards, including but not limited to these:

  • Mid-Columbia Economic Development District
  • Mid-Columbia Community Action Council
  • Tri-County Corrections
  • Frontier TeleNet
  • Frontier Regional 911 Agency Dispatch Center
  • Tri-County Mental Health – Center for Living
  • North Central Public Health District
  • Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility / NORCOR (regional jail)
  • Lower John Day Regional Partnership
  • Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation
  • Association of Oregon Counties

… in addition to local boards:

  • Sherman County Weed District
  • Sherman County Fair
  • Sherman County Public/School Library
  • Prevention Coalition
  • Senior & Community Center Advisory Committee
  • Local Public Safety Coordinating Council.

4. Sherman County Court: Duties & Compensation

pencil.sharpThe Sherman County Court (a county judge and two commissioners) considers a wide range of services, some shared with the state and some reserved for the county.

Members of the Sherman County Court are paid. Their work is substantially supported by the work of an Administrative Assistant, Finance Officer, Clerk, Treasurer, legal counsel and others, as well as personnel working for state and regional government entities that deliver services to Sherman County.

In addition to attending meetings of the County Court, they represent the county on state, regional and local boards in a mutual division of duties. These assignments are a routine part of their work for which they report at meetings of the County Court.

Compensation for Fiscal Year 2017/18 is determined by the budget committee.

The current compensation for the full-time County Judge position on a seven-step salary schedule is $7,530/month, the top salary for the county judge position of $7,240, plus longevity pay of $290/month.

The current compensation for the half-time position of County Commissioner, Position 1 on the seven-step salary schedule is $2,573/month. This is at the second of the seven steps for a commissioner and is a .50 FTE (full-time equivalency) position (20hrs/wk).

The current compensation for the half-time position of County Commissioner, Position 2 on the seven-step salary schedule is $3,127/month.  This is at the sixth of the seven steps for a commissioner and the same .50 FTE (20hrs/wk).

These officials are eligible for all county benefits, Public Employees Retirement System and health insurance based on FTE and mileage. Compensation for all county employees is calculated on the schedule according to their classification, FTE and longevity, some on a merit basis. More information is found here: https://www.co.sherman.or.us/departments/county-court/.


5. Editorial. Let’s Ask Our Candidates for County Judge

sherrycaricatureElection Day is coming up! We encourage Sherman County voters to ask the four candidates for the position of County Judge a few questions. It’s part of the process! We’re interviewing them for this position.

It’s our responsibility to know why these four candidates want this responsibility and what they have accomplished or hope to accomplish on our behalf.

Let’s ask the candidates! 

  • Joe Dabulskis
  • Larry Hoctor
  • Fred Justesen
  • Mike Smith

Why? What?

  • Why do you want this responsibility?
  • What do you hope to accomplish?
  • What inspired you to run for office?
  • If elected, would you participate in County College?

Qualifications for County Judge w/Juvenile & Probate Jurisdiction.

  • Let’s get acquainted. Tell us about yourself, your education, military and public service and family.
  • Describe your previous work experiences?
  • What one skill makes you the most qualified for this position?
  • Describe your qualifications for governance, planning and policy development.
  • Describe your participation in county activities.
  • What are your thoughts about Sherman County’s future?

County Goals and Long-range Plans.

  • What are the county’s primary obligations?
  • What are the county’s top three or four goals?
  • Is county government, as currently funded and staffed, sustainable?
  • How many people are employed by Sherman County government?
  • What is the population of the county? Is growth predicted?

Strategic Investment Program (SIP).

  • Please describe the Strategic Investment Program (SIP) (wind energy dollars) and changes we can expect in future revenue.
  • Does the County continue to reserve a percentage of wind farm revenue?
  • Name three or four SIP-funded projects. 

Jobs & Economic Development.

  • What are your ideas for economic development?
  • What is your position on private enterprise for economic development? 

County Government Competition with Private Enterprise.

  • What is your position on county competition with private enterprise?
  • Weed control?
  • Internet services?
  • Senior Center meals?
  • Housing lots and subsidies?
  • Telecommunication?

Funding, Maintaining & Preserving Public Parks.

  • What is your position on funding public parks? Park partnerships?
  • Sherman County’s DeMoss Springs Memorial Park?
  • S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Philippi Park on the John Day River?
  • S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Giles L. French Park?
  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park?
  • Sherman County Fairgrounds Event Center.

Telecommunication: Sherman County’s Fiber.

  • Is Sherman County’s Fiber Project on schedule?
  • Who owns, manages and maintains the fiber?
  • How is it funded? County SIP dollars and/or State?
  • How much has been spent so far?
  • Are additional funds needed?
  • Do you view the Fiber Project as comparable to a government highway on which Internet Service Providers drive – to provide services?
  • How many Internet Service Providers use our fiber?
  • Is it competitive?
  • Are county government offices connected?
  • Is the school district connected?
  • Does the fiber serve everyone in the county? If so, how?
  • What, specifically, is in it for me?
  • How has the Fiber Project improved our economic development?

County Internet Network.

  • How many Sherman County residents subscribe to Rural Technology Group for internet service?
  • Who owns Rural Technology Group?
  • Does the county subsidize Rural Technology Group?

Sherman, Gilliam & Wheeler’s Frontier Regional 911 Dispatch Center in Condon.

  • Who proposed a 911 call center to be located in Sherman County?
  • What is the need?
  • Who would pay for it?
  • Would it be independently sustainable?

You’ll think of other questions! Ask them! Call the candidates! Ask! We’re in this together! One of them will represent and work for us!