Sherman County eNews #45

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman High School Basketball on Saturday, Feb. 24

  2. The Humanities

  3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2018 Spring Grant Cycle

  4. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Feb. 26

  5. Relationships and Rules and Parenting

  6. Oregon Historical Society’s 2018 Oregon History Makers Medal Awards

  7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center March Meal Menu

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman High School Basketball on Saturday, Feb. 24

Come cheer on the Sherman Varsity Boys as they compete against Grand View Christian Academy in the Second Round Playoffs this Saturday, February 24, 2018, here at the Sherman County School Event Center starting at 4:00.

Admission is $6 for Adults and $4 for Students

GO HUSKIES!

— Audrey Rooney, Registrar 

Sherman High School 


2. The Humanities

“The term ‘humanities’ includes, but is not limited to, the study and interpretation of the following: language, both modern and classical; linguistics; literature; history; jurisprudence; philosophy; archaeology; comparative religion; ethics; the history, criticism and theory of the arts; those aspects of social sciences which have humanistic content and employ humanistic methods; and the study and application of the humanities to the human environment with particular attention to reflecting our diverse heritage, traditions, and history and to the relevance of the humanities to the current conditions of national life.” –National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities Act, 1965, as amended

See Sherman County Cultural Coalition Grant Application Notice and

https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com/


3. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2018 Spring Grant Cycle

The Sherman County Cultural Coalition will begin accepting grant applications March 1, 2018, for the 2018 Spring Grant Cycle. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: March 30, 2018

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: http://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:

Sherman County Cultural Coalition

P.O. Box 23

Moro, OR 97039

Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?

Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com.


4. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Feb. 26

camera.35mm.blueThe Sherman County Photography Club meets this Monday, February 26, 6pm at the Steve Burnett Extension and Research Building in Moro. Come view the February photo challenge “Dogs…Happy Chinese New Year”.

Kathy Thompson will share her exciting experience participating Dogwood Photography Project 52.

Everyone is welcome to attend and refreshments will be served.


5. Relationships and Rules and Parenting

If you are a parent or grandparent, you know there are plenty of rules for raising kids. Today, let’s consider why ignoring these rules can sometimes be a good idea.

Some years ago, in his book, How to Parent, Dr. Fitzhugh Dodson said that, “Raising a child is a human relationship, and human relationships cannot be reduced to a set of rules.” There is an inherent truth in that statement.

Rules are only guidelines, and both you and your child are unique. Each of you is a product of a special combination of genes and environment that has never existed before. What’s more, you have a special relationship with each of your children that is different from the relationship of any other two people on this planet.

Try to avoid the mistake of trying to fit this relationship into any preconceived idea of what it is “supposed to be” like. Refrain from dogmatically following a set of rules, even when the rules are written by a so-called “expert.” (Remember, expertise does not mean “perfection.”) And, refrain from trying to force your child to conform to someone else’s idea of what she or he should be.

The most important thing you can do for your children or grandchildren is to offer them stability, guidance and support while they explore, and learn to realize, the unique potential self which is unfolding within them.

You can reinforce their efforts to achieve worthwhile goals. You can set reasonable limits. You can remain flexible. But most of all, you can make sure they know that you recognize them and respect them for the goodness that resides within each of them. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Oregon Historical Society’s 2018 Oregon History Makers Medal Awards

Portland, OR — The Oregon Historical Society is pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of the Oregon History Makers Medal. First awarded in 2009, the History Makers Medal is regarded as one of Oregon’s most prestigious honors and is presented annually by OHS to individuals and organizations that are positively shaping the history, culture, and landscape of Oregon.

The 2018 Oregon History Makers Medal recipients are:

Stacy Allison: Adventurer, author, & businesswoman:  On September 29, 1988, after twenty-nine days on the mountain, Stacy Allison became the first American woman to summit the 29,028-foot Mt. Everest. Stacy has also reached the top of Mt. Denali, the highest point in North America, and was part of the first successful women’s ascent of Ama Dablam, the 22,495-foot peak known as Nepal’s Matterhorn. The author of Beyond the Limits: A Women’s Triumph on Everest and Many Mountains to Climb: Reflections on Competence, Courage and Commitment, Stacy is also a much sought-after motivational speaker. A dedicated volunteer to the American Lung Association, Habitat for Humanity, and Medical Teams International, Stacy is also owner and operator of Stacy Allison General Contracting.

Edward “Ed” Ray: Transformational higher education leader: President of Oregon State University since 2003, Edward “Ed” Ray is widely regarded as the most transformational leader in the school’s 150 year history. Under his guidance, OSU has received record levels of research awards and contracts; enrolled the highest number of students in the school’s history; launched a successful $1.14 billion fundraising campaign, which included nearly $189 million for scholarships and fellowships, 79 newly endowed faculty positions, and funding for key scientific and learning facilities; expanded dual-enrollment agreements to all seventeen of Oregon’s community colleges, and opened and grew the OSU-Cascades campus in Bend.

Bill Stoller: Visionary business leader & philanthropist: Raised on a family farm outside of Dayton, Oregon, Bill Stoller is perhaps best known as the founder and owner of the winery that bears his name. He is the co-founder of Express Employment Professionals, currently the largest privately held staffing company in the world, with more than 800 offices in three countries, as well as the founder of Xenium, a human resources and employer services outsource company. As an ardent preservationist, Bill’s drive for sustainability earned Stoller Winery the first-ever LEED Gold certification in the world.

Bob’s Red Mill: Revolutionizing the food industry: Founded in 1978 by Bob and Charlee Moore, Bob’s Red Mill is known worldwide as the producer of natural, certified organic and gluten-free milled grain products. Bob celebrated his 81st birthday in 2010 by transferring ownership of his company to his employees through an employee stock ownership plan. Bob and Charlee’s passion for healthy foods and clean living led them to donate tens of millions of dollars to Oregon State University, Oregon Health & Science University, and the National University of Natural Medicine to fund projects and research promoting healthy diets.

“In this tenth anniversary year of the History Makers Dinner, we are pleased to honor three individuals and one iconic Oregon business that exemplify what it means to be an ‘Oregon History Maker’,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk.

The Oregon History Makers Medals will be presented at a dinner at the historic Montgomery Park building in Portland on Sunday, October 7, 2018. Table sponsorships and individual tickets are available; for more information, please contact Alexis Borges-Silva at 503.306.5266 or alexis.silva@ohs.org.


7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center March Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

Meal Menu

March 2018

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at  541-565-3191 the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & Up $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
  1 2
Chicken Thighs w/stuffing Clam Chowder
Veggies & salad Cottage Cheese & rolls
Fruit Veggies, salad & dessert
5 6 7 8 9
Chicken ala King Oven Fried Chicken Beef Stroganoff over Mac & Cheese w/bacon Navy Bean & Ham Soup
Biscuits, Veggies, Salad Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Noodles Veggies & salad Cornbread & Veggies
Dessert Veggies, salad & fruit Veggies, salad & dessert Fruit Salad & Dessert
12 13 14 15 16
Hamburger gravy over Beef & Noodles Pork Roast Hot Turkey Sandwich BBQ Meatballs & Rice Pilaf
Mashed Potatoes Muffins & Veggies Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Veggies & Salad Veggies & Salad
Veggies, salad & dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, salad & Dessert Fruit Dessert
19 20 21 22 23
Cheeseburgers Oriental Chicken Meatloaf Chicken Tetrazzini Hot Ham & Cheese/Bun
Potato Wedges Rice Pilaf & Veggies Mashed Potatoes w/gravy Veggies & Salad Potato Wedges
Veggies, salad & dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, salad & dessert Fruit Veggies, salad & dessert
26 27 28 29 30
Pizza loaded w/meat BBQ Burger & Cheddar Oven Fried Chicken Chili Chicken Fried Steak
Veggies & Salad Cornbread Pie Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Cornbread & Veggies Mashed Potatoes/Gravy
Dessert Veggies, salad & fruit Veggies, salad & fruit Salad & Fruit Veggies, salad & Dessert

MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO AVAILABILITY — ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of food is prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Evangelist Billy Graham Dies at Age 99

Video: The Second Amendment

Public Unions Are Violating Workers’ Constitutional Rights

 


 

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