Sherman County eNews #372

CONTENTS

  1. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem, by the Numbers

  2. Health and Wellness

  3. Support Gorge Grown Food Network

  4. 2017 Red Cross: Double Digit Increase in Responses, Families Helped & Deployments

  5. Interstate 84 – Columbia River Highway – Mileposts

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


New Year’s Prayer

by Charlotte Anselmo

Thank you Lord for giving me
The brand new year ahead
Help me live the way I should
As each new day I tread.

Give me gentle wisdom
That I might help a friend
Give me strength and courage
So a shoulder I might lend.

The year ahead is empty
Help me fill it with good things
Each new day filled with joy
And the happiness it brings.

Please give the leaders of our world
A courage born of peace
That they might lead us gently
And all the fighting cease.

Please give to all upon this earth
A heart that’s filled with love
A gentle happy way to live
With Your blessings from above.


1. Oregon Capital Insider Index: This Week in Salem, by the Numbers

Oregon.Flat.poleHere are 10 numbers that illustrate some of this week’s big, and small, Oregon political stories:

  • 0102: The second of January is the deadline to register to vote in the Jan. 23 special election to decide whether to affirm a health care-funding scheme approved by the Legislature earlier this year.
  • 3.2: The percentage of unemployed people in Benton County in November. New statistics released by the Oregon Employment Department Tuesday showed that county has the lowest unemployment rate in the state.
  • 21: On Jan. 1, Oregon will become the fifth state to increase the legal age to buy tobacco products to 21, after California, Hawaii, Maine and New Jersey.
  • 6: The number of languages offered on voter registration forms. The Secretary of State recently added Chinese, Vietnamese, Somali and Russian to the existing forms in English and Spanish.
  • 15: The number of days that agencies have to release public records in most cases, starting Jan. 1.
  • 36.2: The percentage of Oregon’s voters who were registered as Democrats in November, according to statistics released Tuesday by the Oregon Secretary of State’s Elections Division.
  • 37.4: The percentage of Oregon’s nearly 2.7 million registered voters who are non-affiliated or a member of a third party, according to the same statistics.
  • 2022: The year former U.S. Sen. Mark Odom Hatfield’s papers will be released to the public, coinciding with his 100th birthday July 12 of that year.
  • 135,000: The number of dollars the former owners of Gresham bakery Sweet Cakes has to pay a lesbian couple for refusing to bake the couple a wedding cake based on the couple’s sexual orientation, according to an Oregon Court of Appeals decision Thursday.
  • 27 million: An estimate of the reduction in the number of itemizers nationwide in 2018 because of the increase in the standard deduction to $10,000 under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, according to the Tax Policy Center.

~http://oregoncapitalinsider.com/


2. Health and Wellness

Are you interested in health, nutrition and being active….for yourself, your family, your friends, your community?   Could you use some extra motivation to achieve your own health goals?  Are you interested in research-based, scientific information on health and lifestyle? What topics are of interest to you? Would you like to attend monthly gatherings about health and wellness, with a healthy meal served?  Could you be on the wellness committee at work or get one started?   

Are you looking for some fun health- and nutrition-related volunteer activities to do in the county with kids, adults, families, or seniors?  Interested in personal growth and leadership opportunities?  Would you like to partner with Extension on the fun health and nutrition outreach in Sherman County, such as school cafeteria taste tests to classroom nutrition lessons to afterschool cooking to “Healthalicious Cooking” day camps to food demos/recipe handouts at Sherman Veggie Rx events? Are you interested in new health activities such as recipe samples at the food bank or staffing a display at the school or library activity nights or exercise sessions at the senior center or having a county walking, hiking or kayaking group?

You’ve heard of Master Gardeners or Master Food Preservers or Master Recyclers, right?  These are regular folks with an interest in a topic that they want to learn more about, and volunteer in their community to help others learn, too.   OSU Sherman County Extension is researching the idea of a Master Wellness Program to bring health and wellness information to Sherman residents for your own benefit and motivation, as well as give you an opportunity to “pay back” by volunteering at Extension or other food- and health-related events in the community.  

What you learn can help yourself…and others…live more healthful lives.   In fact, research on these programs in other states shows that participation in a health-focused master volunteer program can positively influence participants’ lifestyle behaviors as they work to improve health and quality of life in their communities.  You benefit in your personal health as you help others with their health!

Whaddya think?  We’d like to hear from you.  Call or email Cindy Brown at 541-565-3230 work, 541-993-5291 cell, or cindy.brown@oregonstate.edu, or write to 66365 Lonerock Road, Moro OR 97039.


3. Support Gorge Grown Food Network

Thank you for supporting Gorge Grown Food Network. Together, we’re working to build a resilient and inclusive regional food system that improves the health and well-being of our community. We had a remarkable year in 2017. 

  • Thousands of families throughout the Gorge received Veggie Prescriptions to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables from local farmers
  • Gorge Grown Farmers Markets put more than $370,000 back into the local economy and supported more than 60 family farmers, food producers and small business owners
  • The Food Security Coalition gathered a diverse group 30+ stakeholders from across the Gorge to build a stronger food system and make healthy, local food more accessible to everyone
  • Nearly 3,000 lbs of fresh produce was purchased from local farmers for the Healthy Corner Store Project serving communities in Sherman and Wasco Counties
  • Columbia Gorge Gleaning rescued more than 4,000 lbs of fresh produce this fall and distributed the surplus to community sites that serve food insecure residents
  • Hood River Farmers Market extended the season into the winter and early spring, providing the Gorge’s first year-round market space for farmers, producers and customers

In 2018, we will continue our groundbreaking work. To do this, we need your help. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation today: https://www.givegab.com/donations/new?group_id=gorge-grown


4. 2017 Red Cross: Double Digit Increase in Responses, Families Helped & Deployments

PORTLAND, Ore., December 29, 2017 — In 2017, the American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington saw double digit increases in disaster relief responses, families helped following a disaster and deployments of responders to disaster relief operations, when compared to 2016.

From January 1, 2017, to date, the local Red Cross has responded to 764 disasters (a 13 percent increase over last year), helped 1,218 families (a 26 percent increase over last year) and deployed 366 disaster relief responders (a 74 percent increase over last year).

“Wildfires here at home, multiple hurricanes in the Southeast and wildfires in California have resulted in more people in need of help,” said Candace Horter, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “The Red Cross was and will continue to be there to deliver aid in the weeks and months to come.”

RED CROSS RESPONSES ACROSS THE NATION
In just 45 days, the American Red Cross responded to six of the year’s largest and most complex disasters. This included back-to-back hurricanes — Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate — the deadliest week of wildfires in California history and the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history in Las Vegas.

In total, the Red Cross provided more food, relief items and overnight shelter stays than in the past four years combined. The Red Cross mobilized 56,000 disaster workers from across the nation — 92 percent volunteers — to provide help after 242 significant disasters such as wildfires, floods, tornadoes and other emergencies in 45 states and three territories. This aid included:
* Opening 1,100 emergency shelters to provide 658,000 overnight stays
* Serving 13.6 million meals and snacks
* Distributing 7 million relief items
* Providing 267,000 health and mental health contacts
* Supporting 624,000 households with recovery assistance

HOW TO HELP
The American Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that relies on the generosity of donors in order to fulfil or mission. Despite this close relationship with the federal government, the
American Red Cross is not a federal agency and does not receive regular federal funding to carry out services and programs.

“As 2017 comes to a close, please consider making a year-end contribution to the Red Cross,” Horter said. “Your gift helps your friends, your neighbors or perhaps even you to recover after a disaster.”

Donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small. Donations can be made at redcross.org or by calling 1-800-RED CROSS. Donations are tax deductible.

DONATIONS IN ACTION
* $10 provides one hot meal and additional snacks to a person – These nourishing meals, which include a main course, snacks and a drink, are provided by Red Cross workers and distributed at shelters or in communities via mobile kitchens in emergency response vehicles.
* $20 provides comfort supplies for two families of four – These supplies are stored and ready for distribution nationwide. Comfort kits contain deodorant, toothbrush, toothpaste, facial tissues, wash cloth, shampoo, liquid soap, lotion, comb, razor and shaving cream.
* $50 provides a full day of food and shelter for one person – This service includes providing breakfast, lunch and dinner, the costs to mobilize and distribute a cot, two blankets and a comfort kit as well as the costs to support the Red Cross workers providing this service.
* $200 provides a full day of food and shelter to a family of four – This service includes providing breakfast, lunch and dinner, the costs to mobilize and distribute a cot, two blankets and a comfort kit as well as the costs of Red Cross workers to provide this service.


5. Interstate 84 – Columbia River Highway – Mileposts

1 – 12th Avenue

2 – 33rd Avenue

3 – 47th Avenue

4 – 68th Avenue

5 – 82nd Avenue

6 – I-205 Junction

7 – 102nd Avenue

10 – 122nd Avenue

11 – Parkrose Water Tower

12 – 162nd Avenue

13 – 181st Avenue

14 – 201st Avenue

15 – Sandy Boulevard Exit (Westbound)

16 – Wood Village Exit

17 – Troutdale Junction

18 – Lewis and Clark Park

22 – Corbett

23 – Corbett Viewpoint

24 – Rooster Rock

25 – Rooster Rock State Park

28 – Bridal Veil

29 – West Dalton

31 – West of Multnomah Falls

34 – Horsetail Falls

35 – West of Dodson Overpass

37 – East of Dodson Overpass

39 – Moffett Creek

40 – Bonneville Dam

41 – Tunnel

42 – Multnomah/Hood River County Line

43 – West of Cascade Locks Exit

44 – Moody Street Overpass

45 – East of Cascade Locks Exit

46 – Herman Creek

47 – Herman Creek Log Pond

49 – Eastbound Scale House

51 – Wyeth

52 – Shellrock Mountain

53 – Lindsey Creek

54 – Westbound Scale House

55 – Starvation Creek Rest Area

56 – Viento State Park Exit

58 – Mitchell Creek

59 – Mitchell Point

61 – Ruthton Hill Point

62 – West of Hood River Exit

63 – Jaymar Underpass

64 – Multnomah/Hood River County Line

65 – Oregon 35 Exit

66 – Koberg Rest Area

68 – Wasco/Hood River County Line

69 – Chicken Charley Island

70 – Mosier

71 – Schogren RR Overpass

73 – Memaloose Rest Area

75 – Rowena Bluff

76 – Mayer Park Overpass

77 – Rowena

79 – Tooley Lake

80 – Tooley Terrace

81 – Pinewood Trailer Court

82 – Chenowith Creek Bridge

83 – Kopper Kitchen

84 – West/The Dalles City Ctr Exit

85 – Grain Elevator

86 – Boat Basin Exit

87 – The Dalles Br/Bend Hwy 197 Exit

88 – Fifteen Mile Creek

89 – Dalles Dam Exit

90 – Five Mile RR Overpass

92 – Sand Dunes

94 – No Name Lake

96 – Celilo Bridge RR Overpass

97 – Celilo Interchange

99 – Tunnel Point RR

100 – Wasco/Sherman County Line

101 – Miller RR Overpass

102 – Fulton Canyon

104 – Biggs Grain Elevator

105 – Biggs Junction

107 – Old Maryhill Ferry

109 – Rufus RR Overpass

110 – Rufus

112 – John Day Dam/Viewpoint

114 – John Day River/Sherman-Gillian

122 – Quinton RR Station

123 – Philippi Interchange

129 – Blaylock Interchange

131 – Woelpern Rat Hole

136 – Arlington Viewpoint

137 – Eastbound Arlington Exit

138 – Westbound Arlington Exit

147 – Heppner Junction

149 – Gilliam/Morrow County Line

151 – Three Mile

157 – RR Overpass

159 – Tower Road

161 – Boardman Rest Area

164 – Boardman

168 – Oregon 730 Junction

177 – Morrow/Umatilla County Line

178 – Ordnance Interchange

180 – Westland Road

183 – Hermiston

186 – Stanfield Rest Area

189 – Stanfield Interchange

193 – Lexington/Echo Junction

198 – Rew Elevator

199 – Yoakum Interchange

203 – Barnhart Interchange

207 – West of Pendleton

209 – Pendleton City Center

211 – East of Pendleton Interchange


 

6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeMy Christmas Eve by Retired Trooper Bob Welsh

Photographer Challenges Herself  To Shoot In ‘Ugly’ Location, And Results Prove That It’s All About The Skill

Oregon Recipes | 1859 Oregon Magazine

17 striking findings from 2017 

A Response For People Using Record Cold U.S. Weather To Refute Climate Change

 

Prager U.: Is Fascism Right or Left?

Clan Map of Ireland

 

Central Oregon, West Coast Brace for Recycling Changes

5 ways getting around in Oregon will be more expensive starting Jan. 1

 

The Future the US Military is Constructing: a Giant, Armed Nervous System

Judicial Watch Weekly Update

 

Destination Oregon: Severe Brothers Saddlery in Pendleton

Why Attitude Is More Important Than IQ


 

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Sherman County eNews #371

CONTENTS

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar 


1. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU to the Editorial Team – Gladys Wesley, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Allen – for publishing the fall issue of Sherman County: For The Record right on schedule! A lot of us will be interested in the remarkable lead story with lots of pictures, Barnstormers: Let’s Put on a Play, by Forest Peters! Well done, Forest! Other stories follow: History of the Sherman Seniors 1967 by Jane Macnab & Lois Kaseberg; Sherry Kaseberg’s stories, Mattie’s Hump & Dinty’s Café and Miller Island, An Unexpected Chapter, Part Two; Memorial Gifts & Honorariums; and two school class photographs. ~The Editor

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]:

“Let us be grateful to people who make us happy; they are the charming gardeners who make our souls blossom.” — Marcel Proust

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

GRASS VALLEY PAVILION REJUVENATION PROJECT. 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance | Grass Valley Pavilion. 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction & Dancing to the music of Countryfied. A Benefit for the Grass Valley Pavilion Rejuvenation Project at the Historic Grass Valley Pavilion in Grass Valley, Oregon on Saturday, December 30th. Tickets $20 at the door, MCP Farm Store or Huskey’s Market. Social Hour 5:30, Italian Buffet Dinner 6, Raffle & Auction 7 & Dance at 8. 

EMPLOYMENT:

CUSTODIAN. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified custodial candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included.Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500. Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district) and resume if you are interested in the position to:

Wes Owens, Superintendent

65912 High School Loop

Moro, Oregon  97039

(541) 565-3500

wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will remain open until filled.

Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

TEMPORARY LICENSED HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST.                       

Endorsement(s) Required:

Endorsement in Health Education is required for this position. Other opportunities may become available to increase FTE.

SalarySalary will be dependent upon start date, education, and experience.

Start Date: On or before, January 29, 2018.

Position Description:     

Sherman County School District is seeking a highly qualified .43 FTE Health Education Specialist. The successful candidate will spend two (2) periods each day teaching Health Education classes serving 7th-12th grade students and one (1) period each day as the Yearbook classroom instructor. The workday for this position will be from 7:45 am until 11:15 am. Current paid coaching opportunities that are available at this time include Head High School Tennis Coach and Head High School Track Coach, other potential coaching and advisor opportunities may also become available.

Qualifications:

  • Ability to work independently as well as a member of a team.
  • Ability to communicate with parents, students and staff.
  • Able to meet the individual needs of all students.
  • Excellent planning, organizational skills.
  • Qualified applicants who have experience and an interest in coaching are encouraged to apply.

About Sherman County School District:

The Sherman County School District is a K-12 progressive school with approximately 245 students, located in Moro, Oregon.  The 2016-17 school year saw the opening of a new elementary and remodeled Jr./Sr. High School connected as one modernized facility.  Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing required.  For further information and application materials please email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

HEALTHY FAMILIES OREGON HOME VISITOR. North Central ESD Early Education is hiring for a part time Healthy Families Oregon Home Visitor. Healthy Families Oregon seeks to insure healthy, thriving children and nurturing, caring families with a target of reaching parents with newborns and expectant parents. We seek to enhance family function, promote positive parent-child relationships and support children’s healthy growth and development through home visiting and links to community services.
The main duties of this job will be to provide parental support and education through the early years of a child’s life so children will grow up to be emotionally secure and safe, healthy, and more school-ready. Provide parenting skills, child development monitoring, early learning activities, and linkages to community resources. High school diploma required, AA or Bachelor’s Degree preferred. Must have reliable transportation to and from worksites.  Worksite Location: Office located in Condon. Service area includes Gilliam, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties. Work Schedule: 30 hours/week. Salary Range: $14.17-$20.15 DOE. Benefits: Medical, Dental, Vision and Long Term Disability. Reports to: Healthy Families Supervisor. Application Deadline: Open until filled. Please send resume and cover letter to bansotegui@ncesd.k12.or.us 877-562-3739 “The NCESD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.”

FOR SALE:

HOME +ACREAGE. For sale by owner. $395,000. Beautiful home on 33 acres. 13 acres of dryland wheat and 20 in pasture that is fenced and cross fenced including riding arena. The home is approximately 3000 sq ft with 3 bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths. Completely remodeled in 2016 including new septic and water system with full house filter, new paint and flooring throughout house. Outbuildings include a 25 X 50 barn with 3 stalls, 5 horse/livestock shelters in small fenced pastures and a 10 X 25 storage/pump house. Only 10 minutes to Highway 84 and a quick 20 minute commute to The Dalles. Contact Nancy at 541-442-8500.

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS. Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts, created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, ready for Christmas. ~ The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282  | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/ 12/29

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS | FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

STUDDED TIRES 245/75R-16 on GM Alloy Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM).  Lightly used, asking $700 for wheels and tires. Sold the vehicle and the new owner did not need the studded set. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text).  12/29

1.5 ACRE LOT. New Price on 1.5 acre lot just outside of Moro. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $50,000. http://www.rmls.com/report/17410095 ~ Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  12/29

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

SERVICES:

NEWSPAPERS

 VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

PLANNING COMMISSION POSITION. The Sherman County Planning Commission has an open position for a Planning Commission Member. This is strictly a volunteer appointment. The Planning Commission develops, maintains and implements the County’s Comprehensive and Land Use Ordinances. The position is a four year term and requires attendance at regular monthly planning commission meetings. Members must have an interest in land use planning, reflect the values of the community, interpret and apply zoning ordinance provisions, make decisions and recommendations, educate the public on land use and understand the legislative and quasi-judicial process. Interested individuals may contact the Sherman County Planning Department at 541-565-3601 for more information.

COURT APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATE for CHILDREN. Winter CASA volunteer training (advocates for foster children) begins in January 2018 and we have 4 spaces left. Call (541) 386-3468 to find out more & schedule an interview.

WANTED:

DAM STORIES. The 60th anniversary of the start of construction and 50th anniversary of the dedication of the John Day Dam will be in 2018. Gladys Wesley, editor of Sherman County: For The Record, plans to devote the spring issue to stories about  construction of the dam and the Biggs bridge and road and railroad relocation. Did you or your parents work on any of these? Do you remember the changes in the area as a result of the added jobs? Did you and/or your family move to Sherman County at the time? Did you attend the opening of the bridge or other events? Do you have photographs of that period? You and your stories are an important part of Sherman County history. Your photos to illustrate your story will be scanned and returned. Send your stories to Sherman County Historical Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or to info@shermanmuseum.org (with subject line Story for FTR). Questions? Contact the Museum: 541-565-3232. Deadline for submission is February 28, 2018.

YOUR STORIES. Gladys Wesley, editor of Sherman County: For The Record, Sherman County Historical Society’s twice-yearly historical anthology, reminds us that the editorial team is always looking for stories related to Sherman County for future issues… stories about places, families or events. Time marches on and for the young people of today the events of the 1950s and 1960s are as much history as the late 1800s were when the historical society was started in 1945. Send your stories to Sherman County Historical Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or to info@shermanmuseum.org (with subject line Story for FTR). Questions? Contact the Museum: 541-565-3232.

FREE:


2. CALENDAR (new or corrected) 

snowflake4DECEMBER

27-31 Oregon Coast Whale Watching Week

30 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance w/Countryfied, Grass Valley Pavilion

JANUARY

1 Oregon State Parks’ Free First Day Hikes

3 Sherman County Court 9

3 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Executive Board Meeting 4

4 AG Tech Bootcamp, University of Idaho, Pocatello

8 SAC/Mid-Columbia Council of Governments 10-12 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 8

9 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

9-10 Direct Seed Conference, Kennewick

10 Developing/Expanding Your Farm Stand/Agritourism Seminar, Central Point

10 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Memorial Service for Reine Thomas 1 Wasco United Methodist Church

20 Sherman County Court 9

22 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 2

23 Statewide Special Election

24 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Wheeler County

30-Feb. 1 Northwest Ag Show, Portland

FEBRUARY

1 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

3 North Central Livestock Assoc. Social Hour 5 Dinner 6 Grass Valley Pavilion

5 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Rufus

7 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Executive Board Meeting 4

9 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Sherman County Watershed Council 8

13 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30

13 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

13 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

14 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30

15 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR, The Dalles

16-18 Winter Fishtrap, The New Agrarians, Joseph, Oregon

20 Kessler Angus Ranch Bull Sale, Milton-Freewater

21 Sherman County Court 9

24 OSU Small Farm Conference, Corvallis

28 Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals 9 

MARCH

1 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

1-4 National Association of Counties Conference, Washington, D.C.


 

Sherman County eNews #370

CONTENTS

  1. Workshops: Starting a Successful Business, Bottom Line, Jan. 9 & 19

  2. Oregon’s New Distracted-driving Restrictions

  3. Public Notice. North Central Public Health District Executive Committee, Jan. 9

  4. Bait Your Hook with Kindness and Consideration

  5. Sherman County Court Notes, Dec. 20

  6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center January Meal Menu

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


A happy New Year! Grant that I
May bring no tear to any eye,
When this New Year in time shall end
Let it be said I’ve played the friend,
Have lived and loved and labored here,
And made of it a happy year.
~Edgar Guest


1. Workshops: Starting a Successful Business, Bottom Line, Jan. 9 & 19

The Columbia Gorge Community College Small Business Development Center will be offering two workshops in January.  A “Starting a Successful Business” workshop will be held at the CGCC Hood River Indian River Campus on Tuesday, January 9 from 9:00AM to noon.  The workshop will focus on the necessary steps to start a business in Oregon, the criteria for choosing a business structure and the four cornerstones to help succeed in business.  The workshop is free.

An “Increasing Your Bottom Line” workshop will be held at the CGCC The Dalles Campus on Friday, January 19 from 11:30 AM-1:30 PM.  The workshop will focus on the basic components for profit growth and how a business can develop a framework to set goals and measure results.  The workshop will also provide an opportunity to discuss business strategies and share best practice experience with business peers. The cost of the workshop is $20.  Register online at http://bit.ly/CGCCBizClasses.  Call 541 506-6121 for more information.


2. Oregon’s New Distracted-driving Restrictions

Oregon.Flat.poleOregon’s new distracted-driving law closed loopholes in a pre-existing ban on holding a cell phone while driving and enhanced penalties for violations. House Bill 2597 expanded the ban to include holding any mobile electronic device while driving, even while waiting at a stoplight. Drivers face a fine of up to $1,000 for their first offense.

Less than a month after the law took effect Oct. 1, Rep. Julie Parrish, R-West Linn – who voted for the law – was pulled over and fined $265 for using her cellphone while driving.  She was using the phone to get directions to the KATU studio in Portland, where she was scheduled to give an interview, she said.

“Old habits die hard for those of us who were introduced to cell phones before there were specific laws related to distracted driving and phone use,” Parrish said. “It might be difficult for people to break a years-long habit of driving and using a cell phone, but it’s a habit I never want my kids to start.”

Nearly 3,500 people were killed and about 391,000 injured in motor vehicle crashes involving distracted drivers in the United States In 2015, according to the most recent statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.


3. Public Notice. North Central Public Health District Exec. Committee, Jan. 9

The North Central Public Health District Executive Committee will be holding a meeting Tuesday, January 9, 2018 at 3:00PM. Meeting will be held at North Central Public Health District located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon.  This meeting is open to the general public. 


4. Bait Your Hook with Kindness and Consideration

A good fisherman goes out of his way to bait his hook with what the fish prefer — which might not be a bad tip for those who wish to succeed in human relationships. Just as in a conversation it’s a good idea to listen more than you talk, it is also wise in relationships to think about the well-being of others more than you think about your own wishes and desires. When you constantly strive to treat others in the same way you would like them to treat you, you become a person whom others like to be around, one who commands their respect, confidence, and loyalty. When you learn to manage emotions and your ego, and when you learn to always consider the needs and desires of others, it is inevitable that you will “bait your hook” with kindness and consideration, and catch more friends than you can count.  ~Napoleon Hill 


5. Sherman County Court Notes, Dec. 20

ShermanCoLogo~By Administrative Assistant Kayla von Borstel

(This is a brief summary of topics addressed and is not official minutes. For official minutes and details, please see the official approved minutes posted on the Sherman County website at www.co.sherman.or.us after the January 3 Court session.)

The Sherman County Court met in regular session on December 20, 2017, and in conducting the business of the county,

  • met with Ron McDermid, Justice of the Peace, to discuss building updates. Construction is on schedule; phase one is winding down and phase two of renovation will begin soon. Ron stated there is one-third of the contingency fund left which is as expected. Discussion held on what to do with items no longer in use by Departments. These items will be deemed as surplus;
  • met with Mark Coles, Road Master, to discuss purchasing equipment. Approved purchase of a used Caterpillar Paving and Compaction machine for $76,850;
  • entered into Executive Session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (f) Exempt Documents to discuss housing documents;
  • approved the Victims of Crime Act Support Services & Training Grant Application 2018 and authorized Judge Thompson to sign the Support Services and Training Statement of Compliance;
  • approved the 2017-2019 Victims of Crime Act and Criminal Fine Account Non-Competitive Grant Award and authorize Judge Thompson to sign;
  • approved the Kindergarten Partnership and Innovation Grant Agreement between Sherman County and Early Learning Division and authorize Judge Thompson to sign;
  • authorized budget transfers/payments as recommended by the Finance Director, including $291,823 from the County General Fund, $1,5000,000 from the SIP Community Service Fees Fund, and $7,976,910 from the SIP Additional Fees Fund and authorized Judge Thompson to sign;
  • appointed Amanda Whitman and Bert Perisho to the Sherman County Fair Board for a term of three years to expire December 31, 2020;
  • appointed Rory Wilson to the Weed Control District for a term of three years to expire December 31, 2020;
  • appointed Ryan Thompson to the Planning Commission for a term of four years to expire December 31, 2021;
  • approved the amount of $3,378.60, to be taken from Main Street Improvement Program, to the City of Moro as payment for expenses accrued by Jody Bonney for the Main Street Improvement Project;
  • added action item, Frontier Telnet Lease Agreement, approved the Intergovernmental Lease of office space between Frontier Telnet and Sherman County to lease office space in the Oregon State University/Burnet Building subject to review of the lease by the County Commissioners and Financial Officer;
  • discussed website security, approved the additional expenditure of $750 to Proud City to install Completely Automated Public Turing test to tell Computers and Humans Apart (CAPTCHA) to the new website for additional security. Additionally, Lauren Hernandez is approved to work on an hourly basis to assist Proud City in the installment of CAPTCHA. If Lauren is unable to assist Proud City, the Court approves Proud City to complete CAPTCHA installment in its entirety for the sum of $1,500;
  • discussed the need for Administrative Assistant Electronic Equipment; approved Administrative Assistant Electronic Equipment Request for speakers, pouch laminator, and second monitor;
  • discussed workforce housing and website re-design updates;
  • heard reports from Court members about regional board activities.

6. Sherman County Senior & Community Center January Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

Meal Menu

January 2018

We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served.

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at  541-565-3191 the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & Up $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
1 2 3 4 5
Closed for New Years

 

Pizza loaded w/meat Oven Fried Chicken Beef Stew w/Biscuits BBQ Meatballs
Salad & veggies Mashed potatoes w/gravy Salad & veggies Rice Pilaf, salad, veggies
Fruit Salad, veggies & dessert Fruit Dessert
8 9 10  11 12
Beef Chili Chicken Alfredo Meatloaf Ham Fried Rice Beef and Noodles
Corn bread, salad, veggies Salad & veggies Mashed potatoes/gravy Salad, Veggies, Fruit Muffin Rolls, salad, veggies
Dessert Fruit Salad, veggies, dessert Fruit Dessert
15  16 17 18 19
Closed for Martin Luther King Jr. Day Hot Turkey Sandwich Hamburger gravy over Spaghetti w/meat sauce Chicken Fried Steak
Mashed potatoes/gravy Rice Pilaf, salad, veggies Garlic bread, salad, veggies Mashed potatoes/gravy
Salad, veggies, Fruit Dessert Fruit Salad, veggies, Dessert
22 23 24 25 26
Cheeseburgers Chicken ala King Beef Stroganoff/Noodles Oven Fried Chicken Beef & Bean Burrito
Potato wedges, salad, veggies Biscuits, salad, veggies Salad & veggies Mashed potatoes/gravy Mexican rice, salad, veggies
Dessert Fruit Dessert Salad, veggies, fruit Dessert
29 30 31  
Baked Potato Bar Oriental Chicken Roast Pork
w/chili & cheese Rice Pilaf, salad, veggies Mashed potatoes/gravy
Salad, veggies, dessert Fruit Salad, veggies, dessert

Menu subject to change due to availability

ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3The Ultimate Eastern Oregon Road Trip | Local Adventurer

Four laws that made an impact in 2017

A Whale of a Time at the Coast

Defense News

Military Times

Recipes Cook Up Word Fun

Fossils suggest a universe filled with life

Untold Truth About The History Of The Trail Of Tears – Black Indians Are Native Aborigines


 

Sherman County eNews #369

CONTENTS

  1. 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance | Grass Valley Pavilion, Dec. 30

  2. Happy Holidays from Columbia Gorge CASA

  3. Sen. Ron Wyden: Net Neutrality

  4. Weather Events 2017

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. ~Mark Twain.


1. 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance | Grass Valley Pavilion, Dec. 30 

6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction

& Dancing to Countryfied!

cowboy.boot

A Benefit for the Grass Valley Pavilion Rejuvenation Project

at the Historic Grass Valley Pavilion in

Grass Valley, Oregon.

Tickets $20 at the door, MCP Farm Store or Huskey’s Market

Social Hour 5:30

Italian Buffer Dinner 6

Raffle & Auction 7

Dance 8


2. Happy Holidays from Columbia Gorge CASA

children.cartoonWith your support, in 2018 we can continue to ensure that children in foster care in Sherman, Wasco and Hood River counties have a CASA volunteer looking out for their best interests.

Become a CASA volunteer! Winter CASA volunteer training begins in January 2018 and we have 4 spaces left. Call (541) 386-3468 to find out more & schedule and interview.

Donate! Can’t be a CASA volunteer?  Donate so that others can. Our 2017 Annual Appeal is going on now and the Gorge community has a great opportunity to double donations now through 1/15/18.  Generous CASA supporters have stepped up and offered our biggest challenge match yetAll donations received through 1/15/18 will be doubled – up to $9,000! 

Columbia Gorge CASA Advocates for foster children in Wasco, Sherman, & Hood River counties

Mailing: PO Box 663, Hood River, OR 97031  /  Office: 1308 12th Steet (alley entrance), Hood River, OR 97031  /  Cell: 503.502.1247 / Office: 541.386-3468 / Web: www.gorgecasa.org


3. Sen. Ron Wyden: Net Neutrality

American flag2Net neutrality allows you to pay your internet access fee and then you get to go where you want, when you want, and how you want online.

But last week, the Federal Communications Commission voted to roll back net neutrality protections. I’m furious that they’ve ignored the tens of thousands of Americans – from small businesses and startups to consumer advocates and tech executives – who said NO to this repeal.

They’re playing into the hands of Big Cable making it possible for people with big wallets to get special deals. This could be a complete nightmare – with even higher prices and fewer choices.

Here’s what’s next:

  • State attorneys general, including Oregon’s Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum, are challenging the FCC decision to block or charge more for access to one website over another. I support their fight.
  • I’m calling on the FCC to cooperate with investigators looking into who committed the massive fraud that involved submitting millions of false comments to the FCC.
  • I’m still fighting back and urging Congress to reverse the FCC ruling.

4. Weather Events 2017

eclipse2Here are the top local weather events for 2017 as voted by staff from the National Weather Service in Pendleton, Oregon.  The average score with a top ranking of 10 shown.

1.  Severe Winter-9.27: It was a top 5 cold January for many locations, such as Hermiston (1), Pasco (1), Dayville (1), Sisters (2), Long Creek (2), Pelton Dam (2), La Grande (2), Meacham (4), and Walla Walla (5).  The Winter Severity Index which tracks snow and temperatures and compared to previous winters at selected locations showed the Winter of 2016-17 to be extreme at all points in the Inland Northwest, including Redmond, Walla Walla, Pendleton, and Yakima.  Interstate-84 was closed between Boardman and Baker City on 16 days during December and January.

2. Smoke-8: Wildfires, in and around the Inland Northwest, produced long durations of poor visibility and unhealthy air quality.  Beginning in early August, smoke poured into the region from fires in British Columbia.  At the end of August and early September, smoke from fires in the Cascades  and Columbia Gorge enveloped the region.  Stagnant air conditions and a light easterly flow even allowed smoke from Idaho and western Montana to drift into the region.

3. Solar Eclipse-7.27: On August 21st, it was a once in a lifetime event when the long anticipated total solar eclipse occurred.  What made it weather worthy was that the sky conditions were nearly perfect for viewing.  On the previous day, there was a weak disturbance that produced clouds and then, the day after the eclipse, the smoke from regional fires returned to many areas.

4. June 26 flash flood and severe thunderstorms-6.09:  The largest severe weather outbreak in nearly 4 years produced eight severe thunderstorms which pounded central and northeast Oregon and southeast Washington.  Large hail up to golf ball sized was observed near Warm Springs and Clarno, Oregon.  The Pendleton airport received its largest 1 hour rainfall on record with 0.97 inch.  Flash flooding was reported near the airport and also in Kennewick and Richland, Washington.  Winds gusted 60 to 65 mph at Pendleton and also Richland and Kahlotus, Washington.

5. Wet Water Year-5.27: Pendleton, Yakima and the Tri Cities, Washington each earned top 10 ranking for wet water years ending September 30.  Nearly all of this moisture came in the October through June period.

6. Bye Bye Drought-4.81: In early March, the drought monitor showed all of Washington and Oregon drought free for the first time since October 2011, a period just short of 5 and a half years.   At the end of March, mountain snowpack was 100 to 140 percent of normal in the Cascades, Blues, Ochocos, and Wallowas.

7. Central Oregon Hail storm-4.27-: On May 4th, a late evening severe thunderstorm traveled through northern Deschutes and Jefferson counties and produced large hail between 1 and 2 inches in diameter  northwest of Bend and Terrebonne, before moving into the Madras area.

8. Hot Dry Summer-3.91:  Many locations recorded the average temperatures in the top 5 for warmest on record for June through August. The Long Creek, Oregon average summer temperature of 66.5 degrees barely beat the previous record hottest by 0.1 degree set in 2015. Most locations only received 25 to 75 percent of normal precipitation with the Pendleton area being the exception at 131 percent of normal.  It was dry for 54 consecutive days in Easton, Washington and for 61 days in Redmond, Oregon.   Hermiston and Yakima had the driest July on record.  It was the hottest August on record at Ellensburg, Hermiston, Bend, Easton, Yakima, Pelton Dam, Long Creek, and Condon.

9. Union County Blizzards-3.36: On January 7th and 18th, the LaGrande, Oregon airport reported visibility less than 1/4 mile due to blowing snow creating blizzard conditions. On the 7th, all roads in Union County, including I-84, were closed as winds gusted to over 60 mph.

10. Damaging Winds-2.64: On April 7th, a strong low pressure system created a tight gradient and produced wind gusts in the 60 to 70 mph range at Walla Walla and Ellensburg, Washington and also at Shaniko, Heppner, La Grande, and Pendleton, Oregon.  Snapped trees and power outages were reported in the Bend area.

— Dennis Hull- KB0NYC
Warning Coordination Meteorologist
541-969-7136
www.weather.gov/pendleton


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbFluorescent Nanomedicine Could Improve Tumor Removal Process

 

Where Does the Federal Government Get All That Money?

Brilliant Maps: The European Diaspora: European Ancestry Worldwide

Oregon Farm Bureau: Tax reform will help agriculture

Capitol Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers

 

Winter Holiday Music is So Jewish


 

Sherman County eNews #368

CONTENTS

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. CLASSIFIEDS (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

Christmas.holly1Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

applause1CONGRATULATIONS and THANK YOU to the Editorial Team – Gladys Wesley, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton and Nancy Allen – for publishing the fall issue of Sherman County: For The Record right on schedule! A lot of us will be interested in the remarkable lead story with lots of pictures, Barnstormers: Let’s Put on a Play, by Forest Peters! Well done, Forest! Other stories follow: History of the Sherman Seniors 1967 by Jane Macnab & Lois Kaseberg; Sherry Kaseberg’s stories, Mattie’s Hump & Dinty’s Café and Miller Island, An Unexpected Chapter, Part Two; Memorial Gifts & Honorariums; and two school class photographs. ~The Editor

Christmas.Santa.mailTHANK YOU, DARLA & COUNTRY FLOWERS! Cousins in the mid-west ordered flowers for us and you arranged to have them delivered from Condon by pony express to The Farm Store in Wasco! We’re pleased and impressed by your creative customer service! ~Larry & Sherry

JOYFUL NEWS!:

Christmas.Bethlehem

Stille Nacht / Silent Night

Joseph Mohr, 1818; ascribed to Franz Gruber, 1818

Silent night! Holy night! All is calm, all is bright,

Round yon Virgin Mother and Child; Holy Infant, so tender and mild,

Sleep in heavenly peace, Sleep in heavenly peace.

Silent night! Holy night! Shepherds quake at the sight,

Glories stream from heaven afar, Heavenly hosts sing Alleluia;

Christ the Saviour is born, Christ the Saviour is born.

Silent night! Holy night! Son of God, love’s pure Light

Radiant beams from Thy holy face, With the dawn of redeeming grace,

Jesus, Lord, at They birth, Jesus, Lord, at Thy birth.

Silent night! Holy night! Wondrous Star, lend thy light,

With the angels let us sing, Alleluia to our King,

Christ the Saviour is born, Christ the Saviour is born.

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

EMPLOYMENT:

CUSTODIAN. Sherman County School District is seeking a qualified custodial candidate. The candidate must be self-motivated and is responsible for performing custodial duties, minor maintenance, and other miscellaneous duties on a regimented schedule in order to ensure that the school building and facilities are maintained in a healthy, safe, and sanitary manner.  Medical, dental, and vision insurance are included.

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug screening required. For information and application materials please email or call Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us or 541-565-3500.

Application Method/Materials Required. Please submit a letter of interest, application (available from the school district) and resume if you are interested in the position to:

Wes Owens, Superintendent

65912 High School Loop

Moro, Oregon  97039

(541) 565-3500

wowens@sherman.k12.or.us

This position will remain open until filled. Sherman County School District is an equal opportunity employer.

TEMPORARY LICENSED HEALTH EDUCATION SPECIALIST.                       

Endorsement(s) Required:

Endorsement in Health Education is required for this position. Other opportunities may become available to increase FTE.

Salary:

Salary will be dependent upon start date, education, and experience.

Start Date

On or before, January 29, 2018.

Position Description:     

Sherman County School District is seeking a highly qualified .43 FTE Health Education Specialist. The successful candidate will spend two (2) periods each day teaching Health Education classes serving 7th-12th grade students and one (1) period each day as the Yearbook classroom instructor. The workday for this position will be from 7:45 am until 11:15 am. Current paid coaching opportunities that are available at this time include Head High School Tennis Coach and Head High School Track Coach, other potential coaching and advisor opportunities may also become available.

Qualifications:

  • Ability to work independently as well as a member of a team.
  • Ability to communicate with parents, students and staff.
  • Able to meet the individual needs of all students.
  • Excellent planning, organizational skills.
  • Qualified applicants who have experience and an interest in coaching are encouraged to apply.

About Sherman County School District:      

The Sherman County School District is a K-12 progressive school with approximately 245 students, located in Moro, Oregon.  The 2016-17 school year saw the opening of a new elementary and remodeled Jr./Sr. High School connected as one modernized facility. 

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing required.  For further information and application materials please email Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us.  Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

HEALTHY FAMILIES OREGON HOME VISITOR. North Central ESD Early Education is hiring for a part time Healthy Families Oregon Home Visitor. Healthy Families Oregon seeks to insure healthy, thriving children and nurturing, caring families with a target of reaching parents with newborns and expectant parents. We seek to enhance family function, promote positive parent-child relationships and support children’s healthy growth and development through home visiting and links to community services.
The main duties of this job will be to provide parental support and education through the early years of a child’s life so children will grow up to be emotionally secure and safe, healthy, and more school-ready. Provide parenting skills, child development monitoring, early learning activities, and linkages to community resources. High school diploma required, AA or Bachelor’s Degree preferred. Must have reliable transportation to and from worksites.  Worksite Location: Office located in Condon. Service area includes Gilliam, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties. Work Schedule: 30 hours/week. Salary Range: $14.17-$20.15 DOE. Benefits: Medical, Dental, Vision and Long Term Disability. Reports to: Healthy Families Supervisor. Application Deadline: Open until filled. Please send resume and cover letter to bansotegui@ncesd.k12.or.us 877-562-3739 “The NCESD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.”

FOR SALE:

HOME +ACREAGE. For sale by owner. $395,000. Beautiful home on 33 acres. 13 acres of dryland wheat and 20 in pasture that is fenced and cross fenced including riding arena. The home is approximately 3000 sq ft with 3 bedrooms and 3 1/2 baths. Completely remodeled in 2016 including new septic and water system with full house filter, new paint and flooring throughout house. Outbuildings include a 25 X 50 barn with 3 stalls, 5 horse/livestock shelters in small fenced pastures and a 10 X 25 storage/pump house. Only 10 minutes to Highway 84 and a quick 20 minute commute to The Dalles. Contact Nancy at 541-442-8500.

HANDCRAFTED BARREL STAVE FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS. Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, ready for Christmas ~ The Wood Butcher, Wasco, Oregon 541-993-4282 https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/  12/22

MEMBERSHIP IN THE SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY is a great Christmas gift!  Annual membership (per address) fee is $30/year. Benefits include free admission, a 10% discount in the Museum Store, two issues of the newsletter, The Plow, and two issues of the historical anthology, Sherman County: for the Record. Contact Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or director@shermanmuseum.org or 541-565-3232.

SHERMAN COUNTY: FOR THE RECORD, the twice-yearly historical anthology published by Sherman County Historical Society. Selected issues make wonderful Christmas gifts! $6 + $1.50 postage. Contact Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or director@shermanmuseum.org or 541-565-3232. [Note: Contact Sherman County eNews to request a summary list of contents 1983-2017 – sherryk@gorge.net]

SHERMAN COUNTY CLASSIFIEDS | FACEBOOK   https://www.facebook.com/groups/1680690712181261/

STUDDED TIRES 245/75R-16 on GM Alloy Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM).  Lightly used, asking $700 for wheels and tires. Sold the vehicle and the new owner did not need the studded set. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text).  12/29

1.5 ACRE LOT. New Price on 1.5 acre lot just outside of Moro. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $50,000. http://www.rmls.com/report/17410095 ~ Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  12/29

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

SERVICES:

NEWSPAPERS

 VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

PLANNING COMMISSION POSITION. The Sherman County Planning Commission has an open position for a Planning Commission Member. This is strictly a volunteer appointment. The Planning Commission develops, maintains and implements the County’s Comprehensive and Land Use Ordinances. The position is a four year term and requires attendance at regular monthly planning commission meetings. Members must have an interest in land use planning, reflect the values of the community, interpret and apply zoning ordinance provisions, make decisions and recommendations, educate the public on land use and understand the legislative and quasi-judicial process. Interested individuals may contact the Sherman County Planning Department at 541-565-3601 for more information.

COURT APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATE for CHILDREN. Winter CASA volunteer training (advocating for foster children) begins in January 2018 and we have 4 spaces left. Call (541) 386-3468 to find out more & schedule an interview. 

WANTED:

DAM STORIES. The 60th anniversary of the start of construction and 50th anniversary of the dedication of the John Day Dam will be in 2018. Gladys Wesley, editor of Sherman County: For The Record, plans to devote the spring issue to stories about  construction of the dam and the Biggs bridge and road and railroad relocation. Did you or your parents work on any of these? Do you remember the changes in the area as a result of the added jobs? Did you and/or your family move to Sherman County at the time? Did you attend the opening of the bridge or other events? Do you have photographs of that period? You and your stories are an important part of Sherman County history. Your photos to illustrate your story will be scanned and returned. Send your stories to Sherman County Historical Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or to info@shermanmuseum.org (with subject line Story for FTR). Questions? Contact the Museum: 541-565-3232. Deadline for submission is February 28, 2018.

YOUR STORIES. Gladys Wesley, editor of Sherman County: For The Record, Sherman County Historical Society’s twice-yearly historical anthology, reminds us that the editorial team is always looking for stories related to Sherman County for future issues… stories about places, families or events. Time marches on and for the young people of today the events of the 1950s and 1960s are as much history as the late 1800s were when the historical society was started in 1945. Send your stories to Sherman County Historical Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or to info@shermanmuseum.org (with subject line Story for FTR). Questions? Contact the Museum: 541-565-3232.

FREE:


2. CALENDAR (new or corrected)

DECEMBER

24-30 Sherman County School District Christmas Vacation

24 Wasco United Methodist Church Christmas Eve Worship Service 11

24 Christmas Eve Mass 5 Grass Valley Catholic Church

24 Moro Community Presbyterian Church Service 10:45

24 Candlelight Service, Christmas Eve 6 Moro Community Presbyterian Church

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

27-31 Oregon Coast Whale Watching Week

30 6th Annual Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance w/Countryfied, Grass Valley Pavilion

JANUARY

1 Oregon State Parks’ Free First Day Hikes

3 Sherman County Court 9

4 AG Tech Bootcamp, University of Idaho, Pocatello

9 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 8

9 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

9-10 Direct Seed Conference, Kennewick

10 Developing/Expanding Your Farm Stand/Agritourism Seminar, Central Point

10 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

12 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

20 Sherman County Court 9

22 Frontier Regional 911 Agency Board Meeting 2

23 Statewide Special Election

24 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Wheeler County

30-Feb. 1 Northwest Ag Show, Portland

FEBRUARY

5 Lower John Day Area Commission on Transportation 10-12 Rufus

9 Community Renewable Energy Association (CREA) Board Meeting 10-1

13 Sherman County Watershed Council 8

13 Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30

13 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

13 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

14 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30

15 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 10 NORCOR, The Dalles

16-18 Winter Fishtrap, The New Agrarians, Joseph, Oregon

20 Kessler Angus Ranch Bull Sale, Milton-Freewater

21 Sherman County Court 9

24 OSU Small Farm Conference, Corvallis


 

Sherman County eNews #367

CONTENTS

  1. Take a Holiday Break at the Sherman County Public/School Library

  2. OSU Requires Vaccinations for Meningococcal B for Students

  3. Distractions

  4. Quotation Marks

  5. Notice. Sherman County Court, Jan. 3

  6. Beatrice Holmes Ward 1925-2017

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


On this day, December 21, in 1964, a great warm and moist surge of Pacific air brought torrential rains on an already deep snow base, resulting in record flooding across Oregon and Northern California.


1. Take a Holiday Break at the Sherman County Public/School Library

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017Holiday Hours 11am-7pm on Tuesday and Thursday, 10am-4pm on Saturday.

Tired of hearing “I’m bored?” Join us Thursday, December 28 for a day filled with Star Wars fun. The Force Awakens starts at 1pm. There will be a story time and crafts for younglings at 3pm. Crafts for older kids, teens, and adults will start after the movie.


2. OSU Requires Vaccinations for Meningococcal B for Students

North Central Public Health is forwarding an Oregon Health Authority media release to make sure it reaches local OSU students and families during winter break. Health officials today reported a sixth case of meningococcal disease infecting a student enrolled at Oregon State University in Corvallis, and are encouraging undergraduate students during winter break to receive vaccinations for meningococcal B disease.

“Oregon State University takes the health and welfare of its students, employees and the general public very seriously,” said Steve Clark, OSU vice president for university relations and marketing.

“Effective immediately, Oregon State University will require all of its Corvallis students 25 and younger to be vaccinated for meningococcal B disease by Feb. 15,” he said. “Prior to this latest case, vaccinations were encouraged for all OSU students 25 years and under, but required for all incoming first-year students and transfer students.”

Paul Cieslak, MD, medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division, said, “In light of the university’s new vaccination requirement, most OSU students remain unvaccinated and their time over the holidays might be the best opportunity for them to be vaccinated.”

The latest case is a 21-year-old Oregon State undergraduate student enrolled at the Corvallis campus who was hospitalized Dec. 17 with meningitis while visiting family members. Preliminary tests found meningococcal disease to be the probable cause, and further testing is underway to determine whether it is the same strain of meningococcal bacteria that caused the other OSU cases.

“We offer our thoughts, concern and wishes for a speedy and full recovery for this student and for their family,” Clark said.

If confirmed to be meningococcal B, it would be the sixth case of the disease at OSU’s Corvallis campus since November 2016, and the third since October.

OHA epidemiologists on Tuesday distributed a statewide alert urging health care providers and pharmacists to encourage vaccination and to take every opportunity to vaccinate all OSU undergraduate students age 25 and younger with a series of serogroup B meningococcal vaccine.

Winter break, which began Dec. 9 for Oregon State, continues through Jan. 7.

“We ask that health care providers consider meningococcal disease in their diagnosis when college students, particularly those with links to OSU, show up with unexplained high fever, headache, stiff neck or rash, and report any suspected cases promptly to their local public health department,” Cieslak said.

OHA epidemiologists are supporting OSU, Benton County and other local public health departments around the state in investigating the case, including identifying and treating individuals with whom the student had close contact in recent days. Members of the student’s immediate family have been treated with preventive antibiotics.

The latest illness shows the disease still is a cause for serious concern in and around the OSU Corvallis campus community, Cieslak says, and until students are vaccinated, they remain at risk of the potentially deadly disease.

Two brands of meningococcal B vaccines are licensed in the United States, and they are not interchangeable:

  • Bexsero, a two-dose series, with the second dose given at least one month after the first
  • Trumenba, a three-dose series, with the second dose given one month after the first, and the third dose given six months after the first

Either vaccine can be used, but because they are not interchangeable, the follow-up doses should be of the same brand as the initial dose.

State law requires health insurers to cover the cost of vaccines and antibiotics during an outbreak for enrollees 25 and younger, and who are attending or enrolled to attend OSU at the Corvallis campus. Students having trouble accessing vaccines due to insurance restrictions should call 888-877-4894 or email cp.ins@oregon.gov to connect with patient advocates.

Vaccination is the best means of preventing meningococcal disease. The following measures may offer some additional protection: students reduce the risk of transmission by coughing into a sleeve or tissue; avoiding exchange of respiratory and throat secretions, such as by sharing drinks or kissing; washing and sanitizing hands often; and not sharing drinks, utensils, cigarettes or other smoking equipment or personal cosmetics that touch the lips. Meningococcal B disease is not typically transmitted by touching kitchen counters, tables, doorknobs and other surfaces.

Link to OHA media release:

Additional meningococcal B disease information:

For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at www.ncphd.org. 


3. Distractions

Distracted driving has become a “hot button” subject in most cities around the world, whether it’s texting while driving, eating while driving, even getting dressed while driving! Many cities have enacted laws that fine us for talking on our mobile phones while driving. Many of us have probably encountered someone so distracted by texting, that they walk through an intersection against the DO NOT WALK sign!

These types of distractions and the conversations around them are a serious matter, because the repercussions involve life and death. However, distractions have other ramifications that are not as readily seen, especially when it comes to getting our work done or having our brains learn something new. In this way, distractions keep us from focusing on the task at hand.

While “multi-tasking” is still bandied about as a plus in some workplaces, research has shown this to be a false assumption. Distractions actually impair memory creation. Media multi-taskers (those folks who seem to be glued to instant messaging, email, Facebook, Instagram and the like) are especially susceptible to the negative impact of distractions on their performance, with a steep drop-off shown in their memory-making results.

This is not to say that all distractions are bad. Let’s face it, there are days when we simply need to give ourselves and our brains a break. When this happens, however, it’s not so much a distraction as it is purposely putting a subject or project aside, giving the brain time to sift through the information being presented to it. Additional research shows that the brain gets bored and loses focus after about 20 minutes on a subject. Then, it needs a new stimulus, or it shuts off its attention completely.

You see, the brain learns best when it has time to consider what it is learning, as well as how the new information is going to be applied. And in this process, the fewer the distractions, the better. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Quotation Marks

The rules set forth in this section are customary in the United States. Great Britain and other countries in the Commonwealth of Nations are governed by quite different conventions. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Rule 4 in this section, a rule that has the advantage of being far simpler than Britain’s and the disadvantage of being far less logical.http://www.grammarbook.com/punctuation/quotes.asp

Quotation marks are primarily used to indicate material that is being reproduced word for word, as well as some other important uses.  

http://www.thepunctuationguide.com/quotation-marks.html


5. Notice. Sherman County Court, Jan. 3

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Court will be in session on Wednesday, January 3, 2018, at 9:00 a.m.  in the Hearings Room at the Sherman County Courthouse Addition, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.


6. Beatrice Holmes Ward 1925-2017 

flower.rose.starA Journey Completed,

A life well lived and a rest well deserved

for a beloved Mother

Beatrice Holmes Ward, a loving Mother was the daughter of the late Alonzo and Emma Holmes.

Beatrice H. Ward received her final call from her God and Savior Jesus Christ to come home Saturday, December 9, 2017 at approximately 6:15 P.M. in Emanuel Hospital in Portland, Oregon. Beatrice Ward lived a long fulfilling and happy life with her family.

Beatrice Ward was born August 24, 1925 in the town of Morton, Mississippi to a family of six children. She was baptized and received God as her personal savior at Pleasant Hill Baptist Church in Morton Mississippi.

Beatrice attended grade school and high school in Mississippi prior to marrying Willie B. Ward in Morton, Mississippi, where they produced six children, three boys and three girls. The family moved from Mississippi while the children were very young to McNary, Arizona in 1952 after their last child was born. Her husband Willie B. Ward had got a new job in McNary, Arizona, working for Southwest Forest Industries.

Beatrice was a homemaker and later started to work outside the house when her children were in school. She worked as a fry cook and later a chef in several restaurants in McNary and the neighboring towns to help make ends meet for the family.

After all the children were out of school and had moved to Portland, Oregon, and other places her two sons moved her to Portland, Oregon, in 1979. Beatrice immediately made friends and eventually found a job working for Emanuel Hospital in housekeeping and later retired from there in 1989.

Beatrice was warm hearted, full of life and a loving Mother always willing to share and help others and taught her children those same values.

Beatrice was very proud of her Church and was one of the early members who worked with Rev. Howard and others to see the completion of the new church, Antioch Missionary Baptist Church. She loved gardening and keeping her lawn and flowers looking presentable to the community.

As many that know her, she loved to grow her vegetable and grapes to share with others in the community. It was very fulfilling for her to give to others the fruits of her labor from her garden.

Beatrice was preceded in death by her husband, Willie B. Ward, her son Robert Earl Ward and her daughter Vena Mae Ward Lee, her father and mother Alonzo & Emma Holmes, brothers, Billy Ray, Elford & Nelson Holmes, sisters Levelma Davis and Myrtis Thompson.

Beatrice is survived by her sons, Arthur B. Ward, Billy L. (Iralene) Ward; two daughters, Emma Jean Russell, Queen Esther (Robert) Clark, son in law Bobbie James Lee, two nephews, three nieces, four granddaughters, one grandson, four great grandsons, three great granddaughters and a host of many other relatives, friends and neighbors who will miss her smiling face, warm friendship and big heart.

~ http://www.rosecityfuneralhome.com/notices/Beatrice-Ward


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3

 

Trump Will Speak at American Farm Bureau Federation Convention

White House | Cabinet Meeting Marks Tremendous Year of Progress


 

Sherman County eNews #366

CONTENTS

  1. Out with the Negative, In with the Positive

  2. OSP Increases Patrols, Urges Motorists to Travel Safely Through the Holidays

  3. Paid Work Experience, Business Internship Program & Professional Development

  4. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving

  5. City of Moro Announces New City Administrator

  6. OP-ED: Tax Reform for Oregon’s Middle Class

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


snowflake

I’m dreaming of a white Christmas
Just like the ones I used to know
Where the treetops glisten, and children listen
To hear sleigh bells in the snow.
I’m dreaming of a white Christmas
With every Christmas card I write
May your days be merry and bright
And may all your Christmases be white. ~ Irving Berlin.


1. Out with the Negative, In with the Positive

We have spent the last couple of days becoming aware of the negatives in our thoughts. Are you having trouble getting some of those negative thoughts to go away?

No one, not even the most optimistic person in the world, can think positively all the time. If we pay any attention to the daily news – and that is so easy to do – keeping negative thoughts at bay can be a real challenge. But successful people know how to get rid of their negative thoughts fast when they do appear.

Here’s a great technique that originated with Matt Oechsli, a therapeutic hypnotist:

First, identify the thought that is bothering you. Most likely, it is a fear of something. Is it failure? Rejection? Incompetence? Could it be illness or catastrophe? Being able to put a name to the problem is huge, as it brings it down to a manageable size and gives you a target.

Secondly, interrupt the problem thought by visualizing a candle flame and taking a long, deep breath. You cannot concentrate on two opposing thoughts at the same time, so you will find your fear diminishing, and the deep breathing triggers a relaxation response.

Third, eject it. As you exhale, imagine that you are breathing out the fearful or negative thought. See the candle flame flicker and go out as you blow it away with your breath.

Finally, replace it. Put a positive affirmation in its place, drawing a positive picture in your mind of what you want to think or feel. Then, repeat that affirmation several times.

Remember: Identify, Interrupt, Eject and Replace. It will take some practice at first, but this is a technique that can help you learn how to take charge of your thoughts, and at the same time, you will be taking charge of your life. ~The Pacific Institute


2. OSP Increases Patrols, Urges Motorists to Travel Safely Through the Holidays

ORStateFlagOSP will be increasing patrols during the holidays running December 13th through January 1st, 2018.

OSP emphasis will be on the Fatal 5 driving behaviors, which lead to serious injury and fatal crashes. Those are Speed, Occupant Safety, Lane Usage, Impaired Driving and Distracted Driving. OSP is asking motorists to report dangerous drivers and those believed to be impaired.

AAA projects a record-breaking holiday travel season this year with about a third of the population traveling for the Christmas and New Year holidays! That adds up to a whopping 107 million Americans including more than 1.3 million Oregonians. The vast majority–91 percent–will take a holiday road trip. AAA expects to rescue more than 901,600 drivers nationally and 12,000 in Oregon over the holiday travel period, with the primary reasons being dead batteries, flat tires, lockouts and vehicle tows. Make sure you and your vehicle are ready for winter driving conditions. Pack an emergency kit as well as food and water for you and your passengers, including your four-footed family members. Bring extra jackets, gloves, blankets and warm clothing. And don’t blindly follow your GPS–if it directs you to a road that doesn’t appear to be maintained or well-traveled, turn around!

As with other holiday weekends OSP is urging motorists to plan ahead, expect heavy traffic, expect poor driving conditions with rain expected at lower elevations and snow in the mountain passes, and take your time. Know your route and the road conditions before traveling by going to www.tripchceck.com


3. Paid Work Experience, Business Internship Program & Professional Development

Mid Columbia Producers in conjunction with other businesses throughout the Gorge have put together paid work opportunities and internships.  Please feel free to send this on to students, unemployed individuals or people looking for a career change. Please direct interested parties the website www.gorgeworks.com.   

Interested in exploring jobs with career potential and getting paid in the process?

Gorge Works offers access to multiple paid work experience opportunities for the Summer of 2018 in the Columbia Gorge through one convenient application process. See https://gorgeworks.com/paid-work-experience-positions/.

Host an Intern: Columbia Gorge businesses are welcome to apply to be part of this nine-week summer internship program. See https://gorgeworks.com/host-an-intern/

Professional Development: Our host sites will provide on-the-job training that gives you a head-start on a path to a lucrative, life-long career. Additionally, we at Gorge Works believe in providing skills that can be used in a range of environments. Weekly professional development sessions will be facilitated by local experts. Sessions may include the following topics or others:

  • Workplace Expectations
  • Communication
  • Project Management
  • Professional Presentations
  • LEAN 101
  • Leadership
  • Finance

See https://gorgeworks.com/professional-development/.


4. Remember Local Needs with Year-end Giving

Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving | tax-deductible non-profit organizations | Updated 12/2017:

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman Station Foundation, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, P.O. Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Food Bank, P.O. Box 14, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, P.O. Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039
  • Sherman County Senior & Community Center, P.O. Box 352, Moro, OR  97039
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco School Events Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box __, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

5. City of Moro Announces New City Administrator

The City of Moro has a new face in City Hall after the Mayor and city council members voted unanimously to approve the hiring of Erik Glover as the City’s new administrator at the December 5th council meeting.

Erik Glover is a Sherman County native and is a 2010 graduate of Sherman High School in Moro and a graduate of Oregon State University in Corvallis, with a Bachelor’s degree in Agriculture and Agriculture Business Management. Erik brings business management and administration experience, as well as formal education in accounting, budgeting and finance to his role as City Administrator. Erik prefers the small town life and looks forward to getting to know and working with everyone in Moro.

The City Council also wants to thank Kari Silcox for her work as the previous city administrator, and wish her the best in her new role as manager/director of the Senior Center in Moro.

Please help welcome Erik to his new role, and make sure to stop by your City Hall and say Hello!


6. OP-ED: Tax Reform for Oregon’s Middle Class 

American flag2By Representative Greg Walden

Pro-growth tax reform is on its way to hardworking, middle-class Americans.  And it’s about time. 

The biggest percentage of tax reductions next year will go to those earning between $20,000 and $50,000 a year.  That’s according to the Joint Committee on Taxation.  An eastern Oregon family earning the median income of approximately $50,000 a year will pay about $1,300 less next year.  Over the next eight years that’s a savings of $10,400 for that family.

What does that mean across the country? A typical American family of four earning $73,000 a year, will see a 58% reduction in their federal taxes. That’s real relief.

Moreover, by nearly doubling the standard deduction, even fewer Oregonians will have to hire an accountant to search the 73,954 pages of the federal tax code only to discover darn few of the special interest loopholes apply to them.  We’re closing the loopholes and making filing your taxes as easy as filling out a postcard. 

For those who choose to itemize their taxes, I worked with my colleagues to maintain provisions important to Oregonians such as preserving the ability to deduct medical expenses, and a combination of both property and state income taxes up to $10,000 – helpful in our high-tax state. For students and teachers, I also successfully fought to maintain the deductions for student loans and teaching expenses.

The IRS should have new tax withholding tables in employers’ hands before February.  Once that happens, taxpayers will begin to see more going into their pockets, and less going to the Washington, D.C. bureaucracy.

In addition to providing historic and meaningful individual tax relief to Oregon families, this measure is also designed to rekindle job growth.  Few in Congress were job creators.  My wife and I spent more than 20 years as small business owners in the Columbia Gorge.  I can tell you from first-hand experience of growing a business and meeting a payroll, passage of this Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will help small businesses, family farms and ranches, and those contractors with a truck and backhoe expand and grow. 

Oregon’s breweries and wineries get substantial relief from the beer and wine excise taxes thanks to Republican Senate provisions I fought to include in the final bill. These savings will our let our craft brewers and winemakers reinvest more money locally in their businesses and our communities. 

Globally, we’ll finally see American-based companies bring money home and invest it here, rather than look for ways to shelter earnings overseas. America had one of the highest corporate tax rates in the industrialized world, resulting in lost jobs and American companies moving abroad. That all changes under this legislation. 

Our plan makes the American economy more competitive, which will lead to more job growth and economic expansion. We’re finally giving American companies a better place to do business. 

A spokesman for Intel, one of Oregon biggest employers, told the Oregonian newspaper that these changes “…can help level the playing field for U.S. manufacturers and make us more competitive in today’s global economy.  The bill should also spur further investment in American manufacturing and (research and development).”

These tax reforms are boosting confidence in our economy.  Last month, the National Federation of Independent Business confidence index hit an all-time high.  Meanwhile, in the fourth quarter, optimism among manufactures also reached a new high. While the stock market will ebb and flow, a 5,000-point gain in the last year is both historic and welcome news to those with savings and retirement accounts, especially after the last eight years of slow growth. 

Many factors affect the strength of the economy, including an available and trained workforce, international incidents and more. Congress and the President need to focus on rebuilding America’s infrastructure next.  But after waiting 31 years for real tax reform, finally we have a law that brings tax savings to hard working Americans and makes us competitive again overseas. 

Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River) represents Oregon’s 2nd Congressional District, which includes 20 counties in central, southern and eastern Oregon.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeChenowith Principal Anne Shull on Leave Since September

Book: How to Save Education and a Trillion Dollars by Elgen M. Long

Sen. Ron Wyden cosponsors bill to legalize marijuana across U.S.

Tax reform smacks down excessive nonprofit salaries—Commentary

Northwest Lineman College

American Thinker

 

Was the Christmas star real?

Judge Declares Mistrial In Bundy Standoff Case After Gov’t Misconduct Discovered

George Soros Illegally Bankrolling Campaign To Amend Ireland’s Constitution, Government Watchdog Says