Sherman County eNews

Serving Sherman County, Oregon, and the region.

Sherman County eNews #345

CONTENTS

  1. Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store, Dec. 2

  2. Sherman County Lions Club Fruit Shipment Delayed until Dec. 9

  3. gofundme for Denny Riggs Family

  4. Local Students Given Opportunity to Study Abroad

  5. In Search of Happiness – Part 1

  6. The State of the Press: Fewer Reporters, Bigger Government

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


A key to a vital life is an eagerness to learn and a willingness to change.  ~Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey


“Our country is in danger, but not to be despaired of. Our enemies are numerous and powerful; but we have many friends, determining to be free, and heaven and earth will aid the resolution. On you depend the fortunes of America. You are to decide the important question, on which rest the happiness and liberty of millions yet unborn. Act worthy of yourselves.” —Joseph Warren (1775)


1. Christmas Shopping at The Museum Store, Dec. 2

Christmas.Holly2
Moro, OR – The Sherman County Historical Museum Store in Moro, Oregon will be open for your Christmas shopping on Saturday, December 2nd from 10:00 am until 3:00 pm. Come shop, enjoy refreshments, and tour the Sherman County Historical Museum! Pick up the newly designed camper coffee mugs, a historic Sherman County calendar, the Camp Sherman Calendar, Melissa & Doug brand wooden toys and puzzles, cute farm animals that walk and talk and a $5 t-shirt sale and much more for everyone on your list! Take a Walk on the Rural Side and we will see you on December 2nd at the Sherman County Historical Museum Store!

For more information contact the Sherman County Historical Museum at 541-565-3232 or email info@shermanmuseum.org.


2. Sherman County Lions Club Fruit Shipment Delayed until Dec. 9

The Lions Club just received word that the GRAPEFRUIT AND ORANGES which they have for sale are stalled in Texas and will not be available until Dec.9th.  Nell Melzer reports that if you have ordered fruit and call her next week you may pick up your order at her home. 541-565-3517. The fruit is always top quality. We apologize for the shipping delay!


3. gofundme for Denny Riggs Family

Denny Riggs is a single mom currently raising three children, and has recently been diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer.  Denny is facing surgery and followup treatments and a long battle to regain her health.  As those who know Denny and her situation will attest, Denny has given her heart and soul to her children and now is in need of some help from the community to get her and her family through this medical crisis.  Donations will be used primarily for medical expenses, fuel expenses and groceries for the household.  God bless you for considering a donation to this remarkable woman and her family. https://www.gofundme.com/denny-riggs-family.


4. Local Students Given Opportunity to Study Abroad

Qualified high school students are offered a unique opportunity to spend an academic year, semester or summer holiday in Europe, Asia, North or South America, Australia or South Africa as part of the ASSE International Student Exchange Program.

Students, 15 to 18 years old, qualify on the basis of academic performance, character references and a genuine desire to experience life abroad with a volunteer host family.

Families abroad are carefully screened to provide a caring environment in which students can learn the language and culture of their host country.  Students do not need to know the language of the host country prior to departure but will acquire the language skills through experiencing the day to day culture of their host country.  ASSE students attend regular high school classes along with their new teenage friends.

ASSE is dedicated to promoting closer ties of friendship between the United States and other countries by fostering intercultural understanding through youth exchange programs. 

ASSE also provides international opportunities for families to host students from Spain, Mexico, Germany, Great Britain, France, Brazil, Thailand, Japan, and many more.  These carefully screened and selected students are 15 to 18 years old and will attend the local American high school for an academic year.

Students or families interested in learning more about becoming an ASSE exchange student or host family should contact us at 1-800-733-2773 or visit our website at asse.com, host.asse.com or email us asseusawest@asse.com.


5. In Search of Happiness – Part 1

Human beings have been grappling with the concept of happiness since, well, the beginning. Once we could put a name to that feeling of contentment, of well-being, of knowing where our next meal was coming from and where we were going to sleep at night, we began to give some deeper thought to the subject.

Giving some deeper thought to the subject of happiness is what we are going to be doing for the next several days. During that time, we are going to lean on some ancient philosophy as well as modern interpretations and applications. The work of Dr. Robert Spitzer, S.J., friend and mentor to Lou Tice, will prove insightful.

To get started, we want to take a look at how the ancient Greeks looked at happiness around 2400 years ago. Because the subject is so big (apparently, it took Plato 360 pages to define happiness), it needed to be broken down into more easily understandable pieces. So, in his work, Plato divided the subject into four levels or types, each with distinctive characteristics.

Level 1 can be characterized as “Instant Gratification.” See the ice cream. Eat the ice cream. This level maximizes pleasure and minimizes pain. Typically, happiness at this level is physical and very intense. And it owes no obligation to anyone or anything, except the self. The down side is that it is usually over quickly, and then one needs immediately to go searching for the next gratifying moment.

Level 2 is all tied up in ego. It’s “Competition” but competition with everybody else. Someone stuck at this level is always trying to find someone they can be “better than.” Promotion of the self is of the utmost importance, and personal power is key. In every encounter, individuals at this level are constantly comparing themselves against others, in order to feel superior. The down side here is we run the risk of finding people better than us, and then happiness disappears.

There are two more levels to go, and we will address them tomorrow. In the meantime, give yourself the opportunity to see some of these behaviors being played out in your world – friends, family, co-workers, etc. Make a mental note of reactions to these behaviors and how they affect your own sense of happiness. ~The Pacific Institute


6. The State of the Press: Fewer Reporters, Bigger Government

classifieds.boyInformation about government increasingly comes from well-paid government employees – what does that mean for the reporters who are left and the democracy we all live in?

As Oregon newsrooms have gotten smaller, less experienced and more demanding, the ranks of well-paid government communications staff have swelled — a trend that is only expected to continue.

Many journalists laid off from or leaving the industry are now often acting as media gatekeepers for public agencies and officials, and even producing news-like content for the government agencies that now employ them.

Lee Shaker, a researcher at Portland State University, says this has become a necessary part of the government information cycle, as the old system of news has fallen apart over the past two decades.

But there is a risk to democracy when the news environment is so fractured, he says. Government still needs to get information out to the public, the public is now bombarded with information, and politicians find it advantageous to attack the independent press, Shaker says.

“That creates a lot of uncertainty and uncertainty is grounds for distrust, grounds for disagreement,” he says… … …

Several anecdotal accounts say The Oregonian’s reporting staff is between 100 to 120, about a quarter of its heyday.

The Portland Tribune and Pamplin Media Group’s news staff has also shrunk in size, though the reporting staff has grown since the 2007-09 recession, says company President Mark Garber. Garber estimates there are close to 100 reporters, photographers, copy editors and other news-side staff at the more than two dozen Pamplin newspapers.

Damian Radcliffe, a researcher at the University of Oregon, says the news environment is not as bad as some ex-journalists may think.

“There are a lot of rose-tinted spectacles in looking back on how journalism was versus how it is now,” Radcliffe says. “What is clear is that there are fewer resources but … I think the quality of reporting that we see on a daily and weekly basis remains incredibly robust.”

Radcliffe, who recently published a paper on the state of local journalism in the Pacific Northwest, says news organizations are diversifying with new revenue streams and new partnerships between former competitors.

“You didn’t have the resources you once did, but there are still a lot of people interested in government reporting, but you have to work together,” he says.

The ‘official line’

Radcliffe also says public affairs reporting has changed now that government has many channels to communicate with constituents.

Being a “stenographer” for government meetings and the like is now redundant, he says.

“I think that should be seen as an exciting opportunity for journalists in that regard,” Radcliffe adds, because news organizations can concentrate on investigative and enterprise work.

Chris Broderick, a former Oregonian staffer and now head of a major government communications team, says the tension between journalists and the “official line” from politicians and public officials is not much different than it used to be.

“That’s been going on forever,” Broderick says. “I think what’s changed is the media side.”

Broderick spent 32 years in journalism before leaving The Oregonian in 2010. While he says individual journalists are still doing good work, he joins other ex-staffers in worrying about the loss of in-depth coverage.

“I think a lot of people are less informed, no question about that in Oregon,” he says. “I think people are still doing a good job of hustling news and being watchdogs and doing what they can, but it’s just a matter of resources.”

…. “Those resources (from private news organizations) are gone and they’re not coming back, and I think that’s unfortunate for the community,” he says.

An obligation to communicate

Kelly McBride, a media ethics expert at The Poynter Institute journalism school, says the role of news organizations is to answer the public’s questions.

… Despite the advent of social media and government communications teams … public officials still have an obligation to talk to the press, McBride adds.

“There is really very little excuse for a public official being unresponsive to other organizations just because they have their own news organization,” McBride says. “Open government is open government.”

She adds that government has an obligation to communicate with the public despite smaller newsrooms… … …

See the entire article at http://cni.pmgnews.com/pt/379672


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3This first one’s for you mwm:

The state of the press: fewer reporters, bigger government

 

Sherman County Public School Library

The Pioneer Woman

The White House Just Unveiled Its Christmas Decorations and They’re Simply Magical

PHOTOS: The 2017 White House Christmas Decorations

Archenemies of Liberty — Soros, Steyer, Bezos and Bloomberg


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #344

CONTENTS

  1. Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 20

  2. 1st Annual 5K Reindeer Run & Snowflake Stroll, Dec. 2

  3. Notice: Weed Advisory Board Meeting, Dec. 5

  4. Decorate The Mitten Tree at Sherman County Public/School Library

  5. Keeping Charge Over Your Life

  6. Politeness

  7. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving, Updated

  8. Sherman County Senior & Community Center December Meal Menu

  9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 20

Come join us and learn a new game.  We have installed a court in the gym at the Wasco School Events Center.  Bo and Mary Macnab will be available from 10 a.m. to noon on the following dates to help you learn the basics.  Please wear clean shoes.  We have four racquets available for beginners.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 10-12

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6, 10-12

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13, 10-12

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 20, 10-12

Questions?  Call Mary at 442-5450.


2. 1st Annual 5K Reindeer Run & Snowflake Stroll, Dec. 2

snowflakeMark your calendars – December 2nd is the first annual 5K Reindeer Run & Snowflake Stroll, a holiday costume-themed race! Prizes will be awarded for the most festive individual costume, the most festive group costume, and the most festive running train (3 or more individuals linked linearly – think Santa behind a few reindeer!).

Coffee, cocoa, and hot cider will be provided.

When: December 2nd at 10 AM (registration at 9 AM)

Where: Lewis & Clark Festival Park, The Dalles

If you’d like to pre-register, please fill out the attached form and send it to Judy Bankman at judyb@ncphd.org.

Hope to see you there!  For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


3. Notice: Weed Advisory Board Meeting, Dec. 5

ShermanCoLogoThe next Sherman County Weed Advisory Board regular meeting is scheduled for Tuesday December 5th, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. at the Weed District building, 66143 Lone Rock Road, Moro (north side of the Fairgrounds). The public is welcome.


4. Decorate The Mitten Tree at Sherman County Public/School Library

mittens1Bring your donation of gloves, mittens, hats and scarves to decorate the Mitten Tree at the Library. We invite everyone to adorn the bare branches with warmth. We are also requesting warm throws and blankets to place under the tree. The Mitten Tree will be up through the end of December and all donated items will be given to our local food bank and other agencies serving Sherman County. 


5. Keeping Charge Over Your Life

What does a sense of having control over your life have to do with successful aging?

When we enter this later phase of life, we experience certain losses that can’t really be avoided. However, having a sense of control over our lives is a very important factor in how successfully we age.

An important study by Harvard researchers, conducted in a nursing home, is a case in point. One group of residents took charge of their daily living activities, including dressing, eating, personal hygiene and maintaining their own environments. A second group had all these functions taken care of for them by staff.

Results indicated that those in the first group were more alert, active and happier. 18 months later, 15% of that group had died, compared to 30% of the second group.

You see, the opportunity to make choices increases our sense of personal power and control. While folks who are older deserve our love, attention and support, the more we take over the business of living for them, the more they will come to need our help. The less they will be able to do for themselves, the faster their decline into helplessness.

Watch for a well-intentioned but misguided desire to be helpful that tempts you to take over for your friends and relatives who are older. Instead, support their efforts to take care of themselves and you will be empowering them to live longer, happier lives.

~The Pacific Institute


6. Politeness

Politeness to others is usually born out of respect for the individual, which you learn as a child. When you are treated with respect by other members of the family, you learn to respect them as well. The self-esteem that results from being recognized as a unique person by the people who matter most to you helps you develop the confidence necessary to succeed later in life. Politeness and consideration for others are habits that — once developed — usually stay with you for a lifetime. While common courtesy may seem relatively insignificant in the grand scheme of things, it is a reflection of more basic values. More important, if you develop the habit of respecting others, you are likely to command respect from them. ~Napoleon Hill Foundation


7. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving, Updated

Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving | tax-deductible non-profit organizations | Give to these organizations to honor someone with a shared interest, to recognize someone’s achievement or success, in memory or remembrance, to express your appreciation, or as an alternate gift for someone who has everything.

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman Station Foundation, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, PO Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, PO Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Food Bank, PO Box 14, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039
  • Sherman County Senior & Community Center, P.O. Box 352, Moro, OR  97039
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, PO Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box ____, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

8. Sherman County Senior & Community Center December Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

December Meal Menu

  We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served. 

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Menu subject to change due to availability.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
        1
Pizza loaded w/Meat
Salad & Veggies
Dessert
4 5 6 7 8
Sloppy Joe’s /Bun Turkey Tetrazzini Oven Fried Chicken Swedish Meatballs Beef Chili
Potato Wedges & Salad Salad & Veggies Mashed Potatoes &Gravy Rotini Noodles & Salad Cornbread & Salad
Veggies & Dessert Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies & Ice Cream
11 12 13 14 15
Chicken & Noodles Chicken Fried Rice Meatloaf Mac & Cheese w/Ham Sour Cream Chicken Enchiladas
Salad & Veggies Salad & Veggies Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Salad & Veggies Veggies & Salad
Dessert Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Fruit Ice Cream
18 19 20      CHRISTMAS LUNCH 21 22
Cheeseburgers Chicken & Broccoli Casserole (DIVAN) Roast Beef Chicken a la King Hearty Vegetable Beef Soup
Potato Wedges & Salad Salad & Veggies Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Biscuits & Salad Rolls, Salad
Veggies & Dessert Fruit Rolls, Veggie, Salad & Dessert Veggies & Fruit Veggies & Dessert
25 26 27 28 29
CLOSED TO CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS CLOSED TO CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS Baked Ham Chicken Fried Steak French Dip Sandwich
Au Gratin Potatoes & Salad Mashed Potatoes & Gravy Potato Wedges, Salad
Veggies & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies & Dessert

9. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limb Oregon Faith Report: 1.8 Million Federal Dollars spent on abortions in Oregon

Trump’s White House is decked out for the holidays

When The FCC Kills Net Neutrality, Here’s What Your Internet Could Look Like

Repealing Obama’s Net Neutrality a Blow for Freedom

The Ford Family Foundation & Karla von Borstel Chambers

Remembering Bill Tatum

This Year’s Hay Kings Tell How They Won


 

Sherman County eNews #343

CONTENTS

  1. Wasco City-Community Library Annual Fundraiser, Dec. 2

  2. James “Jim” Thomas Nerdin 1939-2017

  3. Respecting the Inner Child

  4. Free First Aid / CPR / AED Course, Dec. 11


I am only one, but I am one.

I can’t do everything, but I can do something.

The something I ought to do, I can do,

And by the grace of God, I will.

~ E.E. Hale


One person can make a difference! ~Mary Anne Radmacher-Hershey


“One man with courage makes a majority.” ~Andrew Jackson


1. Wasco City-Community Library Annual Fundraiser, Dec. 2

Saturday, December 2, 2017

Wasco School Events Center

Christmas.Santa.mail

4-7 p.m. Santa arrives! He’ll be visiting with the kiddies …….4-7pm

5- 6 p.m. Performers from the Sherman county GOOD NEWS CLUB will perform the “Ultimate Christmas Party,” a skit coordinated by Julie Fritts

4-7 p.m. Raffle tickets available for purchase (first one is free)….children and adult prizes, popular games, Plinko and others

  • Refreshments
  • POPULAR BOOK SALE
  • Vendors (tables still available)

All proceeds will be used to purchase new books, CDs and other needed supplies

Questions? Call Librarian Danee Rankin 541-980-8210


2. James “Jim” Thomas Nerdin 1939-2017

flower.rose.star
The world lost a master teacher on November 22, 2017 when James Thomas “Jim” Nerdin died after a valiantly fought battle with brain disease. Jim is remembered fondly by his children and countless other students for his uncanny knack for teaching. From youth to adults, Jim loved to share the knowledge he gained through study, work, and by simply having a willingness and desire to try new things. It’s impossible to list all the ways he taught or the number of lives he influenced through his teaching. Jim was a math teacher at school but his teachings extended far beyond math to things such as wood-working and furniture building, basketball, camping, tennis, construction, yard work, chopping wood, public speaking, gospel principles, fulfilling priesthood duties, how to make dinner from random leftovers and above all, hard work. 

Jim had a witty sense of humor and was a big jokester even through his last months struggling with his health. He passed this quality on to his sons while always making sure they didn’t do anything to disrespect his wife and their mother. Friends and fellow church members remember Jim for his strong handshake, ready smile, and eagerness to serve others. 

Jim is survived by his wife Connie, his children Eric (Kari) Nerdin, Julie (Doug) Hill, Laurie Nerdin, Jeff (Michelle) Nerdin, Robb (Stacey) Nerdin, Matt (Karen) Nerdin, Keith (Carley) Nerdin, Jamee (David) Shipp, his sister Garthia (Neil) Anderson, his brother Ray (Kathy) Nerdin, thirty-two grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Jim was preceded in death by his parents Garth and Violet Nerdin, his sister Nancy Ferrel and his grandson Riley J. Nerdin. 

Jim was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on April 30, 1939 and grew up in Port Orchard, Washington. He attended Frank Gibbons Elementary School and graduated from South Kitsap High School in 1957. Jim received a bachelor’s degree in mathematics from University of Washington, a teaching certificate from Brigham Young University (1969) and a master’s degree in computer science from University of Oregon (1976). Jim married his childhood friend Connie Dewey on December 28, 1963 and they raised their eight children together in Washington, North Dakota, Utah and Oregon. 

Jim was a dedicated teacher and school administrator. He began his career in education at Crane Union High School (1971-1978) where he taught math and chemistry and served as vice principal. He served as superintendent-principal at Wheeler County High School (1978-1979) and as principal at Sherman County High School (1979-1985), where he also taught math. Jim served as superintendent-principal at Helix High School (1985-1992), as superintendent at Harrisburg High School (1992-1999) and as superintendent at Sheridan High School (1999-2001). Jim coached volleyball and was the first ever girls’ basketball coach at Crane Union High School. He also coached boys’ basketball at Sherman County High School and girls’ basketball at Helix High School and College Place High School. After retiring from education, Jim founded JimCo Mortgage Field Service, which he ran until his full retirement in 2003. 

Jim was a dedicated member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and served multiple full-time missions for the church. He served as a young man in the Finland Helsinki Mission (1960-1962) and later served with his wife Connie in the Nigeria Ibaden Mission (2003-2004), in the Arizona Tucson Mission (2004-2005), doing genealogical work as part of the Norwegian Project (2007-2008), and as temple missionaries in the New York Palmyra Mission (2011-2013). Most recently Jim served as a member of the High Priest Group leadership in the Walla Walla Second Ward of the LDS church. 

In addition to his career and church service, Jim worked a variety of hands-on jobs including construction, roofing, hanging drywall, thinning forest trees and working at a grain elevator. Jim was also an accomplished woodworker and furniture maker and enjoyed hiking, reading, camping, canoeing and writing. He authored a book of family history entitled “They Will Not Depart From It” (a reference to Proverbs 22:6) and a modern western novel entitled “Frozen in Time,” as well as other essays and articles. Many of these pursuits are pursued by Jim’s children and grandchildren. 

A funeral service will be held at the LDS church located at 1821 South 2nd Avenue in Walla Walla, WA on Wednesday, November 29, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. A graveside service will immediately follow at Blue Mountain Memorial Gardens at 300 SE Myra Road in College Place, WA. Friends and family may send condolences or sign the online register book at http://www.mountainview-colonialdewitt.com. Mountain View — Colonial DeWitt, 1551 Dalles Military Road, Walla Walla, WA, is in charge of arrangements. 

As Jim was fond of saying, we now say to him, “Have fun storming the castle, Dad!”

~The Eugene Register-Guard


3. Respecting the Inner Child

Over the years, it’s become somewhat of a cliché to “get in touch with” our inner child. It’s giving ourselves permission to, occasionally, not be an adult. However, we don’t want to ignore who we were, either. Today, let’s talk about the inner child and what it means when it comes to adult growth and development.

All of us have had the experience of being a child, and most of us have no trouble at all being tender and compassionate toward the children we know.  But when adults find themselves feeling or behaving in a childish way – if they notice at all – they often react with horror.

It is important to realize that growing up is not a one-way trip. Adults can be childish sometimes, just as children can act very grown up. Sometimes, people who are totally “adult” all the time can be a bit intimidating, can’t they? Perhaps, we can learn to respect that inner child who lives in each of us.

While it is true that growth means trying new things and, in the process, letting go of old things, it doesn’t mean you should despise the self you once were. On the contrary, the child we used to be, and still are in many ways, deserves the same love and compassion we would show any youngster. Childhood is one part of our life that we learn with, and we don’t want to deny the learning we have done. After all, it has gotten us to where we are today.

It is only when we reject our own past, our inner child so to speak, that the specter of self-hatred begins to raise its head, making it much more difficult to let go and move on. By the way, letting go becomes easy when it is done out of self-love and compassion, and because we are on to something better, rather than because our inner parent says we “have to” for our own good. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Free First Aid / CPR / AED Course, Dec. 11

Wasco Co. Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) and North Central Public Health District invite you to register for a FREE First Aid / CPR / AED Course taught by Marc Taylor, American Safety and Health Institute (ASHI) certified instructor.

Date: Monday, December 11th, 2017

Time: 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Location: Mid-Columbia Fire & Rescue, The Dalles

Space is limited and you MUST register to attend.

For more information & to register, go to: https://wascofirstaid.eventbrite.com.

Participants will develop basic first aid knowledge and skills and the confidence to respond in a crisis. This comprehensive training offers 2-year ASHI certification.

Please bring your own lunch or be prepared to obtain your lunch from a nearby restaurant as lunch is not provided during the lunch break.

This training is provided by Business Oregon, Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division: Health Security, Preparedness and Response

For more information, please contact North Central Public Health District at (541) 506-2600 or visit us on the web at http://www.ncphd.org or our Facebook Page at https://www.facebook.com/NorthCentralPublicHealth/.


 

Sherman County eNews #342

CONTENTS

  1. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving

  2. Sherman County High School Christmas Tree Sale, Dec. 2

  3. Coming Soon: New Sherman County Website

  4. Sherman County Group Facebook Page

  5. The Idea of Being Free

  6. Baker’s Clay

  7. Notice: Sherman County Court Session, Dec. 6

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 Your treasured but un-identified photographs will not be treasured by those who inherit them. Please label them!


If you can’t shop locally, consider Amazon Smile: You shop. Amazon gives. At least one Sherman County charity is listed.


1. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving

Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving | tax-deductible non-profit organizations |

Give to these organizations:

–to honor someone with a shared interest,

–to recognize someone’s achievement or success,

–in memory or remembrance,

–to express your appreciation, or

–as an alternate gift for someone who has everything.

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman Station Foundation, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, PO Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, 36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, PO Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, PO Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box ____, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

2. Sherman County High School Christmas Tree Sale, Dec. 2
tree.evergreen
Available Trees and Sizes
Doug Fir Sizes: 5/6 | 6/7 | 7/8
Grand Fir Sizes: 5/6 | 6/7
Noble Fir Sizes: 4/5 | 5/6 | 6/7 | 7/8

Locations
65912 High School Loop, Moro, OR

Time
DECEMBER 2nd
9:00 AM to 3:30 PM

Prices vary between $25.00 and $50.00 depending on the size and type of tree.


3. Coming Soon: New Sherman County Website

ShermanCoLogoWelcome to our future website! We’re excited to be launching a new website that will help us better serve Sherman County. But first, we’re starting with “BETA”–a testing and feedback phase before we make it our official site. For a short period of time, the public BETA site will exist in tandem with our current website.

The new site focuses on helping residents, businesses and visitors better access services and information and includes:

  • a responsive design that adapts to phones, tablets, laptops and computers
  • a simple search that makes it easier to find information and services
  • an ‘Answers’ tool that lets users quickly access frequently asked questions integration with county social media accounts
  • and more

Once we’ve resolved final testing and preliminary feedback issues, we will make the BETA our official county website. After the official site is launched, much like consumer web applications we all use in our daily lives, the new site will continue to change and get better over time as we discover and address user needs.

Visit the BETA site here:

https://sherman-county-or.proudcity.com/

Timeline: Here is the timeline for the new website launch:

  • BETA launch: Now!
  • Official launch: Week of December 4th

Feedback: Use the ‘Feedback’ button on the bottom of the website to share how we can make it serve you better.

We’re excited to have a more modern, accessible website that will empower us all to best serve residents, visitors and businesses, and we look forward to making it better and better every day. Please visit our future website and give your feedback! 


4. Sherman County Group Facebook Page

See https://www.facebook.com/groups/144574559075535/


5. The Idea of Being Free

A lot of us grew up with the notion that we are free people, able to choose where we live, what we do for a living, and to come and go at will. But many people, although certainly free in these ways, are emotional prisoners. Have you ever thought about what it means to be emotionally free?

Dr. David Viscott, a well-known psychiatrist, said that emotional freedom means that you can do what you want, when you want to do it. You see, when you are emotionally free, you believe in your own goodness and you act to increase your sense of self-worth. You understand that whatever interferes with this belief is false, so you seek to exclude and avoid it.

Being emotionally free comes down to being free to believe in yourself and in your special-ness, and feeling free to make the most of it. Of course, all of this requires that you be free in expressing your emotions and responsible for the consequences of doing so. Freedom without responsibility breeds trouble, just as responsibility without freedom breeds resentment.

As you become an emotionally free person, you release the claim on you that is held by the past, and you become more and more able to give freely to others. You are better able to decide what is truly in your best interests, as you live your life to the fullest in the present, as well as in the future.

To learn more about this idea, you may want to see if you can find a copy of Dr. Viscott’s book, “Emotionally Free.” Though Dr. Viscott has passed, and the book was originally published in 1993, it is still available – on Amazon. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Baker’s Clay

Christmas.Ornament.(use hair pins or paper clips before baking as hangers for Christmas ornaments)

 

4 c flour

1 c salt

1 ½ to 1 ¾ c water

Bake 350 degrees 1 hour.


7. Notice: Sherman County Court Session, Dec. 6

The Sherman County Court will be in session on Wednesday, December 6, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Courtroom at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  The agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us

CoCourtAgenda December 6 2017_Page_1

CoCourtAgenda December 6 2017_Page_2


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbIn Charts, How These 7 Taxpayers’ Bills Would Change If Tax Reform Was Enacted

 

Banking on wind power in the West

The Patriot Post

 

Christmas with Bob Hope and the Troops

Walmart Vs. Amazon In Eastern Oregon

Study: Seal and sea lions’ strong revival eats into salmon harvest, orca recovery

6 Key Elements in Understanding the Tangled Uranium One Scandal

Welcome to Sherman County, Oregon – A Historical Collection

Prager U., An Arab Muslim in the Israeli Army

 

WW2 Islam & Modern Islam: Know Thy Enemy

 

Is Eco-Terrorism Above the Law?

 

The West Point Rapone Case and the Bill of Rights

How Free Trade Helps Americans Have Higher Incomes and More Jobs

Words | Adjective forms are plentiful and trick

 

Linn’s Stamp News: Monday Morning Brief | Letters to Santa


 

Sherman County eNews #341

CONTENTS

  1. Notice. North Central ESD Early Intervention Program Annual Meeting, Nov. 27

  2. Notice. Sherman County Court to Meet, Nov. 30

  3. 2017-18 Sherman Middle School Girls & Boys Basketball Schedule

  4. The World Around Us

  5. The English Plural According to George Carlin

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


You know, there is only one thing in life over which we have complete control, and that is what goes on inside our minds. When you choose to take charge of your thoughts, of the things you tell yourself, you become very powerful. Certainly, you may feel disappointment when things go wrong, but you can choose to see all the setbacks as temporary. You can choose to use them as opportunities to grow, and you’ll develop the ability to quickly bounce back when you hit an obstacle, as well as the incredible strength that comes from standing up to adversity. ~ Lou Tice


1. Notice. North Central ESD Early Intervention Program Annual Meeting, Nov. 27

North Central ESD, Early Intervention program will be holding its annual LICC meeting in conjunction with the Early Childhood meeting on Monday, November 27, 2017 at 12:30 pm. We will be meeting in the conference room of the ESD building in Condon, OR. Parents are welcome and encouraged to attend. If you have any questions please contact Kalie Rolfe, EI/ECSE Director at krolfe@ncesd.k12.or.us.


2. Notice. Sherman County Court to Meet, Nov. 30

ShermanCoLogoSherman County Court will meet on Thursday, November 30, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. in the Office of the County Court at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039 in executive session in accordance with ORS 192.660 (2) (i) Personnel for the purpose of holding interviews for the Sherman County Senior Center Director and Cleaning staff positions.


3. 2017-18 Sherman Middle School Girls & Boys Basketball Schedule

sports-basket2ball

DATE DAY OPPONENT SITE 5/6 GIRLS 5/6 BOYS 7/8 GIRLS 7/8 BOYS
Dec. 4 Mon. Horizon Christian Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Dec. 8 Fri. South Wasco Maupin 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00
               
Dec. 11 Mon. Dufur Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Dec. 14 Thurs. Bye Bye 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Jan. 8 Mon. Arlington Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Jan. 11 Thurs. Condon Condon 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Jan. 15 Mon. Arlington Arlington 3:00 3:00 4:00 4:00
               
Jan. 18 Thurs. Horizon Christian Hood River 12:00 11:00 11:00 12:00
               
Jan. 22 Mon. South Wasco Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Jan. 25 Thurs. Dufur Dufur 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Jan. 29 Mon. Dufur Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Feb. 1 Thurs. Bye Bye 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Feb. 5 Mon. Condon Moro 5:00 4:00 4:00 5:00
               
Feb. 8 Thurs. Bye Bye 3:00 4:00 5:00 6:00

 

5/6 Girls Coach:   Kari Peters            5/6 Boys Coach:  TBD

7/8 Girls Coach:   Samantha Smith     7/8 Boys Coach:   TBD

Athletic Director:  Gary Lewis              Principal:    Mike Somnis

Superintendent:   Wes Owens


4. The World Around Us

To some extent, each of us is affected by the environment around us. But, when your happiness depends on what goes on around you, you are in trouble.

Have you ever thought about what happens when we let what goes on in our environment determine how we feel on the inside?  When things are going well, we feel good, cheerful, positive, and full of enthusiasm. But, when the least little thing goes wrong, we start to come un-glued.

If this happens, we can start feeling like a victim, and when we feel like a victim, we give up control of our lives. There are those who believe that we are victims because we have chosen to be that way. This is a harsh critique, but there may be a grain of truth in it.

Some say that if you are not having problems, you are missing an opportunity for growth. This is exactly the thing we are talking about, because you choose to take charge of how you respond and what you do, regardless of what is happening in your environment.

You know, there is only one thing in life over which we have complete control, and that is what goes on inside our minds. When you choose to take charge of your thoughts, of the things you tell yourself, you become very powerful. Certainly, you may feel disappointment when things go wrong, but you can choose to see all the setbacks as temporary. You can choose to use them as opportunities to grow, and you will develop the ability to quickly bounce back when you hit an obstacle, as well as the incredible strength that comes from standing up to adversity.

The choice really is yours to make – it has been, and will continue to be in the future. You are in charge of you, your beliefs and the decisions you make. There is great strength in that, and, when harnessed, tremendous power for good. ~The Pacific Institute


5. The English Plural According to George Carlin

The English Plural

according to

George Carlin (1937-2008) 

We’ll begin with a box, and the plural is boxes,
But the plural of ox becomes oxen, not oxes.
One fowl is a goose, but two are called geese,
Yet the plural of moose should never be meese.
You may find a lone mouse or a nest full of mice,
Yet the plural of house is houses, not hice.

If the plural of man is always called men,
Why shouldn’t the plural of pan be called pen?
If I speak of my foot and show you my feet,
And I give you a boot, would a pair be called beet?
If one is a tooth and a whole set are teeth,
Why shouldn’t the plural of booth be called beeth?

If Father is Pop, how come Mother’s not Mop?


 6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Agriculture the most important use of water

As net neutrality heads for repeal, Oregon’s Walden and Wyden lead opposite ends of the debate

Editorial: Remembering the Proclamation of Thanksgiving

Blood Borders: A Proposal to Redraw a “New Middle East”

I saw behind me those who had gone, and before me those who are yet to come. I looked back and saw my father and his father and all our fathers, and in front to see my son and his son, and the sons upon sons beyond. And their eyes were my eyes.  As I felt, so they had felt and were to feel, as then, as now, as tomorrow and forever. I was not afraid anymore, for I was in a long line that had no beginning and had no end. ~unattributed

Thomas Sowell DESTROYS The Welfare State In One Sentence

Analysis: One Democrat on Trump’s Electoral Integrity Commission Is Misleading the Public with Complaints About its Work

Plan Toys

The Greatest Paper Map of the United States You’ll Ever See

 

Chasing the Dream. Your American Dream Score.

Insider Index: This week in Salem, by the numbers


 

Sherman County eNews #340

CONTENTS

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

REMINDERS:

Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

We often take for granted the very things that most deserve our gratitude. — Cynthia Ozick

thankYou

THANK YOU! Special thanks to Tom Lepinski for coordinating the Coffee Time with Veterans on Veterans’ Day, Saturday, November 11 at Wasco School Events Center. Thank you to Jessie Fuhrer, Melissa Kirkpatrick and Carol MacKenzie and everyone who contributed goodies for the “chat and chew” with our veterans! A good time was had by all! Thank you, Veterans, for your years of service! ~City of Wasco

THANK YOU! The Times-Journal, on November 9th, published a picture of our friend Dewey Thomas as he celebrated his 103rd birthday with family and friends in Wasco, and articles about Rep. Huffman’s resignation from the Oregon House, Sen. Ferrioli’s resignation from the Oregon Senate, Sherman County Court actions, Frontier TeleNet’s meeting of November 3rd, and the local football teams, among other current topics of interest. We look forward to the weekly news of Sherman, Gilliam & Wheeler counties! ~The Editor.  P.S. A subscription to The Times-Journal makes a fine Christmas or birthday gift … and strengthens our collective informed citizenship!

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]:

 

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

SHERMAN COUNTY HOLIDAY BAZAAR. Shop Locally! Saturday, December 2nd from 10 until 3:30 at the Sherman County School Cafeteria, Moro, Oregon. Questions? Call Beth McCurdy 541-980-1821 or contact shermanctyfair@hotmail.com. See http://www.shermancountyfairfun.com. Sponsored by Sherman County Fair Board. 12/1

HOLIDAY SHOPPING AT THE MUSEUM STORE – DECEMBER 2nd. Shop locally! The Sherman County Historical Museum Store in Moro, Oregon will be open for your Christmas shopping on Saturday, December 2nd from 10:00 am until 3:00 pm. Come shop, enjoy refreshments, and tour the Sherman County Historical Museum! Pick up the newly designed camper coffee mugs, cute farm animals that walk and talk, local authors newest books, stock up on goat milk lotion with the best deal around and $5 t-shirt sale for everyone on your list! Take a Walk on the Rural Side and we will see you on December 2nd at the Sherman County Historical Museum Store! For more information contact the Sherman County Historical Museum at 541-565-3232 or email info@shermanmuseum.org. 12/1

SHERMAN COUNTY FOOD BANK & WASCO SCHOOL EVENTS CENTER. Wasco School Events Center is sponsoring Bingo and a Soup Dinner fundraiser to benefit the Sherman County Food Bank on December 3rd from 2:00 to 4:00 pm. It will be held in the Leland Schwendel Auditorium at the Wasco School Events Center (formerly the Wasco Annex). Cost for the meal is $6 or $20 for a family of 4 or more. Bingo will start at 3:00 pm and we will play 10 rounds at $1 per card or a donation of a can of vegetables per card. Prizes will be gift baskets donated by local businesses. Hope to see you on the 3rd for some good food and fun Bingo! Prizes will be on display at the Events Center if you want to take a peek prior to the 3rd. 12/1

SHERMAN COUNTY PRESCHOOL GALA OF TREES. Trees will be on display starting November 27th. Get your tickets ($5) now for a chance to win a unique, fun and fully decorated Christmas tree. Donors include RDO, MCGG, Rod McGuire, Apex/Little Wheats, Sherman Farm Chem and others. All proceeds support your local preschool. 12/16

EMPLOYMENT:

HEALTHY FAMILIES OREGON HOME VISITOR. North Central ESD Early Education is hiring for a part time Healthy Families Oregon Home Visitor. Healthy Families Oregon seeks to insure healthy, thriving children and nurturing, caring families with a target of reaching parents with newborns and expectant parents. We seek to enhance family function, promote positive parent-child relationships and support children’s healthy growth and development through home visiting and links to community services.
The main duties of this job will be to provide parental support and education through the early years of a child’s life so children will grow up to be emotionally secure and safe, healthy, and more school-ready. Provide parenting skills, child development monitoring, early learning activities, and linkages to community resources. High school diploma required, AA or Bachelor’s Degree preferred. Must have reliable transportation to and from worksites.
Worksite Location: Office located in Condon. Service area includes Gilliam, Sherman, and Wheeler Counties. Work Schedule: 30 hours/week. Salary Range: $14.17-$20.15 DOE. Benefits: Medical, Dental, Vision and Long Term Disability. Reports to: Healthy Families Supervisor. Application Deadline: Open until filled. Please send resume and cover letter to bansotegui@ncesd.k12.or.us 877-562-3739 “The NCESD is an Equal Opportunity Employer.”

DIRECTOR. Sherman County Senior & Community Center Director.  Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of Senior Center Director at the Sherman County Senior & Community Center. Position is permanent part-time salaried, 20hr/week. Responsibilities include scheduling use of Center facilities, supervising employees, maintaining and monitoring senior programs and contracts for compliance to ensure funding, receiving fees and delivering revenue to the Fiscal Officer, and other duties as assigned.    For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us.  Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Position open until filled. Successful applicant must have or be willing to obtain a Food Handlers Card and pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 12/1

MORO CITY ADMINISTRATOR. Position open for the City of Moro to be filled immediately. Proficiency in computer and office skills required.  Experience in Accounting, Budget and Payroll would be helpful. Starting pay is $15/hour, possibly higher, depending on experience, plus benefits.  Pick up an application at the Moro City Hall Office located at 104 1st Street, Moro, or request an application via email at moro@embarqmail.com.  Mail or E-Mail completed application along with a cover letter and a copy of resume to – City of Moro – Job Search, PO Box 231, Moro, OR 97039 or moro@embarqmail.com.  For further information contact Kari Silcox at 541-565-3535.  The City of Moro is an equal opportunity employer.  The Council reserves the right to reject any or all applicants. Applications will be accepted until 4:00 p.m. on Monday, November 27th, 2017.  11/24

COACHES. Sherman County School Coaching Opportunities! Coaching positions are currently available in the following areas:

Winter

5th-8th Boys Basketball (2 positions)

5th-8th Girls Basketball (1 position)

Spring

Boys and Girls HS Track & Field (Head Coach)

Boys and Girls HS Track & Field (Assistant Coach)

Boys and Girls Tennis (Head Coach)

Criminal record check and pre-employment drug testing will be required for all positions. For further information and application materials please email Gary Lewis at glewis@sherman.k12.or.us or Wes Owens at wowens@sherman.k12.or.us. Sherman County School District is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

SENIOR CENTER CLEANING STAFF. Sherman County is accepting letters of interest for the position of Senior Center Cleaning Staff. This is a limited-hour position, 2-4hr/wk, no benefits. Hourly pay rate to be determined. Applicant must make decisions independently using effective time management. Please submit letter and/or resume to Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Position open until filled. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 11/24

FOR SALE:

FIRE SALE. Second Hand Made is having one last Fire Sale. Friday the 24th through Sunday the 26th from 10 to 4 at the Wasco School Events Center. Stop by and check it out! We will honor any outstanding gift certificates. Everything is priced to sell!
11/24

HANDCRAFTED FURNITURE & NOVELTY GIFTS. Considerately Handcrafted furniture and novelty gifts, created from re-purposed wine & whiskey barrels, ready for Christmas. See us at the Sherman County Holiday Bazaar in Moro on Dec. 2nd! ~Kevin Kaseberg | The Wood Butcher | Wasco, Oregon | 541-993-4282  | https://www.oldwoodnbarrels.com/ 12/29

FABRIC for 4-H. 4-H Rewards at JoAnn Fabric.  Save 15% with JOANN 4-H Rewards! Current & lifetime 4-H members, parents of members, volunteers and 4-H staff can save 15% off total in-store and online purchases every day with 4-H Rewards. JOANN will give a minimum of 2.5% of every eligible transaction to support 4-H programming. 12/1

STUDDED TIRES 245/75R-16 on GM Alloy Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM).  Lightly used, asking $700 for wheels and tires. Sold the vehicle and the new owner did not need the studded set. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text).  12/29

1.5 ACRE LOT. New Price on 1.5 acre lot just outside of Moro. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to town but in the country in Sherman County. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $50,000. http://www.rmls.com/report/17410095 ~ Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  12/29

PROPERTY IN GRASS VALLEY. For sale by owner. Utilities are accessible. $60,000 or best offer. Contact Deb Miller deb.miller0530@gmail.com or 509-750-9707.  12/01

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

SERVICES:

PHOTOGRAPHY SESSIONS. Now is the time to book a photo session! The holidays are just around the corner! Schedule a session now to have prints available for the holiday season. Now is also the time to capture the fall colors before they are gone for the year. Photo sessions start at $150.00. Contact me soon for Senior pictures, family photo sessions, weddings, engagements, and more. Also check out the photos from football and volleyball this season: http://www.jeremylanthorn.com/2017-2018/Sherman-Fall-Sports   11/24

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

WANTED:

FREE:


2. Calendar (new or corrected)

NOVEMBER

27 Sherman County Photography Club 6 Steve Burnet Research & Extension Bldg.

27 Sherman County Preschool Gala of Trees Display Opens

28 Mid-Columbia Community Action Council

28 Screenagers Movie: GROWING UP IN THE DIGITAL AGE 6 School Cafeteria

29 Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, 13, 20

29-Dec. 1 Hermiston Farm Fair

30 Sherman County SWCD Board of Directors Meeting 8:30

30-Dec. 2 Oregon Cattlemen’s Convention, Bend

30-Dec. 3 Western States Hereford Assn. Nugget Sale, Reno, NV

DECEMBER

1 Festival of Trees 6 Civic Auditorium, The Dalles

2 Sherman County Holiday Bazaar 10-3:30 Sherman County School Cafeteria, Moro

2 Holiday Shopping at The Museum Store 10-3 Sherman County Museum, Moro

2 Condon Light Festival and Parade 5:30 Condon

2 Holiday Open House 9-5 Columbia Gorge Discovery Center & Columbia R. Trading Co.

2 Cascade Singers’ Holiday Concert 7 Zion Lutheran Church, The Dalles

3 Cascade Singers’ Holiday Concert 3 Zion Lutheran Church, The Dalles

3 Bingo/Soup Dinner Benefit-Sherman County Food Bank 2-4 Wasco School Events Center

5 Folk Songs of the Winter Holidays 6 Sherman County Public/School Library

5-7 Oregon Farm Bureau Annual Meeting, Pendleton

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Wasco Methodist Church

6, 13 & 20 Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym

7 PEARL HARBOR DAY, 1941

8 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

11 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

12 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30

12 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

13 Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting 10 Moro

13 Mid-Columbia CORE Pesticide Training 9:30-3 CGCC

13 & 20 Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym

14 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30 Moro

14 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Board Meeting 1 NORCOR, The Dalles

14 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District Board Meeting 4-5 Hood River

20 Sherman County Court 9

20 Open Pickleball Court at the Wasco Gym

21 Winter Begins

24-20 Sherman County School District Christmas Vacation

25 CHRISTMAS DAY

30 6th Max Nogle Dinner/Auction/Dance w/Countryfied, Grass Valley Pavilion 

JANUARY

3 Sherman County Court 9

4 AG Tech Bootcamp, University of Idaho, Pocatello

9 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 8

9 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board Meeting 8:30

9 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2

9 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3

9-10 Direct Seed Conference, Kennewick

10 Developing/Expanding Your Farm Stand/Agritourism Seminar, Central Point

10 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30

12 Community Renewable Energy Association Board Meeting 10-1

23 Statewide Special Election

24 Tri-County Court Meeting 10-2 Wheeler County

30-Feb. 1 Northwest Ag Show, Portland

FEBRUARY

14 VALENTINE’S DAY

16-18 Winter Fishtrap, The New Agrarians, Joseph, Oregon

20 Kessler Angus Ranch Bull Sale, Milton-Freewater

24 OSU Small Farm Conference, Corvallis


 

Sherman County eNews #339

CONTENTS

  1. Commissioners pick Bonham to fill Huffman’s House seat, District 59

  2. Oregon State Police Urge Motorists to Travel Safely This Week

  3. Red Cross Offers Thanksgiving Travel Tips

  4. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving

  5. The Next Three Feet

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it. ~William Arthur Ward

Send  a message of  congratulation or appreciation to post in the Joyful News or Thank You columns in Friday’s Sherman County eNews! 


NEVER DRIVE USING CRUISE CONTROL WHEN THE ROAD IS WET OR ICY! 


1. Commissioners pick Bonham to fill Huffman’s House seat, District 59

The Dalles businessman to represent District 59

MADRAS, Ore. – The Dalles businessman Daniel Bonham was appointed Monday by a vote of Wasco, Jefferson, Deschutes and Wheeler county commissioners to serve out the Oregon House District 59 term of John Huffman, another The Dalles resident who recently resigned from the position. Bonham, 40, owns a stoves and spa business and and will fill the remainder of Huffman’s term in office after Huffman vacated the seat to accept a federal appointment.

Continue at http://www.ktvz.com/news/daniel-bonham-chosen-to-fill-huffmans-house-seat/659551725


2. Oregon State Police Urge Motorists to Travel Safely This Week

OSP is urging motorists to travel safely this Thanksgiving Holiday Week. Other traffic advisories to motorists are winter travel conditions, Black Friday shopping and the Civil War Game in Eugene.

Thanksgiving Holiday Weekend – This holiday period (Wednesday through Sunday) will see one of the highest volumes of traffic in over a decade according to AAA Oregon/Idaho. As with other holiday weekends OSP is urging motorists to plan ahead, expect heavy traffic, expect poor driving conditions with rain expected at lower elevations and snow in the mountain passes, and take your time (more traveling tips at the bottom of this release). Know the road conditions before traveling by going to www.tripchceck.com

Winter travel – Those traveling in lower elevations, expect rain and wet roadways. Increase your following distances due to decreased traction on those wet roadways.

For those traveling Oregon’s mountain passes, expect snowfall and winter driving conditions. Know when traction tires are required by visiting tripcheck.com. Too often these mountain pass crashes are caused by those not using traction tires. These crashes cause delays that last hours at times. If chains are the traction device, know how to install or use them. Too often we find motorists struggling in deep snow and below freezing conditions attempting to put them on for the first time.

November 24th and 25 – Black Friday Shopping at the Woodburn Outlet Mall. There has been historically major traffic issues on Interstate 5 in Woodburn on Thanksgiving evening and the following Friday due to the high volume of shoppers frequenting the Woodburn Outlet Mall. There has traditionally been backed up traffic prior to the Woodburn exit. Motorists are asked to consider taking alternate routes to Woodburn.

OSP will be focusing enforcement efforts on motorists driving on the shoulder of I-5, parking on the shoulder of I-5 and any other hazardous behavior. Another particular issue has been motorists driving past the backed up traffic and then trying to squeeze in prior to the Woodburn exit. OSP will be in the area actively enforcing traffic laws.

November 25 – Oregon State University versus University of Oregon Football Game in Eugene at 4PM. OSP is advising motorists traveling on Interstate 5 to expect high volumes of traffic in the mid-Willamette Valley before and after the game. OSP is urging those attending the game to take your time, plan ahead and have a designated driver.

OSP is also urging motorists to plan their travels:
*Expect heavy traffic volumes. Take extra time to reach your destination
*Visit ODOT’s traveler page www.tripcheck.com


3. Red Cross Offers Thanksgiving Travel Tips

PORTLAND, Ore., November 20, 2017 — Millions of people are expected to travel over the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, and the American Red Cross is offering tips travelers can follow as they visit loved ones over the long weekend.

“More vehicles are expected on the highways, which can mean travel hazards and delays,” said Candace Horter, Regional Chief Executive Officer. “Planning ahead and staying alert will help you get to your holiday destination safely.”

DRIVING SAFETY

1. Make sure your car is in good condition for a road trip (free of maintenance issues).
2. Pack an emergency preparedness kit and supplies in the trunk.
3. Share travel plans with a family member or friend.
4. Check the weather along your route and plan for travel around any storms that may be coming.
5. Be well rested and alert.
6. Buckle up, slow down, and don’t drive while impaired.
7. Follow the rules of the road and use caution in work zones.
8. Give your full attention to the road. Avoid distractions such as cell phones.
9. Make frequent stops. During long trips, rotate drivers. If you’re too tired to drive, stop and get some rest.
10. If you have car trouble, pull as far off the road as possible.

OTHER SAFETY TIPS

Winter weather:
* Keep the car’s gas tank full for emergency use and to keep the fuel line from freezing.
* Pull over and stay with your vehicle. Do not try to walk to safety.
* Tie a brightly colored cloth (preferably red) to the antenna for rescuers to see.
* Start the car and use the heater for about 10 minutes every hour. Keep the exhaust pipe clear so fumes won’t back up in the car.
* Leave the overhead light on when the engine is running to help rescuers see the vehicle.
* Keep one window slightly open — away from the blowing wind — to let in air.

Public transportation and preventing the spread of the flu virus:
* Everything you touch is likely touched by someone else — luggage, seats, etc. — which is how germs are spread.
* Handle your own belongings. Wash your hands often with soap and water.
* Carry hand sanitizer and anti-bacterial wipes with you. You can use them to wash your hands or wipe down surfaces such as armrests.
* Bring your own pillows and blankets — they can act as a shield against the seat itself.
* Avoid touching your face or eyes. If you have to cough or sneeze, do so into a tissue or your sleeve.

DOWNLOAD RED CROSS APPS
People can download the Red Cross Emergency App for instant access to weather alerts for their area and where loved ones live. Expert medical guidance and a hospital locator are included in the First Aid App in case travelers encounter any mishaps. Both apps are available to download for free in app stores or at redcross.org/apps.


4. Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving

Remember Local Needs for Year-end Giving | tax-deductible non-profit organizations | Give to these organizations to honor someone with a shared interest, to recognize someone’s achievement or success, in memory or remembrance, to express your appreciation, or as an alternate gift for someone who has everything.

  • ABC Huskies Day Care, Sherman County Child Care Foundation, P.O. Box 424, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Columbia Basin Agricultural Research Center – Sherman Station Foundation,
    36656 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039
  • Grass Valley Pavilion Renovation & Rejuvenation Project, City of Grass Valley, P.O. Box 191, Grass Valley, OR 97029
  • HAVEN from Domestic and Sexual Violence, PO Box 576, The Dalles, OR 9058
  • Little Wheats Day Care Inc., P.O. Box 71, Moro, OR 97039
  • Maryhill Museum of Art, 35 Maryhill Museum Drive, Goldendale, WA 98620
  • Oregon Cultural Trust, Oregon Cultural Trust, 775 Summer Street NE, Ste 200, Salem, OR 97301 – a portion of these funds are allocated to Sherman County Cultural Coalition for distribution, & matched to local cultural non-profit gifts provide a tax credit.
  • OSU Extension 4-H Programs, P.O. Box 385, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Ambulance, PO Box 139, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Cultural Coalition, PO Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman County Historical Society & Museum, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 –qualifies for Oregon Cultural Trust Tax Credits
  • Sherman County Junior Hoops, c/o Sherman County Athletic Foundation, PO Box 191, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Lions Club, P.O. Box 27, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Sherman Elementary Parent Teacher Organization, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Public/School Library, 69512 High School Loop, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Scholarship Association, Attn: Gary Shelton, 65912 High School Loop, Moro, Oregon 97039.
  • Sherman Development League, P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
  • Sherman County Preschool
  • Wasco Cemetery Association, Sun Rise Cemetery, PO Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco RR Depot & History Center, City of Wasco, P.O. Box ___, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Wasco Salmon/Steelhead Tournament, P.O. Box ____, Wasco, OR 97065
  • Your church.

5. The Next Three Feet

Did you know that the secret to success could be summed up in one word? No? Well, read on.

For over 45 years, we have been studying success. Some of the most successful people in the world were Lou Tice’s students, and in return, we learned a great deal from them. We have also spent a lot of time in the company of some of the world’s most respected research psychologists, talking about what makes some people succeed and others collapse – the difference, in short, between the can’s and the can-nots, and the do’s and the do-nots.

So, after all these years of studying and researching, we can say this with the utmost confidence: The secret of success is “attitude.” That’s it – Attitude. And let’s face it. It isn’t really a secret.

People who succeed do not have fewer problems than other people. They do not start out with greater brainpower, or better parents, or more money, either. As a matter of fact, sometimes they start out working against incredible odds. But they have a way of looking at things, a way of seeing obstacles as possibilities, and a way of hanging in there and making the most of every opportunity, that almost guarantees success.

As celebrated climber Royal Robbins once reported, “When it’s been a long day of climbing, and I feel like I can’t go any farther, I concentrate on the next three feet. And then the next three feet; and then the next three feet. Pretty soon, I’m at the top.”

Successful people are flexible, optimistic and hard working. If you want to sum it up in a word, it is not difficult to do: Success, more than anything else and without a doubt, is a question of attitude. The good news about attitudes is that they can be changed, and we are in charge of our own attitudes.

So, what is your attitude about your “next three feet?” ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkOrganize Your World with Outlook

Will anyone actually buy the Tesla Semi, or any other class 8 electric truck?

Energy Skeptic: Pessimism and Optimism versus Ignorance

Oregon health agency’s money troubles double in new report

Black Friday is a paid holiday for most state workers

Prager U.: Convention of States|a possible solution to the corruption facing Washington, D.C.

Goodbye to Plastic | Reusable, Compostable, Organic Cotton, Beeswax Food Wrap

Military Times

Defense News

Defense News | Early Bird Brief

Oompa | Naturally Brilliant Toys

 G Willikers Toy Shoppe | Hood River

Sherman County, Oregon – A History Collection

Ode To Joy To The World

USDA: More than $1 billion invested in rural health care

First Lady Melania Trump and Barron Trump Receive the White House Christmas Tree