Sherman County eNews #296

CONTENTS

  1. Weather: October Outlook & September Monthly Climate Summary

  2. Sherman County EMS in Pink Gloves for Breast Cancer Awareness Week

  3. Ragtime Festival in Shaniko and Madras, Oregon, Oct. 6-8

  4. New Members Appointed to Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission

  5. Regional Economic Symposium Nov 2, Forest Products Focus

  6. Compulsive Busy-ness – Part I

  7. History Tidbits: Wily Willis Knighten 1892-1964


“Here comes the orator! With his flood of words, and his drop of reason.” —Benjamin Franklin (1735)


1. Weather: October Outlook & September Monthly Climate Summary

thermometer.degreesYou can find the October outlook and the September monthly climate summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

~Dennis Hull- KB0NYC
Warning Coordination Meteorologist
541-969-7136
www.weather.gov/pendleton


2. Sherman County EMS in Pink Gloves for Breast Cancer Awareness Week

Sherman County EMS will once again be wearing pink gloves in October for Breast Cancer Awareness Week!


3. Ragtime Festival in Shaniko and Madras, Oregon, Oct. 6-8

        music.notes (2) The 15th annual Shaniko Ragtime and Vintage Music Festival will take place on Oct. 6-8th. The Music event begins, Friday at 1 p.m. with Keith Taylor, event founder, at the Historic Shaniko Schoolhouse.  From 1 through 6 p.m., musicians Keith Taylor, Vicki Cox, Meg Graf, Clare Kennedy, Lance Maclean, and Jack & Chris Bradshaw will perform. Then activities will move to the Sage Saloon for a jam session from 7-11 p.m. Food is available in the interim.  These musicians from Oregon, Washington, California and New Hampshire welcome all musicians who sing or play acoustic instruments to join the jam sessions.

         Saturday events will be held at the Erickson Aircraft Museum, at the Madras Airport.  Ragtime event and Airport Museum supporter, Kenny Bicart has established a music event in Madras and invited the Shaniko Ragtime musicians. In addition to other music, the Ragtime & Vintage Music Artist’s performances take place from 1 p.m. through 5 p.m. and they return to the museum for a jam session from 7 to midnight.

Back in Shaniko on Sunday, the traditional All-Performer concert in the school rounds out the festival from 2 to 4 p.m. for a suggested donation of $10 per person.

Keith Taylor, of Haines, Ore., began playing ragtime in 1972. With a background in classical music, he has degrees in composition and piano, and studied in Paris with Rene Leibowitz.  The native Oregonian, returned to Azalea, OR. in 1978, then moved to Haines in 2005, where he works as a freelance pianist, composer and teacher.

         Vicki Cox, of Eugene, leads the Calamity Jazz Band, plays lead trumpet for the Lincoln Pops Big Band, and performs with Bill Borcher’s Oregon Jazz Band. She majored in musical performance at the University of Oregon.

         Meg Graf is a remarkable and versatile musician playing a variety of instruments. From Eugene, she also performs with Calamity Jazz and other music ensembles.

         Clare Kennedy, from Vancouver, Wash., is a popular and sought-after pianist. She also plays organ and sings. She holds a bachelor of arts in music from Linfield College.

         New to the lineup this year is Lance Maclean, a Piano Tuner and Computer Specialist from New Hampshire, returns to Oregon where for years played on the Dixieland Festival Circuit in the band, “The Hot Frogs Jumping Jazz Band” for 10 years. Then he was with, “Night Blooming Jazzmen”, for several years. Lance since the age of 14 has mastered the 5-String Banjo, Bass, Tuba, Guitar, Mandolin, and Piano.

         Jack and Chris Bradshaw are Ragtime duo pianists, share history of the pieces and offer toe-tapping, high-energy sound. From Gilroy, California they are involved in multiple festivals, have played widely in the U.S. and belong to the Sacramental Ragtime Society. Both are classically trained and have masters degrees in music.

         The Ragtime Festival is sponsored by the Shaniko Preservation Guild. For more information, call the event line 541-489-3434 or visit www.ShanikoOregon.com.


4. New Members Appointed to Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission

Oregon.Flat.poleOregon Parks and Recreation Department Director Lisa Sumption has appointed three members to the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries.

Bev Power, who earlier filled a vacated term, was appointed for her first full term. Ms. Power currently manages the IOOF Eastwood Cemetery owned by the City of Medford. She has interest and knowledge in electronic mapping and technology to assist in day-to-day management of cemeteries, and has been an active member contributing several resources developed by the commission.

Milo Reed is a Portland based freelance historian who also works for the Multnomah County Library at the Rockwood Branch. He is the former Vanport Mosaic Historian in Residence and serves on the board of Oregon Black Pioneers.

Sarah Silbernagel works as an archaeologist for the Natural Resources Conservation Service in Pendleton, Oregon, covering nine counties in Eastern Oregon. Her love for historic cemeteries and the preservation of the past has been instilled since childhood.

“I am happy to have these three on the commission,” stated Kuri Gill, coordinator for the state historic cemeteries program. “Together they bring a combination of skills and passion that will benefit our work to expand the stories of Oregon’s historic cemeteries and provide tools to preserve them.”

The seven-member Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries supports OPRD historic cemetery preservation efforts by offering training, educational resources, coordination and grants. Its other members are Diane Elder of Paisley, Mike Leamy of Astoria and Charlotte Lehan of Wilsonville, Mark Petrie of North Bend, and Bev Power of Medford.

For more information about the commission and the historic cemeteries program visit www.oregonheritage.org or contact Historic Cemeteries Program Coordinator, Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov or (503) 986-0685.

[Note: The Historic Cemeteries Commission will meet in Moro on October 13th.]


5. Regional Economic Symposium Nov 2, Forest Products Focus

Mid-Columbia Economic Development District (MCEDD) announces its annual 2017 Gorge Economic Symposium on November 2. This yearly, half-day event shares economic and employment trends at the regional and county level with presentations by Washington economist Scott Bailey and Oregon economist Dallas Fridley, covering Hood River, Wasco, Sherman, Klickitat and Skamania counties.

This year the symposium will also include a focus on understanding the current status and future potential of the wood and forest products industry in the Gorge. Jason Spadaro, President of SDS Lumber, will provide an overview as keynote speaker and Lisa Naas Cook will moderate a panel of public and private industry leaders from different niches within the regional wood and forest products industry. The event concludes by tying the information back to the regional economic development strategy developed by MCEDD and adopted in 2017. 

The event is Thursday, November 2 from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the Hegewald Center in Stevenson. More information and tickets ($15) are available at mcedd.org.


 6. Compulsive Busy-ness – Part I

What is the difference between a pleasantly active life and one that is compulsively busy?  Sometimes, it is a heart attack.

There is no doubt about it – we are a “can do” society. Sometimes though, “can do” becomes “must do,” and “must do” can have some unpleasant consequences. For one thing, people who “must do” things, as opposed to “wanting” to do them, often find ways to subconsciously sabotage themselves, just to take the pressure off. For another, they short-change their families and themselves.

When you are compulsive about how much you have to accomplish every day, you sacrifice spontaneity, creativity and the joy of everyday living. Your children grow up largely without you, and you can’t kid yourself into thinking that a few minutes of so-called quality time can make up for generally not being there at all. (Well, you “can” kid yourself, but you won’t be truly happy with the results.)

Compulsive doers also run the risk of actually reducing their productivity. Psychologists who specialize in stress management report compulsive doers make more mistakes and are more prone to physical illness. They are called “Type A” people, and we know that they make more mistakes and are more prone to heart attacks than the rest of us. We also know that stress-related accidents in the workplace are increasing at a dramatic rate. So, how do you break out of the programming that drives people to do too much?

Give this some thought this evening, and we will look at some solutions to this all-too-common problem tomorrow.  In the meantime, for your heart and mind, enjoy the day! ~The Pacific Institute


7. History Tidbits: Wily Willis Knighten 1892-1964

 By Sherry Kaseberg

Wily Knighten’s contributions to the people of Sherman County are best described in an editorial by Giles French in 1964. He recognized the need for rural school consolidation and one high school for wider curricula at a time when some of Sherman County’s young men and women were living with relatives to finish high school in Portland or families were temporarily living in Willamette Valley urban centers to educate their children.

He was born June 23, 1892, at Grangeville, Idaho, to William Green and Sarah Anna (Magill) Knighten, youngest of seven children. He lived with his Magill grandparents at Wamic until he was 10 years old. His mother lived in Grass Valley.

When Wily was 10 years old, he moved to Grass Valley where he attended school to 12th grade. He was living with his mother and stepfather, Anna and Elmer Remington, and his brother John in Grass Valley in 1910 when he was 17.

Wily joined the National Guard while a student at the University of Oregon.  He mustered into the 41st division of the regular Army in 1917 and was assigned to New York in charge of supplies. He was discharged in 1919 and graduated from the University of Oregon in 1920.

Wily was engaged in the teaching profession from 1922 until 1959 when he retired as Sherman County School Superintendent. He taught school in Grass Valley, Fossil and at Kent where he was principal in 1930.

From 1931-1959, he served as Sherman County School Superintendent. During this period the consolidation process in Sherman County took place resulting in one elementary school in each of Sherman County’s five towns, and a high school to serve the county.

Sherman County Journal, Moro, Oregon, August 20, 1964:  “Services In The Dalles Today For Wily Knighten.  Funeral services for Wily W. Knighten, 72, longtime county superintendent of schools at Moro in Sherman County, who died Saturday at Community Memorial Hospital in Pendleton after a six months illness, was held at 11 a.m. Thursday at Smith Callaway Chapel. The Rev. Robert Hutchinson of Portland officiated, with Masonic services that followed.  Graveside rites were held at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

“Mr. Knighten had been a resident of Sherman County for 65 years, and was engaged in the teaching profession from 1922 until his retirement in 1959.  He was born June 23, 1892, at Grangeville, Idaho.  He grew up in Sherman county and joined the National Guard while a student at the University of Oregon in 1915.

“In 1917 he was mustered into the regular Army and was discharged in 1919.  He was graduated from the University of Oregon in 1920.  Most of his work in education was in Sherman County where he was county superintendent of schools for 25 years.

“Mr. Knighten was a past master of Sherman Lodge 143, A.F. & A.M.; past patron of Sherman Chapter 132, OES, and was a member of the American Legion Post in Moro.  The Dalles Barracks of World War 1 Veterans, the National Education Association and the Oregon Education Association.  He was a member of First Congregation Church in The Dalles.

“He married Donalda MacGregor in 1925, and she survives together with a son, Wily W. Knighten, Jr., of Anchorage, Alaska; a daughter, Mrs. John J. Miller, of Bellevue, Wash.; two brothers, Bert of Harper, and John of Baker; three sisters, Mrs. Janie Venable, and Mrs. Grace Rutherford, both of Boise, Idaho, and Mrs. Lelia Serrurier, Eureka, California, and two grandchildren.

“Active pallbearers were Hans Bardenhagen, George Wilson, Kenneth Sather, Kenrick Dunlap, Donald von Borstel and Lester Barnum.  The honorary pallbearers were Frank Brumbaugh, Earl Olds, Loy Cochran, Frank von Borstel, Theodore Johnston, Giles French, Sam and Charles Davis, Herman Peters, Paul Fraser, Vernon Miller and Harold Beckett.

“Friends who wish may send contributions to the Wily W. Knighten College Scholarship Memorial Fund, care of Paul Fraser, of First National Bank, Sherman county branch.”

Sherman County Journal, Moro, Oregon, August 20, 1964: by Giles L. French, Editor: “Wily Knighten.  It should not be forgotten that Wily Knighten, who was buried this week, was the man most responsible for the excellent school system in Sherman county today.  As school superintendent he labored diligently for rural school consolidation, for one high school for wider curricula.

“He was an excellent teacher; his extra hour attention kept many a boy in school when he was discouraged with inability to grasp the problem of some subject.

“In his youth Wily Knighten was a remarkable athlete, running in the early field meets, playing ball with the “town” team when a beardless youth.  He earned his way through college and did not play there.

“But perhaps it will be as good citizen, public spirited citizen, that he will be most remembered.  Almost any enterprise of worth could enlist his aid; he was always helpful to fellow veterans, aided with all community planning, served on innumerable committees.  And he did the jobs he took competently and faithfully. The county was fortunate to have had him as a citizen. GLF. ”

The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon) – Thursday, August 20, 1964: “Knighten, Wily | Death Claims Educator, 72 | The Dalles (Special) – Funeral for Wily W. Knighten, 72, longtime county superintendent of schools at Moro in Sherman County who died Saturday at Community Memorial Hospital in Pendleton after a six months illness, will be at 11 a.m. Thursday at Smith Callaway Chapel. The Rev. Robert Hutchinson of Portland will officiate, with Masonic services to follow.  Graveside rites will be at 2:30 p.m. Thursday at Willamette National Cemetery in Portland.

“Service Cited. Mr. Knighten had been a resident of Sherman County for 65 years, and was engaged in the teaching profession from 1922 until his retirement in 1959.  He was born June 23, 1892, at Grangeville, Idaho. In 1917 he was mustered into the regular Army and was discharged in 1919.  He was graduated from the University of Oregon in 1920.  Most of his work in education was in Sherman County where he was county superintendent of schools for 25 years.

“Mr. Knighten was a past master of Sherman Lodge 143, AF & AM; past patron of Sherman Chapter 132, OSE and was a member of the American Legion Post of Moro, The Dalles Barracks of World War I Veterans, the National Education Association and the Oregon Education Association. He was a member of First Congregational Church in The Dalles.

“Widow Survives. He married Donalda MacGregor in 1925, and she survives together with a son, Wily W. Knighten, Jr. of Anchorage, Alaska: a daughter, Mrs. John J. Miller of Bellvue, Wash.; two brothers, Bert of Harper, and John of Baker; three sisters, Mrs. Janie Venable, and Mrs. Grace Rutherford, both of Boise, Idaho, and Mrs. Lelia Serrarier, Eureka, Calif., and two grandchildren. The family suggests that any remembrance be in the form of contributions to the Wily W. Knighten College Scholarship Memorial Fund, care of Paul Fraser of the Sherman County branch of the First National Bank.” [spelling as found]


 

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