Sherman County eNews #284

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

  2. Sherman County 2018 Primary Election Notice

  3. Frontier Digital Network Unapproved Meeting Minutes, Sept. 15

  4. Frontier TeleNet Unapproved Meeting Minutes, Sept. 15

  5. Do You Value Honesty?

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“Guns didn’t change. Society did.” ~Spokane Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich sets the record straight. He says a culture that glorifies violence, not the availability of firearms, is the root of the problem.


1. Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals Board Openings

ShermanCoLogoThe Sherman County Board of Property Tax Appeals (BOPTA) has board openings for the 2017-18 tax year.  These positions are open to nonoffice-holding residents of Sherman County.  A nonoffice-holding resident cannot be: a member of the county governing body, a member of the governing body of any taxing district within the county, an elected official within the county, a person employed in or hired by the county or any taxing district within the county, a former county assessor, or any appointee acting in the place of the assessor that held the office or was appointed during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA, or a person previously employed in or hired by the office of the assessor during the tax year subject to appeal to BOPTA.   

Board members hear petitions for reduction of the real market, maximum assessed, specially assessed, and assessed value of property placed on the roll by the county assessor as of January 1, 2017.  The board will also consider requests to waive penalties assessed for the late filing of real and personal property returns.  

An initial training session is required for new members and for those members returning after a break in service.  Board members are required to attend training approved by the Department of Revenue at least every other year unless no petitions are filed.  The BOPTA board generally meets for one or two sessions during the year between February and June.  The one-year term ends on June 30, 2018.

If you are interested in being considered for the BOPTA board, please contact Jenine McDermid at 541-565-3606 or by email at:  countyclerk@shermancounty.net no later than Friday, September 29. Members of the BOPTA pool will be appointed by the county governing body on October 4, 2017.


2. Sherman County 2018 Primary Election Notice

Notice is hereby given that on Tuesday, May 15, 2018 the Sherman County Clerk’s Office will be conducting the 2018 Primary Election by mail. Candidates may file for office from September 7, 2017 until the deadline of 5:00pm on March 6, 2018. The following county offices will appear on the ballot:    

PARTISAN OFFICE:

Major party candidates will be nominated for this office at the Primary and elected at the November 6, 2018 General Election:  

         County Commissioner, Position 2 – 4 year term (Current: Tom McCoy)

NONPARTISAN OFFICES:

Candidates for the following nonpartisan offices may be elected to office at the Primary:  

         County Judge – 6 year term (Current: Gary Thompson)

         County Assessor – 4 year term (Current: Ross A. Turney)

         District Attorney – 4 year term (Current: Wade McLeod)     

Candidates for the offices of County Judge and District Attorney are required to file   directly with the Oregon Secretary of State’s office.

Candidates for the following nonpartisan office will be nominated at the Primary and elected at the November 6, 2018 General Election:

         County Treasurer – 4 year term (Current: Marnene Benson-Wood)

LOCAL PRECINCT COMMITTEEPERSONS:

Precinct Committeeperson candidates may file for office between February 6, 2018 and 5:00pm March 6, 2018. These are 2 year terms and are elected at the Primary.

Forms and manuals are available on-line at the Oregon Secretary of State, Elections Division http://sos.oregon.gov/elections/Pages/laws-rules-publications.aspx.  Links to forms are also available on the Sherman County Clerk’s web page: http://www.co.sherman.or.us/govt_clerk.asp and forms are available at the Clerk’s Office which is located in the Courthouse at 500 Court Street, Moro, OR.  Please call 541-565-3606 if you have questions. 


3. Frontier Digital Network Unapproved Meeting Minutes, Sept. 15 

FRONTIER DIGITAL NETWORK

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

UNAPPROVED MINUTES

SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

         The regular meeting of the Frontier Digital Network Board of Directors was called to order by Chairman, Judge Steve Shaffer at 9:45 AM.  This meeting held in the Conference Room of the Jeanne E. Burch Building, 401 Adams Street, Fossil, Oregon.

Directors Present:  Judge Steve Shaffer, Judge Gary Thompson and Judge N. Lynn Morley.

         Also Present:  Todd Cox and Ryan LeBlanc, Day Wireless System; Will Carey, Legal Counsel; Ron Spenser, Motorola; Rob Myers; Pat Shaw; Tom Wolf, Columbia Basin Electric Co-op; Mac Stinchfield, Times Journal; Jack Lyon; Lori Anderson; Rob Ordway, Wheeler County Commissioner; (and) Mike Smith and Jeanne Burch, Frontier Digital Network Staff.

         Public Input/Comment-None

         Directors Changes or Additions to the Agenda:  One addition to New Business, CIS Letter.

         Minutes:  Minutes of August 25, 2017 meeting reviewed.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Gary Thompson to approve Frontier Digital Network August 25, 2017 minutes as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Financials:  Financial Statement for Frontier Digital Network reviewed.  Moved by Gary Thompson, seconded by Lynn Morley to approve Frontier Digital Network financials as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Public Hearing:  A public hearing to discuss an ordinance that merges Frontier Digital Network with Frontier TeleNet was called to order at 9:55 AM.  Will Carey explained that an ordinance to transfer all assets and obligations from Frontier Digital Network to Frontier TeleNet and dissolving Frontier Digital Network is necessary.  Judge Shaffer asked for comment from the public regarding this matter:  Judge Pat Shaw, Gilliam County stated that she supports this merger as it was necessary at the time Frontier Digital Network was formed because Gilliam, Sherman and Wheeler Counties were the members.  Frontier TeleNet also has the three counties plus the North Central Education District and this made it necessary to have a separate ORS 190.  Mike Smith reported that he had received one request to have the proposed ordinance sent by mail and that has been done.  Having no more testimony the public hearing closed at 10:00 AM.

         Regular Board Meeting resumed at 10:02 AM.

         Frontier Digital Network Dissolution:  Moved by Lynn Morley, Seconded by Gary Thompson to approve an Intergovernmental Agreement Transferring and merging all assets and obligations from Frontier Digital Network (FDN) into Frontier TeleNet and after that dissolving Frontier Digital Network (FDN) and operating all requirements under Frontier TeleNet.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Letter to City County Insurance:  A proposed letter from Frontier Digital Network Board of Directors to City County Insurance read.  This letter requests that the Frontier Digital Network insurance policy be canceled and all coverage be transferred to Frontier TeleNet.  Moved by Gary Thompson to approve a letter to City County Insurance as presented.  Seconded by Lynn Morley.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 10:15 AM.

         Respectfully Submitted

         Jeanne E. Burch

         Frontier Digital Network Staff


4. Frontier TeleNet Unapproved Meeting Minutes, Sept. 15

FRONTIER TELENET

BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING

UNAPPROVED MINUTES

SEPTEMBER 15, 2017

         The regular meeting of the Board of Directors of Frontier TeleNet was called to order by Chairman Judge Steve Shaffer at 10:10 AM.

         Directors Present:  Judge Steve Shaffer, Judge Gary Thompson and Judge N. Lynn Morley.

         Also present:  Todd Cox and Ryan LeBlanc, Day Wireless System; Will Carey, Legal Counsel; Ron Spenser, Motorola; Rob Myers; Pat Shaw; Tom Wolf, Columbia Basin Electric Co-op; Mac Stinchfield, Times Journal; Jack Lyon; Lori Anderson; Rob Ordway, Wheeler County Commissioner; (and) Mike Smith and Jeanne Burch, Frontier TeleNet Staff.

         Public Input-None

         Directors Changes or Additions to Agenda:  None

         Minutes:  Minutes of August 25, 2017 Board of Directors Meeting reviewed.  Two corrections were noted.  The spelling of CREA and the Statement by Tom McCoy regarding Inland Development Corporation payments from Sherman County removed.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Gary Thompson to approve the August 25, 2017 Board of Directors Meeting as corrected.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Financial:  Financial Statement for August 2017 reviewed.  Moved by Gary Thompson, seconded by Lynn Morley to approve August 2017 financial statement as presented.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Public Hearing:  A public hearing was called to order at 10:15.  The purpose of this hearing is to receive comment on proposed Public Contracting Rules for Frontier TeleNet.  Legal Counsel Will Carey explained that the Frontier TeleNet can adopt their own special Public Contracting Rules.  By adopting these rules an entity is exempt from following the Attorney General Rules.  Will Carey also stated that the law firm of Hoyt Speer, who prepared the rules, specializes in public contracting rules.  This gives the Board some discretion and also allows the Frontier TeleNet Board to become the Public Contracting Review Board.  Judge Pat Shaw spoke in favor of this Resolution and stated it makes it much easier to have these in place plus access to a law firm that keeps up to date on the rules. Mike Smith has been asked to send copy of these rules by email to an interested person.

         Hearing Closed at 10:20 AM.

         Frontier TeleNet meeting resumed at 10:21 AM.

         Public Contracting Rules: Moved by Gary Thompson, seconded by Lynn Morley to adopt Public Contracting Rules Resolution No. 9152017-01 and to adopt the findings in Exhibit A of this document.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Gary Thompson to adopt resolution no. 9152017-02, a Joint Resolution of the Board of Directors and Local Contract Review Board opting out of the Attorney General’s Model Public Contracting Rules and amending public contracting rules for Frontier TeleNet.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Cottonwood Tower Update:  Mike Smith reported that there is continued progress on this project.  Ryan LeBlanc reported that the plan has been approved and that it needs to be approved by Region 43 which will meet on September 26, 2017.  Ryan explained that the Cottonwood project is just on the edge of Region 43 but he sees no problem with the approval. Everything should be ready to go in the next two weeks and it was noted that landowners, permits and other requirements are all in place.

         Wheeler County Wireless Project:  Lynn Morley reported that he is working out the final details on this project.  Governor’s approval and signature have been obtained and also approved by the Wheeler County Court.  It was noted by others in the room that this is a model project for a wireless system.

         AOC Assistance Contract:  Greg Wolf has met with several people regarding Frontier TeleNet and will conduct a few more to interview.  Greg will have a report in the next few weeks.  Greg suggested an audit of Frontier TeleNet Equipment might be helpful.  Reaching out to mission-critical partners to discuss costs.

         Website Update:  Mike Smith reported he had talked to Matt Sekora and project is being worked on.

         SUAII Motorola Service Contract:  Mike Smith reported the original cost of service contract was $360,000.00 and it has been negotiated down to $200,000.00 for the first year and $230,000.00 for subsequent years.  A discussion held on where the funds to pay this contract will come from.  Mike Smith reported he is working with an entity that might be interested in connecting to FTN Digital Switch as this saves them considerable money.  Moved by Lynn Morley, seconded by Gary Thompson to approve System Upgrade with Motorola with a revised cost of $200,000.00 for the first year and $230,000.00 for subsequent years.  The first payment on this agreement will be in July 2018.  Motion carried with all present voting aye.

         Sherman County Fiber Optic RFP, Wasco to Rufus Update:  An RFP has not been advertised as legal counsel Jim Deason had expressed some concerns.  Mr. Deason is working with Will Carey on these concerns.  Centurylink is now showing some interest in this project.  The project has not progressed at the State of Oregon.

         Frontier 911-Burns Tribe Update:  Still waiting for a signature on documents.  Burns Tribe has a new executive officer and that is why it has taken some time for documents to be signed.

         Other Items for the good of the Order:  Steve Shaffer reported on a meeting with Giliam County, the City of Condon, Columbia Basin Electric Joe Fernel and City of Condon Consultant regarding the fiber build with Zayo Bandwidth. Steve stated they did not want Frontier TeleNet at the table.

         Ron Spenser representing Motorola presented Rob Myers with a plaque expressing Motorola’s appreciation of the years Rob has invested in Frontier TeleNet and Frontier Digital Network as General Manager.

         Public Input/Comment:  None

         Next Meeting:  October 20, 2017 at the Gilliam County Courthouse in Condon, Oregon at 10 AM

         There being no further business the meeting adjourned at 11:10 AM.

         Respectfully Submitted:

         Jeanne E. Burch

         Frontier TeleNet Staff


5. Do You Value Honesty?

Parents, if your kids had a class called “Honesty 101,” would they cheat to get a passing grade? Do kids today think of cheating as something everybody does, except nerds? Do they see it as a victimless crime that involves little risk and certain gain?

According to surveys of students and teachers across the U.S. and abroad, the answer is, unfortunately, yes. Fred Schab, professor emeritus at the University of Georgia who passed away in 2009, wrote that since 1969 when he began his study, cheating had been on the rise. An academic cheating fact sheet out of Stanford University states that while about 20% of college students in the 1940s admitted to cheating, surveys today show that between 75% and 98% of college students admitted having cheated in high school.

More kids think dishonesty is sometimes necessary and more parents are helping their kids avoid school rules. With cheating very visibly going on around them – from banking and savings and loan scandals to international athletes using performance-enhancing drugs, to Dad bragging about how he got out of a traffic ticket – somehow this isn’t surprising.

Our schools need clear policies on cheating and an open discussion of the ethics involved. They also need to make sure kids understand just what cheating is, and enforce serious penalties for those who are caught. Clearer learning goals and noncompetitive evaluation of students’ progress could help, too. As well, we need an understanding that at its very core, cheating is doing dishonor to the self. Every time we cheat, we subtract from the sum of who we are.

Most important of all are high standards for ethical behavior – taught, talked about and practiced at home. We see news about prominent figures exhibiting less than ethical behavior every day, some of it happening without apparent consequences. These examples are difficult to ignore, and can become easier to follow, in time.

So, do you value honesty? If you do, it is important to think about how you can best teach your children to value it too. Parents are the single greatest influence on children up to age five, and it is rarely too early to learn the benefits of honesty – especially with oneself. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.crow.flyPainted Hills Natural Beef

Editorial: Public records law has another hole

 

Columbia River Gorge Devastation

 

As Evidence of Election Fraud Emerges, the Media Wants to Keep You in the Dark

Map. More People Live Inside This Circle Than Outside Of It

Juniper mill illustrates ‘new natural resource economy’


 

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Sherman County eNews #283

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman High School Volleyball Schedule Update

  2. Sherman County Court Minutes on the Web, Sept. 6 & 14

  3. Two Great Celebrations Under One Great Roof, Sept. 30

  4. Thanking The Constitution On Its 230th Birthday For Our Rights And Freedoms

  5. Clear, Concise Vision

  6. New Landslide Hazard Inventory Maps Include the Eagle Creek Fire Area

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“A popular Government, without popular information, or the means of acquiring it, is but a Prologue to a Farce or a Tragedy; or, perhaps both. Knowledge will forever govern ignorance: And a people who mean to be their own Governors, must arm themselves with the power which knowledge gives.” —James Madison (1822)


1. Sherman High School Volleyball Schedule Update

sports-volley-ballSherman High School Volleyball

Sept. 23, 2017 – These matches have been CANCELLED, planning on rescheduling soon.

~Audrey Rooney, Registrar, Sherman High School           

 

PH: 541-565-3500 ~ Fax: 541-565-3319


2. Sherman County Court Minutes on the Web, Sept. 6 & 14

ShermanCoLogoApproved minutes for the September 6, 2017 regular session and the September 14, 2017 special session are now available on the county website at www.co.sherman.or.us. The most current draft agenda for October 4, 2017, is also available on the website home page.


3. Two Great Celebrations Under One Great Roof, Sept. 30

Two Great Celebrations

Saturday, September 30th

Under One Great Roof

at the

Grass Valley Pavilion!

Countryfied is celebrating 30 years of making music!

Rod & Lori McGuire are celebrating 40 years of marriage!

Tri-tip and pork loin will be provided.

Please take a side dish!

Social hour 5:30, Dinner 6:30 and Dancing 8 o’clock.


4. Thanking The Constitution On Its 230th Birthday For Our Rights And Freedoms

constitution-wethepeopleAre We Too Ignorant To Save Our Constitutional Republic?

Constitution: September 15, 2017: This weekend marks the 230th anniversary of the U.S. Constitution, perhaps the world’s greatest political document. But what should be a rousing celebration is darkened somewhat by Americans’ ignorance of the source of their own freedoms.

The Constitution’s beauty lies in the fact that it not only delineates our rights as Americans, but expressly limits and defines the government’s ability to interfere in our private lives. This exquisite equipoise between citizens’ duties, responsibilities and rights make it the defining document of our nation’s glorious freedom.

But sadly, as numerous recent surveys show, Americans know little about the document that has enabled them to have greater freedom and to create more wealth than any nation in history.

The Annenberg Public Policy Center’s recent poll depressingly found that “Only 26% of respondents can name the three branches of government,” way below 2011, when 38% got the answer right. And 33% couldn’t name even one of the branches of government, the same as in 2011, the first time the test was administered.

Perhaps worse, “More than a third of those surveyed can’t name any of the rights guaranteed under the First Amendment.”

Unfortunately, that’s not the only survey revealing our collective ignorance of our own great history. The Intercollegiate Studies Institute has, since 2005, surveyed over 28,000 undergrads at some 80 colleges about civic literacy, including our Constitution. As the ISI notes, “the average score on our basic 60-question civic literacy exam was about a 54%, an ‘F.’ “

Even adults with college degrees barely scored higher than those with just high school diplomas. And in one alarming finding, seniors at elite schools, including the Ivy League,  actually scored lower than freshmen, suggesting what ISI called “negative learning.”

We’re not trying to be a nanny or a noodge, or to shame anyone. No one knows everything.

But America is the wonderful place it is largely because of the Constitution and those that framed it. They ensured that we would have a republic, not a dictatorship or a monarchy, and that our country, no matter what its flaws and imperfections, would always pursue freedom, liberty and justice for its people. Those who call this country “greedy,” “racist,” or “fascist” are the most profoundly ignorant of all.

We can and should do better, starting with high school civics education, which has failed recent generations of students and imperiled our future freedoms by churning out ignorant citizens who know little or nothing about our laws, rights and governing institutions.

What we have is too precious to squander. We hope you’ll be encouraged to bone up a bit on your constitutional heritage, and the struggles and debates that lay behind it. And maybe you should look at what your kids are being taught in school. It might surprise you, and not in a pleasant way. 

~http://www.investors.com/politics/editorials/are-we-too-ignorant-to-save-our-constitutional-republic/


5. Clear, Concise Vision

faceblwhIf you are single and looking for a long-term relationship or marriage but are having trouble finding a partner or spouse, here are some suggestions for you – and they don’t involve an Internet site. However, they do involve two vital points:  truly knowing yourself, and clearly knowing what you want.

First, do you know specifically what kind of person you are looking for? What qualities do you value in a mate, and how do you judge whether a person has those qualities?  

Do you have a clear picture of what your relationship with your partner will be like, including how you will treat each other, how you will deal with conflict, what your social life will look like? You see, the clearer your values are and the clearer your picture of the kind of person you are looking for is, the likelier it is that you will end up with what you want. 

Do you have issues from your family of origin or other relationships that might prevent you from enjoying this kind of happiness?  Would some counseling or group support help eliminate these obstacles? 

Finally, do you live in a way that is consistent with what you want in a relationship? Because, in the end, it is far more important to be the right person than it is to find the right person. 

It is difficult to attract anyone who is better or more successful or kinder than you are comfortable with, or believe in your heart of hearts you deserve. If you work on your mental pictures and your growth as an individual first, you will recognize and be ready for the right person when that person comes along.

Incidentally, this same process works when we are looking for business colleagues or business partners. We need to understand and live our corporate values first, and have a clear, concise picture of what we are looking for in a business partner. Then we will be ready to engage with the best possible partners on our corporate path forward. ~The Pacific Institute


6. New Landslide Hazard Inventory Maps Include the Eagle Creek Fire Area

Oregon.Flat.poleNew maps offer an improved look at landslide hazards in Oregon’s Columbia River Gorge – an area that’s even more susceptible to landslides following recent wildfires.

The Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) today released new landslide inventory maps for eastern Multnomah County, including the Eagle Creek Fire burn area.

Land that has slid in the past is more likely to slide again, says Bill Burns, DOGAMI engineering geologist. The new mapping revealed 286 existing landslides – all places that are highly susceptible to future slides.

Knowing where past landslides have occurred is especially critical in the Eagle Creek fire area, Burns says, because recently burned areas are also more likely to slide. With vegetation removed, rain can reach soil more quickly, and loss of root strength also means less stable soil.

“With Oregon’s rainiest months still ahead, it’s extremely important for people to be more aware than ever of landslide hazards in this area,” he says.

The Columbia River Gorge is one of Oregon’s most landslide prone areas. The winter storms of 1996-1997 triggered more than 9,000 slides statewide. In the Dodson-Warrendale area of the Gorge, multiple massive debris flows destroyed homes and closed Interstate 84, the Union Pacific Railroad, and Columbia River traffic.

“We can’t predict when and where the next landslide events will occur,” Burns says. “But by improving information about existing landslide locations, we better understand what areas might be hazardous during storm events, or where taking action to reduce risk is a good idea.”

DOGAMI’s interactive SLIDO shows the newly mapped landslides: www.oregongeology.org/slido. A guide to landslide hazards around the home also offers general guidance homeowners should consider regarding their home and property, including landslide warning signs and who to contact if they suspect active landslides on their property. The guide is available for free download at bit.ly/landslidehazards

STAYING SAFE WHEN LANDSLIDES ARE POSSIBLE. Throughout the rainy season, the National Weather Service highlights the potential for debris flows and landslides during flood watch advisories.

“When landslides are possible in your area, you need to stay alert to weather conditions, and to what’s happening around you,” says Ali Ryan Hansen, DOGAMI communications director. If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

– Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
– Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
– Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
– Travel with extreme caution. Assume highways are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.
– Stay cautious after the storm. Cleaning up after landslides can also be hazardous. A small mudslide can actually be part of a larger landslide. Cleanup should not be done until after the storm.

ABOUT THE PUBLICATION. Open-File Report O-17-03, Landslide Inventory of Eastern Multnomah County by William J. Burns and Kassandra O. Lindsey includes four map plates (scale 1:12,000), Esri geodatabase, and metadata. The publication is available for download at: http://www.oregongeology.org/pubs/ofr/p-O-17-03.htm


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3Cranberry Harvest Begins

OSU Center for Teaching & Learning & Team Oregon Motorcycle Safety Program

Hillsdale College Equips Students for Self-Government

How Western Civilization Remade the World Free Online Course

Attorney General Jeff Sessions slams sanctuary cities, cites Portland case

7 of The Most Fascinating Facts About Slavery in The Roman World

Brilliant Maps. European Borders In 1914 vs Borders Today

The 28 Best Map Based Strategy Board Games

 

United Airlines goes all dreamy in newest in-flight safety video

See Words Aplenty; Use the Correct One

Does the President Have the Right to Expect Loyalty from His Attorney General?

Report: Cutting $2.3 Trillion of Government Waste Would Balance Budget in 3 Years