Sherman County eNews #281

CONTENTS

  1. Sherman County School 2nd Annual Hall of Honor Induction Celebration, Sept. 22

  2. Notice: Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board Meeting, Sept. 26

  3. Hurricane Relief Concert at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Oct. 1

  4. Documentary: The Vietnam War Oregon Remembers, Premiers OPB, Oct. 2

  5. Letter to the Editor: A Finite World

  6. A Little Bit of Difference

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“In the formation of our constitution the wisdom of all ages is collected — the legislators of antiquity are consulted, as well as the opinions and interests of the millions who are concerned. It short, it is an empire of reason.” —Noah Webster (1787)


1. Sherman County School 2nd Annual Hall of Honor Induction Celebration, Sept. 22

Logo.Sherman High SchoolThe Sherman County School District will celebrate the induction of four individuals and one athletic team into the Sherman County School District Hall of Honor during half-time of the September 22, 2017 home football game against Pilot Rock High School. 

The public is welcome to join the celebration at a pre-event banquet reception that will take place prior to the game at 5:30 p.m.  At the banquet designated speakers will share memories and the Boosters will be offering a $10.00 tri-tip dinner for adults and $5.00 for children under 10.

The 2017 inductees include Author, Legislator and Journalist, Giles French (posthumously); former School District Board Member, County Commissioner, Historian and Sherman County eNews creator, Sherry Kaseberg; former Student Athlete/Olympian, Amy (Martin) Shaffer; long-time dedicated Employee/Coach Gary Shelton; and the 2001 State Championship Women’s Basketball Team.

The purpose of the Hall of Honor is to formally recognize outstanding contributions to the heritage and tradition of the Sherman County School District.  It is the intent of this Hall of Honor to recognize and preserve the memory of students, teachers, athletes, teams, coaches, boosters, and others whose achievements and support have brought recognition and honor to the Sherman County School District. 

For information regarding the Hall of Honor or to nominate a candidate for future induction, please visit http://www.shermancountyschooldistrict.weebly.com and click on the Hall of Honor tab.  For questions, call Wes Owens at 541-565-3500.


2. Notice: Sherman County Soil & Water Conservation Board Meeting, Sept. 26

Sherman County SWCD will be holding a Special Business Board Meeting on September 26th, 2017 @ 830am. Meeting will be held at the district office – 302 Scott Street, Moro.

~ Kayla von Borstel, Sherman County SWCD

Sherman County Area Watershed Council Coordinator

541-565-3216 x 109

Kayla.vonBorstel@or.nacdnet.net


3. Hurricane Relief Concert at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Oct. 1

music-notesExtraordinary Composer/Pianist to perform

Grisha Krivchenia,  a young Northwest composer/pianist, will perform a special Hurricane Relief Benefit Concert at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Sunday, October 1, at 3:00 p.m.

Grisha divides his time among the Seattle area, Santa Fe, and concert dates around the world.  He enjoys a busy performance schedule, and the Columbia Gorge community is fortunate to be included in a concert tour he is making through Oregon at the end of September and first of October. 

Grisha’s compositions are realized by professional ensembles throughout the Northern Hemisphere.  Recent premieres have taken place in Los Angeles, Seattle, and Bucharest. 

Grisha completed his studies at Oberlin Conservatory, where he studied piano with Sedmara Rutstein and composition with Jeffrey Mumford.  In 2007, Grisha founded the music program at Spring Street International School in Friday Harbor, Washington.  His chamber music is published by Abundant Silence Publishing.

Grisha takes special interest in using art to amplify voices that might otherwise go unheard.  He writes music in collaboration with hospice patients and recently completed a song cycle on texts by Syrian refugees.

The October 1, 3:00 p.m., Hurricane Relief Concert at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, is presented and sponsored by Gorge Community Music and Cascade Singers.  All donations at the door will go to the Red Cross to help the victims of the hurricanes this season.   For more information, contact Lloyd Walworth: lloydwalworth@gmail.com  541-340-9858 


4. Documentary: The Vietnam War Oregon Remembers, Premiers OPB, Oct. 2

Nearly 50 years after the end of combat operations in Vietnam, Oregonians remain deeply affected by the events of those times. “Oregon Experience” explores the stories of a wide variety of people, from combat veterans, nurses and support personnel, to anti-war protestors and outspoken political leaders, grieving family members and today’s Vietnamese community — all coming to terms with an event that divided the country and forever marked those who lived through it. The documentary premieres on OPB TV Oct. 2, 2017, at 9 p.m.

More than 120,000 Oregonians served in the Vietnam War. More than 800 died as a result of their service. “The Vietnam War Oregon Remembers” is a 90-minute “Oregon Experience” special that showcases the memories of Oregon Vietnam veterans — and explores how their experiences have shaped their lives today.


5. Letter to the Editor: A Finite World

Hi Sherry,

pencil.sharpMost of the farmers and ranchers that I know are totally oblivious to the threats of over population, climate change, resource depletion, etc. and refuse to listen if you try to have a discussion about them. Some have a peripheral awareness because they have heard them mentioned somewhere, but refuse to believe that they will ever be affected by or that they are of serious concerns. Maybe they could relate to Lester Brown, who was raised on a farm and was a farmer before his enlightenment as to the dire circumstances of our global civilization. Becoming informed and resisting denial are two prerequisites to mobilizing as a society to meet the challenges we face in the immediate future. Your basic instincts and intuition are trying to tell you that most of our activities are unsustainable if we are honest with ourselves. We live in a finite world and infinite growth is not possible. An economic system based based on infinite growth in a world of finite resources is a Ponzi scheme that is starting to become painfully exposed.

See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lester_R._Brown.

Also see Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity, Chapter 7: Grain Yields Starting to Plateau | | Earth Policy Institute http://www.earth-policy.org/mobile/books/fpep/fpepch7

Fred Justesen

Grass Valley, Oregon


6. A Little Bit of Difference

What is the difference between mediocrity and greatness? Possibly not as much as we think.

You know, it really takes very little to make a big difference in our lives and in the world. In professional baseball for example, most batters hit for an average of about .250, which means that they get one hit for every four times at bat.  Anyone who hits .300, three hits out of ten, is considered a star.  By the end of the season, there are only about a dozen players out of hundreds in the leagues who have maintained a .300 average, and these are the ones who get the big contracts, the acclaim, and the TV commercials.

In other words, the difference between the great players and the ordinary players is only one hit out of twenty!  This slim margin of greatness in baseball symbolizes the dynamics of greatness in life, because when we use just a tiny bit more of our potential, we grow, we add to the sum and total of humanity, and we become outstanding human beings.

Now, the purpose of being outstanding is not to win acclaim or glory, but to be more of what we can be, to not ignore those talents and skills lying asleep inside of each of us.  If you accept the idea that most of your present limitations are not based on any unchangeable reality but are rather the result of the beliefs you hold about your reality, then the next step is to deliberately and systematically change those beliefs.

Change the way we think, and we change the way we run our lives, our work, our interactions with others, and we change the way we interact with the world.

This is called possibility thinking, and it is a skill we can learn quite easily. In fact, we have probably done it before… ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

computer.guy.runOver 1 million fish evacuated due to Columbia gorge fire

 

Video: We The People, The Constitution Song

Video. The Good, The Bad and The Ugly

Check Your Fact

Oregon Business Plan

Cost Of Trump’s Wall Compared To The Costs To Support Illegals
World of walls: How 65 countries have erected fences on their borders as governments try to hold back the tide of migrants

Cassandra’s Legacy: Sustainability

Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity

Gatestone Institute | International Policy Council

My White Friend Asked Me on Facebook to Explain White Privilege. I Decided to Be Honest

What the Ctenophore says about the evolution of intelligence


 

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