Sherman County eNews #252

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Fair: Kick-off BBQ, Car Show & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 23

  2. Sherman County Fair: Down on the Farm Chore Course, Aug. 24

  3. Library Baby Lap-Sit Story Time will be held at Playgroup in the Park, Aug. 24  

  4. Sherman County Fair: Parade of Exhibitors, Saturday, Aug. 26

  5. 2017 Oregon Century, Sesquicentennial Farms & Ranches Announced

  6. Free Services, Cascadia Mobile Legal Clinic, Sept. 11

  7. Separating Self-Worth & Behavior


 The study of history is a powerful antidote to contemporary arrogance. It is humbling to discover how many of our glib assumptions, which seem to us novel and plausible, have been tested before, not once but many times and in innumerable guises; and discovered to be, at great human cost, wholly false.  –Paul Johnson


1. Sherman County Fair: Kick-off BBQ, Car Show & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 23

food.BBQ

Kick Off BBQ dinner menu and prices!!

Wednesday, August 23, 2017

The Fair Board is greeting and cooking for you!!

Burgers & hotdogs with trimmings, macaroni salad, potato salad, baked beans, chips, cookie and lemonade!

BBQ will start at 5:00 on the fairgrounds mid-way in Moro

Hamburger meal $7

Hot dog Meal $5

Family of 4 or more $20

Bring your family and visit with friends at the Car Show and have dinner, then stay and watch the 4-H style show and horse games in the arena! 


 2. Sherman County Fair: Down on the Farm Chore Course, Aug. 24  

garden.shovel.barrowThe exciting, entertaining Down on the Farm Chore Course is a timed event for teams of two scored by judges. It may have a surprise or two along with simple farm chores like digging a hole, packing a lunch pail, checking the fence for needed repairs, making sure there is no fire to put out, some running and lifting. No entry fee. Cash prizes. Thursday, August 24 at 7 p.m. in the arena. A lot of fun! Free admission!


3. Library Baby Lap-Sit Story Time will be held at Playgroup in the Park, Aug. 24

book.girl.readbook.boy.readSherman County Public/School Library will partner with Healthy Families Thursday, August 24, 10:30 -12:00 and Baby Lap-Sit Story Time will be held at Playgroup In The Park.

 


4. Sherman County Fair: Parade of Exhibitors, Saturday, Aug. 26

The Sherman County Fair Parade is going to be a little different this year!  We are dialing it back to how it was about 50 years ago.  This year the parade will be held at the fairgrounds, now called our Parade of Exhibitors. Parade entry forms are available at the fair office or on the web site.  www.shermancoutyfairfun.com.  Parade line up will start at 8:45 Saturday morning at the fairgrounds.   ANY ONE CAN ENTER THE PARADE.   Parade watchers! Please come to the fair grounds to see everyone!!  No admission fee. For more info please call the fair office.  541-565-6510.


5. 2017 Oregon Century, Sesquicentennial Farms & Ranches Announced

(Salem, OR) — At the annual awards ceremony at the Oregon State Fair, families from across the state will receive recognition for operating as Century or Sesquicentennial (150-year) Farm or Ranch. The 2017 ceremony will be held on Saturday, August 26, 2017, at 11:00 am at the Oregon State Fair. The public recognition ceremony and awards celebration will be held in the Picnic Grove Area. Please join us for this special event that celebrates Oregon’s agricultural heritage.

Nineteen farms and ranches from 10 different counties will be honored this year as Century Farms or Ranches, and one farm from Clackamas County reached Sesquicentennial status, bringing the total number of Oregon Century Farms and Ranches to 1,200 and Sesquicentennial to 39.

> Get the family narratives of all honorees here: http://bit.ly/2g2jCVP

The Century Farm and Ranch families being honored in 2017 are:

Iwasaki Bros. Inc.-Jim Iwasaki
Haskin Heritage Farm -David McCready
Kranberry Acres -David Cranick & Marci Murray
Sievers Farm -Diana Arvieux, Rosemary Wood, Trudy Stenger
Haselbacher Farms -Raymond & Mary Haselbacher
Four Ridge Orchards -David & Bonnie Brown
Cattrall Brothers Vineyard -William & Thomas Cattrall
Shady Brook Farm -Tom & Lona Bunn
Stubblefield Ranch -Lucian & Margot Turner
Belshe Ranch -James Belshe
Oak Creek Farm -Alton Coyle
Misner Family Farm -Michael & Therese Misner
Bar M Ranch -Gary & Ingrid Margason
Kee/Crofoot Ranch -Dell & Nikki Squire
Basil & Mary Stupfel -Mark Stupfel
Herring Farm -Lea Herring
Charles M. Colton & Sons -Robert, Lorene & Michael Colton
Nicholson Investments LLC -Larry Nicholson
C & S Waterman Ranch LLC -Charlie & Sharon Waterman.

The Sesquicentennial Award program began in 2008 in honor of Oregon’s 150th birthday celebration. Sesquicentennial awards recognize Oregon families who have continuously farmed portions of their original family acreage for 150 years or more. Thirty-nine families have now received this prestigious sesquicentennial award.

This year’s family being honored is: Voss Farms -Jeannette Voss & Julie Edy
> See the 2017 family narratives here: http://bit.ly/2g2jCVP

Every Oregon farm and ranch has a unique history and special family story. The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch program encourages agriculture families to share, with a broader audience, these stories. By promoting family stories, rich cultural heritage is passed down to future generations while educating Oregonians about the social and economic impact of Oregon agriculture.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program began in 1958 to honor farm and ranch families with century-long connections to the land. To qualify for a century or sesquicentennial award, interested families must follow a formal application process. Members of the Application Review Committee review each application against the qualifications, which include continuous family operation of the farm or ranch; a gross income from farm use of not less than $1,000 per year for at least three years out of five prior to application; and family members must live on or actively manage the farm or ranch activities. Application documentation may include photos, original deeds, personal stories, or other historic records. These records help support Oregon’s agricultural history by providing valuable information about settlement patterns or statistics on livestock and crop cycles. All documents are archived for public access.

Award winners receive a certificate signed by the Governor and Director of the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Historic roadside signs are imprinted with the founder’s name and the year the ranch or farm was established.

The Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program is administered by the Oregon Farm Bureau Foundation for Education. It is supported by a partnership among the Oregon Farm Bureau, the State Historic Preservation Office, OSU University Archives, and by generous donations of Oregonians.

The application deadline for 2018 is May 1.

For information about the Oregon Century Farm & Ranch Program, contact Andréa Kuenzi, Program Coordinator, at 503-400-7884 or cfr@oregonfb.org.


6. Free Services, Cascadia Mobile Legal Clinic, Sept. 11

Cascadia Mobile Legal Clinic

Moro

September 11

11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Sherman County Senior and Community Center

300 Dewey Street

SERVICES: Wills, trusts, powers of attorney, advance

directives, consumer, landlord/tenant, probate/estates,

domestic violence/elder abuse, civil disputes, immigration.

COST: All clients receive a free 30-minute consultation.

Legal services provided thereafter, if any, are provided to

eligible clients for free or on a sliding fee scale.

Call 503-444-3449 for an Appointment

* Walk-Ins Welcome *

http://www.cascadialawyers.com


7. Separating Self-Worth & Behavior

Whether you are raising kids or trying to improve your own self-esteem, the relationship between who you are and what you do is important. Whether you are a parent, grandparent, or simply trying to build your own self-esteem, it is important to realize that we need to separate our sense of self-worth from our behavior. 

Imagine this scene: A three-year-old asks repeatedly, “Mama, do you love me?” Each time, Mom answers, “Of course I do.” Then the child takes her hand and leads her to a broken vase or shattered toy and looks at Mother questioningly. 

Here is a little child, on this earth only three short years, already asking one of the most profound psychological questions any of us can ask: “Is my ability to be loved tied to what I do? Am I the same as my behavior?” The answer for all of us, no matter how old we are, should be the same, “No, indeed!”

The importance of this point cannot be overemphasized. To increase self-worth, it is vital that we respond to behavior while remaining friendly and respectful toward the person. This means that when a child misbehaves, we should not call him a “bad boy.” And when a child does what we want her to, we should not say, “What a good girl!” In either instance, we want to comment on the behavior – with celebration of something done well, or a clear “next time” picture to change the negative behavior – and hug the child. 

One caveat for adults: While we are not simply what we do, our actions are a reflection of what we think. So, if the actions you see yourself taking do not line up with the person you think you are, then perhaps it’s time for some much-needed self-reflection. Step outside yourself and look at what you do and how you act. If it is not what you’d like to see, you do have the power to change. ~The Pacific Institute


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #251

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Fair: Dale Coles Classic Car Show, BBQ & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 23

  2. Sherman County Fair: Health District 6th Annual Wellness Walk, Aug. 26

  3. Discover Columbia Gorge Community College, Aug. 30-31

  4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

  5. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

  6. The Gift No One Else Has

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The Holocaust illustrates the consequences of prejudice, racism and stereotyping on a society. It forces us to examine the responsibilities of citizenship and confronts the powerful ramifications of indifference and inaction. ~ Tim Holden.


1. Sherman County Fair: Dale Coles Classic Car Show, BBQ & 4-H Style Show, Aug. 23

Dale Coles Classic Car Show

Wednesday, August 23

CarBeetle

Check-in 3:30 p.m.

Awards 5:10 p.m.

and the

Kick-off BBQ

Burgers & Dogs with the Fair Board 5 p.m.

4-H Style Show 5:30 p.m.


2. Sherman County Fair: Health District 6th Annual Wellness Walk, Aug. 26

6th Annual Wellness Walk

Walk for Wellness

Sponsored by the Sherman County Health District

And the Sherman County Medical Clinic

8:00 A.M.

Saturday, August 26th, 2017

Registration forms with route information are available at the Sherman County Health District Administration Office.

$5 registration fee

****First 25 to register receive t-shirt!****

Post-walk refreshments will be available at finish.

Please call Caitlin at 541-565-0536 for additional information.


3. Discover Columbia Gorge Community College, Aug. 30-31

Two events in late August will help people throughout the region “Discover CGCC!,” just in time for fall term registration.

“Discover CGCC!” is the theme of the two-hour informative sessions at the college’s campuses in Hood River and The Dalles, where you’ll learn about program options, opportunities to reduce the cost of college, and steps to enroll this fall. Two events are scheduled and people are invited to attend either one.

The events are Wednesday, August 30, on the Hood River Indian Creek Campus and Thursday, August 31, in the Building 2 Lecture Hall on The Dalles Campus, from 9 to 11 a.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. each day.

Attendees will learn how earning a degree can improve your employability, protect you during economic downturns, support your career ambitions, and increase your earning potential. You’ll become familiar with programs of study from Adult Basic Skills, GED, English Speakers of Other Languages, Community Education, one-year certificates and two-year degrees. There will be details on affordability and financial support that will help you focus on academic success, as well as steps to admission, registration, and campus tours.

Students who RSVP for this event, attend, and enroll as a full-time degree-seeking student this fall may be eligible to receive a $50 credit at the CGCC Bookstore! For more information or to RSVP, contact our Student Outreach and Recruitment team by calling (541) 506-6019 or email soar@cgcc.edu.


4. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

The Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 5, 2017. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 29, 2017

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition, P.O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


5. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms for projects and/or programs in Sherman County will be available September 11, 2017. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2017, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2018.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

•A brief description of your project.

•State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.

•Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc., P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions? Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


6. The Gift No One Else Has

Did you know that you have a gift that no one else in the world possesses?  Maybe you have already discovered it.  It is your ability to live a life that expresses your unique personality and your individual talents through the work that you choose to do, the way you spend your free time and through your relationships.

Although it may seem hidden at first, when you search for your gift with an open mind and a free spirit, it will be there. Once you have found it, if you follow it with courage and persistence, it will reward you with a happiness and deep satisfaction that nothing else can provide.

Now, it does not matter how big or important your gift is, and it does not matter what others think it should be. All that matters is that 1) it is yours and 2) that you are free to give it. When you do give of it, it doesn’t deplete you. It validates and fills you, because giving reaffirms the meaning of life.

It is hard to go comparison-shopping when it comes to finding your special gift, because you can’t try on someone else’s life. But in order to truly live your own, you need to be willing to listen to your heart, pay whatever it costs, and make a firm commitment not to turn back.

If you do these things, you will find your gift, and you also will find that you have more to give to others than you had ever dreamed possible. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

Bird.Black.Envelope13th century astronomical diagrams with movements of sun, moon and earth (eclipse).

Irish: The Forgotten White Slaves

Setting the Record Straight with Ronald Dwyer

African American Woman Sets The Record Straight On Racism And The Republican Party

“The Young American Male: A Shameful Chronology of Neglect”


 

Sherman County eNews #250

CONTENT

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week.

  2. Sherman County Fair 4-H Basket Raffle Supports Camp Kids & Counselors

  3. What are you planning to take to the Sherman County Fair on Wednesday?

  4. Why the Peaceful Majority is Irrelevant

  5. Imogene Winn 1930-2017

  6. The Silent Influencer

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. ~George Santayana (16 December 1863 in Madrid, Spain – 26 September 1952 in Rome, Italy) was a philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist.


1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017Monday, August 21 at 9:30 – Eclipse Viewing Party.
We will have crafts and read stories as we watch the eclipse.
Remember, you need to wear sun safe eclipse viewing glasses; we will have them available for attendees.

Thursday, August 24 at 11:00am – Baby Lap-Sit Story Time
Come build early literacy skills with your little one as we read a story, sing songs, and play games like “peek-a-boo.”

Thursday, August 24 at 6:00pm – Special Movie Night Party!
It is with deepest pride and greatest pleasure that we welcome you August 24..
We invite you to relax, pull up a chair as the library proudly presents…Beauty and the Beast! Wear your best princess, hero and villain clothes and come ready to enjoy dinner and a movie. We will have a kid friendly feast that would make Mrs. Potts proud.
Rated PG
Run Time 2hrs 9min
All ages!


2. Sherman County Fair 4-H Basket Raffle Supports Camp Kids & Counselors 

4-H clover1Get your raffle tickets at the 4-H Pavilion at the Sherman County Fair for a chance to win an amazing, creative theme basket! Winners will be announced on Saturday, August 26, during the 4-H & FFA awards.

 


3. What are you planning to take to the Sherman County Fair on Wednesday?

What are you planning to take to the Sherman County Fair?  The following are a few classes in the Open Class Divisions. Remember, anyone can enter something in the open class divisions. There is NO entry fee. Entry day is Wednesday, August 23, 2017.

Take a look! http://www.shermancountyfairfun.com/.

  • Flowers >>> Asters, geraniums, gladiolus, daisy, marigold, roses, zinnia, potted plants and more!
  • Hay & Grain >>> Wheat, barley, sheaf of grain, oats, grass hay and more!
  • Land Products >>>  Herbs, garden veggies, garden oddities, fruits, nuts, eggs and more!
  • food.pie.hotKitchen Products >>> Canned fruits, veggies, meats, jellies and jams, butters, relishes, dried fruit, veggies, herbs, breads, rolls, cookies, cakes, pies and more!!
  • Clothing & Needlecraft >>>  sewing, knitted, crocheted, embroidered, counted cross stitch, quilted items, table furnishings, afghans, pillow case, quilts, afghans, wall hangings and more!
  • Arts, Crafts & Hobbies >>> ceramics, leather craft, stained glass, jewelry, collections, holiday collections, woodworking and more!
  • Photography >>> snapshots, album page, whole album, enlargement sequence of people, animals, sports, flowers, sunrise, grain, special events, and more!
  • Kids Corner >>>  baked goods, garden veggies, flowers, sewing, knitting, pumpkin painting, writing, paintings, Legos, art from recycled items, and more! Don’t forget the coloring contest for the kiddos!!

4. Why the Peaceful Majority is Irrelevant

History lessons are often incredibly simple.

By Paul E. Marek of Saskatoon, Canada, February, 2006, a second-generation Canadian, whose grandparents fled Czechoslovakia just prior to the Nazi takeover.

I used to know a man whose family were German aristocracy prior to World War II. They owned a number of large industries and estates. I asked him how many German people were true Nazis, and the answer he gave has stuck with me and guided my attitude toward fanaticism ever since.

“Very few people were true Nazis,” he said, “but many enjoyed the return of German pride, and many more were too busy to care. I was one of those who just thought the Nazis were a bunch of fools. So, the majority just sat back and let it all happen. Then, before we knew it, they owned us, and we had lost control, and the end of the world had come. My family lost everything. I ended up in a concentration camp and the Allies destroyed my factories.”

We are told again and again by experts and talking heads that Islam is the religion of peace, and that the vast majority of Muslims just want to live in peace. Although this unquantified assertion may be true, it is entirely irrelevant. It is meaningless fluff, meant to make us feel better, and meant to somehow diminish the specter of fanatics rampaging across the globe in the name of Islam.

The fact is that the fanatics rule Islam at this moment in history. It is the fanatics who march. It is the fanatics who wage any one of 50 shooting wars world-wide. It is the fanatics who systematically slaughter Christian or tribal groups throughout Africa and are gradually taking over the entire continent in an Islamic wave. It is the fanatics who bomb, behead, murder, or execute honor killings. It is the fanatics who take over mosque after mosque. It is the fanatics who zealously spread the stoning and hanging of rape victims and homosexuals. The hard, quantifiable fact is that the “peaceful majority” is the “silent majority,” and it is cowed and extraneous.

Communist Russia was comprised of Russians who just wanted to live in peace, yet the Russian Communists were responsible for the murder of about 20 million people. The peaceful majority were irrelevant. China’s huge population was peaceful as well, but Chinese Communists managed to kill a staggering 70 million people. The average Japanese individual prior to World War II was not a war-mongering sadist. Yet, Japan murdered and slaughtered its way across Southeast Asia in an orgy of killing that included the systematic murder of 12 million Chinese civilians – most killed by sword, shovel and bayonet. And who can forget Rwanda, which collapsed into butchery? Could it not be said that the majority of Rwandans were “peace loving”?

History lessons are often incredibly simple and blunt; yet, for all our powers of reason, we often miss the most basic and uncomplicated of points. Peace-loving Muslims have been made irrelevant by the fanatics. Peace-loving Muslims have been made irrelevant by their silence. Peace-loving Muslims will become our enemy if they don’t speak up, because, like my friend from Germany, they will awaken one day and find that the fanatics own them, and the end of their world will have begun.

Peace-loving Germans, Japanese, Chinese, Russians, Rwandans, Bosnians, Afghanis, Iraqis, Palestinians, Somalis, Nigerians, Algerians and many others, have died because the peaceful majority did not speak up until it was too late. As for us, watching it all unfold, we must pay attention to the only group that counts: the fanatics who threaten our way of life.

[Also see The Real American Heritage in The East Oregonian]


5. Imogene Winn 1930-2017

   flower.rose.star     Imogene Winn of Weston was born April 24, 1930, in Grainton, Nebraska, to Daniel and Margaret Sloan. She died on August 16, 2017, at Brookdale in Walla Walla.

         Imogene and her family settled in Weston where she worked as a phone operator and soda jerk while completing high school as valedictorian of the class of 1947. She married Bob Winn, June 7, 1947, and celebrated 65 years of marriage before Bob died.

         Imogene worked for Pabatco, Art Fulkerson DVM, Dr. A.B. Adkisson and Walla Walla Clinic. She enjoyed music, flowers, and caring for others. Her love language was providing food for others. She loved God and shared her faith regularly with those around her.

         Her activities included volunteering at the library, in the schools, and participation in church activities. She loved working in strawberry harvest and sharing the fruit with many people over 50 years. She is survived by Jasper and Kathy Winn, Milton- Freewater, Wesley and Debbie Winn, Grants Pass, Preston and Arlene Winn, Weston, and Suzanne and Jeff Babbitt, Lynnwood, Wash. She had 12 grandchildren and 21 great-grandchildren.

         A memorial service will be held at the Weston Community Church at 1 p.m. Sunday, August 20, 2017. Memorial contributions may be made to the Weston Food Bank or Weston Public Library. ~The East Oregonian, August 19, 2017


6. The Silent Influencer

Do you ever talk to yourself, out loud? Quite a few people do – although these days, we usually check to see if they are talking on a mobile phone! For the most part, your self-talk is silent, and it’s very powerful. You see, we talk to ourselves all the time. In fact, most of it happens in the form of thoughts, and it usually happens so fast, we aren’t even aware of it.

While you are reading this right now, you are talking to yourself three times as fast as you read. When you stop reading, your mind speeds up to about six times faster. It has been estimated that we have between 50,000 to 70,000 thoughts running through our minds every day. That’s one thought every 1.2 to 1.7 seconds. And we are consciously aware of about 20% of those thoughts.

These running thoughts, or “self-talk” as it is called, are very significant. It is important that you become aware of what your self-talk contains. Your self-talk builds up or tears down your self-image, determines what kind of relationships you have with other people, influences what kind of income you have and what kind of work you do. It affects virtually everything in your life.

If you tell yourself good things don’t happen to you, there is a very good chance they won’t, because your subconscious will make sure that you find a way to prove yourself right. And if you have a positive expectation of success, chances are excellent that you will succeed. You will persist in your efforts and you will persuade others to help you until you achieve your goal.

So, pay close attention to the kinds of things you say to yourself. And, if you hear put downs, derogatory labels or harsh criticisms, deliberately stop them and answer back in a positive way. When you take charge of your self-talk, you go a long way toward taking charge of your life. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3 Coast-to-coast eclipse postmarks include ‘landfall’ marking in Oregon

Rear-vision system for tractors and trailers goes portable and wireless

TEDEd.The Rise & Fall of the Berlin Wall

The East Oregonian: The Real American Heritage

Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it. ~ George Santayana (16 December 1863 in Madrid, Spain – 26 September 1952 in Rome, Italy) was a philosopher, essayist, poet and novelist.

Why you see swastikas in America but not Germany

Populism and the Future of Democracy

Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility

13 ways tech will reinvent farming as we know it


 

Sherman County eNews #249

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

  2. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

  3. Pans on Fire & Rookie Cooks 4-H Clubs

  4. Oregon eclipse update: info related to smoke, fire, vehicle fuel, eclipse glasses

  5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

  6. Nena Springs Fire Update, Aug. 18

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1. Sherman County Cultural Coalition 2017 Fall Grant Cycle

The Fall Grant Cycle for Sherman County’s Cultural Coalition will begin September 5, 2017. Applicants may be individuals and/or groups and need not be legally recognized non-profits.

Application Deadline: September 29, 2017

Awards up to $1,500 will be granted in support of local Sherman County activities and events which promote Culture, Humanities, Heritage and the Arts in Sherman County.

Additional information including Grant Guidelines and the application form, may be found at: https://www.shermancountyculturalcoalition.com

Completed grant applications may be mailed to:
Sherman County Cultural Coalition, P.O. Box 23, Moro, OR 97039
Or emailed to: shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com

Questions?
Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermanculturalcoalition@gmail.com


2. Sherman Development League Grant Applications

Sherman Development League Grant/Loan Applications

Sherman Development League (SDL) grant application forms for projects and/or programs in Sherman County will be available September 11, 2017. Grants can be applied for by 501(c)(3) and other non-profit organizations. Organizations that have received a grant from SDL are not eligible to apply until their current grant requirements have been met. Revolving loan funds are also available to for-profit entities and businesses.

Applications will be accepted until November 15, 2017, and grants will be awarded by February 1, 2018.

To receive appropriate grant/loan application forms, please submit a letter of request which includes:

•A brief description of your project.

•State if the project is a capital expenditure, one-time program or pilot project, emergency assistance or a loan request.

•Identify the type of organization requesting funding.

Mail or email requests to:
Sherman Development League, Inc., P.O. Box 11, Moro, OR 97039
shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com

Questions? Contact Melva Thomas at 541-442-5488 or shermandevelopmentleague@gmail.com


 3. Pans on Fire & Rookie Cooks 4-H Clubs

4-H clover1The “Pans on Fire” outdoor cooking and food preservation 4-H club met on Thursday, August 17 at 9am at the Extension Office, with Hunter Kenney in attendance and Emma Robbins excused absence.  Hunter worked on his 4-H record book and got it done for fair.  He then made jerky from ground beef, using a jerky gun to make three different shapes. 

The “Rookie Cooks” 4-H club met on Friday, August 18 at 1pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Zach, Logan, and Becca.  Excused absence was Jordan.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Becca, 4-H Pledge by Logan.  We worked on fair entry forms and record books.  Prepared peanut butter cookie dough and shaped in two ways:  criss-cross with forks and with chocolate candy.  Judged and sampled the cookies.  Played game “Barnacle”.  Next meeting is in 2018.  Meeting adjourned at 3:05pm.  Signed, Becca Earl


4. Oregon eclipse update: info related to smoke, fire, vehicle fuel, eclipse glasses

eclipse1Salem OR — As the eclipse quickly approaches, issues related to traffic, wildfires, and smoke are affecting travel. Rumors related to fuel, and a shortage of eclipse-rated glasses, are also prompting concerns. The Oregon Eclipse Joint Information Center, working with partner centers and agencies around the state, will issue regular updates starting today.

WILDFIRES
+ The State Emergency Communications Center (ECC) elevated from “enhanced watch” for the eclipse to activation at 1 p.m. on Friday in order to coordinate response to the growing number of wildfires in the state.

CONCERNS OF FUEL SHORTAGES
+ Some people have questioned whether enough fuel is available at Oregon gas stations. The Oregon Department of Energy reports fuel trucks are making deliveries around the clock. Even if a station runs out of fuel, its a temporary situation.

+ The terminals report that Oregons supply is in great shape, with no problems. Fuel haulers reinforced that. They’re making their deliveries and not reporting any problems.

+ Should you encounter a fuel shortage at an area gas station, we recommend you visit another fuel station or return to the station that was out of fuel at a later time.

+ Stay calm, fuel on!

WILDFIRE SMOKE
+ Weather and smoke levels can vary dramatically during wildfires. This can vary not only daily, but also hourly. Smoke may also affect one part of a community but not another. This can make it difficult to provide specific health warnings, especially when conditions change quickly.

+ Since smoke from wildfires varies around the state — and can change quickly — we recommend residents and visitors visit the multiagency site for communicating smoke information to the public at http://oregonsmoke.blogspot.com. This site has the best and latest information about smoke conditions in your area.

+ Some people, such as those with chronic heart or lung disease, children and the elderly may experience health effects even when the air is unhealthy for a short time. It is important to take precautions based on your individual health and the smoke levels around you. This may mean staying indoors when air quality is poor. It may also mean not exercising during these conditions.

TRAVEL DELAYS/TRAFFIC
+ Traffic into and around Oregon will increase over the next few days as more and more people arrive to view the eclipse.

+ The best advice is to get where you are going and then stay put. Arrive early, stay put and leave late is your best course of action.

+ Those wanting the best and most current information on traffic conditions around the state should visit the Oregon Department of Transportations Tripcheck web page at http://TripCheck.com.

+ ODOT also has a mobile site at http://TripCheck.com/mobile.

SHORTAGE OF ECLIPSE GLASSES
+ Some areas have reported the supply of eclipse viewing glasses is low or depleted. While genuine protective eyewear is the only safe way to directly view the eclipse, one alternative to glasses includes a homemade pinhole projector. Visit the OEM Facebook page for a link to instructions on How to Make a Pinhole Projector to View the Solar Eclipse. The OEM page is http://www.facebook.com/OMDOEM

+ For additional information on safe viewing, visit the Oregon Academy of Ophthalmology at www.oregoneyephysicians.org, and the Casey Eye Institute www.ohsu.casey.com.

REMINDER
Oregons 211 information line is the best source of information for questions regarding Eclipse issues. Resident and visitors are encouraged to call 211 or visit 211info.org for information.


5. Self-Fulfilling Expectations

Do you know what a self-fulfilling prophecy is? Most people know that a self-fulfilling prophecy is an event that, because it is predicted and expected, is therefore more likely to happen, and even caused to happen. 

For example, according to Success magazine, two different groups of psychologists were once asked to observe the same child playing. One group was told beforehand that the child was emotionally disturbed. The other group was told that the child was a genius. When the psychologists were asked to report on their observations afterward, each group had found evidence to support their preconceived ideas. 

Now, it’s important to realize that self-fulfilling prophecies are everyday experiences – not just laboratory experiments. What do you expect your day to be like when you get up in the morning? How do you expect your kids to behave? How much success do you expect for yourself? What do you expect for your organization’s production or sales for this month, this year?

You see, if you predict failure, failure is generally what you will find. And if you expect excellence, excellence is very likely what you will get. How we think about a situation determines how we act, and how we act, more than anything else, determines the results. 

That is how self-fulfilling prophecies work. There’s nothing magical about them. What you get in life is pretty much how you behave, coming back at you. Does that make sense to you? Do yourself a favor this weekend, and see if you recognize areas where you are setting yourself up because of your expectations. If you are setting yourself up for the good, terrific! If not, what can you do to change those internal expectations, and change your life, your work, your business?

And with school about to start again (at least in the Northern Hemisphere), how can you help the school-age children in your life set themselves up to expect the best, and work toward it? ~The Pacific Institute


6. Nena Springs Fire Update, Aug. 18

Warm Springs OR — At approximately 3:20pm Thursday, an ember from the Nena Springs Fire blew out of containment lines near Kishwalk. Driven by high winds, the fire began running in grass and brush. Two helicopters, handcrews and at least 10 engines responded in addition to 150 firefighters that were already assigned to the fire.

Winds pushed the fire over Indian Head Canyon and through Charlie Canyon, then continued move a mile east past the Kah-Nee-Ta Resort. As was planned earlier in the week, in the event an evacuation notice was issued, visitors sheltered in place. Firefighters used Route 8 to burn from the road. This successfully removed grass from around the Resort and forced the fire to stay above and away from the area. While the Resort is still at a Level 3 evacuation, the immediate threat to it is gone.

At approximately 10pm Thursday night, the fire jumped Hwy 3 at Fish Hatchery Grade. Firefighters’ priority was to keep the fire from crossing the Warm Springs River and to prevent it from burning structures. As of midnight Thursday, these objectives had been met.

The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal Red Team, commanded by Ian Yocum, was mobilized late Thursday night. Two task forces of engines from Marion and Multnomah Counties began working with the existing organization around midnight. Yamhill and Washington Counties engines and personnel arrived this morning. These task forces bring with them a total of 79 firefighters, 19 engines and four water tenders to assist with protecting structures and building upon the work firefighters have already completed.

The fire has grown an estimated 6,000 acres bringing the total acres to approximately 46,000. A flight will occur this morning to get a more accurate account of the fire’s size. It is 40% contained.

Evacuation Notices: The Kah-Nee-Ta Resort & Spa received a Level 3 evacuation notice Thursday evening. As was planned this week, in the event of a wildfire, visitors will remain in place. Charley Canyon, Webster Flat Road, South Junction, Culpus Bridge, and Wolf Point Subdivision are now at a Level 3 Evacuation Notice.

Evacuation Center: The Red Cross established an evacuation center at the Warm Springs Community Center for residents that have been evacuated.

Road Closures: Hwy 3 to School Flats; Hwy 8 to Kah-Nee-Ta Village; Webster Flat Road, and Culpus Bridge are closed to all traffic.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbEclipse Viewers Urged to Protect Eyes and Guard Against “Painless” But Irreversible Damage

 

US Postal Service Postmarks to Celebrate Oregon’s Eclipse Path

Oregon Wheat Growers League

20 Potent Pieces Of Life Advice, As Told By People Over 60.

 

NW News Network: If you build an eclipse camp will they come?

 

Agent Orange on Arizona Reservation


 

Sherman County eNews #248

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

REMINDERS: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

THANK YOU, TERRI EARL! Sherman County School Clothes Scramble 2010-2017! Thank you for organizing this program offering exchanges of nice used clothing for Sherman County families. THANK YOU, PARTICIPATING FAMILIES and SHERMAN COUNTY PUBLIC/LIBRARY STAFF! We’ve enjoyed following this grass-roots effort that provided opportunities for us all to help one another. ~The Editor

CONGRATULATIONS, DARYN (McDERMID) REYNOLDS, on your Western Oregon University graduation with a Bachelor of Arts in Social Science! ~The Editor

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries] 

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS: 

NON-PROFIT OPPORTUNITY.  Sherman County Emergency Services has cans and bottles to donate to a non-profit.  If interested, please contact Shawn at 541-565-3100.

SOUTH SHERMAN FIRE & RESCUE WOMEN’S AUXILIARY. BIG BAKE SALE! FRIDAY, AUGUST 18 and SATURDAY, AUGUST 19 8 AM to 4 PM or until we run out of baked goods! GRASS VALLEY CITY PARK. QUESTIONS? Call Judy at 928-851-2340.

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

EMPLOYMENT: 

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $20-$27/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.usSubmit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Monday, September 4, 2017.  Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

CHILDCARE PROGRAM. MANAGER/DIRECTOR & ASSISTANT. Little Wheats childcare program is looking to fill TWO POSITIONS: a Program Manager/Director and Assistant; a successful applicant must love children and be dependable. Both positions need 1st Aid/CPR, food handlers and recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect – however we can work with you to provide these trainings for you. Some are online and some are classes. The Director position starts at $15-17hr, the Assistant $10-12hr, depending on experience/qualifications, both are typically 26-35 hrs a week. The manager is required to be on site around 70% of the open hours, though can work more if requested. Highly preferred for the manager to have one year of qualifying teaching experience in the care of a group of children (kindergarten, preschool, child care center, CF home, Head Start) or 30 quarter credits in ECE or a step 8 in the Oregon Registry. Little Wheats does not offer medical insurance – but we do offer a $150 monthly stipend towards whatever medical coverage you choose for the Director. We also provide both positions with 1 week’s paid personal leave each year after a 3 month probation period; it is based on the average number of hours worked per week. (ie – if you normally work 20 hours per week, you would receive a week off paid at 20 hours or if you worked an average of 30 hours per week you would be paid for 30 hours, etc….) We also provide reduced rates for childcare for employees. Please call/text 541-980-5232 with questions, pick up an application at 409 Dewey St. in Moro, or apply online at Indeed.com.  8/18

PREVENTION COORDINATOR. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of Prevention Coordinator. This is a part time position, 20-24 hr./week or .50/.60FTE, Monday-Friday; there is an option for flexible scheduling within the FTE, and potential for expansion. Partial benefits available. Applicant must value collaboration and be skilled in data collection, program implementation, and grant management. This position works closely with youth, the community, and other agencies to identify and implement strategies to prevent drug and alcohol abuse in Sherman County. This is an exciting opportunity to effect local change.  For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, PO Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, September 1st. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

RETAIL YARD ASSOCIATE, PETROLEUM DELIVERY DRIVER, GRAIN FACILITY OPERATOR & GRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. Mid Columbia Producers Inc. is hiring for a variety of positions.  Full Benefits including Health, Dental, Vision, Rx, 401k with robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation and sick leave and more are available to all regular full time positions.  All four positions listed here are full time.

Retail Yard Associate Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  Customer service, deliveries and inventory management are a few of the essential job functions of this position. It can be physically demanding and requires the individual to work in varying weather conditions.  The chosen candidate will work at all three of our locations including The Dalles, Wasco and Goldendale Washington.

Petroleum Delivery Driver This position is based in Bend, OR.The role of the Petroleum Delivery Drivers is to safely transport petroleum products and render outstanding customer service to our patrons.  The deliveries will range from commercial/industrial accounts and home heating oil to bulk and packaged lubricants.  Product knowledge is a plus.  On Site training will be provided.

Grain Operations Laborer This position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County depending on the candidates and business necessity.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.   Maintenance, housekeeping, and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility are some of the essential functions of this position.

Grain Facility Operator This position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County depending on the candidates and business necessity. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.  *This position requires the ability to obtain a pesticide license with space fumigation endorsement.

For more information on joining the MCP team, please visit www.mcpcoop.com. To apply for any of these positions please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277  Fax: (503)536-6875

Brittany@mcpcoop.com  8/18

 FOR SALE:

ECLIPSE GLASSES. Last chance to get your 2017 Oregon Solar Eclipse Glasses at the Sherman County Museum Store. Our eclipse glasses are from Rainbow Symphony, one of the NASA recognized manufacturers that meet the ISO Standard. Glasses are $2.00. Members receive a 10% discount. Open daily 10-5 at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. 8/18

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

STUDDED TIRES ON RIMS. Studded tires, 245/75R-16 on GM Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM). Lightly used asking $700 for wheels and tires. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text). 9/8

RANCH-STYLE HOME IN RUFUS. $209,900. Attractive ranch style home on corner lot in Rufus. Built in 2013. High ceilings. Great floor plan with open concept. 3 bed 2 bath. 1580 Sq Ft. Spacious entry with wide hallway. Large living room. Dining room has sliding glass doors to back patio. Kitchen is great for entertaining with Breakfast bar. Lots of storage with pantry, more than ample counter space for cooking. Nice master bed and bath. 2 Charming bedrooms and 2nd bath. Nicely landscaped. Contact Bonnie Long At Copperwest Properties 541-993-1513. 8/18

WEATHERED OAK WINE BARREL ADIRONDACK CHAIRS. Weathered Oak Wine Barrel Adirondack Chairs – stationary $350, rocker $375 or the set for $650. Local Craftsman. Call for photos… 541-788-9497.  9/8

PROPERTY NEAR MORO. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000. RMLS# 17410095 – Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  11/10

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

APARTMENT FOR RENT. For Rent in Moro, OR is a beautiful 1 bedroom (possibly 2), 1.5 bath apartment. There is a second bonus room that could be used as a bedroom or office. Features an open floor plan, loft bedroom, stainless steel appliances, knotty alder cabinets, and custom woodwork throughout. The apartment is nestled in a barn which includes 3 stalls and a tack room. Plenty of fenced pasture for your horse(s) and a small yard for you to enjoy our beautiful sunsets. $850/month includes water and garbage. Applications and reference checks will be required. Call 509-250-0904 for more information or to make an appointment to view. 9/8

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

SCHOOL CLOTHES SCRAMBLE COORDINATOR. Sherman County School Clothes Scramble, an annual August event, will continue with the next volunteer. Following her 7th annual Scramble, Terri Earl has a file of information she will be glad to pass along. Please text or call Terri at 541-980-2959 for information. 8/25

WANTED:

ART WORK FOR SHERMAN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ADDITION. The Sherman County Project Team is actively seeking Sherman County-themed art work for display in the courthouse addition currently under construction. The team is interested in any two-dimensional media (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, etc) for display inside the addition. Deadline for submittal is August 31. For the initial screening, please provide an 8″ by 10″ color photograph or digital image of the proposed article. Include the dimensions of the actual article, if the size is fixed, along with a description of how the article relates to Sherman County and any relationship between the contributor and Sherman County. If the project team is interested in directly inspecting the article, arrangements will be made with the contributor to do so. We know there are several talented local artists and photographers out there and encourage each one to contribute. There is no restriction upon the number of articles that can be submitted for consideration. Sherman County will offer a stipend, the amount of which is to be determined, for each piece of art work acquired. Submittals can be made by mail to PO Box 282, Moro, OR 97039 or by email to debbieh@co.sherman.or.us Questions may be directed to the same email address. 8/25

FREE:

 NEWSPAPER OBITUARIES from Sherman County newspapers, posted for family historians, were transcribed from microfilm by Chris Sanders. http://shermancountyoregon.com/obituaries/


 2. Calendar (new or corrected) 

AUGUST

1-27 Pacific Northwest Plein Air Exhibition 10-5 Maryhill Museum of Art

18 Frontier Digital Network & Frontier TeleNet Board Meetings 9 Moro

18-19 South Sherman Fire & Rescue Women’s Auxiliary Bake Sale 8-4 Grass Valley

19 Celebration of Life: Bill Vann, Otilia Geiser Vann 1 Discovery Center

19 Great American Eclipse Education & Entertainment in Fossil

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

20 Sherman County Fair Commercial/Community Booth Application Deadline

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade,
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 8 a.m. The Dalles

22-27 Sherman County Fair

22 Sherman County Fair 4-H Static Exhibit Judging

22 Sherman County Fair 4-H Horse Show 10

24 Healthy Families’ Play Group 10:30-12 Moro City Park (now Aug. 24)

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10:30 The Dalles

23 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting 1:15-3 The Dalles

23 Sherman County School District Surplus Sale 9-6

23 Sherman County Fair: Take your entries to the fair! 

23 Sherman County Fair Dale Coles Classic Car Show 3:30

23 Sherman County Fair BBQ Burgers/Dogs with the Fair Board 5

23 Sherman County Fair 4-H Style Revue 5:30

23 Sherman County Fair Horse Games in the Arena 7:15

24 Healthy Families’ Play Group 10:30-12 Moro City Park

24 Kindergarten Registration for Sherman County School

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H Poultry, Rabbit & Cavie Show 8 a.m.

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Market Judging 10

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Market Judging 11

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Market Judging 12:30

24 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Market Judging 2

24 Sherman County Fair Down on the Farm Chore Course 7

25 Frontier TeleNet & Frontier Digital Network Board Meetings 9 Wasco Annex

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H Home Economics Contests 8

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship 10

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship 11

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship 1

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship 2

25 Sherman County Fair Cattle Sorting Contests 7 Arena

26 Sherman County Fair Wellness Walk 8 Downtown Moro

26 Sherman County Fair Exhibit Parade 9:15 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair Queen’s Reception 10 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-Around Showmanship 12

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Sale 4-5

26 Sherman County Fair FFA Annual BBQ 5:30

26 Sherman County Fair Special Introductions 7:15 Arena

26 Sherman County Fair Bull Riding Contests 7:30-9

26 Sherman County Fair Dance with Countryfied in the Arena 9:30-1

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90

27 Sherman County Fair Cowboy Church with Susie McEntire 10:30

27 Sherman County Fair Demolition Derby 2 Arena

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Burnet Bldg.

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles

31-Sept. 3 Gilliam County Fair, Condon

SEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

2 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell

4 LABOR DAY

5 School resumes in Sherman County

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 Gilliam County Court 10

6 Wheeler County Court 10

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30 Moro

12 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

12 Mid-Columbia Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30 Senior Center, Moro

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District 4-5 Klickitat County

22 Autumn Begins

22 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Reception & Awards

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

26 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting

29 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 TBD


 

Sherman County eNews #247

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

  2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

  3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

  5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

  6. Pushing Through Fear


“It is the manners and spirit of a people, which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” —Thomas Jefferson (1787)


1Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

Sherman County Public/School Library is closed today, Thursday, August 17 due to a temporary water shut off. The library will open again as scheduled on Saturday, August 19th at 10pm. Book Club will continue tonight as planned with tea and treats; please make necessary arrangements. Game night has been canceled.  Thank you for your patience!


2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

Hope this finds you all enjoying summer, getting ready for the Sherman County Fair and back to school.

If anyone wants to “step up to the plate” and make this school year extremely interesting…how about saying YES to a last minute request to host an international student for the academic year?

States’ 4-H, the national program that coordinates 4-H exchange program at OSU, has announced it is “scrambling as there are still 5 academic year students left to place (one girl and four boys) that will be arriving the end of the month from Ukraine, Armenia, Kurgyzstan, and Turkmenistan.”  The 16 y/o girl is into dancing/music/photography;  the boys (15, 17 and 18) all look like they’re into computer science, coding, graphic design, and/or robotics…and want to do things like swimming, basketball, volunteering at an animal shelter, being with pets, or traveling while in the USA.

If you would consider being a last-minute host….(which our family did in the fall of 2008 for a young man from Mexico)…or know of any families that might like to host them….if you have children about the age of these students…or would like to learn more about these amazingly talented/smart international exchange students…immediately contact:

Brenda Coleman, OSU 4-H International Exchange programs

Brenda.Coleman@oregonstate.edu


3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County 

The Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission is asking for recommendations for a cemetery that would be good for a marker cleaning and repair workshop on October 14 when they meet in Sherman County. They would need a water source, some tilting or broken markers in a cemetery that needs a little attention, markers that need cleaning and, ideally, folks who can pull together some gravel and perhaps a port-a-potty. The workshop is usually all day 9-3 or 4, and folks bring their own sack lunch for it. It’s a wonderful opportunity for Sherman County. Please contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov, as soon as possible. ~Sherry Kaseberg


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society will be meeting on Sept. 9, 2017 at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in the Basalt Cafe. General meeting and program will begin at 1:00 pm. This month’s program will be given by Sandy Bisset who will give a presentation on Land Records. The meeting and program is open to the public and those interested in genealogy and family history are encouraged to attend. The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society meets the second Saturday of each month. Event schedules can be found on our blog and general information and newsletter can be found on our main website, https://gorgegen.blogspot.com/.


5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

THE DALLES—Columbia Gorge Discovery Center presents Columbia River Indian Summer on September 9th at 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. This free daytime event feature artisans, musicians and vendors from our regional Native American community.

The programming will includes flute music by Foster Kalama, tule mat making demonstrations by Taaw-lee-Winch, traditional Indian games and drumming with Jefferson Greene, a Northwest Twined Pouch Workshop by Pat Courtney Gold, and local craft vendors.  A salmon lunch and Indian fry bread will be available for purchase on a first come first served basis beginning at 12:00 noon.

“We want to offer the opportunity for local indigenous peoples to showcase their culture and history at our facility,” said Executive Director Carolyn Purcell.  This is part of an ongoing Indigenous Voices Project funded in part by grants from Trust Management Services, Oregon Historic Trails Fund and Wy’East Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Folklife Network.  For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org


6. Pushing Through Fear

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better.

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth.

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the good life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? What steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute


 

Sherman County eNews #247

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

  2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

  3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County

  4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

  5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

  6. Pushing Through Fear


“It is the manners and spirit of a people, which preserve a republic in vigor. A degeneracy in these is a canker which soon eats to the heart of its laws and constitution.” —Thomas Jefferson (1787)


1. Sherman County Public/School Library Temporary Closure, Aug. 17

Sherman County Public/School Library is closed today, Thursday, August 17 due to a temporary water shut off. The library will open again as scheduled on Saturday, August 19th at 10pm. Book Club will continue tonight as planned with tea and treats; please make necessary arrangements. Game night has been canceled.  Thank you for your patience!


2. Last Minute Opportunity to Host an International Student for the Academic Year!

Hope this finds you all enjoying summer, getting ready for the Sherman County Fair and back to school.

If anyone wants to “step up to the plate” and make this school year extremely interesting…how about saying YES to a last minute request to host an international student for the academic year? 

States’ 4-H, the national program that coordinates 4-H exchange program at OSU, has announced it is “scrambling as there are still 5 academic year students left to place (one girl and four boys) that will be arriving the end of the month from Ukraine, Armenia, Kurgyzstan, and Turkmenistan.”  The 16 y/o girl is into dancing/music/photography;  the boys (15, 17 and 18) all look like they’re into computer science, coding, graphic design, and/or robotics…and want to do things like swimming, basketball, volunteering at an animal shelter, being with pets, or traveling while in the USA. 

If you would consider being a last-minute host….(which our family did in the fall of 2008 for a young man from Mexico)…or know of any families that might like to host them….if you have children about the age of these students…or would like to learn more about these amazingly talented/smart international exchange students…immediately contact:

Brenda Coleman, OSU 4-H International Exchange programs

Brenda.Coleman@oregonstate.edu


3. Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Offers Workshop in Sherman County 

The Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission is asking for recommendations for a cemetery that would be good for a marker cleaning and repair workshop on October 14 when they meet in Sherman County. They would need a water source, some tilting or broken markers in a cemetery that needs a little attention, markers that need cleaning and, ideally, folks who can pull together some gravel and perhaps a port-a-potty. The workshop is usually all day 9-3 or 4, and folks bring their own sack lunch for it. It’s a wonderful opportunity for Sherman County. Please contact Kuri Gill at Kuri.Gill@oregon.gov, as soon as possible. ~Sherry Kaseberg


4. Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Land Records Program, Sept. 9

The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society will be meeting on Sept. 9, 2017 at the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center in the Basalt Cafe. General meeting and program will begin at 1:00 pm. This month’s program will be given by Sandy Bisset who will give a presentation on Land Records. The meeting and program is open to the public and those interested in genealogy and family history are encouraged to attend. The Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society meets the second Saturday of each month. Event schedules can be found on our blog and general information and newsletter can be found on our main website, https://gorgegen.blogspot.com/.


5. Columbia River Indian Summer at the Discovery Center, Sept. 9

THE DALLES—Columbia Gorge Discovery Center presents Columbia River Indian Summer on September 9th at 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. This free daytime event feature artisans, musicians and vendors from our regional Native American community.

The programming will includes flute music by Foster Kalama, tule mat making demonstrations by Taaw-lee-Winch, traditional Indian games and drumming with Jefferson Greene, a Northwest Twined Pouch Workshop by Pat Courtney Gold, and local craft vendors.  A salmon lunch and Indian fry bread will be available for purchase on a first come first served basis beginning at 12:00 noon.

“We want to offer the opportunity for local indigenous peoples to showcase their culture and history at our facility,” said Executive Director Carolyn Purcell.  This is part of an ongoing Indigenous Voices Project funded in part by grants from Trust Management Services, Oregon Historic Trails Fund and Wy’East Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, and Oregon Folklife Network.  For more information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org


6. Pushing Through Fear

Nothing blocks change quite the way fear does, and when its power is greater than your power to push through it, fear is devastating. We can see evidence of this every day in the news. However, in his 1989 publication, “Getting Unstuck,” Dr. Sidney Simon discussed ten ways fear blocks change, and today that information bears repeating. You see, the power of fear, unchecked, hasn’t changed.

Fear persuades you to do less than you are capable of doing. It triggers internal defense systems and fools you into thinking that you have perfectly good reasons not to change. Fear, particularly fear of making mistakes, causes indecisiveness and stops you from knowing what you really want. It warps your perception of your life and what you can do to make it better. 

Fear keeps you from asking for help when you need it or benefiting from the emotional support offered to you. To calm your fears, you develop unhealthy habits and behavior patterns. Fear makes you give up one step short of your goal. And finally, fear keeps you from taking the risks necessary for growth. 

Fear can control your life if you let it. But you can push through it if you can relax physically and mentally, and develop the habit of taking well-chosen risks – small ones at first, then bigger ones. Affirmations and visualizations are a great help too. If you get into the habit of vividly seeing yourself achieve success, you can overcome the paralyzing effects of fear and move confidently into the good life you deserve.

What fears do you have that are preventing you from positive change? What steps, even if they are small ones at first, can you take today, or this week? ~The Pacific Institute