Sherman County eNews #234

CONTENT

  1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week.

  2. Sherman County Facebook Group

  3. Letter to the Editor: Response to Importing/Exporting Oil

  4. Wanted! Your Stories about John Day Dam, Rail & Highway Relocation!

  5. Sherman County Photography Club, Aug. 28

  6. Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

  7. Book: Oregon Geographic Names

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. What’s Happening at Sherman County Public/School Library This Week.

Logo.ShermanPub.School.Library2017
Tuesday, August 8 at 11am – 6pm – School Clothes Scramble

Thursday, August 10 at 11:00am – Baby Lap-Sit Story Time
Come build early literacy skills with your little one as we read a story, sing songs, and play games like “peek-a-boo.”

Thursday, August 10 at 6:00pm – Movie Night
Power Rangers
Rated Pg – 13
Run Time – 2hrs 4 min
A group of high-school students, who are infused with unique superpowers, harness their abilities in order to save the world.

Saturday, August 12 at 10am – Fairy Garden Craft Day
Thank you to everyone who registered! We will see you Saturday!
Remember, bring your own shallow 10-18 inch container and if you want to add your own trinkets, feel free to bring them.


2. Sherman County Facebook Group

Sherman County https://www.facebook.com/groups/144574559075535/


3. Letter to the Editor: Response to Importing/Exporting Oil

Dear Sherry,

Well, Freddie is at it again, zeroing in with his single focus lens.  I guess he hasn’t been reading about the new oil discoveries in America. Lucky for us, Freddie isn’t running the ‘show.’ In a previous letter, he disparaged our use of oil, suggesting we must do away with black gold in favor of renewables. First, he wants wind power–clip a few birds and disturb some wildlife. Then he advocates solar–just a little (wink wink) toxic waste and fried birdies. Our dams–destructive to fish. Coal–how ’bout some black lung?  Fracking–we can foul some water. Then, there is nuclear–just a little problem with that nasty plutonium. Good old oil–all those Tesla greenies think their electricity comes from a wall plug–not. The reality is, as long as we live and breathe, we will need energy sources from all options. Our exporting energy demonstrates our independence from some of the bad actors, who have, in the past, enslaved us. Yeah, USA!

Alison Yamauchi


4. Wanted! Your Stories about John Day Dam, Rail & Highway Relocation!

pencil.sharpWanted! YOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES

Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story!

Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org.


5. Sherman County Photography Club, Aug. 28

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Sherman County Photography Club

August 28  6 p.m.  OSU Extension Bldg.


6. Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

globeThe Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is the Federal and national standard for geographic nomenclature. The U.S. Geological Survey developed the GNIS in support of the U.S. Board on Geographic Names as the official repository of domestic geographic names data, the official vehicle for geographic names use by all departments of the Federal Government, and the source for applying geographic names to Federal electronic and printed products.

The GNIS contains information about physical and cultural geographic features of all types in the United States, associated areas, and Antarctica, current and historical, but not including roads and highways. The database holds the Federally recognized name of each feature and defines the feature location by state, county, USGS topographic map, and geographic coordinates. Other attributes include names or spellings other than the official name, feature designations, feature classification, historical and descriptive information, and for some categories the geometric boundaries.

The database assigns a unique, permanent feature identifier, the Feature ID, as the only standard Federal key for accessing, integrating, or reconciling feature data from multiple data sets. The GNIS collects data from a broad program of partnerships with Federal, State, and local government agencies and other authorized contributors, and provides data to all levels of government, to the public, and to numerous applications through a web query site, web map and feature services, and file download services. ~https://geonames.usgs.gov/domestic/


7. Book: Oregon Geographic Names

sherman.map.

An Oregon classic since 1928, Oregon Geographic Names is a comprehensive reference to place-names throughout the state. Generations of readers, from librarians and researchers to travelers and people interested in Oregon history, have used and enjoyed this fascinating and definitive resource. The seventh edition is significantly expanded, with more than 6,200 entries reporting what is known about the origin and meaning of each name. An accompanying CD holds biographic and geographic indexes and maps that show the locations of over 1,600 post offices and nearly 1,300 communities and geographic features.

~http://www.ohs.org/shop/museum-store/books-and-publications/oregon-geographic-names.cfm


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

 

bird.owl3Sherman County Facebook Group

Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

Book: Oregon Geographic Names

ODOT says salt now on the table

How to Get the Perfect Eclipse Shot Using Your Smartphone


 

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