Sherman County eNews #259

CONTENTS

  1. Workshop: The Art of Books: Preserving Your Story Through Handmade Books, Sept. 10 & 17

  2. Meeting Notice: North Central Public Health District Board Meeting, Sept. 12

  3. Following Our Dreams

  4. Work Share Program Offers Employers Positive Alternative to Layoffs

  5. The Greatest Cure Known is Work

  6. History is Repeating Itself, Tragedy or Farce Unclear So Far

  7. Do the Rich Pay Their Fair Share?

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


The whole aim of practical politics is to keep the populace alarmed (and hence clamorous to be led to safety) by menacing it with an endless series of hobgoblins, all of them imaginary. ~H.L. Mencken


1. Workshop: The Art of Books: Preserving Your Story Through Handmade Books, Sept. 10 & 17

Sunday, September 10 & Sunday, September 17 | 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

During this two-day workshop, writer, artist and bookmaker Maureen Lauran will show you how to craft a beautiful handmade book to hold your treasured ideas, art, and artifacts for years to come. Bring your personal content (list provided at registration), and Lauren, who has worked at many great institutions from the Smithsonian to Maryhill, will guide you through each step of the process, from conception and design to completion.

Cost: $60 members / $75 non-members. Supplies, coffee and snacks provided; no-host lunch. To register, call 509.773.3733 ext. 25 by September 7 or email louise@maryhillmuseum.org.


2. Meeting Notice: North Central Public Health District Board Meeting, Sept. 12

The North Central Public Health District Board will be meeting Tuesday, September 12, 2017 at 3:00 p.m. at the North Central Public Health District, located at 419 E. 7th Street, in the Main Meeting Room, in The Dalles, Oregon. This meeting is open to the general public.


3. Following Our Dreams

Today let’s talk about the best advice you will ever get on how to become financially as well as mentally wealthy.  It is a true story that should interest you if you would like to earn a lot of money or even if you just want to enjoy lots of success.

Some time ago, a random sample of 1500 graduating college seniors were surveyed to find out what they would base their career choice on. 83 percent said that financial gain was the first thing they would base their career choice on and following their dream, or their passion, would come second.  7 percent said that following their dream would be first and financial gain second.

In a follow-up study on actual net worth 20 years later, what do you think they found?  Well, 101 of the 1,500 had become millionaires. But only one of those millionaires had come from the group that put financial gain first, while one hundred of them came from the group that followed their dreams.

Of course, this study doesn’t “prove” anything. Its objective is simply to give us information about ourselves.  The point is that a path with heart, and a goal with passion driving it, is incredibly powerful.  People who do great things have, above everything else, a purpose that stirs their soul. How does that saying go? “Do what you love and you will never work a day in your life.” If it’s something you love, it’s not work – it is a life-fulfilling joy!

So, follow your dream. Do what you love and what gives you joy, and do it with your whole heart.  And if what you love and dream is also a contribution to the betterment of the world around you, so much the better!

If this survey is any indication, this might be the way to become a millionaire, if that is what we truly want. But more so, it is also the way to become mentally wealthy, because following our passions will make us happy. So where do your passions and goals lay? ~The Pacific Institute


4. Work Share Program Offers Employers Positive Alternative to Layoffs

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM, OREGON — A combination of a targeted informational campaign and process improvements led to a substantial increase in usage of the Work Share Program by employers in Oregon. That was the findings from a recent study released by Westat and the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research and Social Dynamics.

The study showed an increase in use of the program of 58% in the Portland area, and 100% outside of Portland by employers over a 12 month period.

Work Share is a program that gives employers during a time of economic downturn, an alternative to laying off staff. Through Work Share, an employer may reduce staff work hours, saving labor costs, and the affected workers in turn can receive a partial unemployment benefit payment to help cover lost wages. The major barrier for employers using the Work Share Program, the study confirmed, is being unaware of its existence.

More than 8,400 jobs have been saved by the Work Share program since it began in 1983. Many different types of businesses use the program and experience a variety of benefits through their participation, such as the retention of skilled employees, preservation of quality and efficiency, and an ability to go back to full-time operations as soon as the market allows. Since its inception, the Work Share program has helped more than 1,700 employers avoid layoffs in Oregon.

The Chief Evaluation Office (CEO) of the U.S. Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) contracted with Westat and its subcontractors, the Upjohn Institute for Employment Research and Social Dynamics, to evaluate the effectiveness of informational campaigns designed to increase employer awareness and use of the Work Share Program, also known as Short-term Compensation. The study covered the programs in Oregon and Iowa.

Throughout the process, the Oregon Employment Department engaged employers around the state through webinars and in-person presentations.

“We understand that government programs are often seen as cumbersome,” said Salena De La Cruz, Work Share Project Manager. “We’ve reduced the paperwork and made the program very accessible. The enhanced program provides a good option for businesses to consider when facing market fluctuations.”

Partnering with the Oregon Employment Department, a 12-month informational campaign was designed to educate employers in the Portland area and targeted treatment areas around the state. The campaign included informational mailings, presentations, and internet postings. Throughout the campaign, feedback on Work Share was gathered from employers. Incorporating this feedback, the Oregon Employment Department worked to streamline the application process and promote the program statewide.

In addition to an increased use of the Work Share Program, the study found an increased awareness of the program by employers of more than 30%.

Companies interested in the program can contact a program specialist at 503-947-1800, toll free 1-800-436-6191 or by emailing OED_WorkShare@Oregon.gov.


5. The Greatest Cure Known is Work

garden.shovel.barrowEmotions are sometimes strange, volatile, and unpredictable. They do not always respond to logic and reason. They do, however, respond to action. If you have occasional feelings of loneliness, discouragement, or discontentment, the best way to kill such negative emotions is to work them to death. Almost nothing is as bad as it first seems, and there’s nothing like a hard day’s work to put everything in proper perspective. When you begin to feel negative emotions, dwelling on your misfortunes only makes you feel worse. Do your best to put them out of your mind and think about more positive, constructive things. Physical labor can help. Choose a task that doesn’t require a great deal of concentration, and then focus on accomplishing the task at hand.  ~Napoleon Hill


6. History is Repeating Itself, Tragedy or Farce Unclear So Far

By Andrew Thomas

world.globe.mapIn my younger years, studying world and American history in school, I used to wonder how people of those past times could have been so stupid.  How could people actually believe that Hitler was a righteous man?  How could they be convinced that Jews were evil and Nazism was good?  Germans and Japanese at that time must have been crazy.

Didn’t Americans understand that a civil war between states could lead to incredible bloodshed?  How could people who shared the same heritage and culture go at each other’s throats so readily?  It seemed like fantasy to me.  People must have been completely different back then, much more gullible and ignorant.

How could it have been possible for Josef Stalin to starve tens of millions of Ukrainians to death with no resistance?  How could Mao, as leader of the world’s largest population, starve to death tens of millions of his own people without opposition?  It seemed impossible, almost like fiction.

After 65 years of my existence, I now realize that people have not changed.  The ignorance of man is not a fantasy, it is real and enduring.

It is a different world, yet the same.  We are the same human race that killed six million Jews under the Nazis, slaughtered 620,000 Americans in the Civil War, and murdered tens of millions of Ukrainian and Chinese citizens under Communism.

In our modern, so sophisticated Western world, we welcome the conquerors and assassins of an ancient culture into our society, where they can continue conquering and slaying us with our complete cooperation.

We welcome laws suppressing our freedom to speak, to own property, to operate a small business, and to defend ourselves.  We actively oppose the Constitution that brought us where we are today.

In America, we built a thriving civil society, amazing the world with our wealth, our perseverance, our moral strength, and our positive ideology.  We were the saviors of humanity.

And now, we show that we are truly fallible humans, in the process of destroying it all.  Being in the middle of this history, most of us can’t see it.  Having eliminated slavery and attained social justice, we demand more.  Having achieved racial equality, it is not enough.  Being the wealthiest nation of people in the world does not satisfy us.  We need total global equality and diversity on Earth for every sex, race, and religion, even if that is not rationally possible to achieve… … …

[Continue here: http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2017/08/history_is_repeating_itself_tragedy_or_farce_unclear_so_far.html%5D


7. Do the Rich Pay Their Fair Share?

dollarbillTop earners remain targets for tax increases, but the federal income tax system is already highly progressive. In 2013, the latest year with available data, the top 10 percent of income earners earned 45 percent of all income and paid 70 percent of all federal income taxes.  ~ Do the rich pay their fair share?


8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Oregon Agricultural Progress

 

Paraprosdokians. Words. Figures of Speech.

Cassandra’s Legacy: Climate Change Isn’t Our Biggest Environmental Problem, and Why Technology Won’t Save Us

Brilliant Maps: Chile Is a Ridiculously Long Country – Europe & US Size Comparison

“The greatest good we can do our country is to heal its party divisions and make them one people.” —Thomas Jefferson (1801)

Trashy Business in Portland

Fact check: Did Kate Brown really sign a gun confiscation bill?

The Wall Is the Centerpiece for Asserting American Sovereignty

Coast to Coast Eclipse Postmarks include ‘landfall’ marking in Oregon

History Is Repeating Itself, Tragedy or Farce Unclear So Far

 

1600 Daily Whitehouse News


 

Advertisements

Sherman County eNews #258

CONTENT

  1. Free Medicare Class at Columbia Gorge Community College, Oct. 12

  2. Do Unto Others…

  3. Such a Thing as Good Stress?

  4. DriveHealthy Campaign Launches to Reduce Distracted Driving

  5. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu


“It has been a source of great pain to me to have met with so many among [my] opponents who had not the liberality to distinguish between political and social opposition; who transferred at once to the person, the hatred they bore to his political opinions.” –Thomas Jefferson (1808)


1. Free Medicare Class at Columbia Gorge Community College, Oct. 12

grandparents.3Get your questions answered

(Salem) — Every day, state Medicare experts hear from people who missed a Medicare deadline, face a penalty or paid more for health or drug insurance than they should have.

“People call and say nobody told me about this deadline or that my neighbor’s drug plan isn’t the best for me,” said Donna Delikat, Medicare trainer for the state’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program. “That’s why we offer classes that explain Medicare and answer typical Medicare questions.”

SHIBA is a state-federal program that trains a network of volunteer counselors to offer free, unbiased counseling to Oregonians with Medicare. State staff will visit Columbia Gorge Community College in Hood River on April 6 to offer a free, two-hour class on the ABC & Ds of Medicare. The class is open to anyone, including people new to Medicare.

“People who take this class will get tips about Medicare that may help them avoid problems later,” Delikat said. “Also, anyone who is looking for a meaningful volunteer opportunity can take the class to see if helping others with Medicare is something they want to pursue.”

Class information

When & Where: From 9:00 to 11:00 a.m. at Hood River Campus and from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. at The Dalles Campus on Thursday, October 12th.

Who should enroll: People in Medicare or soon to be in Medicare, insurance agents and others who work with Medicare recipients.

Register: Call (541) 506-6011 for the class in The Dalles or (541) 308-8211 for the class in Hood River. Preregistration is preferred but not required.

Help with Medicare: Call SHIBA at: 1-800-722-4134

Volunteer opportunity: SHIBA trains and supports volunteer counselors who want to help people with Medicare in their community. Learn more by attending this class or by calling SHIBA.

SHIBA is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more formation, visit SHIBA at www.oregonshiba.org or the department at www.dcbs.oregon.gov.


2. Do Unto Others…

The greatest of all success rules is this: do unto others as you would if you were the others.

The Golden Rule is more than a principle of ethical behavior; it is a dynamic force that can work good in the lives of untold numbers of people. When you make it a practice to treat others as though you were the others, you spread goodwill among people who, in turn, may be moved to do the same. By their actions, they influence still more people, who generate goodwill among even more people. This force for goodwill increases exponentially and will return to you from totally new sources. The benefit you receive from a good deed performed today by a total stranger may have been a chain reaction from long ago when you observed the Golden Rule in your own dealings with another. ~Napoleon Hill


3. Such a Thing as Good Stress?

Most of us know that too much stress can create problems, for both mind and body. However, did you know there is a kind of stress that is good for you? That is hard to believe, isn’t it? Let’s look a little closer into this “good stress.”

All of us have comfort zones. A comfort zone is just a term used to describe the physical or psychological area in which we feel comfortable and at ease. When we move away from the familiar to the new and different, we are moving out of our comfort zone.

If the move is not something we choose to do or are not ready for, we feel anxiety and stress. If you have ever walked into the wrong rest room or been forced to speak in public, you understand anxiety and stress! It didn’t take long for you to get back to where you knew you belonged.

For most of life, the higher your self-esteem, the broader your comfort zone – and the easier it is for you to deal with unfamiliar situations and new challenges. You see, when you raise your self-esteem, you automatically expand your comfort zone. It works the other way around, as well.

If you use techniques like affirmation and visualization to mentally take yourself out of your comfort zone safely, when it is time to deal with the real thing, instead of anxiety you will feel excitement – a good kind of stress – and you will be giving your self-esteem a boost. It’s a mindset shift to start looking at the future with optimism and confidence.

Most likely, you still won’t feel good about walking into the wrong rest room, and some of us may still want to get out of there as fast as possible! But, you will be able to handle change more easily and deal with new situations without becoming anxious, upset and negatively stressed.

So, for this week, choose an upcoming situation or event that has you concerned. It can be personal, professional, whatever. Take a few quiet moments to close your eyes, a couple of times a day, and imagine what it will look like, feel like, even smell like in this situation. See yourself as poised and calm, and in charge. Rehearse in your mind what you will say to the people involved, maintaining that calm and in-charge feeling. See if this doesn’t reduce your anxiety.

You might even find yourself standing taller physically, because you’ve seen yourself standing taller in your mind. ~The Pacific Institute


4. DriveHealthy Campaign Launches to Reduce Distracted Driving

telephone2Campaign designed to change cultural norms and reduce distracted driving begins!

SALEM — Who are Oregon’s safest drivers? That’s what a new campaign created by AAA Oregon/Idaho, ODOT and the Oregon State Police seeks to discover. DriveHealthy’s aim is to help reduce the incidence of distracted driving in Oregon by introducing friendly competition.

Why the need for this? A recent survey found that while 69 percent of Oregonians are VERY uncomfortable riding with a driver who is sending a text message, 72 percent admit to driving distracted themselves! In Oregon on average eight people are hurt or killed by a distracted driver each day. This has contributed to the largest increase in traffic fatalities in Oregon in a decade. At the same time, cell phone use in vehicles has strong addictive properties: Changing this behavior will be difficult.

“We’re connected to each other socially with technology,” said ODOT Director Matthew Garrett. “And the fact is, that connection doesn’t stop when we get behind the wheel. So we want to replace the addiction to the phone by using those same social connections, combined with immediate feedback on driving and friendly competition.”

“Here’s how it works,” said Garrett. “It’s simple. You get with your closest friends, family or co-workers and form a group. Your group works together to beat others in the same category – like schools, civic clubs, religious organizations or co-workers at other Oregon businesses. You can also compete on your own as an Oregon resident.”

Organizations can register at www.DriveHealthy.org. Starting September 1, they can download a free app from Lifesaver https://lifesaver-app.com/ and the competition begins. Each month is a new opportunity to compete. Will it be effective? Data suggests that a recent similar campaign in Boston reduced distracted driving among participants by 47 percent.

By not opening your phone while driving, you keep your score high. At the end of each month, the groups with the highest scores win bragging rights on the DriveHealthy website.

“We’re convinced,” said Garrett, “that while technology helped create the problem, technology can also help provide a solution to distracted driving.”

DriveHealthy started as the result of a statewide task force, which also recommended passage of tougher cell-phone laws. House Bill 2597 takes effect October 1 and, among other changes, increases the penalty for using a mobile electronic device while driving to $2,000.

Businesses, corporations, organizations and media outlets can support the DriveHealthy campaign in a variety of ways:

  • Adopt the campaign as a cause for your organization
  • Sponsor media promotion for DriveHealthy in your local market
  • Sponsor monthly rewards for the best drivers

For information on how to sponsor DriveHealthy monthly rewards, contact LifeSaver (info@lifesaver-app.com). For information on how to adopt DriveHealthy in your community, contact Tom Fuller (503-986-3455, Thomas.Fuller@odot.state.or.us).

“Our goal is lofty,” said Garrett. “We want to change cultural norms around distracted driving like they changed regarding seat belt use and drunk driving. It took decades to make significant progress in those areas. Today things change at Internet speed so I’m hopeful the norms around driving healthy can become a part of our culture quickly.”


5. Sherman County Senior & Community Center September Meal Menu

Sherman County Senior & Community Center

ShermanCoLogo

Meal Menu

September 2017

  We serve lunch at 12:00, noon sharp.  First come, first served. 

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. Is $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
        1
Hot Dog on a Bun
Baked Beans
Veggies, Salad & Dessert
4 5 6 7 8
Closed for Labor Day

 

Ham & Cheese on a Bun Oven Fried Chicken Baked Potato Bar Turkey Tetrazini
Potato Wedges & Veggies Potatoes/Gravy & Veggies Veggies Veggies
Salad & Fruit Green Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Ice Cream
11 12 13 14 15
Hamburger Gravy Pork Chops Mac & Cheese w/Ham Chicken ala King Navy Bean Soup w/Ham
Mashed Potatoes Potato Wedges Veggies Biscuits & Veggies Yeast Rolls & Veggies
Green Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
18 19 20 21 22
Beef Chili Stuffed Peppers Spaghetti w/meat sauce Quiche Lorraine Pizza loaded w/meat
Cornbread Veggies Garlic Bread Muffins & Veggies Veggies
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Ice Cream
25 26 27 28 29
Chicken Clam Chowder Swedish Meatballs Pork Fried Rice Cheeseburgers
Veggies Cottage Cheese & Rolls Rotini & Veggies Egg Rolls Oven Fries & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Salad & Ice Cream

Menu subject to change due to availability   ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of foods are prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.


 

Sherman County eNews #257

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Back to School Night, Aug. 31

  2. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, Sept. 6

  3. Cascade Singers Community Choir to Begin Fall Season, Sept. 11

  4. Unreasonable Expectations

  5. Reject any ‘cold calls’ (imposters) claiming to be from Oregon SHIBA

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“When you ask outsiders what is relevant to them, you don’t just learn what matters to them. You learn what matters to you, what protocols you are able or willing to shift and which you are not.” ~Nina Simon in The Art of Relevance


1. Sherman County Back to School Night, Aug. 31

Sherman County School
• 6:30 p.m. PK-12 Greeting in the EVENT CENTER

  • 6:45 – 8:00 p.m. Dinner in the cafeteria, meet teachers & staff, visit classrooms, try your locker, get bus information, bring your supplies, return registration packets, meet the Boosters and PTO, shop for spirit gear, and much more!

Thursday, AUGUST 31, 2017
6:30 P.M.

We look forward to seeing everyone!

Questions?? Call the school at 541-565-3500


2. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, Sept. 6

The Sherman County Court will be in session on Wednesday, September 6, 2017, at  9:00 a.m. in the Circuit Courtroom at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039.  Agenda, including updates, will be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.

SCoCourtAgenda.9.6.17


3. Cascade Singers Community Choir to Begin Fall Season, Sept. 11

music.notes (2)Cascade Singers community choir begins its fall season Monday, Sept. 11. Work will begin on a major classical work, Mozart’s “Missa Brevis in F,” and other choral selections for a holiday concert in December.  The Singers meet under the direction of Lloyd Walworth Mondays from 7 to 9 p.m. at Zion Lutheran Church, 10th and Union Streets, in The Dalles.  One-hour work sessions also take place Thursdays at 7 p.m.  Rehearsals are open to all interested singers who will then audition with the director.  The choir often appears at community events, with formal concerts at Christmas, St. Patrick’s Day, and late spring.


4. Unreasonable Expectations

Today let’s talk about self-blame. Unreasonable expectations and self-blame can really make our lives miserable. For example, how often do you hear yourself say something such as, “I left the car lights on – how could I be so stupid?” Or, “I really put my foot in it at the staff meeting – I guess I will never learn.”

Do these sound familiar? Self-blaming statements like these are commonplace for far too many of us. Now, there is nothing the matter with the first part of these statements – they are just simple facts. However, it is the second part – that judgmental blast – that keeps us feeling miserable.

What if we get rid of the judgments and substitute something more positive? For instance: “I left the car lights on – what an inconvenience! Next time, I will be more careful.” Or, “I sure did put my foot in it this time! That is not like me at all. Next time, I will do it differently,” and then tell yourself how you will act the next time the same, or similar, situation arises.

Do you see the difference? While you are acknowledging that your behavior could use some improvement, you are also recognizing your basic competence and stating your intention to do better in the future.

Instead of judging yourself harshly, why not just allow yourself to make mistakes now and then without making a big deal about it. Then, give yourself a positive goal to shoot for. You will find that your self-esteem will really grow as a result. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Reject any ‘cold calls’ (imposters) claiming to be from Oregon SHIBA

(Salem) – Oregon’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance program (SHIBA) staff members and volunteers help consumers understand and enroll in Medicare, but they never make unsolicited phone calls. Anyone who did not contact SHIBA first should refuse to share any personal information and hang up on any unexpected caller claiming to be from SHIBA.

Rejecting this type of “cold call” is a smart habit to avoid scams, especially now, as Washington’s insurance commissioner has reported calls to consumers in that state from people falsely claiming to be from Washington’s SHIBA program.

Oregon SHIBA has received one report of a similar suspicious call being made here.

“We help people over the phone all the time,” said Lisa Emerson, Oregon SHIBA program manager, “but only when they call us, or when we’re returning their call.”

SHIBA has a statewide network of trained volunteers who educate and advocate for people of all ages who have or want to enroll in Medicare. These volunteers, plus five state employees, help consumers understand their rights and Medicare insurance choices. To ask a question or find a SHIBA counselor in your area, contact SHIBA at 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free).


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

Bird.Black.EnvelopeMore than 320,000 acres ablaze in Oregon

Prager U. Short Videos, Big Ideas

 

The 2016 Election and the Demise of Journalistic Standards

Trump’s Right about Confederate Statues and the Slippery Slope

Oregon’s wildfires have burned over 300,000 acres and cost of firefighting has surpassed $100 million

Energy in the Food System uses 19% of all energy consumed in the USA 

DEATH OF A COUNTRY: Germany will become Islamic State, says Merkel

Why is the Mainstream Media Committing Fraud?

Blog. A Single Window

Why Trump’s Upcoming Decision on Federal Lands Matters


 

Sherman County eNews #256

CONTENT

  1. Notice: Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Aug. 28

  2. Robotics Sign Ups Begin as School Starts, Training Sept 9

  3. Purpose = Energy

  4. U.S. Postal Service Total Solar Eclipse Thermochromic Ink Stamp

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


“It is a mistake to think that the past is dead. Nothing that has ever happened is quite without influence at this moment. The present is merely the past rolled up and concentrated in this second of time. You, too, are your past; often your face is your autobiography; you are what you are because of what you have been; because of your heredity stretching back into forgotten generations; because of every element of environment that has affected you, every man or woman that has met you, every book that you have read, every experience that you have had; all these are accumulated in your memory, your body, your character, your soul. So with a city, a country, and a race; it is its past, and cannot be understood without it.” ~Will Durant


1. Notice: Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, Aug. 28

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Special Board Meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Monday, August 28, 2017. This meeting will be held in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library. 

ShCoSchoolBd.Agenda.8.28.2017


2. Robotics Sign Ups Begin as School Starts, Training Sept 9

The new school year brings a new crop of students itching to get their hands on a robot! One of the easiest ways to help your student find their way to a robot is to get involved with FIRST robotics. FIRST is a national program with a sports-like model where students meet as teams over several months to prepare for a competition. There are FIRST programs in the Gorge for students ages 6 to 18.

Your first step? Contact your child’s school to ask if they have a team or check the list of past participating schools at gorgerobotics.org/get-involved. Most teams form soon after school starts to prepare for competitions in the winter. If your student’s school does not have a team, call Jessica Metta with the Gorge Tech Alliance (GTA) at 541-296-2266 to talk about resources to support forming a team. The GTA has free robots and laptops for loan and can point you towards training resources and mentors to support you in forming a team.

One upcoming training is Sept 9, 8:30 am to 4:30 pm at Hood River Extension for coaches of FIRST LEGO League (FLL) teams for students ages 9 to 14. Teams begin meeting now to prepare for one of the Gorge Qualifying Tournaments held the first two weekends in December, sponsored by Insitu and Google. The free workshop covers an intro to FLL, coaching and mentoring techniques, basic robot programming and mechanical design techniques. Pre-registration is required. Find registration links and more information about robotics in the Gorge at GorgeRobotics.org, a service of the GTA.

The GTA’s equipment for loan and support of robotics events is made possible by our regional tech businesses including Google, Insitu and others. The GTA is a non-profit industry association that seeks to support, connect and develop the technology community of the Gorge. Learn more at crgta.org.


3. Purpose = Energy

How is your energy level? Do you sometimes wish you had more get-up-and-go? Today let’s look at how high-energy people get that way. 

Why is it that some people seem to have a never-ending supply of energy? They get up feeling eager to get started and they radiate good spirits and high energy all day long. Have you ever stopped by the vitamin counter at the drug store, wondering what you could take to get that kind of energy? 

Consider this: Assuming you are in good health, your strength and energy will come from having meaningful and clear lifetime goals. In other words, a purpose in life. You see, high-energy people know what they want and have an unshakable belief that what they want is possible. They have a purpose that they have chosen freely, and they set goals and develop action plans to help them achieve that purpose. 

We mentioned earlier some studies that showed the elderly, with a specific goal or purpose, lived longer than those who did not. You have probably proven to yourself how energetic you have felt when you had even a short-term goal, perhaps a yard work chore liking pruning a hedge or putting in a rockery. Even if you hadn’t slept the night before, with the goal at hand, you found yourself with the energy to get the job done. (Now, you may have started losing energy as you were nearing the end of the job, but that’s another story!)

What is your purpose? When it comes to energy, it doesn’t matter so much what you want, as long as you want something. You’d be surprised how energized you can become once you know the answer to this question. When you have chosen your purpose, and you have a clear idea fixed firmly in your mind of what it is you want to be and do, you will be surprised at how your energy level will grow to help you find ways to get there. 

You will become very resourceful and creative, and you will discover that having a purpose is the best vitamin in the world! So, what is your purpose in life? ~The Pacific Institute


4. U.S. Postal Service Total Solar Eclipse Thermochromic Ink Stamp

eclipse2On June 20, the United States Postal Service issued its Total Solar Eclipse commemorative forever stamp (Scott 5211) to heighten anticipation of the eclipse that passed over the continental United States Aug. 21.

When the black disc covering the moon is warmed, as from the touch of a finger, the moon is revealed. When the stamp cools, the black color returns and the moon is hidden once more.

This clever trick, the first of its kind for a U.S. stamp, is the result of heat-reactive thermochromic ink. [continue at http://www.linns.com/news/us-stamps-postal-history/2017/august/total-solar-eclipse-stamps-thermochromic-ink-test.html%5D


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

bird.owl.limb TEDEd Lessons Worth Sharing

 

Obey Traffic Signs, Ignore Grammar

 

True causes of the Uncivil War: Understanding the Morrill Tariff

Brilliant Maps. 1853 Japanese Map Of The World


 

Sherman County eNews #255

CONTENT

  1. Memorial Service: Thelma Geraldine Sather 1918-2017, Aug. 26

  2. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Aug. 28

  3. Sherman County Back to School Night, Aug. 31

  4. Change Stopped at the Top

  5. Study Seeks Survey Response on Cemetery Use and Value

  6. The Chetco Bar Fire Update, 102,333 Acres, No Containment

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Memorial Service: Thelma Geraldine Sather 1918-2017

flower.rose.star
Thelma Geraldine Sather

 Born in Condon, Oregon, May 14, 1918

Died August 22, 2017 in The Dalles, Oregon, at the age of 99.

Memorial Service for Thelma Sather
Saturday, August 26th at 11:00 a.m.
Spencer, Libby, and Powell
1100 Kelly Ave. The Dalles, Oregon

Luncheon 1:30 p.m.

Sherman County Senior & Community Center
Moro, Oregon


2. Sherman County Photography Club Meeting, Aug. 28

Who: Open to anyone interested in photography, all skill levels welcome.

What: Sherman County Photography Club meeting

When: Monday, August 28th 6:00 pm

Where: Steve Burnet Extension & Research Building
66365 Lonerock Road, Moro


3. Sherman County Back to School Night, Aug. 31

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSherman County School
• 6:30 p.m. PK-12 Greeting in the EVENT CENTER

• 6:45 – 8:00 p.m. Dinner in the cafeteria, meet teachers & staff, visit classrooms, try your locker, get bus information, bring your supplies, return registration packets, meet the Boosters and PTO, shop for spirit gear, and much more!

Thursday, AUGUST 31, 2017
6:30 P.M.

We look forward to seeing everyone!

Questions?? Call the school at 541-565-3500


4. Change Stopped at the Top

Managers who want quality from their workforce need to hold themselves to the same high standards of quality. To borrow an old saying, “What’s good for the goose, is good for the gander” – or it should be.

You see, in the quest for total quality and continuous improvement, many managers forget about the role that they themselves play in bringing these things about. They don’t see the baggage they bring to work every day, but expect their employees to be totally focused on their jobs. Or they announce a new corporate ethic, but continue to behave as they always have because they don’t really think the new standard applies to them – or worse yet, they think their behavior already is in line with the corporate ethic.

There is no doubt about it. The companies showing the others how it’s done are characterized by management that is more receptive to change and more receptive to new ideas. The companies that will lead us into the future are the ones led by men and women who can do what is currently considered unusual, and do it comfortably.

They are risk-takers in their personal as well as professional lives and they see themselves – intellectually, emotionally, spiritually, economically – as experiments in continuous improvement. In other words, they are always “Under Construction” and they walk the talk.

In organizations, change typically starts at the top, but it can also be stopped there unless management makes a sincere effort to take its own standards of excellence to heart. What can you do as a manager, as an executive, as an employee, or as an owner to encourage continuous improvement? ~The Pacific Institute


5. Study Seeks Survey Response on Cemetery Use and Value

arrow-rightThe Public History of Cemeteries Survey

<https://goo.gl/forms/4fvWK7HQRuo4IBl62>

As part of a grant project funded by the Oregon Commission on Historic Cemeteries, I am sending out a survey to incorporate into the website I am developing as the main part of the project. In the words of museum maven, Nina Simon from her book The Art of Relevance: “When you ask outsiders what is relevant to them, you don’t just learn what matters to them. You learn what matters to you, what protocols you are able or willing to shift and which you are not.”

The information gained from this survey will be invaluable to my goal of identifying what kind of interpretation people want to see at cemeteries. I appreciate your thought and effort on this survey and look forward to sharing the results with you! – Kirsten Straus


6. The Chetco Bar Fire Update, 102,333 Acres, No Containment

fire2The Chetco Bar Fire is 102, 333 acres, there is no containment at this time, 1,398 personnel are working to control the fire. The fire is approximately five miles northeast of Brookings, OR.

Yesterday, clear skies allowed aviation resources to drop retardant and water along containment lines on the western and southwestern portions of the fire. Throughout the night handcrews and dozers worked to build direct and indirect containment lines and patrol fire activity near homes.

The National Weather Service has issued a Fire Weather Watch for the Chetco Bar Fire area. Strong, gusty winds (10-15mph with gusts up to 25mph) and low relative humidity are expected this 7 p.m. tonight through Saturday morning 11 a.m. As a result of the persistent winds and low relative humidity, fuels will be drier and prone to ignition from flying embers.

In preparation for the unfavorable weather conditions, known as the “Chetco Effect”, fire managers plan to take advantage of every opportunity to use aviation resources. On the ground, handcrews and dozers will continue building containment lines and providing structural protection throughout the fire area. Preparation efforts are focused in the western and southwestern portion of the fire.

Level 1, 2, and 3 Evacuation Levels are in effect for the Chetco Bar Fire. A map of the evacuation area can be viewed at http://tinyurl.com/yaqhaaqc. Residents can sign up for an emergency alert system at http://tinyurl.com/CurryReverse911. The Red Cross is operating a shelter at Riley Creek Elementary, 94350 6th St. in Gold Beach, OR. Local residents are encouraged to review the evacuation levels of the Ready, Set, Go Program (wildlandfires.org).

Smoke impacts and haze are expected today along the coast in Gold Beach and Brookings-Harbor. Highway 101 will continue to have limited visibility due to fog and smoke. More information: https://wildlandfiresmoke.net/outlooks/2017/ChetcoBar#Overview

Reminder: Hunters and recreationists are reminded to avoid closed areas over the weekend. With your help, we can help our firefighters remained focused on suppression efforts.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbSpace station transits sun during eclipse

How the viral ‘climber eclipse’ photos were shot

Report: Secretary of Interior recommends shrinking Oregon monument

Climate-Change Summary & Update

 

Pew Research: U.S. Active Military Presence Overseas

 

Prager U: Man on the Street: Income Inequality

No more hotels? New housing coming for ‘unplaced’ Oregon foster youth

Trey Gowdy Fights Back Tears As He Shocks IRS Official With The Truth 2016


 

Sherman County eNews #254

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

REMINDERS: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

CONGRATULATIONS, MADISON BELSHE! Madison, daughter of Martin and Molly Belshe, and granddaughter of Jim and Jerrine Belshe, graduated from Oregon State University in June with a degree in Agri-business.

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

4-H RAFFLE BASKETS! Get your tickets at the Sherman County Fair 4-H Pavilion for the drawing tomorrow! Support 4-H camp kids and counselors!  

NON-PROFIT OPPORTUNITY.  Sherman County Emergency Services has cans and bottles to donate to a non-profit.  If interested, please contact Shawn at 541-565-3100.

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

EMPLOYMENT:

FAMILY CARE COORDINATOR. Mid-Columbia Center for Living is seeking a Family Care Coordinator (QMHA) to work within Sherman County schools providing therapeutic services to students. Work examples include providing case management services, facilitating student individual and group skill building, and collaborating with MCCFL Sherman County Counselor for children needing outpatient or crisis treatment. This part-time (.6 FTE) position requires a Bachelor’s degree in a human services discipline and two (02) years’ experience in human services; OR a high school diploma and five (05) years of equivalent training and work experience. Experience working with families and children with severe emotional disturbances is preferred, as is being bilingual Spanish/English. Salary: $2,285 – $2,778 per month + benefits (some pro-rated). To view the full job announcement that includes the full range of duties and requirements, and to apply, visit the employment page at our website www.mccfl.org. A completed MCCFL employment application is required. MCCFL is an Equal Opportunity/ADA Employer.  9/8

ASSISTANT CHILD CARE PROVIDER. Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com . Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com . 9/8

COUNTY COURT ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of County Court Administrative Assistant. This is a permanent, part-time position, 32hr/wk. or 0.80 FTE, Monday-Thursday, salary range $20-$27/hr. dependent on experience. Applicant must be knowledgeable in the operation of modern office equipment including computer systems and programs, possess effective written and oral communication skills, and make decisions independently using effective time management. For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or go online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us.  Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, P.O. Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00 p.m. on Monday, September 4, 2017.  Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

PREVENTION COORDINATOR. Sherman County is accepting employment applications for the position of Prevention Coordinator. This is a part time position, 20-24 hr./week or .50/.60FTE, Monday-Friday; there is an option for flexible scheduling within the FTE, and potential for expansion. Partial benefits available. Applicant must value collaboration and be skilled in data collection, program implementation, and grant management. This position works closely with youth, the community, and other agencies to identify and implement strategies to prevent drug and alcohol abuse in Sherman County. This is an exciting opportunity to effect local change.  For job description and/or application, contact the office of the Sherman County Court at 541-565-3416 or online at http://www.co.sherman.or.us. Submit completed application and resume to the Sherman County Court, PO Box 365, Moro, OR 97039. Applications will be accepted until 5:00pm on Friday, September 1st. Successful applicant must pass a criminal history background check. Sherman County is an equal opportunity employer. 9/1

FOR SALE:

FIELDS OF WHEAT SWEATER KIT  https://www.imperialyarn.com/shop/kits/fields-wheat-sweater-kit

GIFTS & GOOD READS: THE MUSEUM STORE. The Sherman County Museum Store has some great items for gifts. Our new horse “Rusty” and “Farmer Cow” join old favorites “Dolly” and “Gallop” $19.99. Cool new stemless wine glasses with the Museum logo $8.95. Logo mugs $8.95. Goat Milk Soap in some new scents from Windrift Hill $3.95. Goat Milk Lotion & Body Butter $6.50 & $7.50. Good selection of books by Rick Steber, Jane Kirkpatrick and Craig Lesley $12.00-$18.00. Beautiful flour sack towels that make a nice gift, $8.95-$16.95. Cute burlap tote bag with a Sherman County Design $12.00. Sherman County Historical Museum and Store, 200 Dewey Street, Moro, Oregon. Open May 1st-October 31st, 7 days a week, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.    9/15

STUDDED TIRES ON RIMS. Studded tires, 245/75R-16 on GM Rims from Tahoe (5 Spoke Factory Alloy Wheels). 6 lug pattern (6 X 13927 MM). Lightly used asking $700 for wheels and tires. Can be seen in Grass Valley by contacting Jeanne @ 541-714-5740 (call or Text). 9/8 

WEATHERED OAK WINE BARREL ADIRONDACK CHAIRS. Weathered Oak Wine Barrel Adirondack Chairs – stationary $350, rocker $375 or the set for $650. Local Craftsman. Call for photos… 541-788-9497.  9/8

PROPERTY NEAR MORO. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000. RMLS# 17410095 – Tiffany Hillman tiffany@drysideproperty.com  11/10

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

APARTMENT FOR RENT. For Rent in Moro, OR is a beautiful 1 bedroom (possibly 2), 1.5 bath apartment. There is a second bonus room that could be used as a bedroom or office. Features an open floor plan, loft bedroom, stainless steel appliances, knotty alder cabinets, and custom woodwork throughout. The apartment is nestled in a barn which includes 3 stalls and a tac room. Plenty of fenced pasture for your horse(s) and a small yard for you to enjoy our beautiful sunsets. $850/month includes water and garbage. Applications and reference checks will be required. Call 509-250-0904 for more information or to make an appointment to view. 9/8

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training] 

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

SCHOOL CLOTHES SCRAMBLE COORDINATOR. Sherman County School Clothes Scramble, an annual August event, will continue with the next volunteer. Following her 7th annual Scramble, Terri Earl has a file of information she will be glad to pass along. Please text or call Terri at 541-980-2959 for information. 8/25 

WANTED:

ART WORK FOR SHERMAN COUNTY COURTHOUSE ADDITION. The Sherman County Project Team is actively seeking Sherman County-themed art work for display in the courthouse addition currently under construction. The team is interested in any two-dimensional media (drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, etc) for display inside the addition. Deadline for submittal is August 31. For the initial screening, please provide an 8″ by 10″ color photograph or digital image of the proposed article. Include the dimensions of the actual article, if the size is fixed, along with a description of how the article relates to Sherman County and any relationship between the contributor and Sherman County. If the project team is interested in directly inspecting the article, arrangements will be made with the contributor to do so. We know there are several talented local artists and photographers out there and encourage each one to contribute. There is no restriction upon the number of articles that can be submitted for consideration. Sherman County will offer a stipend, the amount of which is to be determined, for each piece of art work acquired. Submittals can be made by mail to PO Box 282, Moro, OR 97039 or by email to debbieh@co.sherman.or.us Questions may be directed to the same email address. 8/25

FREE:

NEWSPAPER OBITUARIES from Sherman County newspapers, posted for family historians, were transcribed from microfilm by Chris Sanders. http://shermancountyoregon.com/obituaries/


2. Calendar (new or corrected) 

AUGUST

22-27 Sherman County Fair

25 Frontier TeleNet & Frontier Digital Network Board Meetings 9 Wasco Annex

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H Home Economics Contests 8

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Swine Showmanship 10

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Goat Showmanship 11

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Sheep Showmanship 1

25 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Beef Showmanship 2

25 Sherman County Fair Cattle Sorting Contests 7 Arena

26 Memorial Service: Thelma Geraldine Sather 11 The Dalles

26 Sherman County Fair Wellness Walk 8 Downtown Moro

26 Sherman County Fair Exhibit Parade 9:15 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair Queen’s Reception 10 Fairgrounds

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H Grand Champion All-Around Showmanship 12

26 Sherman County Fair 4-H & FFA Livestock Sale 4-5

26 Sherman County Fair FFA Annual BBQ 5:30

26 Sherman County Fair Special Introductions 7:15 Arena

26 Sherman County Fair Bull Riding Contests 7:30-9

26 Sherman County Fair Dance with Countryfied in the Arena 9:30-1

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90

27 Sherman County Fair Cowboy Church with Susie McEntire 10:30

27 Sherman County Fair Demolition Derby 2 Arena

28 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Burnet Bldg.

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles

31 Sherman County Back to School Day 6:30 Sherman County School

31-Sept. 3 Gilliam County Fair, Condon

SEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

2 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell

4 LABOR DAY

5 School resumes in Sherman County

6 Sherman County Court 9

6 Gilliam County Court 10

6 Wheeler County Court 10

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Program 1 Discovery Center

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

11 Free Services, Cascadia Mobile Legal Clinic 11-2 Senior Center, Moro

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30 Moro

12 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

12 Mid-Columbia Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

13 Sherman Senior Center Advisory Committee 12:30 Senior Center, Moro

20 Sherman County Court 9

21 Mid-Columbia Economic Development District 4-5 Klickitat County

22 Autumn Begins

22 Sherman County School District Hall of Honor Reception & Awards

25 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

26 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board Meeting

29 Association of Oregon Counties District 3 Meeting 10-2 TBD

OCTOBER

4 Sherman County Court 9

4 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Wasco Church of Christ

7 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

9 COLUMBUS DAY

10 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30

10 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30

10 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

10 Mid-Columbia Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

11 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

14 Oregon Historic Cemeteries Commission Workshop, Sherman County

18 Sherman County Court 9

19-20 Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Hood River

23 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority Board Meeting 11 The Dalles

31 HALLOWEEN


 

Sherman County eNews #253

CONTENT

  1. Volunteer Opportunities This Week at the Sherman County Fair

  2. ABC Huskies Child Care Seeks Assistant Child Care Provider

  3. Martin Joseph Zimmerman 1931-2017

  4. Central Oregon Fire Management Evening Update, August 22

  5. Unreasonable Expectations

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


Civilization is not inherited; it has to be learned and earned by each generation anew; if the transmission should be interrupted for one century, civilization would die, and we should be savages again. –Will and Ariel Durant


1. Volunteer Opportunities This Week at the Sherman County Fair

Volunteer SmileThe Sherman County Fair board is seeking volunteers.  There are still a few shifts open in the Open Class Building.  Can be one person or two or even three… where you will see old friends and family members!  Shifts are normally 1 hour to 1.5 hours.   Volunteers just need to be in the building to watch over the exhibits. This building does stay nice and cool on hot days!  Openings are on Friday, Saturday and 1 shift Sunday morning.  For more info please call the fair office after 9:00 a.m.  541-565-3510

If you want to volunteer for anything at the Sherman County Fair, please call the fair office. Helpers are always welcome. The Fair Board appreciates everyone for their participation and support!!


2. ABC Huskies Child Care Seeks Assistant Child Care Provider

balloons.boyAssistant Child Care Provider: Part-time position available at ABC Huskies Child Care in Wasco. Experience preferred but will train. Must be a team player, child oriented and able to work flexible hours. For application and further details: 541-442-5024, email abchuskies@yahoo.com . Employment Application is available on our website at www.abchuskiesdaycare.com .


3. Martin Joseph Zimmerman 1931-2017

flower.rose.starMartin Joseph Zimmerman died August 16th, 2017, at Tokarski House in West Salem of complications from Parkinson’s Disease. He was 85.

Martin was born in McMinnville, Oregon, on October 26th, 1931, to Edward and Cecil Zimmerman, the youngest of six children. He graduated from Yamhill High School and then earned a BS in Crop Science at Oregon State College. After graduating from college, Martin served in the US Army as a training specialist. Two years into his service, Martin married… his college sweetheart, Dorothy Brabham, on June 11th, 1955, the beginning of a long and happy marriage. Martin entered the Army Reserves and the young couple returned to the Zimmerman family farm in Yamhill for several years where the first of their children, Philip, and then Kathryn, were born.

In 1960 Martin joined the OSU Agricultural Extension Service becoming a county agent. His first assignment was Sherman County and he and his young family moved to Moro. Their second son, Stuart, was born two years later. The family moved briefly to Corvallis while Martin completed his Masters in Agricultural Science at OSU which he received in 1967.

The family relocated to Condon in 1971 when Martin transferred to Gilliam County. In 1979 Martin accepted a position in Jefferson County and he and Dorothy settled in Madras as empty-nesters. These were good years for the couple. Martin retired from the OSU Extension Service in July of 1989 as Full Professor and he continued to work as an independent consultant in crop production and seed certification well into his ‘70s. In 2011 Martin and Dorothy moved to Dallas, Oregon, to be closer to their children. Dorothy died August, 2014.

Martin’s expertise in crop production gave him opportunities for adventure and in 1993 he was part of a government agricultural team sent to Armenia to survey farms and identify remedies for wheat production problems. The next year he traveled to Moldova to work with producers of essential oils. Several years later Martin went to Georgia (the former Soviet Republic) on a church-sponsored mission to improve conditions in orphanages. Back home from his various travels, Martin gave presentations on his experiences that were interesting and informative.

Martin was a very community-minded man with a strong service ethic and he was active in his local churches and civic organizations including the Lions Club, Kiwanis, 4-H, and FFA. Children were frequently the focus of his charitable work and he lead the Madras Kiwanis’ annual toy drive for many years. Martin received many distinguished service awards in recognition of his years of service in various organizations.

Throughout his life, Martin maintained a positive outlook, even as his Parkinson’s progressed and following the death of his beloved wife. He is survived by his three children, two grandchildren, and his oldest brother.  There will be a graveside service at the Yamhill-Carlton Pioneer Cemetery on Monday, August 28th at 11am. Macy & Sons in McMinnville are handling arrangements.


4. Central Oregon Fire Management Evening Update, August 22

fire2Redmond, OR – Crews have responded to two escaped human-caused fires in the past 24 hours, both of which were contained at less than a quarter acre. The weather forecast for tomorrow afternoon includes a red flag warning for the southern half of the Deschutes National Forest and the Ochoco National Forest, which includes abundant lightning and gusty winds in excess of 20 mph. Gusty winds are forecast to continue through Thursday. Crews will be available to respond to any new fires that occur.

Air quality conditions are going to continue to be poor for most of central Oregon through Wednesday. This smoke is from fires burning across Oregon and from as far away as northern California. For information from air quality monitoring stations, visit http://www.deq.state.or.us/aqi/

Milli Fire – Smoke caused significant visibility issues today with fire suppression efforts. Aircraft were grounded as a result of the smoky conditions. Heavy smoke moderates fire behavior, so minimum spread is expected. Direct suppression occurred on the northeast and southeast side of the fire near FS 16 where firefighters widened dozer and hand lines. Crews on the northwest side of the fire near OR 242 continued fuel reduction work and may conduct a burnout this evening if conditions allow.

Evacuations:
Level 3 – The subdivisions of Crossroads, Edgington/Remunda, Wildwing, Peterson Burn Road Area, and along both sides of Three Creeks Lake Road (Forest Road 16) about one mile south of Sisters from the junction of the Brooks Scanlon logging road.
Level 1- The subdivision of Tollgate, all areas between OR 242 and HWY 20 and west of Cold Springs Cutoff (FS1018), which includes Black Butte Ranch.

Every effort is being made to return residents to their homes but this cannot be done until the safety of the public can be assured. For more information on the Milli Fire, call the information line at 541-719-8135 or visit inciweb at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/5517

North Pole Fire – Located NE of Shaniko, has crossed a containment line and five engines have responded.

Belknap Fire – Located in the Ochoco National Forest, is 100% contained at 125 acres. There is still a temporary closure in the Mill Creek Wilderness of certain trails, including the Twin Pillars Trail #832; Wildcat Trail #833; and Belknap Trail #833A.

Whychus Fire – Located about eight miles northeast of Sisters, is 100% contained and 2030 acres.

For more information, follow us at http://centralorfireinfo.blogspot.com/ or on Twitter at @CentralORFire. For the Central Oregon Fire Information hotline, please call 541-316-7711.


5. Unreasonable Expectations

Today let’s talk about self-blame. Unreasonable expectations and self-blame can really make our lives miserable. For example, how often do you hear yourself say something such as, “I left the car lights on – how could I be so stupid?” Or, “I really put my foot in it at the staff meeting – I guess I will never learn.”

Do these sound familiar? Self-blaming statements like these are commonplace for far too many of us. Now, there is nothing the matter with the first part of these statements – they are just simple facts. However, it is the second part – that judgmental blast – that keeps us feeling miserable.

What if we get rid of the judgments and substitute something more positive? For instance: “I left the car lights on – what an inconvenience! Next time, I will be more careful.” Or, “I sure did put my foot in it this time! That is not like me at all. Next time, I will do it differently,” and then tell yourself how you will act the next time the same, or similar, situation arises.

Do you see the difference? While you are acknowledging that your behavior could use some improvement, you are also recognizing your basic competence and stating your intention to do better in the future.

Instead of judging yourself harshly, why not just allow yourself to make mistakes now and then without making a big deal about it. Then, give yourself a positive goal to shoot for. You will find that your self-esteem will really grow as a result. ~The Pacific Institute


6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl.limbOregon Air Quality Today

 

How do wheat growers use glyphosate? Part One

Aging Parents with lots of stuff… and the children who dread inheriting it

Americans Should Disagree Without Being Disagreeable

Researchers focus on diversity, flexibility for dryland wheat farmers

How to Clean Grease From Kitchen Cabinet Doors

Plant more prairies to save topsoil and prevent pollution runoff 

Energy Skeptic

Media Research Center News Busters