Sherman County eNews #210

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County Goatees 4-H Club Meeting Notes

  2. CASA Volunteer Training Begins July 25

  3. Rep. Greg Walden: Children in Foster Care

  4. Burnt River School Integrated Agriculture/Science Research Ranch 

  5. Opportunity to be Grateful

  6. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, July 19

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County Goatees 4-H Club Meeting Notes

4-H clover1The Goatees 4-H club met at July 7 at 6pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were:  Wyatt, Bailee, Will, Charlotte, Izzy, Rilea, Elijah, Mercedez, Clay, Joey, Patrick, Austen.  Excused absences were: Cade, Logan, Jordan, Kaelex.  Pledge of Allegience led by Wyatt, 4-H Pledge by Patrick.  We talked about how our goats are and we have a prize game.  Then we talked about our next meetings and different basket ideas.  Next meeting is July 29 at 10am at the fairgrounds.  We will learn how to shave and fit our goats and work on showing them.  Submitted by Wyatt Owens, News Reporter


2. CASA Volunteer Training Begins July 25

Columbia Gorge CASA and Frontier CASA are partnering to offer CASA Volunteer Training beginning July 25th. This course will consist of interactive on-line sessions and three in-person training sessions located in Fossil, Oregon. If you are interested in becoming a CASA volunteer and live in Sherman, Gilliam or Wheeler Counties please contact Susan Erickson, Executive Director of Columbia Gorge CASA at (541) 386-3468 or Candy Humphreys, Executive Director of Frontier CASA at (541) 256-6040. Kids in foster care need your voice!


3. Rep. Greg Walden: Children in Foster Care

American flag2Every child deserves a loving home. In 2015, more than 670,000 American children spent time in foster care, according to a study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Children placed with relatives tend to spend less time in foster care, experience higher stability of placement, and benefit even after exiting state custody through improvements in safety.

I am proud to support several bills that passed through the House which improve the foster care system and the lives of children across the country. These included H.R. 2866, the Reducing Barriers for Relative Foster Parents Act, which reviews and improves licensing standards for placement in a relative foster family home, while ensuring safeguards for the children. There are countless family members of foster children who are willing and eager to accept these children into their home. We should be making that process easier for family members — not tying them up in bureaucratic red tape that extends the amount of time children spend in foster care outside of the extended family.

H.R. 2847, the Improving Services for Older Youth in Foster Care Act, improves support for the transition to adulthood by allowing states the option to continue assisting older, former, foster youth up to age 23, including providing education and training vouchers. This helps to ensure that we are not abandoning children who grow out of the foster care system.

Lastly, the House also passed H.R. 2742, the Modernizing the Interstate Placement of Children in Foster Care Act, which requires states to adopt an electronic system to help expedite the placement of children in foster care or guardianship, or for adoption, across state lines. Most states currently use paper systems for the interstate foster care placement process, requiring caseworkers to print and mail hundreds of pages of paperwork to place a foster child in a home across state lines. This outdated process can take an average of more than five months to complete. This unnecessary delay prevents children from being placed with relatives or an adoptive family and prevents us from helping children in the foster care system to find a better life in a stable home. 

I was glad to give my support to these bills as a step in the right direction towards reforming our nation’s foster care system to better protect and serve children across the country. It is an honor to represent you in the U.S. Congress.

Greg Walden
U.S. Representative
Oregon’s Second District


4. Burnt River School Integrated Agriculture/Science Research Ranch 

Burnt River School District | Unity, Oregon   https://www.briarr.com/

Burnt River School District’s BRIARR program provides small class sizes that offer unique student advancement opportunities. They include:

  • Participation in agriculture and science studies under the direction of a variety of college and university level staff and professionals. 
  • A high school diploma supplemented with enrollment in college courses and the ability to earn an associate’s degree. 
  • A pathway to advanced placement in upper-level college enrollment at multiple state universities. Supervised agricultural experiences through FFA. 
  • Water quality monitoring with the Powder Basin Watershed Council. 
  • Hands-on courses in animal production science, sustainable rangeland science, and forest restoration studies. 
  • A culturally diverse and international student body.

5. Opportunity to be Grateful

You have probably heard something similar to, “Live each day to the fullest, because you never know what tomorrow may bring.” Or perhaps it’s as simple as “carpe diem.” Like all sage offerings, there is an element of truth involved here.

For a lot of us, we take the days of our lives for granted. The years go swirling past in a rush of things to do, places to see, and dreams to fulfill. We work diligently, raise our families, and try to measure up to our own – or someone else’s – definition of success. For some of us, we put our heads down, shoulder to the wheel (so to speak) and forget to look up.

Not “looking up” is unfortunate. We need to take the time to savor the experiences of each day, good or not so good, because these experiences inform who and what we are. If we don’t look up, we miss the simple joy of a quiet summer evening. We miss that look of wonder on a child’s face, the first time they discover rainbows in a puddle. Our hearts forget the thrill of watching a rocket launch into outer space.

In short, we miss the opportunity to be grateful. One reader asks, “Why do people take the experiences of their lives for granted? What other than near-death experience will help each of us to live every day with gratitude? What is striking to me is that the drivers for appreciating life and having gratitude are missing from many people’s lives. How is this happening? We should not have to experience ‘misery’ to boost our insights into the value of life.”

Do yourself a favor for the next week. Begin a new habit. Before the end of each day, stop and soak in the experiences of the day. Let the smile come to your face as you remember the happy and the funny. Plan out what you will do “the next time” for those moments that didn’t come out so well. And be grateful for the time you have had to make a difference in the lives of others.

Opportunity awaits! Celebrate today, and face tomorrow with the expectation that something great is going to happen! ~The Pacific Institute


6. Public Meeting Notice: Sherman County Court, July 19

The Sherman County Court session scheduled for Wednesday, July 19, 2017, at 9:00 a.m. will take place in the Circuit Courtroom at the Sherman County Courthouse, 500 Court Street, Moro, Oregon, 97039. Agenda will also be posted on the Sherman County Website at www.co.sherman.or.us.

SCCourt1.7.19.2017

SCCourt2.7,19,2017


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Wheeler County Eclipse Info

Weinstein PR – Communications, Branding, Marketing

Kinetic Branding – Logo, Web, Print

Report: Walmart Workers Cost Taxpayers $6.2 Billion In Public Assistance

Full List: The World’s 50 Most Valuable Sports Teams 2017

Burnt River School District Integrated Agriculture/Science Research Ranch

 

Eastern Oregon neighbors worry about human waste from eclipse campers, file lawsuit

10 Ways You’re Making Your Life Harder Than It Has To Be

Department of Veterans Affairs Reforms

Oregon Capital Chatter: Who was the session’s most powerful figure?


 

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Sherman County eNews #209

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

caricatureskREMINDERS: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

thankyou.guyTHANK YOU, TED & BETTY! The Sherman County Fair Board extends a sincere and hearty expression of appreciation to Ted & Betty Sabey for their many years of volunteer service and dedication to the Sherman County Fair and the Oregon Fairs Association. Ted first became a Sherman County fair board member in 1980 and Betty volunteered as the Kitchen Division superintendent in the Open Class building, and a few years later she became the open class building superintendent.  Ted and Betty were honored as Grand Marshals in 2005.  Their over 30 years of service have not only been at the county level but also at the state level.  Ted served on many committees (Betty always at his side) of the Oregon Fairs Association (OFA) and on the Oregon Fairs Foundation Board. In 2001 – 2002 Ted served as state president of the OFA, and was honored in 2003 with a Distinguished Service award.

Ted & Betty traveled thousands of miles across Oregon to attend every county fair and fairs in other states as well, making many lifelong friends.  You can ask anyone in the fair industry, new members or a veteran, if they know who Ted is and they will all say, “O yes!” and jump right into a great story about Ted. The Fair Board members thank and acknowledge Ted & Betty for their commitment and hard work in serving Sherman County and wish them the best in retirement road trips. ~ Board Chair Bryce Coelsch, Vice-Chair Shandie Johnson, members Bert Perisho, Rick Jauken Jr., Jennifer Zimmerlee, Tom Rolfe and Amanda Whitman, and Secretary Beth McCurdy.

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

EMPLOYMENT:

WEED CONTROL TECHNICIAN. Lower Deschutes Cooperative Weed Management Area. Hiring (2) Full-time seasonal Weed Technicians. Technicians will hike and survey the canyons of the Lower Deschutes River in search of targeted noxious weeds. Please contact Dan Son or Rod Asher for more information. 503-858-4191 or 541-980-4345
dson@shermancounty.net, rasher@shermancounty.net   7/28

FOR SALE:

HONDA ACCORD. 2003 Honda Accord Coupe. 200k miles. Runs great. Regular maintenance. 2 brand new tires and aligned in April. $3500 or best reasonable offer. Brett 541 993 4551. 7/21

ACREAGE. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000 RMLS# 17410095 tiffany@drysideproperty.com 7/14

HOUSE IN WASCO. 4 bedroom, 2 bath house with extended lot for RV or garden, 2 car garage, workshop in basement. 2 bedrooms on main floor, 2 large bedrooms on upper floor. Many recent inside improvements. $115,000 by owners. Shown by appointment. 541-467-2345 7/14

CONTINUING USED BOOK SALE at Wasco Annex (old grade school) in Wasco, Oregon. Used books only $5.00 per bag; books on tape, music cassettes and  VHS movies for 25 cents.  Stock up and give for gifts. All funds used for the purchase of new items for the library. ~ Danee Rankin, Librarian, Wasco City Community Library. 7/14

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

DISCOUNTED PHOTO SESSIONS. It’s not too early to get senior photos taken care of! Do you want your senior pictures in or around the wheat fields or to include them as a part of your photo session? If so act now before harvest starts! I’m offering $25.00 off a photo session (senior, family, couple, etc.) between now and the start of harvest. Contact me soon to get a discounted rate and get a photo session completed before harvest starts. ~ Jeremy Lanthorn  JeremyLanthorn.com  Jlanthorn@gmail.com (541) 993-2446   (541) 333-2013  7/28

OREGON HERITAGE BULLETINS provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list below is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/Pages/Bulletins.aspx  7/21

CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Would you like some help with meal preparation, light housekeeping, transportation, etc.? I am a caring and honest woman with excellent references.  ~Synoma Olsen 541 993-6924  7/28

CANES & WALKERS. Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  The church will accept donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446 for more info. 7/28 

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

WANTED:

YOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org. 7/21

HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS.  Non-Profit Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. — ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. — The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. — To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! — ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 7/28

FREE: 

SHERMAN COUNTY HISTORY http://shermancountyoregon.com

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT OR LEASE:


2. Calendar (new or corrected)

flower.geraniumJULY

15 Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill Museum

19 Sherman County Court 9

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

21 Frontier Digital Network & Frontier TeleNet Meetings 9 NCESD Building, Condon

22 The Woolery Open Golf Tournament, China Creek 541-993-0211 Arlington

24 Sherman County Photography Club 6 OSU Extension Office, Burnet Building

24-28 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Workshops 9-1 Sherman Extension Office

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

25-30 Wheeler County Fair in Fossil

26 Tri-County Courts’ Meeting 10 Wheeler County (Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler)

wheat.sheaf.combineAUGUST

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Rufus Baptist Church

3 Sherman County Fair Board Meeting 7

4 Summer Concert in Condon, Buffalo Kin 6:30-9:90

5 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

8 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

8 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

8 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

16 Sherman County Court 9

18-22 Outlaw Rodeo Bible Camp – Powell Butte, Oregon

19 Great American Eclipse Education & Entertainment in Fossil

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22-27 Sherman County Fair

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90

27 Demolition Derby, Sherman County Fair

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles 

sun.smileSEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

2 Painted Hills Festival in Mitchell

4 LABOR DAY

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

12 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District 8:30 Moro

12 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

12 Mid-Columbia Center for Living Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

12 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

22 Autumn Begins


 

Sherman County eNews #208

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County School District Regular Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 12

  2. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 23

  3. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 27

  4. News from Sherman County’s Oregon Youth Conservation Corps!

  5. Building on Self-Worth

  6. State Fire Marshal gives caution and tips on wildfire prevention

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County School District Regular Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 12

Logo.Sherman High School SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

REGULAR BOARD MEETING MINUTES

June 12, 2017

The Board of Directors of Sherman County School District met in the Sherman County School/Public Library Meeting Room in Moro, Oregon on June 12, 2017. The following were present: Chair, Bill Martin, Vice Chair, Kyle Blagg; Directors: Kristie Coelsch, Jim Macnab, Merrie von Borstel; Superintendent, Wes Owens; Principal, Bill Blevins; Business Manager, Kim McKinney; Board Secretary, Jeanie Pehlke; Staff Members: Gerald Casper, Kalie Rolfe, Samantha R-Smith, Cindie King, Ree Ella von Borstel, Tyler Dearborn; Students: Emma Robbins, Calvin Avila, Michaela Lloyd, Darian Davis; Visitors: Johnathan Rolfe, Carol Howard, Kris LaComb, Carsten von Borstel, Jess Stutzman, Charmin Avila, John Avila, Sabrina Norris, Mike Smith, Julie McAllister and Piper Jones.

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS TAKEN

Motion by Director Blagg with second from Director Coelsch to approve the board meeting agenda as amended. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously. 

Motion by Director Coelsch with second from Director von Borstel to adopt the consent agenda as presented. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.

Motion by Director von Borstel with second from Director Coelsch that contingent on City Council approval of the process outlined below, the Board directs the Superintendent, with assistance of legal counsel, to proceed with the sale of the South Sherman School (212 NE North Street, Grass Valley, Oregon). The sale will be conducted using the following outlined process:

  1. The District will announce the sale on June 13, 2017, and require offers to be submitted by June 23, 2017.
  2. The property will be advertised for sale to the buyer with the highest cash offer. “As Is” no warranty.
  3. The minimum offer will be $350,000.
  4. If more than one offer is received, that offer amount will be disclosed and all potential buyers who submitted an offer will have a second opportunity to submit their “highest and best” offer. The District will enter into a Sale Agreement with the party with highest offer.
  5. The City will provide the executed Quit Claim Deed to escrow as soon as the Sale Agreement is executed.
  6. The sale will close, on, or before (earlier at buyer’s preference), 45 days after execution of the Sale Agreement.

The Superintendent is authorized to execute the necessary documents for conveying the South Sherman School. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.

Motion by Director Blagg with second from Director Coelsch to approve Sherman County School District Resolution Services 2016-2017 05-10. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously. 

Motion by Director Coelsch with second from Director Macnab to adopt the K-5 National Geographic science textbooks and the 6-12 McGraw Hill science textbooks. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously. 

Motion by Director Blagg with second from Director Macnab to adopt the budget for fiscal year 2017-18 in the total amount of $9,596,646. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.

Motion by Director Macnab with second from Director Coelsch for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2017, the amounts shown below are hereby appropriated for the purposes indicated within the funds listed: See Attached. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.

Motion by Director Coelsch with second from Director von Borstel to hereby impose the taxes provided for the 2017-18 adopted budget at the rate of $3.4203 per $1,000 of assessed value for operations and that these taxes are hereby imposed and categorized for the tax year 2017-18 upon the assessed value of all taxable property within the district. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.


2. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 23

Logo.Sherman High School SHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

SPECIAL BOARD MEETING MINUTES

June 23, 2017

The Board of Directors of Sherman County School District met in the Sherman County School/Public Library Meeting Room in Moro, Oregon on June 23, 2017. The following were present: Chair, Bill Martin, Vice Chair, Kyle Blagg; Directors: Kristie Coelsch, Jim Macnab, Merrie von Borstel; Superintendent, Wes Owens; Business Manager, Kim McKinney; Board Secretary, Jeanie Pehlke; Visitors: Scott Susi, Bonne Whitley, Piper Jones, Johnathan Rolfe, Roger Whitley and Mike Somnis. 

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS TAKEN

Motion by Director Blagg with second from Director Coelsch to approve the board meeting agenda as presented. Vote: 5 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, Martin, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously. 

Motion by Director Blagg with second from Director von Borstel to approve the preliminary hire of K-12 principal, Mike Somnis. Vote: 4 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Martin, von Borstel) 1 No (Macnab) Action: The motion carried.


3. Sherman County School District Special Board Meeting Minutes Summary, June 27

Logo.Sherman High SchoolSHERMAN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT

SPECIAL BOARD MEETING MINUTES

June 27, 2017

The Board of Directors of Sherman County School District met in the Sherman County School/Public Library Meeting Room in Moro, Oregon on June 27, 2017. The following were present: Vice Chair, Kyle Blagg; Directors: Kristie Coelsch, Jim Macnab, Merrie von Borstel; Superintendent, Wes Owens; Business Manager, Kim McKinney; Board Secretary, Jeanie Pehlke; Staff Member: Jen Berry; Visitors: Ryan Nopp, Ellen Nopp, Carol von Borstel, Neil Pattee, Joe Dabulskis, Chris Kaseberg and Jess Stutzman. Absent: Bill Martin

SUMMARY OF ACTIONS TAKEN

Motion by Director Coelsch with second from Director Macnab to approve the board meeting agenda as amended. Vote: 4 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimously.

Motion by Director von Borstel with second from Director Coelsch to authorize the Superintendent to enter into an agreement with Aurora Gardens, LLC for the sale of the Grass Valley facility and property for $356,000 and do all actions necessary to accomplish the sale, including signing the deed and closing papers. Vote: 4 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, Macnab, von Borstel) Action: The motion carried unanimous.

Motion by Director Coelsch with second from Director von Borstel that this Memorandum of Agreement be adopted by the Sherman County School Board for the continuation of Superintendent Wes Owens’ services, as outlined in his 2015-17 employment contract from July 1st to July 10th, 2017. Discussion: Director Macnab stated that the discussion is over because people waited until the last minute. It was clarified that the board has been waiting to execute the Superintendent’s contract until after the certified and classified unions have completed their negotiations. Vote: 3 in Favor (Blagg, Coelsch, von Borstel) 1 No (Macnab) Action: The motion carried.


4. News from Sherman County’s Oregon Youth Conservation Corps!

garden.shovel.barrowThe week of July 3rd-7th was a short work week due to the 4th of July holiday. We were able to get in a full day of pulling Knapp weed down at the mouth of the Deschutes on the 5th and on the 6th we picked up litter on Scott Canyon Rd. and Hay Canyon Rd. The week of the 10th-14th, we worked at the Cottonwood Canyon State Park pulling puncture vine, repairing access roads, and even built a new bypass road for hikers and emergency vehicles. This consisted of removing sage brush, big boulders, and finally laying down a thick layer of gravel to complete the trail. It was a week of hard work but we had fun and learned a lot about maintaining trails. ~Sherman County’s Oregon Youth Conservation Corps


5. Building on Self-Worth

One of the first reactions to the concepts of applied cognitive psychology typically will be, “It’s starting to sound a little selfish.” This is true, to a point. Read below for a comment from the wider, global field:

“The example that you gave seems to indicate that life is more worth living if you first change your attitude to a positive instead of hanging on to a negative, rebellious or resistive attitude. No worries; I got that one. But, in the beginning you stated that what makes life worth living can be summed up in a single word, ‘you’ Now, you’ve lost me.

“In my line of work, I see the degradation of a ‘me first’ attitude. I agree that the only person you can change is ‘you.’ But, if one gets stuck in the ‘you’ or fixates with ‘you’ that would lead to self-centeredness, arrogance, elitism would it not? I see this all the time. Selfishness seems to be the start of greater, more serious social/societal issues. I would think that life is much more worth living, as you have indicated, if you could start by changing yourself to think more positively, to become a better person, in order to be of service to others. Am I missing something here?”

The earlier message may not have gone that one step further by way of explanation. It is what “you” or “me” brings to living, for ourselves and those around us, that is important. Each of us has special talents and skills, which when brought to bear on challenges faced by society in general, or a specific situation, makes life worth living. It is in service to others that we truly express our worth.

However, that sense of self-worth must come first, before we can be effective to the world around us. You see, if we do not feel worthy, we won’t put ourselves in a position to help. We shy away. It is not about “me first” for no other reason. It is about making ourselves the best we can be, then using all that we are to work for positive, effective change in the world around us. ~The Pacific Institute


6. State Fire Marshal gives caution and tips on wildfire prevention

As Oregon’s weather heats up and vegetation dries out, State Fire Marshal Jim Walker is cautioning Oregonians and summer visitors to be vigilant with wildfire prevention and safety.

“Oregon has already experienced a number of human-caused wildfires, said State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “It’s fortunate that no lives have been lost to this point, and we all need to take every precaution to ensure that doesn’t happen.”

The OSFM encourages everyone to follow these wildfire prevention guidelines:
* Know fire risks and obey fire restrictions, such as campfire bans.
* Avoid parking or driving on dry grass as hot vehicles can start a wildfire.
* Vehicles are required to have a shovel and fire extinguisher or at least a gallon of water in many areas.
* Do not use candles, fireworks, tiki torches, or other open flames in wildland areas.
* Remember that sky lanterns are illegal in Oregon airspace.
* Dispose of smoking material in deep, sturdy ashtrays.
* Make sure butts and ashes are extinguished with water and sand.
* Never discard butts on the ground or in vegetation.

For more wildfire prevention information and restrictions, we encourage you to visit Keep Oregon Green at www.keeporegongreen.org and the Oregon Department of Forestry at www.oregon.gov.


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Formed by Megafloods, Channeled Scablands

 

Unlike regular news services, AllSides exposes bias

Oregon Senate Bill 5530 Lottery Bonds
National Review: Oregon’s Radical, Grisly Abortion Law