Sherman County eNews #205

CONTENT

  1. The American’s Creed

  2. Free Well Water Testing

  3. Provide Some Perspective

  4. Notice. Frontier Digital Network Board of Directors Meeting Agenda, July 21

  5. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda, July 21

  6. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Statement on the End of the Monuments Review Public Comment Period

  7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


 1.The American’s Creed

 “I believe in the United States of America as a government of the people, by the people, for the people; whose just powers are derived from the consent of the governed; a democracy in a Republic; a sovereign Nation of many sovereign States; a perfect Union, one and inseparable; established upon those principles of freedom, equality, justice and humanity for which American patriots sacrificed their lives and fortunes. I therefore believe it is my duty to my country to love it; to support its Constitution; to obey its laws; to respect its flag; and to defend it against all enemies.” ~ William Tyler Page


2. Free Well Water Testing

raindropNorth Central Public Health District is offering FREE well water quality testing through August 10, 2017 for residents of Sherman, Gilliam and Wasco counties who get their drinking water from a private well.  This free testing is a $60 value and includes Total Coliform/E. coli/Nitrates. Those interested should contact the District at 541-506-2600.  Test kits are available for pickup at OSU Sherman County Extension in Moro, as well as the Health District at 419 E Seventh Street, The Dalles. 


3. Provide Some Perspective

glassesReading the newspaper, or listening to the news on television or radio, or checking one’s social media feeds, is an exercise in strength – inner strength. “Real Estate Prices Rise Pricing Home Buyers Out of the Market.”  “International Markets Wary.”  “Country Polarized – Frustration Mounting.” Sometimes, the only way to keep a smile on your face is to quit listening, watching and reading!

Of course, shutting off all outside information is one way to control your mood. However, becoming un-informed about the world around us, on purpose, can be self-defeating. We need to understand this ever-changing dynamic, in order to prepare ourselves for the future.

So, what do we do? Well, we make choices. Sometimes, we have a few very good options, and the challenge becomes trying to pick the best one. Sometimes, there is a big difference between two options, and it is easy to pick one or the other. And sometimes, those choices aren’t everything we wish they would be, but we make them because the current alternative may be worse.

Ultimately, it is our choices that define us. They are reflections of what we believe to be true about ourselves and the world around us. We can decide to dwell on the negative, build scotomas (blind spots) to anything positive, and generally feel miserable all the time. Or, we can look for the positive, find it because we are looking for it, and find ourselves able to meet each day with a smile and expectations of something wonderful happening.

We all have this choice, to either get bogged down in the negative, or look for the good. If we look for the good, more than likely, we will find it. Our minds are built to let in those things we feel are important to us, and we can use that built-in ability as we choose.

So, in a world threatening to be overwhelmed by the negative, why not choose to look for the positive? It might just provide some perspective on the craziness. ~The Pacific Institute


4. Frontier Digital Network Board of Directors Meeting Agenda, July 21

Frontier TeleNet [Digital Network]

                        Board of Directors Meeting Agenda and Notice

                                                      July, 21st, 2017

                                                            9:00 AM

                                  Gilliam County Courthouse, Courtroom

  • Call To Order & Director Roll Call
  • Public Input/Comment
  • Directors’ Changes or Additions to the Agenda
  • Minutes Review and Approval
  • Financials Review and Approval
  • Resignation of Jeanne Burch
  • Review of existing contractors, contracts and duties of contractors
  • Update on FTN/FDN merger
  • Cottonwood Tower update
  • Wheeler County Wireless Project Update
  • AOC assistance contract discussions
  • Website and other Social Media and/or Public Presents needs
  • SUA II Motorola Service Contract Proposal

8.0      Discussion/Possible Vote and Approval of Compensation Increases (If Applicable)

7.0      Other items for the good of the order

8.0      Public Input/Comment

9.0      Next Meeting

10.0    Adjournment

The Frontier Digital Network board reserves the right at its sole discretion to enter into Executive Session under ORS 192.660 (a), (g), (j), (n),(D).


5. Notice. Frontier TeleNet Board of Directors Meeting Agenda, July 21

Frontier TeleNet

                        Board of Directors Meeting Agenda and Notice

                                                      July 21st, 2017

                                                           10:00 AM

                                  Gilliam County Courthouse, Courtroom

  • Call To Order & Director Roll Call
  • Public Input/Comment
  • Directors’ Changes or Additions to the Agenda
  • Minutes Review and Approval for June 16th and June 29th (Special Meeting)
  • Financials Review and Approval
  • Resignation of Jeanne Burch
  • Review of existing contractors, contracts and duties of contractors
  • Update on FTN/FDN merger
  • Cottonwood Tower update
  • Wheeler County Wireless Project Update
  • LSN request for Arlington Slatt usage
  • AOC assistance contract discussions
  • Website and other Social Media and/or Public Presents needs
  • SUA II Motorola Service Contract Proposal
  • Sherman County Fiber Optic RFP for Wasco to Rufus
  • Frontier 911 Burns Tribe Contract request for FTN and alternative options for connection

17.0     Discussion/Possible Vote and Approval of Compensation Increases (If Applicable)

18.0     Other items for the good of the order

19.0     Public Input/Comment

20.0     Next Meeting

21.0     Adjournment

The Frontier TeleNet board reserves the right at its sole discretion to enter into Executive Session under ORS 192.660 (a), (g), (j), (n)(D).


6. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s Statement on the End of the Monuments Review Public Comment Period

American flag2(WASHINGTON) — On Monday, July 10, the formal public comment period closed for the review of national monuments. More than 1.2 million comments were received on Regulations.gov and thousands more were received via traditional mail. Twenty-seven national monuments designated since January 1, 1996 that are more than 100,000 acres, or that were considered to have inadequate public input are under review in accordance with President Donald J. Trump’s April 26, 2017, executive order.

“Too often under previous administrations, decisions were made in the Washington, D.C., bubble, far removed from the local residents who actually work the land and have to live with the consequences of D.C.’s actions. This monument review is the exact opposite,” said Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke. “President Trump and I opened the formal public comment period — the first-ever for monuments designated under the Antiquities Act — in order to give local stakeholders a voice in the decision-making process. After hearing some feedback, I’d like to remind and reassure folks that even if a monument is modified, the land will remain under federal ownership. I am strictly opposed to the sale or transfer of our public lands, and nothing in this review changes that policy.

“These comments, in addition to the extensive on-the-ground tours of monuments and meetings with stakeholders, will help inform my recommendations on the monuments,” Zinke said. “I appreciate everyone who took the time to log-on or write in and participate in our government.”

As required by the executive order, Secretary Zinke submitted an interim report to the White House in June with various recommendations and observations on Bears Ears National Monument, which suggested the monument be reduced in size to conform with the intent of the Antiquities Act, that of designating the smallest compatible area. The report also recommended the creation of a national conservation area, and official co-management by the local Tribal governments.

The report came after Zinke spent several days on the ground in Utah touring the monument by air, car, foot, and horseback, speaking with stakeholders from Tribal, local, state and federal government, as well as representatives from the conservation, historic preservation, agriculture, tourism, and education sectors. The Secretary met with the Bears Ears InterTribal Coalition while in Salt Lake City on May 7, and the Acting Deputy Secretary Jim Cason held a four-hour follow-up meeting with the Bears Ears Commission and the InterTribal Coalition on May 25.

The Secretary also traveled to Maine’s Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, and to Boston to hold meetings on the Northeast Canyons and Seamounts National Marine Monument off the coast of New England. The Secretary plans to visit Oregon, New Mexico, and Nevada in the coming weeks.

Regarding the comment period, the executive order stated:

In making the requisite determinations, the Secretary is directed to consider:
(i) the requirements and original objectives of the Act, including the Act’s requirement that reservations of land not exceed “the smallest area compatible with the proper care and management of the objects to be protected”;
(ii) whether designated lands are appropriately classified under the Act as “historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, [or] other objects of historic or scientific interest”;
(iii) the effects of a designation on the available uses of designated Federal lands, including consideration of the multiple-use policy of section 102(a)(7) of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (43 U.S.C. 1701(a)(7)), as well as the effects on the available uses of Federal lands beyond the monument boundaries;
(iv) the effects of a designation on the use and enjoyment of non-Federal lands within or beyond monument boundaries;
(v) concerns of State, tribal, and local governments affected by a designation, including the economic development and fiscal condition of affected States, tribes, and localities;
(vi) the availability of Federal resources to properly manage designated areas; and
(vii) such other factors as the Secretary deems appropriate.
82 FR 20429-20430 (May 1, 2017).


7. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.owl3InciWeb: Incident Information System (fire)

Oregon: Incident Information System (fire)

$15M Sam Hill mansion still Seattle’s most expensive listing one year later

The Unity and Beauty of the Declaration and the Constitution

China’s Intelligence Networks in United States Include 25,000 Spies

Linda Sarsour’s Call For ‘Jihad’ Against President Trump  

Federal prosecutors step up probe of land deal pushed by wife of Bernie Sanders


 

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