Sherman County eNews #200

 CONTENT

  1. Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge 

  2. Sen. Hansell’s “The Real ID Act” passes Senate

  3. Highway of useful service leads to the city of happiness

  4. Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase

  5. Sherman County Sheriff’s Office June Incident Log

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge 

Goldendale, Wash., July 5, 2017) — This summer Maryhill Museum of Art will host the 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air event in the Columbia River Gorge. The event begins July 31 with a four-day plein air paint out, followed by an opening reception Friday, August 4, and an ongoing exhibit through August 27.

Drawing on a long tradition of painting in the open air, this juried event brings together 40 artists to paint the vast, wild beauty of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, from stunning views of Mt. Hood and the Columbia River to the surrounding vineyards and snowy peaks of the Cascades. Participants include emerging and established artists from the Pacific Northwest and from around the country.

Between July 31 and Aug 3, artists will fan out to paint anywhere in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; they will also be invited to paint on Maryhill’s grounds, giving museum visitors a unique view of plein air artists at work.

“Thirteen years ago, there were no plein-air events here—none,” says event founder and painter Cathleen Rehfeld Meyers, who lives in the Columbia River Gorge. “That was my idea for starting this event. The area was completely untapped. It’s an amazingly beautiful place, with an incredibly diverse landscape to paint.”

An opening and artist reception will take place Friday, August 4, 2017 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Maryhill Museum of Art, when the public is invited to view and purchase “fresh” paintings and meet the artists. The paintings will remain on view and for sale in the Maryhill’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center Maryhill through Sunday, August 27, 2017.

The juror for the 2017 event is painter Mike Hernandez, a California-based plein air artist and sought-after workshop instructor, who will award prizes in 17 categories. A full list of participating artists is available at www.maryhillmuseum.org/pleinair

July 31 – August 3 | all day
Pacific Northwest Plein Air Paint Out
Artists spend four days painting at various locations throughout the Columbia River Gorge, including on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art.

Opening Reception
Friday, August 4 | 5 to 8 p.m.
The public is invited to view the paintings artists created in plein air, meet the artists and enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres. Artwork will be available for purchase. Awards will be given in a number of categories, including “Best Sky,” “Best Mountain,” “Best Water,” “Historic Columbia River Highway Award,” “Maryhill Museum Award” and a museum purchase award.

The 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge is made possible by the generosity of Burley Design, Cathedral Ridge Winery, Dakine, Dog River Coffee, Framing Resource, Full Sail Brewing Co., Gamblin Artists Colors, The Griffin House on the Columbia River Gorge, Byron and Sue Henry, Stephen and Laura Muehleck, RayMar Art Panels, Rosemary & Co. Brushes and Scottsdale Artists’ School.


2. Sen. Hansell’s “The Real ID Act” passes Senate

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM, Ore.–Today, the Senate passed a bill chief-sponsored by state Sen. Bill Hansell, R-Athena, Thurs., July 6, that will allow Oregonians access to Federal Facilities and Domestic Air Travel.

Congress passed “The Real ID Act” in 2005, a response to the Sept. 11 attacks, to ensure those individuals who travel on airplanes and have access to Federal Facilities and Military bases were indeed the individuals they said they were. Oregon had been granted extensions from coming into compliance every year. In 2016, the Oregon Department of Transportation appeared before the Joint Ways and Means Sub-Committee on Transportation and Economic Development to notify them that Oregon would no longer be granted an extension.

If Oregon did not become compliant, citizens effective July 10 would not be allowed to gain access to Federal Facilities and Nuclear Reservations.  Then in Jan. of 2019, Oregonians would not be allowed to use their state issued driver’s license to gain access to fly domestically.

“When I heard we wouldn’t be granted any additional extensions I went to the Chair of the committee and told her I planned to introduce a bill to bring us into compliance,” Hansell said.  “I have 50 constituents who work at the Hanford Reservation and might not be allowed to go to work. That is unacceptable.”

Hansell introduced SB 374 as an additional driver license option for the people of Oregon.

“I crafted the bill, like a vanity license plate.  If you don’t want a Real ID or you feel as though you don’t need one, you don’t have to get one.  A regular driver’s license will still be offered,” Hansell said.

The House passed SB 374B on a vote of 56-1 and the Senate passed SB 374B on a vote of 27-2.  The bill now goes to the governor to be signed into law.


3. Highway of useful service leads to the city of happiness

Psychologists who study human behavior have concluded that we are happiest when we are striving to achieve success. It is the act of striving, not the successful completion of the task, that provides the greatest psychic rewards. When you strive to achieve success through service to others, you multiply the benefits to yourself, and you ensure that whatever road you choose in life will ultimately lead you to success and happiness. There is no occupation or profession that will not benefit from a concerted effort to better serve others. But the greatest benefit will be to you, in the form of the self-satisfaction that comes from knowing that you made a difference, that without you others would never have received the service you provided. ~Napoleon Hill


4. Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase

The amount paid to people filing for unemployment insurance benefits has increased. The maximum weekly benefit amount someone can receive will increase from $590 to $604, while the minimum amount will increase from $138 to $141.

The change affects new unemployment insurance claims filed on or after July 2, 2017. Those with existing unemployment claims will continue to receive the same weekly amount they have been receiving.

Oregon’s Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides temporary, partial wage replacement for workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own. The income provided to unemployed workers partially stabilizes the economy in local communities experiencing high unemployment during economic downturns. The UI program also promotes reemployment and the preservation of a trained, local workforce for businesses during economic downturns. The UI program administers UI benefits, such as federal extensions when they are available, and other specialized programs with partners that include the United States Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) and other state agencies.

Under Oregon law, each year the Oregon Employment Department recalculates the maximum and minimum amounts of unemployment insurance benefits people can receive each week. The amounts are set as percentages of the average weekly wage earned by Oregonians. The minimum benefit amount is 15% of average weekly wage, and the maximum amount is 64%. Both dollar amounts are rounded down to the nearest dollar as required by law.

Higher wage growth in 2016 resulted in a 2.2% increase to the minimum weekly benefit and a 2.4% increase in the maximum weekly benefit compared to a year ago.


5. Sherman County Sheriff’s Office June Incident Log

 Sheriff.June2017Incident1Log

 Sheriff.June2017Incident2Log


 6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeTrump’s 1st Qtr. Salary to Go to Fix Antietam Battlefield

 Hobby Lobby fined $3 million over smuggled Iraqi artifacts

 Study Finds Temperature Adjustments Account For ‘Nearly All Of The Warming’ In Climate Data

Livestock guardian dogs a breed apart

Frederick Douglass’s Fiery 1852 Speech, “The Meaning of July 4th for the Negro,” Read by James Earl Jones 


 

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