Sherman County eNews #202

CONTENT

  1. Seven Practices of Highly Effective School Boards

  2. 5-Day Club, July 10-14

  3. 2-Man Ranch Advanced Sorting Clinic with Kristi Siebert, Aug. 12-13

  4. Life’s Survivors

  5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Seven Practices of Highly Effective School Boards

alphabet blackboardBy Kathryn Blumsack and Terry McCabe

[Editor’s Note: While intended for new school board members, this article is helpful for the rest of us in gaining an understanding of the work of our school board members and school personnel.

 We commend and congratulate Sherman County’s new school board members who recently pledged their oaths of office. We have every reason to expect their success as members of this team.  We follow their work as reflected in board meeting minutes with interest and appreciation, and as a measure of their effectiveness. We hope they avail themselves of new board member training and on-going educational opportunities. We thank them for their thoughtful and informed service to our children and our county communities.]

Congratulations! You’re now a member of the Board of Education. You’ve listened to your community, and come to understand its values and concerns. Above all, you’ve embraced the transformative power of a great board to improve public education. Local control of education through elected school boards is a deeply held American political tradition. School boards may be small and local, but they represent perhaps the most important daily civic commitment we as citizens make to our communities, our children, and our future.

As a new board member, you bring sharp questions, innovative ideas, and fresh energy. You’ll look at established routines and policies with new eyes, you’ll challenge old assumptions, and you’ll have the opportunity to share your perspective with your fellow board members. At the same time, you’ll learn how to make a positive difference in the work of the board, and how to contribute most effectively to lasting change. We want you to be the most effective possible advocate for your community’s educational vision and values. To help you succeed, we’re going to share with you the seven practices of highly effective boards.

  1. Going solo’s a no-no

You were elected to your board as an individual. You’ve got issues that are priorities for you. And you’ll get a lot of individual attention early on from friends, school employees, and community members who want you to tackle particular problems. The early temptation will be to say “yes’ and use your power to fix things.

Except you won’t have any power to use — not as an individual, at least. As a school board member, you have no individual legal authority to fix problems or decide issues. One of the wisest things you can do is to help others understand that you can only get your work done as part of a team. We’re not saying you can’t try to take the lead on a particular issue, or that you have to stay silent — not at all. In fact, the more you communicate and share with your fellow board members, the more likely you’ll be able to gain support for your priorities and ideas.

Look at the long term: Your success as a board member is inextricably tied to the success of your board. You will be judged by what it accomplishes, not by what you as an individual tried to accomplish. In all the years (decades!) we’ve worked with school boards, we’ve never heard anyone say something like, “That’s a bad board — except for Mary Smith.”

What do boards work on together? Everything. Consider the three main areas of board responsibility: legislative, administrative, and judicial. The first area of responsibility, legislative, refers to policy making. Effective boards adopt policies that give direction to the superintendent and staff, enabling them to manage the district. The board should seek appropriate input in the development of policy, and after adoption should hold the superintendent and staff accountable for its implementation.

Administration is the second area of responsibility. It includes approving and monitoring the budget, approving and monitoring district contracts, and hiring and evaluating the superintendent and appropriate staff. The administration should present the draft budget based on the goals and objectives outlined by the school board. It is up to the board to ensure that goals and objectives are truly aligned with the spending outlined in the budget. As for contracts, many states give final approval and responsibility for major contracts to the local board. It is important that you understand the bidding process and follow ethical guidelines in approving all contracts.

Finally, the board’s judicial responsibility refers to hearing formal appeals sessions brought forward by staff, students, or parents. Naturally, these appeals require confidentiality, impartiality, and a full understanding of school law and regulations. The judicial function is sporadic, but handling appeals properly is critical to the effectiveness and fairness of a school board.

  1. Respect the team

You were elected as an individual, but you’ll work as part of a team. The best way to succeed as a board is to practice collaboration and respect. Because boards deal with extremely difficult and vexing issues — from budgets to grievances and everything in between — it’s common for emotions to sometimes run high. Keep in mind that you’re in this for the long haul, and the best way to succeed is to be part of a strong team. Boards whose members treat one another with respect tend to be the most effective. Those whose members give in to acrimony tend to get less done.

Collaboration and respect don’t mean consensus. Boards vote, and majorities rule. (But remember: This year’s majority could be next year’s minority.) There is honor in casting a sincere vote, win or lose. But, after the vote, effective boards move forward together. When you’re new, every challenge will be a first-time challenge. But you’ll come to realize that boards confront major issues all the time, and that a long-term commitment to collegiality and respect is critical to effective board governance.

The impact of respect goes beyond the board. The board sets the tone for the entire school system. Staff, students, parents, and the community are watching carefully to see how the board functions. Effective boards don’t only handle their own work well — they establish a model of collegiality and collaboration that builds confidence across the community that everyone is working to do what’s best for students. 

  1. Understand the difference between board and staff

Effective board members refrain from trying to perform management functions that are the responsibility of the superintendent and staff. As a board member, it is your responsibility (along with your fellow board members) to ensure that the schools operate well. But it is not your responsibility to run them. That’s what the superintendent is for.

Boards do have great power, but it can seem a strange kind of power to new members because it’s not the power to order individuals to “do this” or “stop doing that.” It’s the power to establish goals and policies, and then the power to demand accountability for reaching those goals and executing those policies.

The fundamental reason to refrain from trying to perform management functions is so you can hold the system — and above all, its leader, the superintendent — accountable for results. Accountability is the key, and many recent educational reforms aim to clarify and strengthen accountability.

If the superintendent understands that he or she will be held accountable by the board to reach goals and execute policies, then the board has achieved a key part of its work. If board members muddy accountability by trying to involve themselves in management functions, then any individual “win” in a particular case has the larger effect of undermining overall system effectiveness.

Here’s a common situation for a new board member: You’ve been approached by concerned parents or community members about fixing an issue. If this happened during an election, you may have assured the concerned individuals you’d tackle this issue right away. You should listen to such concerns and questions, but rarely if ever will it be appropriate for you to directly contact a principal, a teacher, or a coach to try to solve the problem. That’s one of the main ways board members unintentionally diminish their effectiveness.

Part of your job is to help educate the school community about your responsibilities, explain the chain of command (or “chain of accountability,” as some board members call it), and direct concerned individuals to the appropriate staff person.

A useful guide for new board members is your school system’s policy on how to handle concerns from members of the public, to ensure that every concern gets a fair hearing and timely resolution. And if a concern merits board consideration, you should bring it up with your fellow board members.

  1. Share and defend your views, but listen to the views of others

Your board sets the standard for communication within the district. Do you want your district to be open to a thorough discussion, or are you more interested in your own point of view? School board members must have the ability to compromise. You won’t “win” on every issue you care about. More importantly, sometimes you’ll find that the information, perspectives, and ideas others have may change your mind, or lead to a new and even better collaborative idea.

In the charged and urgent arena of public education, expect to be flexible, even as you seek to honor your deepest values and commitments. There will be times when changes must be made, when tradition cannot be honored, or when pressure must be resisted. Sometimes, you’ll measure the true success of a board not by agreement, but by respectful disagreement and spirited discussion followed by a difficult vote. And after a difficult vote, effective boards embrace the decision and move forward together.

  1. Do your homework and ask tough questions

Members of effective boards come to meetings prepared to engage in discussions, ask questions, and seek clarification. A lot of background information is required to make policy and assess accountability. In meetings, asking sharp questions can help clarify issues not just for yourself, but for students, families, the community, and even school system employees.

Here are some good questions to keep in mind:

  • What is the goal of this initiative?
  • How does it align with our vision, mission, and system goals?
  • How much will it cost? What data tells us it’s important enough to merit the cost?
  • What data supports the notion that it will achieve the desired results?
  • Are staff ready to implement it? If not, what’s our plan?
  • How does it fit with our existing activities? Does it conflict with anything we’re already doing?
  • How will we evaluate the results?

Board members are not career education professionals. Sometimes this feels like a handicap because of all the jargon, technical language, and policy details that board members, especially new board members, may not know. But keep in mind that, in American public education, local board members are not expected to be experts. They are responsible for serving as a bridge between lifelong education professionals and local communities.

To build the bridge, some board members like to ask plain questions. Michael Harvey, a board member in Maryland’s Kent County, likes to encourage clarity and simplicity by asking, “How would you explain this policy to a parent?” 

  1. Respect your oath

Local school board membership is a public office and a public trust. New members swear an oath to uphold laws pertaining to public education. An important aspect of the public trust is to maintain confidentiality when appropriate. Many issues considered by school boards must be handled in confidence, in executive or closed sessions. These commonly include personnel issues, legal matters, negotiations, land acquisition, and grievances.

Your state education laws determine which items must be considered in executive session or in appeals hearings, and specify the process for entering and exiting such a session. Everything discussed is confidential, with the exception of the summary public report the board president makes after the executive or closed session. If an individual board member divulges information from a closed or executive session, he or she may be held legally responsible. Significant costs and legal challenges may arise for the individual member, the board, and the entire school district.

Note that, while executive or closed sessions are permitted, most states require any action as a result of that executive session to be conducted in a public forum. Just as it is important to adhere to confidentiality for matters that should be confidential, it is important to ensure that no open-session topics are discussed, or actions taken, in executive or closed sessions. When in doubt, consult your board lawyer.

  1. Keep learning

Effective board members participate in professional development and commit the time and energy necessary to be informed and effective leaders. You should understand your school system’s vision, goals, and policies; its current successes, challenges, and opportunities; and the educational environment in your community.

Most importantly, you should know the aspirations and expectations of the students and parents. At the national level, American public education is undergoing major and rapid changes. Understanding and translating them for your community’s schools will require steady, ongoing work.

Many resources are available to you in this new position. You need to know about your state statutes and the organizing documents for your district. Work closely with your board chair and your superintendent to better understand district and board responsibilities. Your state school board association is a great resource for information and professional development. There are additional resources available through NSBA (www.nsba.org) and this magazine (www.asbj.com).

OK, new board members. That’s our advice. Congratulations again on your new job and new responsibilities. It’ll be exhausting, challenging, and sometimes painful. But, with luck, you’ll share the experience of many other school board members in the great American tradition: the most rewarding job you will ever have.


2. 5-Day Club, July 10-14

5-Day Club begins Monday July 10th and finishes Friday July 14th at the Grass Valley 1st Baptist Church from 9am to 12pm. And the Rufus Baptist church from 2pm to 4pm.

5-Day Club is an exciting, fun-filled dynamic Bible lessons, creative learning activities, inspiring missionary story, meaningful songs, life-changing Scripture memorization held for 5 consecutive days.

5-Day Club is open to all boys and girls between the ages of five and twelve, regardless of religious background. Parents are welcome to attend the club with their child.

If you have questions please contact Julie Fritts (GV) at 541-980-7628 or Dorothy Holliday (Rufus) at 541-739-2233.


3. 2-Man Ranch Advanced Sorting Clinic with Kristi Siebert, Aug. 12-13

A couple of spots opened up for this clinic!  Great tune up opportunity!

Cow.Daisy5

Equine Mania, LLC presents

2-Man Ranch Advanced Sorting Clinic

August 12 & 13, 2017 at Wheatacres Ranch, Wasco, Oregon

$250 for the 2-day clinic.

Deposit of $100 required by Aug 1.

Limited to 12 riders.

Dry camping & pens available.

For entry forms or information contact

Equine Mania, LLC, Carrie Kaseberg, 69358 Wheatacres Road, Wasco, Oregon 97065

541-980-7394.

Kristi Siebert is a full time horse trainer on a family run ranch in beautiful Goldendale, Washington. Rafter 2S Ranch is where she, her husband and two sons, Logan and Lane, run a breeding facility, raise, and train their own horses. She has a history in many disciplines from cutting, ranch horse versatility, sorting, to colt starting and much more. She teaches fundamental horsemanship, and believes that you can build a foundation that can stand firm in any discipline, and that a horse is only as strong and disciplined as their rider. 


4. Life’s Survivors

When times get tough, some people fold and some are made even stronger. Did you ever wonder why some people seem to be able to handle life better than others? Everyone likes to think that they have what it takes to survive adversity and tough times, but when the chips are down, some folks definitely do better than others.

The real survivors in life (not the participants in the “reality” survivor TV shows that only seem to bring out the worst in human behavior) have developed personalities that allow them more options. They also have a strong and clear intention to survive, and to do it in good shape. When problems or setbacks occur, they don’t waste time complaining and they don’t dwell on the past or what they’ve lost. Instead, their energies are focused on getting things to turn out well.

Survivors believe that, no matter what happens to them, they are the ones who are in charge of their destinies. They don’t get mad at the world for not treating them better. And they do have an extensive menu of behaviors they can choose from, depending on the situation. In other words, survivors are option thinkers with a growth mindset, instead of black and white, either/or thinkers who get by with a fixed mindset.

Survivors also have a wonderful ability to laugh at adversity because they know that even if they lose everything else, they will still have themselves. People with survivor personalities can walk confidently into the unknown because they expect to find a way to make things work out.

So, if you want to be a true survivor, try focusing your attention less on safety and security and more on developing positive beliefs and expectations, built on a firm foundation of reinforced self-esteem. ~The Pacific Institute


5. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

bird.talkOSU develops water-resistant, antimicrobial edible wrap for food preservation

Food Innovation Center, Oregon State University

Pacific Crest Trail Days Summer Festival 

 Sherman County, Oregon – A History Collection 

Russia’s Expert Advice: How Putin Should Tackle His First Trump Meeting

Trump to Putin: ‘It’s an honor to be with you’

“The powers of the general government will be, and indeed must be, principally employed upon external objects, such as war, peace, negotiations with foreign powers, and foreign commerce.” —Joseph Story (1833)

Aerial survey shows lesser prairie-chicken population stable

The White House

Few Think States Should Be Able to Ignore Federal Laws


 

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Sherman County eNews #201

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

REMINDER: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

balloons.boy

THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

COMMENDABLE! 35th Year! The Sherman County Historical Society’s Editorial Team put Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 35, No. 1, in the mail to members this week. Gladys Wesley, Editor, her editorial team — Terri Bibby, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton, Nancy Allen and Sheri Carlson, and authors for this edition – Terri Bibby, Keith Mobley, Eilene Eslinger, Leta Ann Eslinger Reckmann, Amber Tilton, Sherry Kaseberg, Dorothy Coyle Blagg, Jean Zevely Anderson, and Bud Root, are to be commended for continued preservation of local stories, records and photographs. Get your copy by contacting Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or info@shermanmuseum.org or at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro! 10% discount for members.

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

THE MUSEUM STORE. “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno $29.95. Museum members receive a 10% discount. The national award-winning Sherman County Historical Museum is open daily 10-5 May through October in Moro, Oregon.  7/7

SUPPORT OUR COMMUNITY SERVICES. Often we forget that someone else’s grandparents paid for our education….thru taxes, and with their contributions and labor for our community services such as churches and cemeteries. Three of the local cemeteries remind me that I can help maintain those services for my family and my friends. Thanks for those reminders.  When my children were young, lower income and higher expenses made it hard to be generous.  As a grandmother, I want to support these things for my family and friends. Keep up the good work. As a non-helping senior I and my friends should be willing to participate in this small manner! ~Nell Melzer 7/7

EMPLOYMENT:

WEED CONTROL TECHNICIAN. Lower Deschutes Cooperative Weed Management Area. Hiring (2) Full-time seasonal Weed Technicians. Technicians will hike and survey the canyons of the Lower Deschutes River in search of targeted noxious weeds. Please contact Dan Son or Rod Asher for more information. 503-858-4191 or 541-980-4345
dson@shermancounty.net, rasher@shermancounty.net   7/28

PART-TIME RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATE. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a part time retail sales associate.  Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  This position will be based out of The Dalles, Oregon.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Cashier-Process customer orders
  • Maintenance of the facilities
  • Sell products and provide product information
  • Carry out and load farm store merchandise
  • Stock Farm Store with merchandise warehoused or stored in the lot or warehouse
  • Clean and rearrange merchandise as needed
  • Open and close store, lot and warehouse areas
  • Pick up orders from vendors
  • Deliver merchandise to Farm Store customers
  • Load and unload bales of straw, hay and feed

Requirements:

  • Lift, carry, push, or pull objects up to approximately 100 lbs.
  • Must possess basic computer knowledge and be able to navigate with little assistance
  • Must be able to accommodate a varying work schedule
  • Operate with initiative, commitment, strong work ethic & sense of urgency
  • Accurate and comfortable with math and currency
  • Valid Driver’s License
  • Must be able to operate a vehicle with a GVW of 10,000 lbs. or more, with or without a trailer in tow
  • Will be required to work in all weather conditions

Schedule:
Schedule varies, store hours of operation will be Monday – Saturday 7:30 – 5:30.  Shifts are assigned as deemed necessary. Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR. Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com  or be picked up at the main office in Moro.  Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277      Fax: (503)536-6875 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Closing Date: July 8th, 2017, or Until Filled. 7/7

GRAIN FACILITIES OPERATOR. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Facilities Operator.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Facilities Operator is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license
  • The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.  — As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.  Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer. 7/7

GRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Operations Laborer.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to maintenance, housekeeping, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to:

Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer.  7/7

FOR SALE

HONDA ACCORD. 2003 Honda Accord Coupe. 200k miles. Runs great. Regular maintenance. 2 brand new tires and aligned in April. $3500 or best reasonable offer. Brett 541 993 4551. 7/21

ACREAGE. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000 RMLS# 17410095 tiffany@drysideproperty.com 7/14

HOUSE IN WASCO. 4 bedroom, 2 bath house with extended lot for RV or garden, 2 car garage, workshop in basement. 2 bedrooms on main floor, 2 large bedrooms on upper floor. Many recent inside improvements. $115,000 by owners. Shown by appointment. 541-467-2345 7/14

CONTINUING USED BOOK SALE at Wasco Annex (old grade school) in Wasco, Oregon. Used books only $5.00 per bag; books on tape, music cassettes and  VHS movies for 25 cents.  Stock up and give for gifts. All funds used for the purchase of new items for the library. ~ Danee Rankin, Librarian, Wasco City Community Library. 7/14

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

DISCOUNTED PHOTO SESSIONS. It’s not too early to get senior photos taken care of! Do you want your senior pictures in or around the wheat fields or to include them as a part of your photo session? If so act now before harvest starts! I’m offering $25.00 off a photo session (senior, family, couple, etc.) between now and the start of harvest. Contact me soon to get a discounted rate and get a photo session completed before harvest starts. ~ Jeremy Lanthorn  JeremyLanthorn.com  Jlanthorn@gmail.com (541) 993-2446   (541) 333-2013  7/28

OREGON HERITAGE BULLETINS provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list below is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/Pages/Bulletins.aspx  7/21

CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Would you like some help with meal preparation, light housekeeping, transportation, etc.? I am a caring and honest woman with excellent references.  ~Synoma Olsen 541 993-6924  7/28

CANES & WALKERS. Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  The church will accept donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446 for more info. 7/28

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

WANTED:

YOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGE. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org. 7/21

HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS.  Non-Profit Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. — ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. — The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. — To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! — ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 7/28

 FREE:

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT OR LEASE:


2. Calendar (new or corrected) 

wheat.fourJULY

7-9 Caledonian Games, Athena http://www.athenacaledoniangames.org

9 Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno 2-4 Wasco Annex

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Celebration 1-4 Sorosis Park, The Dalles

10 Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting 7 Library

11 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

12 Sherman Museum Kids’ Pioneer Day 8:30-12:30

12 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30 Senior Center

12 Wasco School Advisory Board Meeting 6 Wasco School

15 Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill Museum

19 Sherman County Court 9

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

21 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 9 NCESD Building, Condon

24-28 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Workshops 9-1 Sherman Extension Office

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

26 Tri-County Courts’ Meeting 10 Wheeler County (Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler)

eclipse1AUGUST

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Rufus Baptist Church

4 Summer Concert in Condon, Buffalo Kin 6:30-9:90

5 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

8 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

8 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

8 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

16 Sherman County Court 9

18-22 Outlaw Rodeo Bible Camp – Powell Butte, Oregon

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22-27 Sherman County Fair

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:90

27 Demolition Derby, Sherman County Fair

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles


 

Sherman County eNews #200

 CONTENT

  1. Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge 

  2. Sen. Hansell’s “The Real ID Act” passes Senate

  3. Highway of useful service leads to the city of happiness

  4. Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase

  5. Sherman County Sheriff’s Office June Incident Log

  6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Maryhill Museum of Art hosts Pacific Northwest Plein Air in the Columbia River Gorge 

Goldendale, Wash., July 5, 2017) — This summer Maryhill Museum of Art will host the 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air event in the Columbia River Gorge. The event begins July 31 with a four-day plein air paint out, followed by an opening reception Friday, August 4, and an ongoing exhibit through August 27.

Drawing on a long tradition of painting in the open air, this juried event brings together 40 artists to paint the vast, wild beauty of the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, from stunning views of Mt. Hood and the Columbia River to the surrounding vineyards and snowy peaks of the Cascades. Participants include emerging and established artists from the Pacific Northwest and from around the country.

Between July 31 and Aug 3, artists will fan out to paint anywhere in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area; they will also be invited to paint on Maryhill’s grounds, giving museum visitors a unique view of plein air artists at work.

“Thirteen years ago, there were no plein-air events here—none,” says event founder and painter Cathleen Rehfeld Meyers, who lives in the Columbia River Gorge. “That was my idea for starting this event. The area was completely untapped. It’s an amazingly beautiful place, with an incredibly diverse landscape to paint.”

An opening and artist reception will take place Friday, August 4, 2017 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Maryhill Museum of Art, when the public is invited to view and purchase “fresh” paintings and meet the artists. The paintings will remain on view and for sale in the Maryhill’s M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center Maryhill through Sunday, August 27, 2017.

The juror for the 2017 event is painter Mike Hernandez, a California-based plein air artist and sought-after workshop instructor, who will award prizes in 17 categories. A full list of participating artists is available at www.maryhillmuseum.org/pleinair

July 31 – August 3 | all day
Pacific Northwest Plein Air Paint Out
Artists spend four days painting at various locations throughout the Columbia River Gorge, including on the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art.

Opening Reception
Friday, August 4 | 5 to 8 p.m.
The public is invited to view the paintings artists created in plein air, meet the artists and enjoy wine and hors d’oeuvres. Artwork will be available for purchase. Awards will be given in a number of categories, including “Best Sky,” “Best Mountain,” “Best Water,” “Historic Columbia River Highway Award,” “Maryhill Museum Award” and a museum purchase award.

The 13th annual Pacific Northwest Plein Air Event in the Columbia River Gorge is made possible by the generosity of Burley Design, Cathedral Ridge Winery, Dakine, Dog River Coffee, Framing Resource, Full Sail Brewing Co., Gamblin Artists Colors, The Griffin House on the Columbia River Gorge, Byron and Sue Henry, Stephen and Laura Muehleck, RayMar Art Panels, Rosemary & Co. Brushes and Scottsdale Artists’ School.


2. Sen. Hansell’s “The Real ID Act” passes Senate

Oregon.Flat.poleSALEM, Ore.–Today, the Senate passed a bill chief-sponsored by state Sen. Bill Hansell, R-Athena, Thurs., July 6, that will allow Oregonians access to Federal Facilities and Domestic Air Travel.

Congress passed “The Real ID Act” in 2005, a response to the Sept. 11 attacks, to ensure those individuals who travel on airplanes and have access to Federal Facilities and Military bases were indeed the individuals they said they were. Oregon had been granted extensions from coming into compliance every year. In 2016, the Oregon Department of Transportation appeared before the Joint Ways and Means Sub-Committee on Transportation and Economic Development to notify them that Oregon would no longer be granted an extension.

If Oregon did not become compliant, citizens effective July 10 would not be allowed to gain access to Federal Facilities and Nuclear Reservations.  Then in Jan. of 2019, Oregonians would not be allowed to use their state issued driver’s license to gain access to fly domestically.

“When I heard we wouldn’t be granted any additional extensions I went to the Chair of the committee and told her I planned to introduce a bill to bring us into compliance,” Hansell said.  “I have 50 constituents who work at the Hanford Reservation and might not be allowed to go to work. That is unacceptable.”

Hansell introduced SB 374 as an additional driver license option for the people of Oregon.

“I crafted the bill, like a vanity license plate.  If you don’t want a Real ID or you feel as though you don’t need one, you don’t have to get one.  A regular driver’s license will still be offered,” Hansell said.

The House passed SB 374B on a vote of 56-1 and the Senate passed SB 374B on a vote of 27-2.  The bill now goes to the governor to be signed into law.


3. Highway of useful service leads to the city of happiness

Psychologists who study human behavior have concluded that we are happiest when we are striving to achieve success. It is the act of striving, not the successful completion of the task, that provides the greatest psychic rewards. When you strive to achieve success through service to others, you multiply the benefits to yourself, and you ensure that whatever road you choose in life will ultimately lead you to success and happiness. There is no occupation or profession that will not benefit from a concerted effort to better serve others. But the greatest benefit will be to you, in the form of the self-satisfaction that comes from knowing that you made a difference, that without you others would never have received the service you provided. ~Napoleon Hill


4. Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase

The amount paid to people filing for unemployment insurance benefits has increased. The maximum weekly benefit amount someone can receive will increase from $590 to $604, while the minimum amount will increase from $138 to $141.

The change affects new unemployment insurance claims filed on or after July 2, 2017. Those with existing unemployment claims will continue to receive the same weekly amount they have been receiving.

Oregon’s Unemployment Insurance (UI) program provides temporary, partial wage replacement for workers who are unemployed through no fault of their own. The income provided to unemployed workers partially stabilizes the economy in local communities experiencing high unemployment during economic downturns. The UI program also promotes reemployment and the preservation of a trained, local workforce for businesses during economic downturns. The UI program administers UI benefits, such as federal extensions when they are available, and other specialized programs with partners that include the United States Department of Labor (U.S. DOL) and other state agencies.

Under Oregon law, each year the Oregon Employment Department recalculates the maximum and minimum amounts of unemployment insurance benefits people can receive each week. The amounts are set as percentages of the average weekly wage earned by Oregonians. The minimum benefit amount is 15% of average weekly wage, and the maximum amount is 64%. Both dollar amounts are rounded down to the nearest dollar as required by law.

Higher wage growth in 2016 resulted in a 2.2% increase to the minimum weekly benefit and a 2.4% increase in the maximum weekly benefit compared to a year ago.


5. Sherman County Sheriff’s Office June Incident Log

 Sheriff.June2017Incident1Log

 Sheriff.June2017Incident2Log


 6. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do

Bird.Black.EnvelopeTrump’s 1st Qtr. Salary to Go to Fix Antietam Battlefield

 Hobby Lobby fined $3 million over smuggled Iraqi artifacts

 Study Finds Temperature Adjustments Account For ‘Nearly All Of The Warming’ In Climate Data

Livestock guardian dogs a breed apart

Frederick Douglass’s Fiery 1852 Speech, “The Meaning of July 4th for the Negro,” Read by James Earl Jones 


 

Sherman County eNews #199

CONTENT

  1. Friends of the Wasco School Advisory Board Meeting, July 12

  2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, July 10

  3. Mt. St. Helens Exploratory Expedition, July 29

  4. Think of the Possibilities

  5. God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood


1. Friends of the Wasco School Advisory Board Meeting, July 12

Friends of the Wasco School – Preserving Our Past Advisory Board meeting will be held on Wednesday, July 12th at 6:00PM in the meeting room at the Wasco School. Come with ideas, names of interested volunteers and great enthusiasm!


2. Notice. Sherman County School District Board of Directors Meeting, July 10

The Sherman County School District Board of Directors will hold a Regular Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, July 10, 2017​, in the meeting room of the Sherman County School/Public Library.

ShSch1Bd.July10.17
ShSch2Board.July10.17

3. Mt. St. Helens Exploratory Expedition, July 29

Steve Carlson leads an expedition to explore Mt. St. Helens, Saturday, July 29, from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Meet at 7:45 a.m. at the front entrance of the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles. The fee is $50 and includes a box lunch and bottled water. Reserve your place by calling 541-296-8600 ext. 201. For more information visit www.gorgediscovery.org.


4. Think of the Possibilities

What do you believe is possible for you in your life – in your job, with your family and friends, financially, intellectually, emotionally? This is a very important question, so think about your answer for a moment.

These days more and more doctors, psychologists, researchers and many others are beginning to realize that what we achieve and become in life has as much, or more, to do with our beliefs as anything else. Sure, there are some limits. As far as we know, we can’t time-travel or live forever, and we can’t change things like how tall we are or who we have for parents. But beyond a few unchangeable things, there really are unlimited possibilities, and what you believe to be possible is a major factor in determining what you do and who you become. 

A favorite Tom Peters story is of a Manhattan cab driver who gave all his passengers a mission statement – his written pledge to get them where they wanted to go safely and courteously. He also gave them a selection of newspapers, a snack basket, and consulted with them about the kind of music they wanted to hear on the radio. This guy made 12 to 14 thousand extra dollars a year in tips because he saw possibilities for himself as a cabbie that others couldn’t imagine.

What possibilities are you blocking out because of what you’ve learned or done in the past, or because of what others have told you is “the truth?” What could you be and do, if you allowed yourself to really stretch and grow without excuses or self-imposed limitations?

With the weekend coming up, take some time to let your mind wander, free and unencumbered. Ask yourself the questions, and make a list of your answers: What could you be? What could you do? No limits. No restrictions. Keep it legal, ethical, and in line with your values; but let your imagination run for a while and see what you come up with. You just might find a new focus and passion for yourself. ~The Pacific Institute


5. God Bless the USA by Lee Greenwood

 flagmap.USA.

If tomorrow all the things were gone
I’d worked for all my life,
And I had to start again
with just my children and my wife,
I’d thank my lucky stars
to be living here today,
‘Cause the flag still stands for freedom
and they can’t take that away.
I’m proud to be an American
where at least I know I’m free,
And I won’t forget the men who died
who gave that right to me,
And I gladly stand up next to you
and defend her still today,
‘Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land
God Bless the U.S.A.
From the lakes of Minnesota
to the hills of Tennessee,
Across the plains of Texas
from sea to shining sea.
From Detroit down to Houston
and New York to L.A.,
There’s pride in every American heart
and it’s time we stand and say:
I’m proud to be an American
where at least I know I’m free,
And I won’t forget the men who died
who gave that right to me,
And I gladly stand up next to you
and defend her still today,
‘Cause there ain’t no doubt I love this land.
God Bless the U.S.A.