Sherman County eNews #194

CONTENT

  1. City of Rufus – Garage/Yard Sale, July 1

  2. Sherman County Swine 4-H Club Notes

  3. Life Jacket Worn, Nobody Mourns

  4. ODOT #Eclipse2017 Update: Plan to have fun; plan ahead, so you will

  5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Terri Bardenhagen: Quilting

  6. Rep. Greg Walden’s statement on Hanford Site

  7. Preliminary Rate Decisions for 2018 Health Insurance Plans


1. City of Rufus – Garage/Yard Sale, July 1

sign.forsaleSATURDAY, JULY 1ST, 2017

The following citizens are participating in the City of Rufus garage sale:

 

Stephanie Urquhart – 409 Fields St

Sue Jackson – 312 Fields St

Sandy Van Gilder – 501 1st St (J&J Mini Mart) 541-739-2887

Don Arthur – 302 1st St (Blue Shop – Ed’s RV)

Louise Stephens – 317 Murray St

~Aaron Cook, City Recorder – City of Rufus  541-739-2321 rufuscityhall@gmail.com


2. Sherman County Swine 4-H Club Notes

4-H clover1The Sherman County Swine 4-H Club met on June 28 at 6:00pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were Samantha, Emma, Allie, Cadence, Natalie, Austin.  Pledge of Allegiance led by Austin, 4H Pledge by Natalie.  During the meeting we presented presentations, discussed pigs, discussed 4-H camp.  We also talked about raffle prizes and buyers gifts.  Next meeting is undetermined.  Meeting adjourned at 7:00pm.  Signed Cadence Smtih, News Reporter


3. Life Jacket Worn, Nobody Mourns

raindropPORTLAND, Ore. — More public recreation fatalities occur in July than any other month, and so the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Portland District asks you to please play it safe while on, in, or near the water. Drowning is a leading cause of death this time of year, and most people that drown would have survived if they had worn a life jacket.

Here are some more tips to help you have a safe and enjoyable time this summer. Swimming in open water is different and more difficult than in a swimming pool. You can tire more quickly and get into trouble due to changing conditions, waves, current, lack of experience, or exhaustion. While wearing a life jacket you will not use as much energy, it will help you float, and it will be there when and if you ever really need it.

While on or near the water, watch out for each other at all times. It only takes 20 seconds for a child to drown and 60 seconds for an adult to drown. Several people drown every year within 10 feet of safety because the people around them were not paying attention and did not recognize the signs of drowning: head back, mouth open gasping for air, no yelling or sound, and arms slapping the water like they are trying to climb out of the water. Properly rescuing someone should never include contact with them unless you are a trained lifeguard. Reach out to the victim with something to keep your distance, or throw them something that floats to pull them to safety.

Avoid prolonged breath holding activities and games because it can lead to shallow water blackout. Shallow water blackout can affect anyone who is breath-holding, even physically fit swimmers.

Boaters or those swimming near boats should be aware that carbon monoxide is an odorless, invisible, and silent killer. Carbon monoxide can accumulate anywhere in or around your boat. Early symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include eye irritation, headache, nausea, weakness, and dizziness. One breath of carbon monoxide at the water’s surface can cause you to pass out and drown. Avoid areas where exhaust fumes may be present, and do not let anyone swim under or around the boarding platform.

Increased water safety awareness can help ensure that you and your loved ones have fun this summer and return home safely. Always remember to wear a life jacket because it could save your life or the life of someone you love. Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns. Learn more at www.PleaseWearIt.com.


4. ODOT #Eclipse2017 Update: Plan to have fun; plan ahead, so you will 

eclipse3Arrive early, stay put, leave late

Many things will look different on Oregon highways in the days before the Aug. 21 total solar eclipse. And it’s not just because things will be dark for a while mid-day.

ODOT is making some significant changes in highway procedures to help you stay safe and reduce congestion during the #Eclipse2017.

How different? Here are a few things the public will see—or not.

  • Different traffic patterns. Normal travel paths may change. Communities may close streets to through traffic or ban left turns or right turns to keep traffic moving, especially in areas near gatherings with many eclipse visitors. ODOT does not plan to close state highways, but some left turns may be restricted from or to highways.
  • Work zones. All ODOT construction and non-emergency maintenance in the path of totality will shut down Aug. 18-22. In other parts of the state, work will be curtailed depending on expected eclipse traffic impact. But work zones may still have narrow lanes, sharper curves or grooved pavement: Slow down and pay attention in all work zones, active or not!
  • Fewer big trucks. All over-dimension loads are restricted everywhere in Oregon from noon Friday Aug. 18 to Tuesday Aug. 22.
  • Truck scales closed. ODOT truck scales around the state may be used for staging by law enforcement and emergency response vehicles, a way to better speed help to where it’s needed.
  • More signs with advice. You’ll see hundreds of extra roadside readerboards warning you about road issues and reminding you to avoid distractions and be even more careful about fire danger.
  • More ODOT trucks pre-positioned along critical travel routes to keep motorists mobile and safe.
  • www.Tripcheck.com provides you the most current travel information available, using embedded road sensors, other travel data and more than 400 highway cameras. Check up on the traffic on your planned route before leaving home.
  • Things you can’t see. All over the state, ODOT emergency operation centers will be up and running to help law enforcement, fire fighters and emergency medical providers do their jobs and saves lives.

Here are a few ways to tune in to the latest information.

  • Twitter. Follow @oregondot.
  • Facebook. Visit facebook.com/oregondot.
  • 511. The latest traffic information in an audio format.
  • www.oregon.gov/ODOT/Pages/Eclipse.aspx, ODOT’s eclipse webpage, links you to useful information.

Remember, we’re all in this together. Be prepared, help your neighbors and be kind to our visitors.


5. Sherman County Historical Museum Artist Series – Terri Bardenhagen: Quilting

m_return
Moro, OR – The Sherman County Historical Museum’s local Artist Series is featuring Quilting by Terri Bardenhagen for the month of July at the Sherman County Historical Museum. Terri has always sewn, learning from her mother at a very early age on the family farm in Grass Valley, Oregon. Through the years Terri has made a lot of the family’s clothing and other fabric crafts and projects but in 1990 on a whim she signed up for a quilting class at her local fabric shop in Corvallis, Oregon, resulting in a couple quilts and she was hooked!

Loving the idea of hand-sewing a quilt she has made full quilts by hand along with learning a variety of quilting techniques and experimenting with more difficult challenges. Terri enjoys choosing the fabrics, making the blocks and putting them together. She ties quilts and machine quilts. Terri gives away most of her projects to friends and family and enjoys making beautiful gifts that will last. Don’t miss her wonderful display this July at the museum.

After viewing Terri’s quilts in the lobby, also view the museum’s vintage quilts on display for the Quilt and Fiber Show in Moro July 1st – 9th. The Sherman County Historical Museum quilts will be on display for the month of July!

There is no charge for this exhibit on display in the lobby of the museum for the month of July. The award-winning Museum in Moro is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through October. The Sherman County Historical Museum is located at 200 Dewey Street in Moro, Oregon. For more information call 541-565-3232.


6. Rep. Greg Walden’s statement on Hanford Site

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River), Chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, released the following statement on the Department of Energy’s (DOE) structural integrity analysis of the Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX) tunnels at the Hanford Site. 

“Today’s report is cause for concern and underscores the importance of getting a permanent nuclear waste repository back on track,” said Walden. “Just this week the committee passed bipartisan legislation that would ensure the waste engineered at Hanford is placed safely in a permanent repository at Yucca Mountain. I urge DOE to expeditiously secure and repair the structurally damaged tunnels, and will continue to monitor the situation moving forward.”

For more information on H.R. 3053, the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, see https://energycommerce.house.gov/news-center/press-releases/energy-and-commerce-advances-eight-bills

To read Rep. Walden’s op-ed in The East Oregonian on nuclear waste and Hanford, see http://www.eastoregonian.com/eo/columnists/20170626/walden-want-to-clean-up-hanford-finish-yucca-mountain


7. Preliminary Rate Decisions for 2018 Health Insurance Plans

Salem — Oregonians can now see the state’s preliminary decisions for rates for 2018 individual and small employer health insurance plans. The Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation must review and approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

The preliminary rate decisions are for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer.

In the individual market, the division has issued preliminary decisions for seven companies with average rate changes ranging from a 1.6 percent decrease to a 14.8 percent increase. Under the preliminary decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $355 to $452 a month.

“Although rates are still rising for many consumers, the new Oregon Reinsurance Program provides some stability and relief,” said DCBS Director Patrick Allen. “Without this program, Oregonians who buy their own insurance would be seeing much larger rate increases.”

In the small group market, the division has issued preliminary decisions for nine companies with average rate increases ranging from 3.3 percent to 10.1 percent. Under the preliminary decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $293 to $421 a month.

See the chart at dfr.oregon.gov/healthrates/Documents/2018-pre-prop-rates.pdf for the full list of preliminary decisions.

Reasons for the rate changes include:
– The new Oregon Reinsurance Program. This program reduced individual market rates by 6 percent, and added a 1.5 percent increase to the small group market.
– Federal weakening of the individual mandate enforcement.
– Medical costs continue to rise, driven by increased use and the cost of new specialized prescription drugs.
– The cost of providing care continues to surpass premiums collected for many carriers.

Developed by the Governor and stakeholders and recently approved by the Legislature, the Oregon Reinsurance Program is designed to stabilize the individual market, reduce rates, and to encourage insurance companies to offer plans in more parts of the state. Reinsurance is a mechanism to spread the risk of high-cost claims so that no one carrier takes on a disproportionate share of this risk.

Rates are required to reflect the average cost of providing health care to a member in Oregon’s health insurance market. The division has determined that the average cost of paying claims in the individual health insurance market in 2016 was $384 per member per month; in 2015, the average cost of paying claims was $385 per member per month. Health insurance companies are required to justify any differences to this average in their rate filings.

These preliminary decisions will undergo continued review and discussion through public hearings being held in Salem and streamed online July 10-11. The public comment period also will remain open through Tuesday, July 11. There will be a dedicated public comment period during each public rate hearing. For a schedule of hearings and to submit comments online, visit www.oregonhealthrates.org.

Final decisions are expected to be announced Thursday, July 20.


 

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Sherman County eNews #193

CONTENT

  1. Sherman County 4-H Horse Club News Report

  2. Sherman 4-H Junior Master Recyclers Day Camp Cancelled

  3. Gilliam County Museum Complex in Condon

  4. Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill on July 15

  5. Oregon Heritage Bulletins

  6. Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Oct. 19-20

  7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center July Meal Menu

  8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do


1. Sherman County 4-H Horse Club News Report

4-H clover1The horse 4-H club met on June 8, 2017 at 3:30pm at the Extension Office.  Attending were President Mercedez, Vice President Jared, Secretary Bailey, Courtney, Gabe and Lindsey.  Pledges led by Lindsey.  We talked about vaccinations and having your horse shod.  What activities should we do?  Camping trips.  Elected officers (see above).  Our next meeting will be Monday June 19 at 6pm.  Meeting adjourned at 4:32pm.  Signed Bailey Coelsch, News Reporter. 


2. Sherman 4-H Junior Master Recyclers Day Camp Cancelled

Please note that the 4-H Junior Master Recyclers day camp, to be held July 5-7 at the Extension Office, has been cancelled.  Talese Slay and Cindy Brown will consider starting up a club in the fall/winter at the school.

Cindy Brown | Educator, 4-H Youth Development & Healthy Living OSU Extension Service – Sherman County P: 541-565-3230 | C: 541-993-5291

Cindy.Brown@oregonstate.edu

extension.oregonstate.edu/Sherman


3. Gilliam County Museum Complex in Condon

The Gilliam County Museum Complex is open Wednesday through Sunday, 1 to 5 o’clock, just off Highway 19 adjacent to Burns Park. Admission is by donation. Contact 541-384-4233. Follow on Facebook, Gilliam County Historical Museum-Home/facebook.


4. Afternoon of Dance & an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill on July 15

starsDaytime and evening events on July 15 will bring the grounds of Maryhill Museum of Art to life.  Visitors can learn about modern dance pioneer and Sam Hill’s close friend Loie Fuller during an afternoon program titled Loïe Fuller in the Garden. The event, which takes place from 1 to 6 p.m., includes lectures, performances and hands-on activities for children.

As evening draws near, visitors are invited to stay and watch the stars twinkle overhead during “Starry Night at the Museum,” a campout and stargazing experience on the museum grounds. There is a charge for those who wish to camp and reservations must be made in advance; visitors who wish to stargaze without camping are welcome free of charge. Further details can be found in the schedule below

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS – JULY 15

Saturday, July 15, 2017 | 1 to 6 p.m.
Loïe Fuller in the Garden

Join us for a celebration of modern dance pioneer Loïe Fuller and her influential legacy at Maryhill Museum of Art. Enjoy lectures and performances as well as special hands-on activities and dance for children. The program is organized by Gonzaga University Professor Suzanne Ostersmith, MFA, and her students, and sponsored by Judy Carlson Kelley. 

Hands-On Children’s Activities | 1 to 2:30 p.m., 3 to 4:30 p.m. & 5:30 to 6:45 p.m.
Gonzaga dance students will lead children in creative dance with scarves, coloring images of Loïe Fuller and decorating crowns. Children can also become a living Rodin sculpture along a specially created “dance path.”

Sun-viewing | 2 p.m. onwards
Friends of Goldendale Observatory will be here with special telescopes that allow you to view the sun directly. Takes place outside.

Lecture: Loie Fuller: Influential Star – Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow | 2:30 p.m. and 5 p.m.  Join us for a 20-minute presentation followed by a Q & A with Gonzaga University Professor Suzanne Ostersmith, who will talk about Loïe’s work and how it informed her own recent contemporary work with students at Gonzaga. Takes place in the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Education Center.

Dance Performance | 4:45 p.m. & 7 p.m.
Students from Gonzaga University perform a short dance work choreographed by Suzanne Ostersmith and inspired by Loïe Fuller. Takes place outside.

Saturday, July 15, 2017 | 5 p.m. onwards
Starry Night at the Museum

Join us at Maryhill for a magical overnight campout and stargazing experience in one of the most majestic settings imaginable. Volunteers from Rose City Astronomers will provide telescopes to give visitors awe-inspiring views of the summer night sky. Catch glimpses of the Milky Way, the Andromeda Galaxy, Sagittarius, and even some meteors if we are lucky! Troy Carpenter from the Goldendale Observatory will inspire and inform our special views. Don’t miss this fantastic, family-friendly event!

Cost for Tent or RV Campsite: $50 museum members | $60 non-members. Includes campsite in the gardens at Maryhill, and one (1) free admission to the museum for each member in your party. Tent and RV sites accommodate one tent or RV. Campers provide their own tents and camping gear. No cooking or fires permitted. There are no RV (electrical) hook-ups or showers. Deadline to register for tent or RV site is July 11. 

Visitors who wish to stargaze without camping, are welcome. Stargazing only is FREE on the grounds of the museum.

Register online at www.maryhillmuseum.org/starrynight or register by phone at 509.773.3733 ext. 25.


5. Oregon Heritage Bulletins

wheel.wagon1Heritage Bulletins provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/Pages/Bulletins.aspx 


6. Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Oct. 19-20

Oregon Connections: Networks of the Future

October 19-20, 2017

Hood River Inn

Keynote Speaker: Futurist, Steve Brown

Early Bird Registration is $65 & ends September 8.

http://www.oregonconnections.info


7. Sherman County Senior & Community Center July Meal Menu

We serve lunch at 12:00 noon sharp.  First come, first served

If you have a group of 2 or more, please let the Kitchen staff know at #565-3191, the day before to ensure that we make enough food to serve!

MEAL PRICING: Under 60 Yrs. $7.00 ~ 60 Yrs. & UP $4.00 suggested donation!

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
3 4 5 6 7
CLOSED TO

CELEBRATE THE

4TH OF JULY!

CLOSED TO

CELEBRATE THE

4TH OF JULY!

Oven Fried Chicken BLT Sandwich Sloppy Joes on a Bun
Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Tater Tots & Veggies Potato  Wedges & Veggies
Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
10 11 12 13 14
Taco Bar w/Ground Beef Chicken Ranch Wrap Spaghetti w/Meat Sauce Philly Beef Sub Chicken Oriental
Veggies Tater Tots & Veggies Garlic Bread Potato Wedges & Veggies Rice Pilaf & Veggies
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Ice Cream
17 18 19 20 21
Hot Ham/Cheese on Bun Beef & Bean Burrito Hamburger gravy over Quiche Lorraine Pizza loaded w/Meat
Oven Fries & Veggies Tortilla Chips Mashed Potatoes Muffins Veggies
Green Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Salad & Dessert
24 25 26 27 28
Cheeseburgers Chicken Strips Meatloaf Egg Salad or Tuna Salad Ham Fried Rice
Oven Fries & Veggies Tater Tots & Veggies Mashed Potatoes/Gravy Sandwich Egg Rolls
Salad & Dessert Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad & Dessert Veggies, Salad & Fruit Veggies, Salad, Ice Cream
31 MENU SUBJECT TO CHANGE DUE TO AVAILABILITY — ATTENTION:  For those who have food allergies, be aware that a large variety of food is prepared in the kitchen.  Therefore, meals may be prepared with ingredients and food service equipment may come in contact with ingredients to which you may have an allergic reaction, such as nuts.
Clam Chowder
Cottage Cheese & Rolls
Veggies, Salad & Dessert

8. Links: Things to Think About & Things to Do 

BeeAfter missing 19 Fridays, Oregon lawmakers will work weekend, July 4

The Daily Signal

 Auscrete Corporation and Goldendale, Washington

Wagon Train Adventures

 

The Way I Heard It with Mike Rowe

Who We Are As a People—The Syrian Refugee Question

 

US sets up court in Oregon forest for major gathering

Dozens of Oregon children still staying in hotels while awaiting foster care

Oregon Electric Byways

Vocational Ed, Reborn

Sherman County eNews #192

CONTENT

  1. Classifieds

  2. Calendar


1. Classifieds (new or corrected)

newsletter2FRIDAY CLASSIFIEDS:

Please note: Free classified ads are published on Fridays. The deadline is Wednesday at 5. Please submit ads by using the Submit News page. Include who, what, where, when, & how, contact information and the final Friday date for posting your ad (shown by the date at the end of the ad, for example, 3/17), and contact information, under 50 words if possible. This service is limited to Sherman County. Links are welcome.  Please share your Thank You and Congratulatory notes and Joyful News here. ~ The Editor

applause1THANK YOU & CONGRATULATORY NOTES:

COMMENDABLE! 35th Year! The Sherman County Historical Society’s Editorial Team put Sherman County: For The Record, Vol. 35, No. 1, in the mail to members this week. Gladys Wesley, Editor, her editorial team — Terri Bibby, Dorothy Benson, Lowell Smith, Janet Pinkerton, Nancy Allen and Sheri Carlson, and authors for this edition – Terri Bibby, Keith Mobley, Eilene Eslinger, Leta Ann Eslinger Reckmann, Amber Tilton, Sherry Kaseberg, Dorothy Coyle Blagg, Jean Zevely Anderson, and Bud Root, are to be commended for continued preservation of local stories, records and photographs. Get your copy by contacting Sherman County Historical Society, P.O. Box 173, Moro, OR 97039 or info@shermanmuseum.org or at the Sherman County Historical Museum in Moro! 10% discount for members.

Gratitude can transform common days into thanksgivings, turn routine jobs into joy, and change ordinary opportunities into blessings. —William Arthur Ward

JOYFUL NEWS! [births, birthdays, engagements, weddings & anniversaries]

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATION FUND-RAISERS:

THE MUSEUM STORE. “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno $29.95. Museum members receive a 10% discount. The national award-winning Sherman County Historical Museum is open daily 10-5 May through October in Moro, Oregon. ~Cris Welk, The Museum Store

OUR COMMUNITY SERVICES. Often we forget that someone else’s grandparents paid for our education….thru taxes, and with their contributions and labor for our community services such as churches and cemeteries. Three of the local cemeteries remind me that I can help maintain those services for my family and my friends. Thanks for those reminders.  When my children were young, lower income and higher expenses made it hard to be generous.  As a grandmother, I want to support these things for my family and friends. Keep up the good work. As a non-helping senior I and my friends should be willing to participate in this small manner! ~Nell Melzer

EMPLOYMENT:

MCP logo smallPART-TIME RETAIL SALES ASSOCIATE. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a part time retail sales associate.  Our Farm Stores sell a variety of products from animal food and supplies, fencing and automotive products to household items and clothing.  This position will be based out of The Dalles, Oregon.

Essential Duties and Responsibilities include but are not limited to:

  • Cashier-Process customer orders
  • Maintenance of the facilities
  • Sell products and provide product information
  • Carry out and load farm store merchandise
  • Stock Farm Store with merchandise warehoused or stored in the lot or warehouse
  • Clean and rearrange merchandise as needed
  • Open and close store, lot and warehouse areas
  • Pick up orders from vendors
  • Deliver merchandise to Farm Store customers
  • Load and unload bales of straw, hay and feed

Requirements:

  • Lift, carry, push, or pull objects up to approximately 100 lbs.
  • Must possess basic computer knowledge and be able to navigate with little assistance
  • Must be able to accommodate a varying work schedule
  • Operate with initiative, commitment, strong work ethic & sense of urgency
  • Accurate and comfortable with math and currency
  • Valid Driver’s License
  • Must be able to operate a vehicle with a GVW of 10,000 lbs. or more, with or without a trailer in tow
  • Will be required to work in all weather conditions

Schedule:
Schedule varies, store hours of operation will be Monday – Saturday 7:30 – 5:30.  Shifts are assigned as deemed necessary.

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com  or be picked up at the main office in Moro.  Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

PH: (541)565-2277      Fax: (503)536-6875 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Closing Date: July 8th, 2017, or Until Filled.  0/0

MCP logo smallGRAIN FACILITIES OPERATOR. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Facilities Operator.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Facilities Operator is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. The Facilities Operator holds the primary responsibility for the facility under their operation.  Daily functions include and are not limited to grain elevator operation, maintenance, housekeeping, receiving grain, loading barges, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license
  • The ability to obtain a chemical applicators license with space fumigation endorsement

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.  — As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.  Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277  Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer. 0/0

MCP logo smallGRAIN OPERATIONS LABORER. MCP is seeking applicants to join our team as a Grain Operations Laborer.  This full time position will be based in either Sherman or Gilliam County.  The role of a Grain Operations Laborer is to safely handle grain while rendering outstanding customer service to our patrons.  As an MCP employee you will have the opportunity to perform a wide variety of jobs within the department. Including but not limited to maintenance, housekeeping, inventory management and the practice of environmental health and safety programs applicable to the operation of the facility.

Preferred:

  • Mechanical inclination, to be able to troubleshoot work on minor repairs
  • Grain and/or Seed Industry knowledge

Required:

  • Ability to work well under pressure and deal tactfully with others
  • Able to conform to shifting priorities, responsibilities, strategies, demands and timelines
  • Strong personal and customer service skills. Good verbal and written communication skills
  • Must be able to climb ladders and work at heights up to 200 ft.
  • Periodically perform heavy labor
  • Be able to qualify for use of a dust and mist respirator
  • Valid Driver’s license

Employment will be contingent upon the successful completion of a pre-employment physical, drug screen, background check and MVR.

As a prominent agribusiness company, we offer a competitive salary and benefits package. Including health insurance premiums currently paid 100% for the employee and their dependents, dental, vision and Rx coverage, 401k with company match, robust profit sharing plan, paid vacation, sick, holidays, and more.

Applications are available for download at www.mcpcoop.com or be picked up at the main office in Moro. Open Until Filled. Please send cover letter, application and resume to: Mid Columbia Producers Attn: Brittany Dark, PO Box 344, Moro, OR 97039

Fax: (503)536-6875 PH: (541)565-2277 Brittany@mcpcoop.com

Mid Columbia Producers is an equal opportunity employer.  0/0

WEED CONTROL TECHNICIANS (2). The Sherman County Weed District is looking to fill 2 positions: Weed Control Technicians. These are full-time, seasonal positions with no benefits, $15.43/hour. Primary duties include: Surveying fields and canyons and identification of targeted noxious weeds; Marking, mapping and documenting data; servicing and repairing equipment. Weed Technicians will work outside, in the environment in all weather and in rough terrain.   Snakes and ticks are not uncommon within the project area.  The technicians will work as part of a team in Sherman County. Experience in operating off-road vehicles, pulling a trailer and use of GPS data is a plus. For more information and to receive an application, contact Rod Asher at 541-980-4345 or rasher@shermancounty.net

Sherman County Weed District, 66365 Lone Rock Road, Moro, OR 97039 – Applications due by June 16th, 2017, or until filled.  0/0

sign.forsale

FOR SALE:

ACREAGE. A chance to own 1.5 acres close to Moro but still in the country. All utilities are available. This property is waiting for you to bring your house plans and call it home. Subject to final short plat approval, taxes to be determined. $55,000 RMLS# 17410095 tiffany@drysideproperty.com 7/14

HOUSE IN WASCO. 4 bedroom, 2 bath house with extended lot for RV or garden, 2 car garage, workshop in basement. 2 bedrooms on main floor, 2 large bedrooms on upper floor. Many recent inside improvements. $115,000 by owners. Shown by appointment. 541-467-2345  7/14

CONTINUING USED BOOK SALE at Wasco Annex (old grade school) in Wasco, Oregon. Used books only $5.00 per bag; books on tape, music cassettes and  VHS movies for 25 cents.  Stock up and give for gifts. All funds used for the purchase of new items for the library. ~ Danee Rankin, Librarian, Wasco City Community Library. 7/14

SERVICES: [home, personal, appliance, landscape, fencing, cleaning, maintenance, janitorial, computer, construction, sewing, repairs, transportation, media, preschool, day care, restaurant, support & training]

DISCOUNTED PHOTO SESSIONS. It’s not too early to get senior photos taken care of! Do you want your senior pictures in or around the wheat fields or to include them as a part of your photo session? If so act now before harvest starts! I’m offering $25.00 off a photo session (senior, family, couple, etc.) between now and the start of harvest. Contact me soon to get a discounted rate and get a photo session completed before harvest starts. ~ Jeremy Lanthorn  JeremyLanthorn.com  Jlanthorn@gmail.com (541) 993-2446   (541) 333-2013  7/28

OREGON HERITAGE BULLETINS provide technical information and tips on topics of interest to organizations and individuals involved in heritage. The first list below is a complete listing of Heritage Bulletins, followed by groups of Bulletins by topic: Historic Cemeteries, Historic Places, Organizational Support & Collections. Visit Oregon Heritage Bulletins 7/21

CAREGIVER AVAILABLE. Would you like some help with meal preparation, light housekeeping, transportation, etc.? I am a caring and honest woman with excellent references.  ~Synoma Olsen 541 993-6924  7/28

CANES & WALKERS. Wasco Methodist Church has a supply of canes and walkers that may be used at no charge.  The church will accept donations of any devices that would be helpful to people with limited mobility.  Please contact 541-442-5446 for more info. 7/28

NEWSPAPERS

VISITOR INFORMATION SERVICES & EVENTS:

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES: 

m_returnSHARE YOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the railroads and freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org.

SHERMAN COUNTY FAIR BOARD. Sherman County Fair Board is accepting letters of interest for a board position.  Letters should include your experience with our or other county fairs, how you have been involved or have helped out at a fair and the number of years, other community involvement, and your areas of strengths to contribute to our team. Requirements include Sherman County residency, attendance at monthly board meetings, committing to extra time and work days in August, and additional work days, meetings and trainings as they happen.  Send your letter to Sherman County Fair, P.O. Box 45  Wasco, OR  97065 or to shermanctyfair@hotmail.com to be received by July2nd.  Monthly board meetings are held on the first Thursday of the month.  Contact the Fair Board Secretary with questions and for further information @ shermanctyfair@hotmail.com or 541-980-1821.  6/30

WANTED:

m_returnYOUR STORIES: JOHN DAY DAM, RAILROADS, HIGHWAYS & BRIDGES. Did you or someone in your family come to this area to build the John Day Dam or the freeway? Sherman County Historical Society’s editor for Sherman County: For The Record, Gladys Wesley, is interested in your story! In 2018, it will be 60 years since construction began in 1958. What effect did it have on Sherman County, the schools and housing? Were you the new kid in school? Do you have photographs to illustrate your stories? The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has the material facts. Only you can tell your story! Sherman County: For The Record will feature the John Day Dam next year. Please contact Gladys Wesley at moroglad@embarqmail.com or Sherman County Historical Society at info@shermanmuseum.org.

HOST FAMILIES FOR HIGH SCHOOL EXCHANGE STUDENTS.  Non-Profit Seeks Local Host Families for High School Exchange Students. ASSE International Student Exchange Programs (ASSE), in cooperation with your community high school, is looking for local families to host boys and girls between the ages of 15 to 18 from a variety of countries: Norway, Denmark, Spain, Italy, Japan, to name a few. — ASSE students are enthusiastic and excited to experience American culture while they practice their English. They also love to share their own culture and language with their host families. Host families welcome these students into their family, not as a guest, but as a family member, giving everyone involved a rich cultural experience. — The exchange students have pocket money for personal expenses and full health, accident and liability insurance. ASSE students are selected based on academics and personality, and host families can choose their student from a wide variety of backgrounds, countries and personal interests. — To become an ASSE Host Family or to find out how to become involved with ASSE in your community, please call the ASSE Western Regional Office at 1-800-733-2773 or go to www.host.asse.com to begin your host family application. Students are eager to learn about their American host family, so begin the process of welcoming your new son or daughter today! — ASSE INTERNATIONAL (FORMERLY AMERICAN SCANDINAVIAN STUDENT EXCHANGE) IS A NON-PROFIT, PUBLIC BENEFIT ORGANIZATION.  ASSE IS OFFICIALLY DESIGNATED AS AN EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM BY THE U. S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE, WAS FOUNDED BY THE SWEDISH MINISTRY OF EDUCATION, COOPERATES WITH THE CANADIAN PROVINCIAL MINISTRIES OF EDUCATION,  and the NEW ZEALAND DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION. 7/28 

FREE: 

LOST OR FOUND:

FOR RENT OR LEASE:

DUPLEX. One bedroom apartment. Located in scenic Grass Valley oregon. Locaterd 55 miles south east of The Dalles. 470 Sq ft. One bathroom. Older style home. Off street parking with views of the town and country. First, last and deposit. No pets. Garbage and water included in rent. $450. Text for pics or a tour. Looking forward to hearing from you. Eric Whitley. 541999517.  6/30


2. Calendar (new or corrected)

JUNE

30-July 2 Wheeler County Bluegrass Festival 

American flag2JULY

1 First Saturday—Artist of the Month 10-3 Second Hand Made, Wasco

1 Demolition Derby – Goldendale

1 City-wide Garage & Yard Sale in Rufus 541-739-2321

1 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

1-4 Condon’s Fabulous Fourth of July Celebration

1 Harvesters’ Classic Softball Tournament 19 Condon

1 Cruz-In Car Show & Bluegrass Festival in Fossil

1-9 Experience Moro’s Quilt & Fiber Arts Displays & Activities

2 Dave Barnett Memorial Golf Tournament 10 Condon

2 Gilliam County Historical Society Depot Museum 1-5 Condon

3 4-Wheeler Rodeo 12 Fairgrounds in Condon

3 Artisans’ Market 4-7 Condon City Park

3 Paradise Rose Chuckwagon Dinner 5-8 Condon

3 Sherman County Courthouse will be closed.

3 Summer Concert in Condon, Countryfied & Fireworks 6:30-9:90

4 INDEPENDENCE DAY

4 Breakfast in the Park, Windmill Classic Run, Program 8 & Parade 12, Condon

5 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Grass Valley Baptist Church

5 Sherman County Court 9

5 Gilliam County Court 10

5 Wheeler County Court 10

7-9 Caledonian Games, Athena http://www.athenacaledoniangames.org

9 Book Presentation: “Pigs to Politics” by Bev Clarno 2-4 Wasco Annex

9 Columbia Gorge Genealogical Society Celebration 1-4 Sorosis Park, The Dalles

11 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

11 Sherman County Watershed Council Meeting 11:30 Burnet Building, Moro

12 Sherman Senior & Community Center Advisory Group 12:30 Senior Center

15 Afternoon of Dance and an Evening of Stargazing at Maryhill Museum

19 Sherman County Court 9

20 Northern Oregon Regional Corrections Facility Board Meeting 10 The Dalles

21 Frontier TeleNet Board Meeting 9 NCESD Building, Condon

24-28 4-H Healthalicious Cooking Workshops 9-1 Sherman Extension Office

25 Mid-Columbia Council of Governments Board 1-3 The Dalles

26 Tri-County Courts’ Meeting 10 Wheeler County (Sherman, Gilliam, Wheeler) 

Sun-SoleAUGUST

2 Sherman County Court 9

2 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Rufus Baptist Church

4 Summer Concert in Condon, Buffalo Kin 6:30-9:90

5 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

8 Sherman Soil & Water Conservation District Board 8:30 Moro

8 Sherman County Watershed Council 11:30 Burnet Building

8 Tri-County Mental Health Board Meeting 11-2 The Dalles

8 North Central Public Health District Board Meeting 3 The Dalles

9 Sherman County Senior & Community Center Advisory 12:30 Senior Center

12-13 Equine Mania 2-Man Advanced Cow Sorting Clinic, Wasco

16 Sherman County Court 9

18-22 Outlaw Rodeo Bible Camp – Powell Butte, Oregon

19-20 Special Art Walk & Farmers’ Market 10-5

20 Total Solar Eclipse Party in Condon featuring Brewers Grade
         Camping, Food, Beer & Wine http://www.co.gilliam.or.us/

21 Total Solar Eclipse

22-27 Sherman County Fair

26 Summer Concert in Condon, HYATUS 6:30-9:30

27 Demolition Derby, Sherman County Fair

28 Mid-Columbia Housing Authority 11 The Dalles

SEPTEMBER

2 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

4 LABOR DAY

6 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Moro Presbyterian Church

10 GRANDPARENTS’ DAY

11 PATRIOT DAY

22 Autumn Begins 

OCTOBER

4 All County Prayer Meeting Refreshments/Social 6:30

         Prayer 7-8:30 Wasco Church of Christ

7 First Saturday Art Walk & & Farmers’ Market 10-5 Moro

9 COLUMBUS DAY

19-20 Oregon Connections Telecommunications Conference, Hood River

31 HALLOWEEN