Sherman County eNews #160

CONTENT

  1. The Need is Great: North Sherman Fire District Seriously Seeks Volunteers

  2. Solar Saturday at the Discovery Center, June 3

  3. New Monthly Art Walk/ Farmers Market Event in Moro This Weekend

  4. Weather: June Outlook & May Monthly Climate Summary

  5. Get me a Folksinger! Woody Guthrie and the BPA, June 9

  6. Understanding Feelings

  7. Father’s Day at the Discovery Center, June 18

  8. Discovery Center Program: Plan for the Great American Eclipse. Aug. 12

  9. Congressman Walden: Oregon’s Veterans


1. The Need is Great: North Sherman Fire District Seriously Seeks Volunteers

firetruck.redThe North Sherman Fire District is in need of Volunteers. We cover a vast area including the three rivers, Interstate 84 and Highway 97 from Walker Hill North. If you have a desire to fight brush fire but would rather not respond to motor vehicle crashes, that’s perfectly fine. Please reach out to us if you think you can help in any way. We provide all of the gear and training necessary to carry out the tasks assigned.

I am writing this on behalf of the North Sherman Fire District, however, I know that all emergency services in our area could use an extra hand.  We are very understanding of busy schedules as most of our volunteers have families and day jobs. We will work with your schedule!

If you are a resident of Wasco or Rufus and hold a CDL, we are in dire need of more drivers for our water tenders. 

Please feel free to call me anytime. 

Chief Jeff Holliday  541-705-5640


2. Solar Saturday at the Discovery Center, June 3

sun.circleWHEN: June 3, 2017 @ 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
COST: Free to the public

Bob Yoesle from Friends of the Goldendale Observatory will present a solar viewing free to the public Saturday, June 3 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center, weather and clouds permitting.


3. New Monthly Art Walk/ Farmers Market Event in Moro This Weekend

Two members of the business community in Moro are organizing a new event to bring people to the community. Lisa Shafer of Lisa’s In Stitches and Deena Johnson of Sage Mountain Primitives are bringing vendors together every first Saturday of the month from May through October for an art walk and farmers market, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Moro City sidewalks along Main Street.

“We wanted a fun activity to bring the community together,” says Lisa, “and to highlight the talented artists in the region.” Vendors at the first event in May included artists with tree stump art, picture frames, rope bowls and wood art, yard art, knitted items, wreaths, bird house wind chimes and fairy gardens plus baked goods, lemonade and a candy stand. The list has already expanded for the second event on Saturday, June 3.

Attendees will find arts and crafts, produce and food for purchase and musicians will play at certain times. “Besides the folks living in Sherman County, we are hoping this event will draw visitors and vendors from outside the county to enjoy our downtowns, shops and attractions like the Sherman County Historical Museum,” says Deena. In the future, the two hope to expand the event to nearby cities to encourage visitors to travel on an art loop, making a day of exploring the communities in Sherman and Wasco Counties.

For now, everyone is welcome to the Moro event, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on June 3 in Moro along the Main Street sidewalks to find a treasure, taste something new and have a good time. Contact Lisa at 541-980-4162 or Deena Johnson at 541-705-0232 with questions or to sign up as a vendor.


4. Weather: June Outlook & May Monthly Climate Summary

sun.smile1You can find the June outlook and the May monthly climate
summary AND GRAPHS (toggle between color and gray) for Moro at
http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/pdt/climate/climateSummary/climateSummary.php?stationID=MORO3

~Dennis Hull- KB0NYC
Warning Coordination Meteorologist
541-969-7136
www.weather.gov/pendleton 


5. Get me a Folksinger! Woody Guthrie and the BPA, June 9

WHEN: June 9, 2017 @ 6:00 pm – 8:30 pm
COST: Dinner & program $19; Program only $5

You are invited to spend an evening with Libby Burke, Archivist at the Bonneville Power Administration Library, Friday, June 9 in an entertaining evening, entitled ‘Get Me a Folksinger! Woody Guthrie, BPA and the Columbia River Songs.’ Special guest, musician Bill Murlin, will add to the entertainment with Woody Guthrie songs. A pre-program dinner will begin at 6 p.m., with the program following at 7 p.m. at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon.
Tickets for the dinner and program are $19, the program only is $5. The dinner menu includes chicken enchiladas, Mexican rice, black beans, chips and salsa, and key lime mousse.


6. Understanding Feelings

If you believe in the value of positive thinking, what do you do with your feelings that are not so positive? 

It’s a great thing to be a positive thinker, but sometimes we confuse the desire to think positively with the need to deny our feelings. Have you ever felt sad or angry about something and then rejected that feeling because you believe that it is best to look on the bright side of life? 

This can happen very easily, but when we are thinking positively, we are never denying our feelings. Now, this isn’t saying that you should hold on to feelings that are causing you discomfort or pain; on the contrary, it’s important to let go of them. But we can’t let go of a feeling until we know what it is.

A feeling needs to be acknowledged and looked at before we can release it. To deny feelings is to see a legitimate part of our self as unworthy or without value, and the very act of denial serves only to chip away at our sense of self-esteem. Besides, feelings that are denied don’t go away. Instead, they go underground and show up as illness or unconscious behavior that inevitably causes trouble.

You know, you can accept all of your feelings no matter what they are, but you don’t have to act on them or continue to hold on to those that may be in your way. Accepting and acknowledging your feelings in a patient and thoughtful way is the first step to gaining control over them, while denying and repressing them is a sure way to give them control over you. ~The Pacific Institute


7. Father’s Day at the Discovery Center, June 18

fatherFATHER’S DAY
WHEN: June 18, 2017 from 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
ICE AGE GEOLOGY & SALMON BAKE
Fathers get free admission on Father’s Day, Sunday, June 18, 2017 at Columbia Gorge Discovery Center and Museum, 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles, Oregon. Bring the kids and enjoy a day of family fun, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., 5000 Discovery Drive, The Dalles.
Join Dr. Jim O’Connor at 2:00 p.m. for “Before the Dams: the Geology of the Columbia River Gorge,” A traditional salmon bake and Indian fry bread will be available for purchase, followed by a presentation of Native fishing techniques. For information call 541-296-8600 ext. 201, or visit www.gorgediscovery.org


8. Discovery Center Program: Plan for the Great American Eclipse. Aug. 12

StarYellowWHEN: August 12, 2017 – 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
COST: Included with museum admission
Bob Yoesle from the Friends of the Goldendale Observatory will be on hand Saturday, August 12, 2017 from 12:30 – 1:30 to offer advice and a presentation on what this solar phenomena will be like. The presentation will be inside the Murdock Theater and will be included with museum admission.

Do you know how to prepare for this once-in-a-lifetime event? The total solar eclipse of Monday, August 21, 2017 – also known as “The Great American Eclipse” – will be the first total eclipse to touch on American soil since 1991; the first on the mainland since 1979; and the first to sweep across the entire country since 1918.

However, the August 21, 2017 eclipse will not be a total solar eclipse anywhere in the state of Washington or even in The Dalles. You’ll need to travel to Central Oregon to view the eclipse as it passes in a wide arc through the middle of Oregon. Learn what you can do to prepare to make this lifetime event the memory of a lifetime.


9. Congressman Walden: Oregon’s Veterans

American flag2WASHINGTON, D.C. — Continuing his efforts to improve the care Oregon’s veterans receive at the Veterans Administration (VA), Rep. Greg Walden (R-Hood River) recently voted for legislation passed in the House of Representatives to help give veterans increased access to quality care in a timely manner. Walden applauded seven bills passed in the House of Representatives to reduce the appeals backlog at the VA, tackle opioid addiction, and expand mental health care treatment options for veterans.

“Improving the care Oregon veterans receive at the VA is certainly a priority of mine and I know that it is for all Oregonians,” said Walden. “The House recently passed seven pieces of legislation to take on some of the biggest issues facing our veterans and improve their access to timely care. Legislation the House passed will help the VA move through the backlog of appeals — this is a big issue for our veterans. This legislation would give veterans more options and increased flexibility in the appeals process, which they deserve. This will answer many of the concerns I’ve heard from veterans and veterans organizations in the district — some of whom have waited two years just to get through the first step in the appeals process.

“We also passed bills to reduce duplicative medical examinations that are unnecessary and make sure all VA facilities comply with scheduling guidelines — that makes sure our veterans get access to timely care. We also took concrete steps to improve the mental health care our veterans receive and to tackle the opioid epidemic — which has affected veterans and non-veterans alike across our country. The bills we passed will create a pilot program to explore new, innovative treatment options for veterans suffering from PTSD, traumatic brain injury, military sexual trauma, or chronic pain, and allow for better monitoring of VA prescription drug use.

“There is still much work to be done to get veterans access to the care they have earned and deserve in a timely manner. We won’t give up until that is done. These bills are an important first step in making progress on that front,” said Walden.


 

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